En poursuivant votre navigation sur ce site, vous acceptez l'utilisation de cookies. Ces derniers assurent le bon fonctionnement de nos services. En savoir plus.

dimanche, 13 août 2017

The Plumed Serpent: D.H. Lawrence on Radical Traditionalism


The Plumed Serpent: D.H. Lawrence on Radical Traditionalism

We must change back to the vision of the living cosmos; we must.
The oldest Pan is in us, and he will not be denied.

The Plumed Serpent is the story of an Aztec pagan revolution that spreads through Mexico during the time of the Mexican Revolution (the 1910s). Published in 1926, it also has themes of anti-capitalism, anti-Americanism, romanticism, nationalism, and primal and traditional roles for men and women.

The protagonist is 40-year-old Kate Leslie, the widow of an Irish revolutionary. She’s not particularly close to her grown children from her first husband, and seeking solitude and change in the midst of her grief she settles temporarily in Mexico.

Soon she meets Don Ramón Carrasco, an intellectual who’s attempting to rid the country of Christianity and capitalism and replace them with the cult of the Aztec god Quetzalcoatl (“the plumed serpent”) and Mexican nationalism. He’s assisted in his vision by Don Cipriano Viedma, a general in the Mexican army. Ramón provides the leadership, poetry, and propaganda that helps the movement take off, and Cipriano lends a military counterpoint.


Ramón writes hymns, then distributes copies to the villagers who quickly become fascinated by the idea of the old gods returning to Mexico:

Your gods are ready to return to you. Quetzalcoatl and Tlaloc, the old gods, are minded to come back to you. Be quiet, don’t let them find you crying and complaining. I have come from out of the lake to tell you the gods are coming back to Mexico, they are ready to return to their own home.

The Mexican commoners flock to listen as hymns are read (Mexico’s illiteracy rate was about 78 percent in 1910) (Presley). Soon the villagers are inspired to dance and drum in the native trance-inducing style that’s foreign to Christian worship, and they refuse the Church’s orders to quit listening to the Hymns of Quetzalcoatl. According to Smith, Lawrence was “interested in two related concepts of male homosociality: Männerbund and Blutbrüdershaft,” and there certainly are aspects of this in The Plumed Serpent among the Men of Quetzalcoatl. Ramón also employs an array of craftsmen to create the aesthetics for the Quetzalcoatl movement—ceremonial costumes, the Quetzalcoatl symbol in iron, and traditional Indian dress that’s adopted by the male followers.

Orchestrating a Pagan Revolution

The Plumed Serpent has been called D. H. Lawrence’s “most politically controversial novel” (Krockel). Despite its fascinating plot and the brilliant prose readers expect from Lawrence, it’s been called every name modernists can sling at a book—fascist, sexist, racist, silly, offensive, propaganda, difficult, an embarrassment. So many people have slammed the novel that when literary critic Leslie Fiedler said Lawrence had no followers—at a D.H. Lawrence festival, no less—William S. Burroughs interrupted to say how influenced he was by The Plumed Serpent (Morgan).


A primary reason Lawrence’s book is criticized is because his vision for Mexico may have been inspired by a trip to the Weimar Republic in the 1920s, after which he spoke positively of the growing völkisch movement and its focus on pagan traditions, saying in a 1924 letter: “The ancient spirit of pre-historic Germany [is] coming back, at the end of history” (Krockel). This is a misguided view because the Quetzalcoatl movement has none of the vitriol and racism that later characterized National Socialism (a Christianity ideology). Instead, the Quetzalcoatl leaders’ plan is to unite the various ethnicities in Mexico into one pagan culture, and whites living in the country will be allowed to stay if they are peaceful.

In The Plumed Serpent, Ramón speaks of the need for every country to have its own Savior, and his vision for a traditional, anti-capitalistic society includes a rebirth of paganism for the entire world:

If I want Mexicans to learn the name of Quetzalcoatl, it is because I want them to speak with the tongues of their own blood. I wish the Teutonic world would once more think in terms of Thor and Wotan, and the tree Igdrasil. And I wish the Druidic world would see, honestly, that in the mistletoe is their mystery, and that they themselves are the Tuatha De Danaan, alive, but submerged. And a new Hermes should come back to the Mediterranean, and a new Ashtaroth to Tunis; and Mithras again to Persia, and Brahma unbroken to India, and the oldest of dragons to China.

Although Lawrence’s novel has been criticized numerous times for post-colonial themes, such is an intellectually lazy and incomplete reading. According to Oh, “What Lawrence tries to do in The Plumed Serpent is the reverse of colonialist eradication of indigenous religion. The restoration of ancient Mexican religion necessarily accompanies Lawrence’s critiques of Western colonial projects.”

Lawrence and Nietzsche: A Philosophy of the Future

Ramón performs public invocations to the Aztec god and plans to proclaim himself the living Quetzalcoatl. (When the time is right, his friend Cipriano will be declared the living warrior god Huitzilopochtli, and Kate is offered a place in the pantheon as the goddess Malintzi.) But Ramón’s wife is a devout Catholic and fervently tries to convince him to stop the pagan revolution. Nietzsche was a major influence on Lawrence by the 1920s, and Ramón’s harsh diatribe to his Christian wife sounds straight out of The Genealogy of Morals:

But believe me, if the real Christ has not been able to save Mexico—and He hasn’t—then I am sure the white Anti-Christ of charity, and socialism, and politics, and reform, will only succeed in finally destroying her. That, and that alone, makes me take my stand.—You, Carlota, with your charity works and your pity: and men like Benito Juarez, with their Reform and their Liberty: and the rest of the benevolent people, politicians and socialists and so forth, surcharged with pity for living men, in their mouths, but really with hate . . .

The Plumed Serpent has been compared to Thus Spoke Zarathustra as well. Both feature religious reformers intent on creating the Overman, both use pre-Christian deities in their mythos, and both proclaim that God is dead (Humma). (In a priceless scene, Ramón has Christ and the Virgin Mary retire from Mexico while he implores the villagers to call out to them, “Adiós! Say Adiós! my children.”) A brutal overturning of Christian morality is present in both narratives. In addition, Ramón teaches his people to become better than they are, to awaken the Star within them and become complete men and women.

The Plumed Serpent is an engaging handbook for initiating a pagan revival in the West. The methods employed by Ramón would be more effective in a rural society 100 years ago, but readers will likely find inspiration in the Quetzalcoatl movement’s aesthetics and success. It’s an immensely enjoyable read for anyone interested in reconstructionist paganism or radical traditionalism.


Humma, John B. Metaphor and Meaning in D.H. Lawrence’s Later Novels. University of Missouri (1990).

Krockel, Carl. D.H. Lawrence and Germany: The Politics of Influence. Editions Rodopi BV (2007).

Morgan, Ted. Literary Outlaw: The Life and Times of William S. Burroughs. W. W. Norton (2012).

Oh, Eunyoung. D.H. Lawrence’s Border Crossing: Colonialism in His Travel Writing and Leadership Novels. Routledge (2014).

Presley, James. “Mexican Views on Rural Education, 1900-1910.” The Americas, Vol. 20, No. 1 (July 1963), pp. 64-71.

Smith, Jad. “Völkisch Organicism and the Use of Primitivism in Lawrence’s The Plumed Serpent.D.H. Lawrence Review, 30:3. (2002)

For more posts on radical traditionalism and Julius Evola, please visit the archives here.

Faire face au nationalisme économique américain


« Un ami qui nous veut du bien ? Faire face au nationalisme économique américain »

Ex: http://radiomz.org

Ce soir, la Méridienne vous propose un entretien avec Christian Harbulot, directeur de l’Ecole de Guerre Economique (EGE), sur la question du nationalisme économique américain, ce spectre qui hante l’Europe depuis des décennies et que nos dirigeants ignorent pourtant avec tant de constance. M. Harbulot a dirigé dans le cadre de l’EGE un travail collectif sur cette question qui sera publié en juillet.

Nous n’avons évidemment pas choisi cette thématique par hasard. Le 8 mai n’est pas loin et nous n’oublions pas qu’il y a plus de 20 ans, un de nos camarades perdait la vie en voulant échapper aux forces de l’ordre à cause de sa participation à une manifestation interdite dont le mot d’ordre était « Bienvenue aux ennemis de l’Europe ! ». Si le propos était peut-être excessif, les Etats-Unis doivent cependant être regardés pour ce qu’ils sont et cette émission entend y contribuer.
A la barre JLR.

Pour écouter:


«Le patriotisme économique partout en vigueur... sauf en Europe !»


«Le patriotisme économique partout en vigueur... sauf en Europe !»

Par Eric Delbecque

Ex: http://www.lefigaro.fr/vox

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE - La question du «Made in France» a été au coeur des débats des primaires, à droite et à gauche. Eric Delbecque regrette que les pays européens, au nom du libre-échange, refusent le patriotisme économique que pratiquent pourtant Washington, Pékin ou Moscou.

Eric Delbecque est président de l'Association pour la compétitivité et la sécurité économique (ACSE) et directeur du département intelligence stratégique de SIFARIS. Avec Christian Harbulot, il vient de publier L'impuissance française: une idéologie? (éd. Uppr, 2016).


En dépit du résultat du premier tour, la primaire de la gauche a de nouveau projeté de la lumière sur la thématique du patriotisme économique, en particulier à travers la promotion du «made in France» par Arnaud Montebourg. Le sujet est capital et il est essentiel d'en débattre. Toutefois, il apparaît assez clairement que l'on continue à se tromper d'approche, chez les commentateurs comme au sein de la classe politique. Nombreux sont ceux qui persistent à associer «patriotisme économique» et «protectionnisme». Cette confusion fausse l'ensemble de l'argumentation autour d'une formule globalement travestie. Le patriotisme économique n'est ni un nationalisme économique, ni un repli frileux derrière nos frontières.

Correctement entendu, il est une autre manière d'appeler à un retour du politique dans la sphère économique. Il revendique une stratégie nationale en matière de développement, une vision de notre futur industriel (travaillé en profondeur par l'ère digitale) et une implication publique intense dans la conquête de nouveaux marchés. La France et l'Europe sont loin du compte en la matière.

Il suffit d'observer la machine d'assaut économique de l'Oncle Sam pour s'en convaincre. En premier lieu, ce dernier sélectionne drastiquement ses partenaires étrangers. A cette fin, les Etats-Unis créèrent le CFIUS (Committee on foreign investment in the United States: comité pour l'investissement étranger aux Etats-Unis). Et l'administration américaine ne se prive pas de l'utiliser, ou plutôt de faire comprendre aux investisseurs étrangers que cette menace plane sur eux. Ils sont donc fortement portés à la négociation… A travers cette structure et le texte de l'Exon-Florio (amendement au Defense Production Act de 1950, adopté en 1988), Washington pratique une politique que l'Union européenne ne peut même pas envisager: imposer un certain nombre d'administrateurs de nationalité américaine ou encore exiger que le choix de la stratégie de l'entreprise rachetée échappe partiellement ou totalement aux investisseurs étrangers. D'un point de vue plus offensif, les Américains mènent une véritable diplomatie économique (depuis l'ère Clinton) visant à imposer des groupes portant la bannière étoilée dans les pays «alliés» ou «amis», ceci en utilisant toutes les ressources disponibles de l'administration, y compris des services de renseignement. La Chine fait exactement la même chose.

Notre continent, lui, joue les bons élèves de l'orthodoxie libérale (que n'aurait certainement pas validé Adam Smith). Le patriotisme économique - tel que la France peut le concevoir en restant fidèle à ses valeurs - milite pour la réciprocité dans les relations d'échange de biens et de services entre les nations. Bref, il faut se battre à armes égales, et pas avec un bras attaché dans le dos. Cette inconfortable posture résume pourtant notre situation. Alors que les Etats-Unis, la Chine ou la Russie mettent en œuvre de véritables dispositifs d'accroissement de puissance économique, nous nous accrochons à l'orthodoxie libre-échangiste. L'Hexagone, en deux décennies, n'a toujours pas réussi à construire une politique publique d'intelligence économique (c'est-à-dire de compétitivité et de sécurité économique) à la hauteur des défis qui se posent à nous.

Le problème vient du fait que l'Union européenne jouent les intégristes du droit de la concurrence, alors que les autres nations pensent d'abord à maximiser leur prospérité, même si cela implique de fouler au pied les principes de base du libéralisme. D'une certaine manière, Donald Trump explicite la philosophie des Américains, y compris celle des Démocrates: «Acheter américain, embaucher américain».


Certes, notre pays a mis en place un premier dispositif entre 2004 et 2005 afin de fournir au gouvernement l'outil juridique pour autoriser ou refuser les investissements de groupes étrangers dans la défense et quelques autres secteurs stratégiques. Il fut complété par Arnaud Montebourg avec un décret permettant d'étendre cette possibilité aux secteurs de l'énergie, des transports, de l'eau, de la santé et des télécoms. Mais c'est la volonté qui nous manque, pas les outils juridiques. De surcroît, à l'exception des louables efforts législatifs du ministre de la Justice, Jean-Jacques Urvoas (à l'origine de travaux importants sur cette question lorsqu'il présidait la Commission des lois), et de ceux - opérationnels - de Jean-Yves Le Drian, le ministre de la Défense, il faut bien constater que nos gouvernants n'ont pas la moindre petite idée de ce que signifie et implique une authentique stratégie de diplomatie économique, fondée sur une alliance étroite entre le public et le privé (au bénéfice de l'emploi, des PME, et pas exclusivement à celui des grands actionnaires).

Nos élites jugent la nation obsolète, comment pourraient-elles sérieusement concevoir une véritable doctrine en matière de patriotisme économique, et ensuite l'appliquer? Il faudrait affronter Bruxelles, remettre en cause certains dogmes de la «mondialisation heureuse», imaginer une politique économique qui ne sombre pas dans un protectionnisme idiot tout en refusant la mise à mort de nos industries, bref, il faudrait déployer une vision de l'avenir égale en créativité et courage politique à celle dont fit preuve le Général de Gaulle en son temps. Vaste programme!