Ok

En poursuivant votre navigation sur ce site, vous acceptez l'utilisation de cookies. Ces derniers assurent le bon fonctionnement de nos services. En savoir plus.

dimanche, 18 mars 2018

Sugimoto Gorō & Soldier-Zen

Zen-at-War+army.jpg

Sugimoto Gorō & Soldier-Zen

Asceticism often has a bad reputation in vitalist circles. The idea of the sexless, passionless, passive, world-rejecting monk seems self-evidently maladaptive, an evolutionary dead end, as Nietzsche and Savitri Devi surmised. Yet the fact is that monks have often been warriors, and the monarchs of ascetic religions, such as Christianity and Buddhism, have often been great conquerors. The Christian monastic orders contributed greatly to the fight against Muslim aggression in the Middle Ages and proved capable of exterminating the last pagan holdouts in the Baltic region.

In Japan, Zen Buddhism was the religion of the samurai, who developed a warrior ethos, Bushidō, which was one of the most profound and spiritual of its type in the entire world. Whereas Buddhism today is often associated with a kind of rootless, feel-good pacifism, in the first half of the twentieth century, the Zen schools of Imperial Japan enthusiastically supported national military power and selfless service to the Emperor as the divine embodiment of their nation. Zen monks and leaders developed a so-called “soldier-Zen” (gunjin-Zen) and strongly supported Japan during the Second World War, both in its imperial ambitions and in its resistance to the Allies. In the post-war years, many liberal Western converts to Zen were shocked to discover that their “enlightened” masters had supported authoritarian militarism and imperialism.

Personally, I have long thought that Zen spiritual practice could lead either to world-rejecting withdrawal or to detached, possibly violent, self-sacrifice of the kind evocatively described in the Hindus’ Bhagavad Gita. The Zen practitioner trains himself to tolerate discomfort, self-discipline, self-awareness, and ultimately a kind of transcendence of the self as illusory. One realizes, intimately, that one is nothing but a part of a boundlessly greater whole and a web of interdependent relationships. At the same time, there is a grim quality to Buddhism in general: Gautama’s insight was in recognizing the transience of all things: not merely of nations and empires and of one’s life and possessions, but even of one’s mind, even of the gods (on which the Nordic Eddur agree, for they foresee the inevitable Twilight of the Gods), perhaps even of the universe itself. In Zen in particular, all is “vacuity,” and one learns to stare into the void with serenity, without flinching, even cultivating a quiet, transcendent joy. However, not all are so strong. The “abyssal realization” can easily lead one to fall into despondent discouragement or withdrawn nihilism. There is little emphasis in Zen on building something that might outlive us, on the cultivation of Life.

Brian Zaizen Victoria, a Western Zen practitioner, has written a great deal on the now-politically incorrect attitudes of the Imperial Zen schools. In “A Buddhological Critique of ‘Soldier-Zen’ in Wartime Japan,”[1] [2] Victoria provides an overview of soldier-Zen and translated extracts from its promoters (the quotes from Buddhist texts and Zen practitioners cited in this article are all drawn from Victoria’s chapter). Victoria argues that “soldier-Zen” was in fact non-Buddhist, claiming that Gautama himself was a preacher and practitioner of non-violence:

[W]hen looking at records of Buddha Śākyamuni’s life, we find his actions to be totally consistent with his earliest teachings. Śākyamuni peacefully sought to prevent war, as can be seen in his initial successful attempt to prevent an attack on his own country. Further, he successfully dissuaded King Ajātasattu from attacking the Vajjians. Still further, even when the very existence of his own homeland was at stake, he did not mobilize the members of the sangha as monk-soldiers to defend his country, nor did he use force to enlarge the power and landholdings of the sangha itself (as was later done in medieval Japan).[2] [3]

However, Victoria recognizes that early on in the Mahayana tradition,[3] [4] violence could be religiously sanctioned, which he claims were monastic rationalizations in the service of pro-Buddhist monarchs, and that such violence has been a recurring feature in Buddhist history. The first-century Nirvana Sutra had commanded “protecting the true Dharma [Buddha’s teaching] by grasping swords and other weapons.” In passing, it appears that the ancient Greek converts to Buddhism of Gandhara had, as monks and kings, a certain role in shaping and spreading Mahayana.

One can easily see how a belief in the transient unreality of the world could lead to an unsentimental attitude towards life. A seventh-century Chan (Chinese Buddhist) text, the Treatise on Absolute Contemplation, argued that killing is ethical if one recognizes that the victim is only empty and dream-like.[4] [5] A millennium later, the seventeenth-century Zen master Takuan Sōhō wrote that:

The uplifted sword has no will of its own, it is all of emptiness. It is like a flash of lightning. The man who is about to be struck down is also of emptiness, and so is the one who wields the sword. None of them are possessed of a mind that has any substantiality. As each of them is of emptiness and has no “mind,” the striking man is not a man, the sword in his hands is not a sword, and the “I” who is about to be struck down is like the splitting of the spring breeze in a flash of lightning.[5] [6]

The samurai appear to have had little difficulty in reconciling their Zen religion with their warrior ethos.

sm-chevel.jpgIn the twentieth century, the Imperial Japanese developed soldier-Zen as a particular spiritual ethos compatible with their nation and state. This was advocated in particular by Lieutenant Colonel Sugimoto Gorō (1900-1937), who died in battle in China, and was honored by the Zen orders as a “military god” (gunshin).

Here are some passages from Sugimoto’s writings and sayings:

The Zen that I do . . . is soldier-Zen. The reason that Zen is important for soldiers is that all Japanese, especially soldiers, must live in the spirit of the unity of sovereign and subjects, eliminating their ego and getting rid of their self. It is exactly the awakening to the nothingness of Zen that is the fundamental spirit of the unity of sovereign and subjects. Through my practice of Zen I am able to get rid of my ego. In facilitating the accomplishment of this, Zen becomes, as it is, the true spirit of the Imperial military.

* * *

The emperor is identical with the Great [Sun] Goddess Amaterasu. He is the supreme and only God of the universe, the supreme sovereign of the universe. All of the many components [of a country] including such things as its laws and constitution, its religion, ethics, learning, art, etc. are expedient means by which to promote unity with the emperor. That is to say, the greatest mission of these components is to promote an awareness of the non-existence of the self and the absolute nature of the emperor. Because of the nonexistence of the self everything in the universe is a manifestation of the emperor . . . including even the insect chirping in the hedge, or the gentle spring breeze. . . .

* * *

If you wish to penetrate the true meaning of “Great Duty,” the first thing you should do is to embrace the teachings of Zen and discard self-attachment.

* * *

War is moral training for not only the individual but for the entire world. It consists of the extinction of self-seeking and the destruction of self-preservation. It is only those without self-attachment who are able to revere the emperor absolutely.

* * *

Life and death are identical. [Compare the Zen concept: “Unity of life and death” (shōji ichinyo)] . . . Warriors who sacrifice their lives for the emperor will not die, but live forever. Truly, they should be called gods and Buddhas for whom there is no life or death. . . . Where there is absolute loyalty there is no life or death. Where there is life and death there is no absolute loyalty. When a person talks of his view of life and death, that person has not yet become pure in heart. He has not yet abandoned body and mind. In pure loyalty there is no life or death. Simply live in pure loyalty!

* * *

In Buddhism, especially the Zen sect, there is repeated reference to the identity of body and mind. In order to realize this identity of the two it is necessary to undergo training with all one’s might and regardless of the sacrifice. Furthermore, the essence of the unity of body and mind is to be found in egolessness. Japan is a country where the Sovereign and the people are identical. When Imperial subjects meld themselves into one with the August Mind [of the emperor], their original countenance shines forth. The essence of the unity of the sovereign and the people is egolessness.

sm-debout.jpgThere is an almost “national-pagan” quality to soldier-Zen’s sublimation of the self into an assertive nation mystically united around a divine monarch.

Following his death in battle, Sugimoto was honored as a national hero by Yamazaki Ekijū, the head of the Rinzai Zen school. This is unsurprising given that Yamazaki’s Zen was firmly national and self-sacrificing. He said, “Japanese Buddhism must be centered on the emperor; for were it not, it would have no place in Japan, it would not be living Buddhism. Even Buddhism must conform to the national structure of Japan. The same holds true for Shakyamuni [Buddha]’s teachings.” He claimed that the Japanese had so cultivated selflessness that, “[f]or Japanese there is no such thing as sacrifice.”[6] [8]

Yamazaki described Sugimoto’s death thus:

A grenade fragment hit him in the left shoulder. He seemed to have fallen down but then got up again. Although he was standing, one could not hear his commands. He was no longer able to issue commands with that husky voice of his. . . . Yet he was still standing, holding his sword in one hand as a prop. Both legs were slightly bent, and he was facing in an easterly direction [toward the imperial palace]. It appeared that he had saluted though his hand was now lowered to about the level of his mouth. The blood flowing from his mouth covered his watch.

In the past it was considered to be the true appearance of a Zen priest to pass away while doing zazen [seated meditation]. Those who were completely and thoroughly enlightened, however, . . . could die calmly in a standing position. . . . The reason this was possible was due to samādhi [concentration] power.

To the last second Sugimoto was a man whose speech and actions were at one with each other.

When he saluted and faced the east, there is no doubt that he also shouted, “May His Majesty, the emperor, live for 10,000 years!” [Tennō-heika Banzai]. It is for this reason that his was the radiant ending of an Imperial soldier. Not only that, but his excellent appearance should be a model for future generations of someone who lived in Zen.[7] [9]

For Yamazaki, Sugimoto “demonstrated the action that derives from the unity of Zen and sword [zenken ichinyo].” Furthermore, “[t]hrough the awareness Sugimoto achieved in becoming one with death, there was, I think, nothing he couldn’t achieve.”[8] [10]

Takuan.jpgSocrates is supposed to have said that all philosophy is a preparation for death. By that definition, there is no doubt that Zen is a true philosophy. The Soto Zen leader Ishihara Shummyō said:

Zen master Takuan taught that in essence Zen and Bushidō were one. . . . I believe that if one is called upon to die, one should not be the least bit agitated. On the contrary, one should be in a realm where something called “oneself ” does not intrude even slightly. Such a realm is no different from that derived from the practice of Zen.[9] [11]

This sentiment is perfectly in accord with ancient Western philosophy’s attitude towards death, from Socrates to Marcus Aurelius.

I cannot say whether Mahatma Gandhi was right in claiming that all forms of violence are immoral. However, I observe that, in any case, the vast majority of mankind does not abjure violence. For most, then, the martial self-sacrifice of soldier-Zen cannot be bad in itself, but merely depends on the morality of the cause which it serves. Nor can I say whether Friedrich Nietzsche was right in claiming that the ascetic ideal is inherently emasculating and one needs a more primal, spontaneous, Dionysian way of life. However, we would have to admit that ascetic practices appear to have been central to the martial prowess of fighters as diverse as the ancient Spartans, the medieval Christian warrior-monks, and the Imperial Japanese. No doubt, different individuals will flourish and better actualize their potential in following a more ascetic or more “barbaric” ethos, depending on their temperament.

After the Second World War, the Americans demanded that the Japanese Emperor renounce his claims of godhood. This may have been understandable from a rationalist and materialist liberal perspective, which saw these claims as not only self-evidently false and even deceitful, but also as having provided part of the foundation for Japanese militarism and international aggression. But there was also a price to be paid: the disenchantment of Japan, the reduction of that nation from a mystical family with a special destiny to a mere population of consumers. Human life, no doubt, suffers and becomes impoverished from a lack of a sense of higher purpose. I will not bore you by citing the various psychological studies suggesting this. Each one who, with but a little sensitivity, looks into his own heart will know it to be true.

I do not accept that nothing exists besides this transient world and that, therefore, nothing in a sense ultimately exists. Even when the Himalayas are ground to dust, humanity goes extinct, and this universe itself is torn asunder, some things, I can sense, will always remain and are eternal: the principles of reason and the yearning-for-life. Individual human life, in all its arbitrariness and brevity, seems to have meaning only if that existence can truly be recognized and lived as part of a greater whole. That was evidently one of the ambitions of soldier-Zen.

 

Notes

[1] [12] Brian Zaizen Victoria, “A Buddhological Critique of ‘Soldier-Zen’ in Wartime Japan,” in Michael Jerryson & Mark Juergensmeyer (eds.), Buddhist Warfare (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010), pp. 105-30.

[2] [13] Ibid., p. 126.

[3] [14]Mahayana, or the “Great Vehicle,” refers to the great branch of Buddhism largely coterminous with the East Asian nations. It is often contrasted with Theravada Buddhism, which is often criticized by Mahayana Buddhists as aiming for a “nirvana” which means non-existence or oblivion.

[4] [15] Ibid., p. 123.

[5] [16] Ibid., p. 118.

[6] [17] Ibid., p. 111.

[7] [18] Ibid., p. 115.

[8] [19] Ibid., p. 114.

[9] [20] Ibid., p. 119.

 

Article printed from Counter-Currents Publishing: https://www.counter-currents.com

URL to article: https://www.counter-currents.com/2018/03/sugimoto-goro-soldier-zen/

lundi, 15 juin 2015

“Cioran, la naissance et le Zen”

zen-wallpaper-01.jpg

“Cioran, la naissance et le Zen”

par Massimo Carloni
Ex: https://emcioranbr.wordpress.com

Article paru dans Alkemie Revue semestrielle de littérature et philosophie, numéro 9 / Juin 2012 (thème: L’être)

Abstract: This article suggests approaching the problem of the birth in Cioran. By interpreting the fall from Heaven as the exile, Cioran aims at subtracting the narrative of the Genesis from the moral dialectic innocence/fault towards God, to conjugate it with the profound intuitions on the consciousness of the Zen Buddhism.

L’esprit humain n’est pas la pensée, mais le vide et la paix
qui forment le fond et la source de la pensée.
Houeï-nêng

Être homme signifie précisément être conscient. Être détaché de soi-même, en fuite perpétuelle de ce qu’on est, pour saisir ce qu’on n’est pas.

Bien avant d’être le sujet d’un livre ou d’un article, la naissance a été pour Cioran surtout une obsession, dont il ne s’est jamais libéré. S’acharner contre sa propre venue au monde… Comment une telle folie serait-elle concevable ? Pourquoi donc se vouer à une cause déjà perdue d’avance ? À quoi bon se tourmenter avec l’Insoluble ? En effet, au moment même où nous discutons de la naissance, il est déjà trop tard : « Ne pas naître est sans contredit la meilleure formule qui soit. Elle n’est malheureusement à la portée de personne »[1]. Le forfait, à vrai dire, est désormais accompli, cependant s’arrêter sur cet événement capital n’est pas une occupation oisive, au contraire, car elle pourrait bien se révéler une expérience libératrice.

En glissant sur le problème de la naissance, le Christianisme perdit ab initio l’essentiel de la Genèse transmis par la tradition. Le Bouddhisme, au contraire, en fit l’un des points fondamentaux de sa doctrine. Quant à Cioran, son interprétation magistrale du récit de la Genèse, vise à  le soustraire à la dialectique morale innocence/culpabilité envers Dieu, pour le conjuguer avec les profondes intuitions du bouddhisme Zen.[2]

  1. L’exil de la conscience

Au-delà du langage mythique, la chute originaire du Paradis raconte le drame de la conscience, la tentation du savoir qui se révèlera être fatale à l’homme. Effectivement, botaniste exécrable, l’homme opta pour le faux arbre: il préféra l’arbre de la Connaissance à celui de la Vie. On lit alors dans la Bible : « ses yeux se sont ouverts ». Royaume de l’évidence inarticulée, « le Paradis était l’endroit où l’on savait tout mais où l’on n’expliquait rien. L’univers d’avant le péché, d’avant le commentaire »[3], glose Cioran. L’avènement de la conscience établit donc une fracture, une discontinuité dans l’économie de l’être. L’individu naît donc comme une entité séparée psychiquement de son milieu. Cioran rappelle distinctement l’épisode de son enfance qui marqua en lui le réveil de la conscience, par laquelle il entendit, pour la première fois, le poids d’être au monde.

Tout à coup, je me trouvai seul devant… Je sentis, en cet après-midi de mon enfance, qu’un événement très grave venait de se produire. Ce fut mon premier éveil, le premier indice, le signe avant-coureur de la conscience. Jusqu’alors je n’avais été qu’un être. À partir de ce moment, j’étais plus et moins que cela. Chaque moi commence par une fêlure et une révélation.[4]

En nommant les êtres vivants et les choses, l’homme crée une opposition entre soi et le monde. En vertu d’un savoir purement abstrait et par la médiation logique de l’idée, il s’imagine pouvoir reconstituer l’unité originaire du réel, en gouvernant ainsi le devenir. En vain. Car il ne fera qu’agrandir de plus en plus le gouffre qui le sépare du sein de la Nature. « Au plus intime de lui-même, l’homme aspire à rejoindre la condition qu’il avait avant la conscience. L’histoire n’est que le détour qu’il emprunte pour y parvenir. »[5]

Naturellement intentionnelle, la conscience est toujours conscience-de-quelque-chose. En établissant la distinction originaire entre soi-même et l’autre, la conscience structure l’expérience en un sens dualiste (sujet vs objet), conformément à la logique discursive de l’intellect. De cette façon l’ontologie de la substantia, qui classifie les organismes en vertu de leur différence essentielle, se superpose à l’interdépendance primordiale (relatio) de tous les phénomènes, où ceux-ci sont le produit momentané d’un réseau de conditionnements réciproques entre éléments dépourvus de nature propre. Ce faisant l’homme, ce « transfuge de l’être »[6], accomplit un saut en dehors du flux vital où il était immédiatement plongé, hors de l’inconscience d’un éternel présent qui le tenait à l’abri, sinon de la mort – l’arbre de la Vie lui était quand même interdit – au moins de la mortalité.

Auparavant il mourait sans doute, mais la mort, accomplissement dans l’indistinction primitive, n’avait pas pour lui le sens qu’elle a acquis depuis, ni n’était chargée des attributs de l’irréparable. Dès que, séparé du Créateur et du crée, il devint individu, c’est-à-dire fracture et fissure de l’être, et que, assumant son nom jusqu’à la provocation, il sut qu’il était mortel, son orgueil s’en agrandit, non moins que son désarroi.[7]

Il en découle une fuite en avant désespérée, à corps perdu, vers l’extérieur, vers l’histoire, pour exorciser cette peur de mourir qui fait corps avec son premier instant. La conscience d’être hic et nunc et la conscience de sa propre mortalité se soutiennent réciproquement, ce sont le recto et le verso de de la même médaille. Le cercle vicieux dans lequel l’homme est tombé depuis Adam, est déterminé par la prétention de se sauver consciemment de la catastrophe de la conscience, en se sauvant à la manière de Munchausen, qui tire sur ses propres cheveux. Une telle ambition équivaut à « refaire l’Éden avec les moyens de la chute »[8]. Si « naître c’est s’attacher »[9], intentionnellement ou non, à notre moi et aux choses du monde, pour en sortir il faut parcourir à reculons le chemin, « faire éclater les catégories où l’esprit est confiné »[10], rétablir la condition originaire antérieure à la dichotomie sujet-objet. Autrement dit, il faut renaître sous l’arbre de la Vie.

L’inconscience est le secret, le « principe de vie » de la vie. Elle est l’unique recours contre le moi, contre le mal d’être individualisé, contre l’effet débilitant de l’état de conscience, état si redoutable, si dur à affronter, qu’il devrait être réservé aux athlètes seulement.[11]

  1. Le visage originaire avant la naissance

L’état d’inconscience évoqué par Cioran n’a rien à voir avec l’inconscient de la psychanalyse. Pour Cioran il s’agit donc de révéler les convergences surprenantes de cette inconscience avec ce que le bouddhisme Zen, dans ses différents courants, définit parfois comme : Nature-Bouddha, non-esprit (Wu-hsin), non-pensée (Wu-nien), « visage originaire avant la naissance » (pien-lai mien-mu), non-né (fusho).[12] Cioran même décrit la délivrance comme « état de non-pensée »[13] et il envisage d’écrire un essai à propos de cette condition.[14]

Cette concordance n’est pas le fruit du hasard. À partir des années 1960 – comme en témoignent les Cahiers – Cioran montre un intérêt croissant pour l’interprétation pragmatique du bouddhisme élaborée par le Zen. La virulence anti-métaphysique, typique de la tradition chinoise et japonaise, se marie à merveille avec son anti-intellectualisme viscéral.

Conversant avec un chinois de Hong-Kong, Cioran partage avec lui la méfiance vers la philosophie occidentale « qu’il trouve verbeuse, superficielle, extérieure, car dépourvue de réalité, de pratique ».[15] À un moment donné Cioran arrivera à définir Mozart et le Japon comme « les résultats les plus exquis de la Création ».[16] Charmé par la délicatesse nippone, il recopiera une page entière du livre de Gusty Herrigel sur l’Ikebana, ou « l’art d’arranger les fleurs ».[17] Pendant l’hiver 1967, Cioran ressentira une pitié authentique pour les fleurs de son balcon, exposées au froid intense, au point de les emmener avec soin dans sa  mansarde pour les protéger.[18]

ciorana125.jpg

Chez Cioran, le refus de la conscience n’est rien d’autre que « la nostalgie de ce temps d’avant le temps »[19] où le bonheur consistait dans un « regard sans réflexion ».[20] Parce qu’elle perturbe la spontanéité du geste, l’activité consciente fausse la vie. Préfigurant un but à atteindre, l’esprit se scinde en spectateur et en acteur, et se place à la fois dans et hors de l’action. Le geste s’accomplit donc dans un état de tension, d’effort conscient, car l’esprit est troublé par les conséquences possibles de son action à venir.

 Toute activité consciente gêne la vie. Spontanéité et lucidité sont incompatibles.
Tout acte essentiellement vital, dès que l’attention s’y applique, s’accomplit avec peine et laisse après soi une sensation d’insatisfaction.
L’esprit joue par rapport aux phénomènes de la vie le rôle d’un trouble-fête.
L’état d’inconscience est l’état naturel de la vie, c’est en lui qu’elle est chez elle, qu’elle prospère et qu’elle connaît le sommeil bienfaisant de la croissance. Dès qu’elle se réveille, dès qu’elle veille surtout, elle devient haletante et oppressée, et commence à s’étioler.[21]

Le Zen, dont l’esprit imprègne tous les arts japonais, reconduit l’homme à la réalité du hic et nunc, à l’« ainsité » (tathata)[22]. Afin de se syntoniser sur la longueur d’onde de la vie, il faut que le geste de l’artiste, comme du samouraï d’ailleurs, soit spontané, sans hésitations ; il faut que le geste surgisse du vide de la pensée, en oubliant aussi la technique apprise. Autrement dit, il faut que l’art soit à tel point intériorisée jusqu’à devenir connaissance du corps, en sorte que celui-ci puisse réagir à la situation de manière autonome et instantanée, en éludant la direction de la conscience. Seulement si la technique (waza), l’énergie vitale (Ki) et l’esprit (shin), sont fusionnés harmonieusement, sans que l’une prévale sur les autres, l’action résulte efficace et opportune. Comme une balle flottant dans une rivière, portée par le courant, l’esprit doit couler sans s’arrêter sur rien[23]. À ce propos D.T. Suzuki soutient que

La vie se dessine de soi sur la toile nommé le temps – et le temps ne se répète jamais, une fois passé il ne revient plus. Il en est de même pour l’acte : une fois accompli, il ne peut plus être défait. La vie est comme la peinture nommée sumi-e, qui est peinte d’un seul jet, sans hésitations, sans intervention de l’intellect, sans corrections. La vie n’est pas comme une peinture à l’huile qu’on peut effacer et retoucher jusqu’à ce que l’artiste en soit satisfait. Dans la peinture sumi-e chaque coup de pinceau qu’on passe une deuxième fois devient une tache, il n’a plus rien de vivant […] Et il en est de même pour la vie. Ce qu’elle est devenue par notre action nous ne pouvons plus le reprendre, ou mieux nous ne pouvons même plus effacer pas ce qui est passé à travers notre conscience simplement. Ainsi le Zen doit être cueilli pendant que la chose arrive, ni avant ni après : dans l’instant.[24]

Avec perspicacité, Cioran établit une corrélation directe entre l’immédiat et le réel, d’un côté, et la souffrance et la conscience de l’autre. Takuan Sōhō lui fait écho, lorsqu’il affirme que « Dans le bouddhisme nous détestons cet arrêt, cet hésitation de l’esprit sur l’une ou l’autre chose, que nous définissons comme étant la souffrance » [25]. L’excès d’auto-conscience fait de l’homme un système hautement instable, sensible aux moindres sollicitations du milieu, aussi bien extérieur qu’intérieur. Cela crée un état d’anxiété, d’oscillation entre contraires, qui retarde l’agir ou le rend gêné et inefficace. L’obsession du contrôle, le besoin spasmodique de sûreté et de certitudes préventives, sont autant de témoignages montrant que l’homme est sorti de la spontanéité de la vie, et qu’il vit dans un état d’agitation fiévreuse, incapable de concilier la réalité du vécu avec l’idée qu’il a élaboré a priori. Entre les espèces vivantes, l’homme est le plus souffrant, car il est parvenu au plus haut degré de conscience de soi.

Il vaut mieux être animal qu’homme, insecte qu’animal, plante qu’insecte, et ainsi de suite. Le salut ? Tout ce qui amoindrit le règne de la conscience et en compromet la suprématie.[26]

Alors, comme peut-on retrouver en soi-même cette « virginité ‘‘métaphysique’’ »[27], qui permet de percevoir les éléments comme si on les voyait pour la première fois, « au lendemain de la Création »[28] et « avant la Connaissance »[29] ? Il faut avant tout discerner la vacuité intrinsèque des choses, des mots qui les désignent et, finalement, de la conscience du moi empirique. Autrement dit, il faut démolir complètement la conception ordinaire de la réalité, en même temps que l’armature logique qui la soutient.

zen8458968_1_2_LPpuxukH.jpg

Les maîtres Zen étaient harcelés par leurs élèves, à propos de questions sur l’essence dernière du bouddhisme. Pour arrêter chez les novices le flux de la pensée discursive, les maîtres Zen adoptèrent une série de stratégies, soit verbales soit physiques, telles que : le kōan, le paradoxe, la contradiction, le cri, le coup de bâton, le gifle, l’indication directe… Cette pars destruens du Zen vise à provoquer un choc psychologique, un court-circuit intellectuel, jusqu’à ce que « le langage soit réduit au silence et la pensée n’ait aucune voie à suivre » .[30] Il faut tuer dans l’œuf chaque tentative de fuite de la réalité vers le symbolique. Interroger le maître, c’est encore croire à la connaissance objective, doctrinale, séparée de l’ignorance ; c’est détourner l’attention de soi-même, c’est sacrifier sur l’autel d’un absolu métaphysique l’instant éternel qu’on vit. De ce point de vue, le kōan peut être considéré comme un paradigme de la vie elle-même, dont la complexité ne demande pas une compréhension simplement intellectuelle, mais toujours existentielle, vécue complètement dans l’instant.

Pour éviter tout cela, le Zen invite à expérimenter le Néant, c’est-à-dire le stade où on arrive à reconnaître que « les montagnes ne sont plus des montagnes »[31] (A n’est pas A), où les choses, en perdant leur essence et leurs déterminations, glissent vers le vide. Suzuki à ce propos soutient que « le Zen est une philosophie de négations absolues qui sont en même temps affirmation absolues » .[32] Cioran aussi répondit dans ces termes à une question sur son côté nihiliste

Je suis sûrement un négateur, mais ma négation n’est pas une négation abstraite, donc un exercice ; c’est une négation qui est viscérale, donc affirmation malgré tout, c’est une explosion ; est-ce qu’une gifle est une négation ? Donner une gifle n’est-ce pas… c’est une affirmation, mais ce que je fais ce sont des négations qui sont des gifles, donc ce sont des affirmations.[33]

Ce que les critiques occidentaux interprètent de manière expéditive, chez Cioran, comme étant du nihilisme, du pessimisme, est en réalité une tentative extrême pour emmener le lecteur – et peut-être lui-même – en face de son propre néant, afin que l’esprit, vidé de tout contenu, puisse retourner à la surface des choses, en se réveillant à la perception pure de toute réflexion. « Le véritable bonheur, c’est l’état de conscience sans référence à rien, sans objet, où la conscience jouit de l’immense absence qui la remplit. »[34).

  1. La châtaigne et le satori

Que Cioran le sache ou non, quand il soutient que « connaître véritablement, c’est connaître l’essentiel, s’y engager, y pénétrer par le regard et non par l’analyse ni par la parole », il nous fournit une définition du satori, ou connaissance intuitive, non duale, transcendante, qui recueille instantanément la nature de la réalité. Sur ce point, D. T. Suzuki précise :

Le satori peut être défini comme une pénétration intuitive de la nature des choses, par opposition à leur compréhension analytique ou logique. Pratiquement, il comporte le déploiement devant nous d’un nouveau monde, jamais perçu auparavant à cause de la confusion de notre esprit orienté de façon dualiste. On peut dire de plus que, par le satori, tout ce qui nous entoure nous apparaît selon une perspective insoupçonnée.[35]

Regarder sa nature originaire n’est jamais le résultat d’une pratique méditative, et encore moins le contenu d’une connaissance transmissible. Une fois que notre esprit est engorgé de notions conceptuelles, il se trouve bloqué par le Grand Doute ; dès lors, un événement quelconque, même le plus insignifiant, est à même d’éveiller la conscience.

C’est d’ailleurs ce que connut Hsiang-yen (? -898), élève de Kuei-shan. Le maître lui demanda quel était son visage originaire d’avant la naissance, mais Hsiang-yen ne répondit pas. Dans l’espoir de trouver la réponse à son kōan, il compulsa en vain tous ses livres. Alors, dans un accès de colère, il brûla tous les textes, bien qu’il continuât à se tourmenter au sujet de ce problème insoluble. Un jour, pendant qu’il arrachait les mauvaises herbes du terrain, il heurta une pierre laquelle, par ricochet, frappa à son tour une canne de bambou : c’est ainsi que Hsiang-yen obtint son satori.[36] Même Cioran expérimente un état d’âme identique, lorsqu’il écrit :

Comme je me promenais à une heure tardive dans cette allée bordée d’arbres, une châtaigne tomba à mes pieds. Le bruit qu’elle fit en éclatant, l’écho qu’il suscita en moi, et un saisissement hors de proportion avec cet incident infime, me plongèrent dans le miracle, dans l’ébriété du définitif, comme s’il n’y avait plus de questions, rien que des réponses. J’étais ivre de mille évidences inattendues, dont je ne savais que faire…
C’est ainsi que je faillis avoir mon satori. Mais je crus préférable de continuer ma promenade[37].

Au-delà du mot adopté et de l’ironie finale, il n’y a pas de doute que l’expérience rappelle une expression clé de l’esthétique japonaise, ce mono no aware qui désigne un certain « pathos (aware) des choses (mono) », c’est-à-dire le sentiment ressenti par l’observateur face à la beauté éphémère des phénomènes, lorsque il est pénétré par la brève durée d’une telle splendeur, destinée à s’évanouir de même que celui qui la contemple est voué à disparaître.[38] Ce n’est pas par hasard que, entre les sens du mot aware, on peut trouver celui de compassion, dans le sens étymologique de cum-patire, de souffrir ensemble, qui rapproche l’homme du reste de la nature, liés par un même destin fugace. En reprenant dans les Cahiers l’épisode de la châtaigne, Cioran souligne justement cette vérité métaphorique

Tout à l’heure, en faisant ma promenade nocturne, avenue de l’Observatoire, une châtaigne tombe à mes pieds. « Elle a fait son temps, elle a parcouru sa carrière », me suis-je dit. Et c’est vrai : c’est de la même façon qu’un être achève sa destinée. On mûrit, et puis on se détache de l’« arbre » [39]

Il est symptomatique qu’ailleurs, pour désigner ce clair obscur de l’âme, Cioran utilise une expression typique de l’esthétique japonaise, employée lorsqu’on perçoit « le ah ! des choses »[40]. Ce soupir évocateur, en saisissant la nature impermanente de la vie, indique un sentiment inexplicable de plaisir subtil, imprégné d’amertume, devant chaque merveille qu’on sait périssable. Si d’un côté telle disposition dévoile le côté mélancolique de l’existence, d’un autre côté, il en émane un certain charme du monde qui, en dernière analyse, ne mène pas à la résignation, mais confère un sursaut de vitalité à l’âme de l’observateur.[41]

Le spectacle de ces feuilles si empressées à tomber, j’ai beau l’observer depuis tant d’automnes, je n’en éprouve pas moins chaque fois une surprise où «le froid dans le dos » l’emporterait de loin sans l’irruption, au dernier moment, d’une allégresse dont je n’ai pas encore démêlé l’origine.[42]

Ce sentiment, par les traits morbides de la Vergänglichkeit, ou de la caducité universelle, revient dans toute une série d’impressions notées dans les Cahiers. En maintes occasions Cioran montre qu’il a éprouvé l’expérience du vide mental, de dépouillement intérieur, qui aboutit à une perception absolue de la réalité. De même que le peintre zen se fait creux pour accueillir l’événement qu’il va représenter, pour devenir lui même la chose contemplée, de même, Cioran propose de se rendre totalement passif comme un « objet qui regarde »[43] : « l’idée, chère à la peinture chinoise, de peindre une forêt ‘‘telle que la verraient les arbres’’… ».[44] Du reste, c’est seulement ainsi qu’il est possible de « remonter avant le concept, [d’]écrire à même les sens ».[45] Autrement dit, il faut « Écarter la pensée, se borner à la perception. Redécouvrir le regard et les objets, d’avant la Connaissance ».[46] Le 25 décembre 1965, il note :

Le bonheur tel que je l’entends : marcher à la campagne et regarder sans plus, m’épuiser dans la pure perception.[47]

La contemplation permet de retrouver la dimension éternelle du présent, non contaminée par les fantômes du passé et par les anxiétés de l’avenir. Être entièrement dans un fragment de temps, totalement absorbé par le « hic et nunc » que nous sommes en train de vivre, car, en dehors de l’instant opportun, tout est illusion.

Autrefois un moine demanda à Chao-chou (778-897), un des plus grands maîtres Zen : « Dis-moi, quel est le sens de la venue du Premier Patriarche de l’Ouest ? »[48] Chao-chou répondit : « Le cyprès dans la cour ! » [49]  Or, si pour le sens commun la réponse semble totalement insensée, en revanche, dans l’optique Zen, elle ne l’est pas. Chao-chou soustrait le moine à la métaphysique aride de la pensée discursive, pour le reconduire à la poésie vivante de la réalité. À ce moment-là le cyprès recèle en lui-même le monde entier, bien plus que la réponse doctrinale attendue par le moine. Chao-chou et le moine, dans leur perception immédiate, sont le cyprès. L’être, dans sa nature indifférenciée, se révèle comme VOIR le cyprès. Cioran n’est pas loin de la spiritualité Zen lorsqu’il affirme :

Marcher dans une forêt entre deux haies de fougères transfigurées par l’automne, c’est cela un triomphe. Que sont à côtés suffrages et ovations ? [50]

Ailleurs Cioran parle du vent en tant qu’ « agent métaphysique »[51], révélateur donc de réalités inattendues : écouter le vent « dispense de la poésie, est poésie ».[52] L’insomnie et les réveils brusques au cœur de la nuit, le comblèrent souvent de visions ineffables, d’une béatitude paradisiaque.

Insomnie à la campagne. Une fois, vers 5 heures du matin, je me suis levé pour contempler le jardin. Vision d’Éden, lumière surnaturelle. Au loin, quatre peupliers s’étiraient vers Dieu.[53]

Durant l’été 1966, à Ibiza, après une énième veillée nocturne, c’est encore la beauté déchirante du paysage qui déjoue les sombres résolutions suicidaires.

Ibiza, 31 juillet 1966. Cette nuit, réveillé tout à fait vers 3 heures. Impossible de rester davantage au lit. Je suis allé me promener au bord de la mer, sous l’impulsion de pensées on ne peut plus sombres. Si j’allais me jeter du haut de la falaise ? […] Pendant que je faisais toute sorte de réflexions amères, je regardai ces pins, ces rochers, ces vagues « visités » par la lune, et sentis soudain à quel point j’étais rivé à ce bel univers maudit.[54]

Un autre aspect qui rapproche Cioran du Zen, réside dans une prise de conscience : la vie authentique est propre au cioban, au rustique qui vit au contact de la nature et qui gagne sa vie par le travail manuel[55]. Les années d’enfance, passées en tant qu’« enfant de la nature »[56], « Maître de la création »[57] dans la campagne transylvanienne, ont certainement été comme un imprinting pour Cioran, cependant même le Cioran adulte expérimente en maintes occasions ce qu’il appelle « le salut par les bras ».[58] Il va jusqu’à sanctifier la fatigue physique, car, en abolissant la conscience, elle empêche l’inertie mentale qui aboutit au cafard.[59] Finalement, il caresse un rêve :

 avoir une «propriété », à une centaine de kilomètres de Paris, où je pourrais travailler de mes mains pendant deux ou trois heures tous les jours. Bêcher, réparer, démolir, construire, n’importe quoi, pourvu que je sois absorbé par un objet quelconque – un objet que je manie. Depuis des années déjà, je mets ce genre d’activité au-dessus de toutes les autres ; c’est elle seule qui me comble, qui ne me laisse pas insatisfait et amer, alors que le travail intellectuel, pour lequel je n’ai plus de goût (bien que je lise toujours beaucoup, mais sans grand profit), me déçoit parce qu’il réveille en moi tout ce que je voudrais oublier, et qu’il se réduit désormais à une rencontre stérile avec des problèmes que j’ai abordés indéfiniment sans les résoudre.[60]

D’après le Zen, l’esprit quotidien est la Voie (chinois : Tao, japonais : Do). Donc, soutient Lin-tsi, il n’y a rien de spécial à faire (wu-shih) : « allez à la selle, pissez, habillez-vous, mangez, et allongez-vous lorsque vous êtes fatigués. Les fous peuvent rire de moi, mais les sages savent ce que je veux dire ». [61] Les maîtres Zen, sans différences de rang, s’occupaient des champs, du ménage, préparaient les repas, de telle sorte qu’aucun travail manuel n’était pour eux humiliant. Pendant ces activités, ils donnaient leçons pratiques aux disciples ou bien ils répondaient à leurs interlocuteurs de manière tranchante…

zentWYAA6WBK.jpg

 

Chao-chou était occupé à nettoyer lorsque survint le ministre d’État Liu, qui, en le voyant si occupé, lui demanda : « Comment se fait-il qu’un grand sage, comme vous, balaye la poussière ? » « La poussière vient d’ailleurs », répondit promptement Chao-chou. Une fois reconquise l’esprit originaire, alors chaque chose, même la plus prosaïque, s’illumine d’immensité : « Faculté miraculeuse et merveilleuse activité ! / Je tire l’eau du puits et fends le bois ! ».[62]

  1. Tuer le Bouddha

Afin de voir le visage originaire qui précède la naissance, il nous faut encore surmonter un dernier obstacle, peut-être le plus ardu, puisqu’il s’agit de la sainte figure de l’Éveillé, le Bouddha même. S’il est vrai que, comme l’écrit le dernier Cioran, « Tant qu’il y aura encore un seul un dieu debout, la tâche de l’homme ne sera pas finie »[63], alors le Zen a accompli sa mission depuis longtemps. Il y a mille deux cents ans, Lin-tsi exhorta ses disciples à ne rien chercher en dehors de soi-même, ni le Dharma, ni le Bouddha, ni aucune pratique ou illumination. Il ne faut seulement avoir une infinie confiance dans ce qu’on vit à chaque instant, le reste est une fuite illusoire de l’esprit qu’il faut éviter à tout prix. C’est comme si nous avions une autre tête au-dessus de celle-là que nous portons déjà.

Disciples de la Voie, si vous voulez percevoir le Dharma en sa réalité, simplement ne vous faites pas tromper par les opinions illusoires des autres. Peu importe ce que vous rencontriez, soit au-dedans soit au dehors, tuez-le immédiatement : en rencontrant un bouddha tuez le bouddha, en rencontrant un patriarche tuez le patriarche, en rencontrant un saint tuez le saint, en rencontrant vos parents tuez vos parents, en rencontrant un proche tuez votre proche, et vous atteindrez l’émancipation. En ne vous attachant pas aux choses, vous les traversez librement.[64]

Cioran talonne Lin-tsi sur cette voie, lorsqu’ il affirme qu’ « être rivé à quelqu’un, fût-ce par admiration, équivaut à une mort spirituelle. Pour se sauver, il faut le tuer, comme il est dit qu’il faut tuer le Bouddha. Être iconoclaste est la seule manière de se rendre digne d’un dieu ».[65] Moines qui crachent sur l’image du Bouddha[66] ou qui en brûlent la statue de bois pour se réchauffer, l’utilisation des écritures sacrées comme papier hygiénique, etc. : là où les autres confessions ne voient que sacrilèges, le zen voit des actes vénérables. Une telle fureur iconoclaste se révèle plus nécessaire que jamais, puisque implique une pratique de la vacuité universelle. L’invitation de Lin-tsi à nous allonger, sans attachement, sur la réalité des phénomènes, détruit à la racine n’importe quelle séparation entre sacré et profane, entre nirvāna et samsāra, entre illumination et ignorance. Cioran l’a bien compris, lorsqu’il nous exhorte à « Aller plus loin encore que le Bouddha, s’élever au-dessus du nirvâna, apprendre à s’en passer…, n’être plus arrêté par rien, même par l’idée de délivrance, la tenir pour une simple halte, une gêne, une éclipse… ».[67]

L’élégance suprême et paradoxale du Zen, ce qui le rend supérieur à n’importe quelle autre expérience spirituelle, c’est sa capacité, après avoir tout démoli, à se démolir lui-même, tranquillement. Une fois « plongé » dans la littérature Zen, et après en avoir assimilé la leçon, Cioran flaire le danger et comprend que le moment est venu de s’en détacher. L’expérience de la vacuité doit provenir de soi-même, de ses sensations : « Sur le satori, on ne lit pas ; on l’attend, on l’espère ».[68]

« Les montagnes sont de nouveau des montagnes, les eaux de nouveau des eaux  »… à quoi bon s’efforcer d’obtenir quelque chose ?

Le spectacle de la mer est plus enrichissant que l’enseignement du Bouddha.[69]

NOTES:

[1] Cioran, De l’inconvénient d’être né, in Œuvres, Paris, Gallimard, coll. « Quarto », 1995, p. 1400. Toutes les références  aux œuvres de Cioran sont extraites de cette édition, alors que les œuvres d’autres auteurs sont tirées d’éditions italiennes, sauf exception notifiée le cas échéant. Les traductions sont de l’Auteur (T.d.A.).

[2] D.T. Suzuki avait déjà tenté un premier parallèle entre la Genèse et le bouddhisme : « L’idée judéo-chrétienne de l’Innocence est l’interprétation morale de la doctrine bouddhiste de la Vacuité, qui est métaphysique ; alors que l’idée judéo-chrétienne de la Connaissance correspond, du point de vue épistémologique, à la notion bouddhique de l’Ignorance, encore que l’Ignorance soit superficiellement le contraire de la Connaissance », in D.T. Suzuki, « Sagesse et vacuité », Hermès, n° 2 « Le vide. Expérience spirituelle en Occident et en Orient », Paris, 1981, p. 172.  

[3] De l’inconvénient d’être né, p. 1372.

[4] Ibid., p. 1399.

[5] Ibid, p. 1346.

[6] La Chute dans le temps, p. 1076.

[7] Ibid, p. 1073.

[8] Histoire et utopie, p. 128.

[9] De l’inconvénient d’être né, p. 1283.

[10] Cahiers. 1957-1972, Paris, Gallimard, coll. « Blanche », 1997, p. 139.

[11] Ibid., p. 156.

[12] Houeï-nêng (638-713), le sixième patriarche fondateur de l’école Ch’an du sud, se demande : « Qu’est-ce qu’est le wu-nien, l’absence de pensée ? Voir toutes les choses, pourtant maintenir notre esprit pur de chaque tache et de chaque attachement – celle-ci est l’absence de pensée » cit. in D.T. Suzuki, La dottrina Zen del vuoto mentale, Astrolabio-Ubaldini, Roma, p. 105. (T.d.A.). Takuan Sōhō (1573-1645), maître japonais de l’école Rinzai-shu, écrit : « En réalité, le vrai Soi est le soi qui existait avant la division entre ciel et terre, et avant encore la naissance du père et de la mère. Ce soi est mon soi intérieur, les oiseaux et les animaux, les plantes et les arbres et tous les phénomènes. C’est exactement ce que nous appelons la nature du Bouddha », cit. in Takuan Sōhō, La mente senza catene, Rome, Edizioni Mediterranee, 2010, p. 109 (T.d.A.). Le non-né ou non-produit est un terme forgé par le maître japonais Bankei (1622-1693) pour indiquer l’esprit bouddhique, antérieur à la scission opérée par la conscience.

[13] Cahiers, op. cit., p. 728.

[14] « J’ai l’intention d’écrire un essai sur cet état que j’aime entre tous, et qui est celui de savoir qu’on ne pense pas. La pure contemplation du vide. » Ibid., p. 300.

[15]Ibid., p. 298. À cette occasion, Cioran décrit ainsi son interlocuteur : « Extrêmement intelligent et insaisissable. Son mépris total pour les Occidentaux. J’ai eu nettement l’impression qu’il m’était supérieur, sentiment que je n’ai pas souvent avec les gens d’ici. »

[16] Ibid., p. 364.

[17] Ibid., p. 366.

[18] Ibid., p. 457.

[19] De l’inconvénient d’être né, p. 1281.

[20] Cahiers, op. cit., p. 94.

[21] Ibid., p. 119.

[22] Littéralement « ce qui est ainsi », ou bien, voir les choses telles qu’elles sont. Dans l’interview avec Christian Bussy, réalisée à Paris le 19 février 1973 pour la télévision belge, Cioran argumente : « Je crois effectivement que voir les choses telles qu’elles sont rend la vie presque intolérable. En ce sens que j’ai remarqué que tous les gens qui agissent ne peuvent agir que parce qu’ils ne voient pas les choses telles qu’elles sont. Et moi, parce que je crois avoir vu, disons, en partie les choses comme elles sont, je n’ai pas pu agir. Je suis toujours resté en marge des actes. Alors, est-ce qu’il souhaitable pour les hommes de voir les choses telles qu’elles sont, je ne sais pas. Je crois que les gens en sont généralement incapables. Alors, il est vrai que seul un monstre peut voir les choses telles qu’elles sont. Puisque le monstre, il est sorti de l’humanité ». Le texte nous a été fourni par Christian Bussy, que nous remercions.

[23] Cf. Takuan Sōhō, Op. cit., p. 31.

[24] D.T. Suzuki, Saggi sul buddismo Zen, Rome, Edizioni Mediterranee, 1992, vol. I, p. 282. La peinture à l’encre noire (sumi-e) se produit sur du papier de riz, rêche, mince et assez absorbant, cela ne permet pas d’avoir des mouvements de pinceau hésitants, car il en résulterait des taches: il faut que le peintre agisse soudainement et avec netteté, sans revirements, comme s’il maniait une épée.

[25] Takuan Sōhō, Op. cit., p. 31.

[26] De l’inconvénient d’être né, p. 1289.

[27] Cahiers, op. cit., p. 437.

[28] Ibid., p. 295.

[29] Ibid., pp. 437 et 674.

[30] Izutsu, La filosofia del buddismo zen, Rome, Astrolabio-Ubaldini, 1984, p. 40 (T.d.A.). Le kōan, (en chinois : kung-an), est un terme Zen qui désigne une sorte de problème ou casse-tête, intentionnellement illogique, donné par le maître comme sujet de méditation pour l’élève. Celui-ci, en se tourmentant à cause de cette énigme insoluble, se trouvera bientôt face à une barrière insurmontable, sans issue, jusqu’ il se mette à désespérer de chaque solution logique et discursive possible. Devant l’évidence du vide, la conscience abdique, et se met au niveau de compréhension qu’implique tout être concret, en tant que corps et en tant qu’esprit. Il en résulte la production de la seule réponse possible, qui coïncide avec le retour à la réalité, au flux inconscient de la vie qui depuis toujours nous soutient.

[31] Suivant un célèbre kōan : « Avant qu’une personne n’étudie le Zen, les montagnes sont les montagnes, les eaux sont les eaux. Après un premier aperçu de la vérité du Zen, les montagnes ne sont plus les montagnes, les eaux ne sont plus les eaux. Après l’éveil, les montagnes sont de nouveau des montagnes, les eaux de nouveau des eaux »

[32] Suzuki, La dottrina zen del vuoto mentale, op. cit., p. 91. « La phrase la plus célèbre de Tu-shan était ‘‘Trente coups quand tu peux dire un mot, trente coups quand tu ne peux pas dire un mot !’’ ‘‘Dire un mot’’ c’est une expression presque technique du Zen et signifie n’importe quelle chose démontrée soit par les mots, soit par les gestes, au sujet du fait central du Zen. Dans ce cas ‘‘donner un coup’’ signifie que toutes ces démonstrations ne sont d’aucune utilité. » Ibid.

[33] Interview de Christian Bussy à Cioran, réalisée à Paris le 19 février 1973.

[34] Cahiers, op. cit., p. 642.

[35] D. T. Suzuki, Saggi sul buddismo Zen, Rome, Edizioni Mediterranee, 1992, vol. I, p. 216.

[36] Cf. Leonardo Vittorio Arena, Storia del buddismo Ch’an, Milan, Mondatori, 1998, pp. 190-191.

[37] E.M. Cioran, « Hantise de la naissance », La Nouvelle Revue Française, n° 217, Paris, janvier 1971, p. 15. Il est caractéristique que dans la première version de cet aphorisme, Cioran utilise justement le mot Zen satori, tandis que dans la version suivante publiée dans De l’inconvénient d’être né, il la remplace par le terme de dérivation mystique « suprême ».

[38] L’amour traditionnel pour les fleurs de cerisier est un exemple typique de mono no aware dans le Japon contemporain. Esthétiquement, ces fleurs ne sont pas plus belles que celles du poirier ou du pommier, cependant ils sont les plus appréciés par les japonais pour leur caractère transitoire. En effet, ces fleurs commencent à tomber habituellement une semaine après leur épanouissement. Les fleurs de cerisier font objet d’un véritable culte au Japon, rituellement, toutes les années une foule énorme  envahit les champs pour en admirer la floraison.

[39] Cahiers, op. cit., p. 748.

[40] Cioran, Écartèlement, p. 103 : « On ne peut être content de soi que lorsqu’on se rappelle ces instants où, selon un mot japonais, on a perçu le ah ! des choses. » Cette exclamation reprend l’Entretien avec Léo Gillet : « Ça, on peut le sentir, mais on ne peut pas l’exprimer en paroles, sauf dire : ‘‘Ah ! indéfiniment […] on ne peut pas formuler abstraitement une chose qui doit être vraiment sentie’’ », in Cioran, Entretiens, Paris, Gallimard coll. « Arcades », 1995, p. 94.

[41] Cf. Leonardo Vittorio Arena, Lo spirito del Giappone, Milan, BUR, 2008, pp. 376-377.

[42] Cahiers, op. cit., p. 996.

[43] Ibid., p. 170.

[44] Ibid., p. 568.

[45] De l’inconvénient d’être né, p. 1288.

[46] Cahiers, op. cit., p. 674.

[47] Ibid., p. 323. À ce propos, selon Izutsu : « Le Zen demande vigoureusement que même une telle quantité de conscience du moi soit effacée de l’esprit, de même que finalement tout soit réduit au seul acte de VOIR pur et simple. Le mot ‘‘non-esprit’’, déjà mentionné, se réfère précisément à l’acte pur du VOIR, dans l’état d’une réalisation immédiate et directe », La filosofia del buddismo zen, p. 30.

[48] C’est-à-dire : « quelle est la vérité fondamentale du Zen ? ».

[49] Cfr. Izutsu, La filosofia del buddismo zen, op. cit., p. 160.

[50] De l’inconvénient d’être né, p. 1383.

[51] Cahiers, op. cit., p. 298.

[52] Cioran, Cahier de Talamanca – Ibiza (31 juillet-25 août 1966), Paris, Mercure de France, 2000, p. 30.

[53] Cahiers, op. cit., p. 298.

[54] Cahier de Talamanca, op. cit., p. 13.

[55] Cioban : berger en roumain. Dans la lettre à Arşavir Acterian du 11 juillet 1972, il avoue : « … je serais plus dans le vrai aujourd’hui si j’avais fait une carrière de cioban dans mon village natal plutôt que de me trémousser dans cette métropole de saltimbanques », in Emil Cioran, Scrisori cãtre cei de-acasă, Bucarest, Humanitas, 1995, p. 215 (T.d.A.).

[56] Cahiers, op. cit., p. 101.

[57] Ibid., p. 137.

[58] Ibid., p. 298.

[59] Ibid., p. 101.

[60] Ibid.,  p. 851.

[61] La Raccolta di Lin-chi (Rinzai Roku),  trad. par Ruth Fuller Sasaki, Rome, Astrolabio-Ubaldini, 1985, p. 30.

[62] Verset du poète zen P’ang-yun, cité in Alan W. Watts, The Way of Zen, trad. it, La via dello Zen, Feltrinelli, Milano,  2000, p. 145 (T.d.A.).

[63] Cioran, Aveux et anathèmes, p. 1724.

[64] La Raccolta di Lin-chi, op. cit., p. 46.

[65] Cahiers, op. cit.,  p. 994.

[66] Cioran cite l’anecdote dans ses Cahiers, op. cit., p. 869.

[67] De l’inconvénient d’être né, p. 1396.

[68] Cahiers, op. cit.,  p. 306.

[69].Lettre à Arşavir Acterian du 13 juillet 1986, Cioran, Scrisori cãtre cei de-acasă, op. cit., p. 241(T.d.A.).

00:05 Publié dans Philosophie | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0) | Tags : cioran, philosophie, bouddhisme, zen, roumanie, france | |  del.icio.us | | Digg! Digg |  Facebook

mardi, 30 novembre 2010

Evola on Zen & Everyday Life

Evola on Zen & Everyday Life

Translation anonymous, revised by Greg Johnson

Ex: http://www.counter-currents.com/

Eugen Herrigel
Zen in the Art of Archery
New York: Vintage, 1999
[Zen nell’arte del tirar d’arco (Turin: Rigois, 1956)]

Kakuzo Okakura
The Book of Tea
Stone Bridge Press, 2007
[II Libro del Te (Rome: Fratelli Bocca, 1955)]

Zen_P.jpgThe first of these little books, translated into Italian from German, is unique of its kind, as a direct and universally accessible introduction to the spirit the fundamental disciplines and behavior of the civilization of the Far East, especially Japan. Herrigel is a German professor who was invited to teach philosophy in a Japanese University, and decided to study the traditional spirit of the country in its most typical living forms. He took a special interest in acquiring an understanding of Zen Buddhism, and strange as it may seem, he was told that the best way to do so was to study the traditional practice of Archery. Herrigel therefore untiringly studied that art for no less than five years, and the book describes how his progress therein and his gradual penetration into the essence of Zen proceeded side by side with archery, conditioning one another reciprocally, leading to a deep inner transformation of the author himself.

The essence of Zen as a conception of the world is, as is known, its special interpretation of the state of nirvana which, partly through the influence of Taoism, is understood in Japan not as a state of evanescent ascetic beatitude, but as something indwelling, an inner liberation, a state free from the fevers, the ordeals, the bonds of the ego, a state which may be preserved while engaged in all the activities and in all the forms of everyday life itself. Thanks to it, life as a whole acquires a different dimension; it is understood and lived in a different way. The “absence of the ego” upon which, in conformity with the spirit of Buddhism, Zen insists so strongly, is not however akin to apathy or atony; it gives rise to a higher form of spontaneous action, of assurance, of freedom and serenity in action. This may be compared to a man who holds on convulsively to something and who, when he lets it go, acquires a higher serenity, a superior sense of freedom and assurance.

After calling attention to all these points, the author notes the existence in the Far East of traditional arts that both arise from this freedom of Zen and offer the means for attaining it through the training required to practice them. Strange as it may seem, the Zen spirit dwells in the Far Eastern Arts taught by the Masters of painting, serving tea, arranging flowers, archery, wrestling, fencing, and so forth. All these arts have a ritual aspect. There are, moreover, ineffable aspects thanks to which true mastery in any of these arts cannot be attained unless one has acquired inner enlightenment and transformation of ordinary self-consciousness, which makes mastery a kind of tangible sacrament.

Thus Herrigel tells us how in learning to draw the long bow, little by little, through the problems involved in this art as it is still taught in Japan, he came to the knowledge and the inner understanding that be sought. He realized that archery was not a sport but rather a kind of ritual action and initiation. To acquire a thorough knowledge of it one had to arrive at the elimination of one’s ego, overcome all tension, and achieve a superior spontaneity. Only then was muscular relaxation paradoxically joined to maximum strength; the archer, the bow, and the target became one whole. The arrow flew as if of its own accord and found its target almost without being aimed. Stated in these terms, the mastery attained is a degree of spirituality, or “Zen,” not as theory and philosophy but as actual experience, as a deeper mode of being.

By describing situations of this kind, based on personal experience, Herrigel’s little book is important not only because it introduces the reader to the spirit of an exotic civilization, but also because it enables us to view in a new light some of our own ancient traditions. We know that in antiquity, and to some extent in the Middle Ages also, jealously guarded traditions, elements of religion, rites, and even mysteries were associated with the various arts. There were “goods” for each of these arts and rites of admission to practice them. The initiation to crafts and professions in certain guilds and “collegia” proceeded along parallel lines with spiritual initiation. Thus, to mention a later case, the symbolism proper to the mason’s art of the medieval builders served as the basis for the first Freemasonry, which drew from it the allegories for the proceedings of the “Great Work.” It may therefore be that in all this the West once knew something of what has been preserved to this day in the Far East in such teachings as “the way of the bow” or “the art of the sword,” held to be identical with the “way of Zen” in a singularly positive form of Buddhism.

The Author of the second little book, to the Italian edition of which we now turn, is a Japanese interested above all in aesthetic problems, who has studied the modern schools of art in Europe and America but has remained faithful to his own traditions and has engaged in a resolute and efficient action in his own country against the introduction of Europeanizing tendencies. His Il Libro del Te confirms in the central part devoted more closely to the subject under consideration, what we have just been saying.

There have been close connections in the Far East between Zen, the “tea schools” and the “tea cult” (the term used by the author to designate this is “teaism,” an infelicitous word given that “theism” indicates in our countries every religion based on the notion of a personal God). Indeed it is claimed that the tea ceremonial as elaborated in Japan in the 16th century was derived from the much more ancient Zen rite of drinking tea from one single cup before the statue of Bodhidharma. Generally speaking this ceremonial rite is one of the many forms in which the Taoist principle of “completeness in the fragment” is expressed. Lu-wu in his book Cha-ching had already asserted that in preparing the tea the same order and the same harmony must he observed that from the Taoist standpoint reigns in all things.

The author adds that it is part of the religion of the art of life. “The tea became a pretext for the enjoyment of moments of meditation and happy detachment in which the host and his guests took part.” Both the site and structure of the rooms built for this special purpose—the tea-rooms (sukiya)—follow the ritualistic principle; they are symbolic. The variegated and partly irregular path that, within the framework of the Ear Eastern art of gardening, leads to the tea-room is emblematic of that preliminary state of meditation that leads to breaking all ties to the outer world, to detachment from the worries and interests of ordinary life.

The style of the room itself is of refined simplicity. In spite of the bare and poverty-stricken appearance it may offer to Western eyes, it follows in every detail a precise intention. The selection and the use of the right materials call for infinite care and attention to detail, so much so that the cost of a perfect tea room may be greater than a whole casement. The term “sukiya”—the author says—originally meant “the house of imagination,” the allusion being not to wandering fancies but to the faculty of detaching oneself from the empirical world, of recollecting oneself and taking refuge in an ideal world.

Other expressions used by the Masters of Tea rite are “the house of emptiness” and “the house of asymmetry.” The first of these expressions traces back directly to the notion of the Void proper to Taoist metaphysics (and here we may recall also the part played by this notion, almost as a key or background in the “aerial” element of Far Eastern painting). The expression “house of asymmetry” refers to the fact that some detail is always intentionally left unfinished and care is taken to arrange things to give the impression of a lacuna. The reason for this is that the sense of completeness and harmony must not arise from something already fixed and repeatable, but must be suggested by an exterior incompleteness which impels one to conceive them inwardly by means of a mental act.

The author deals also of the connections existing between the art of tea and that of selecting and arranging the flowers in the sukiya, here again in conformity with symbolism and a special sensibility. Often one single flower rightly selected and placed is the only ornament of the “house of emptiness.”

Lastly the author reminds us that a special philosophy of daily life is accessory to the tea ritual, so much so that in current Japanese parlance a man lacking in sensibility to the tragi-comical sides of personal life is said to be “lacking in tea,” while those who give way to uncontrolled impulses and feelings are said to have “too much tea.” This brings one back to that ideal of balanced, subtle, and calm superiority, which plays so large apart in the general attitude of the man of the Far East.

If we think of the wide use made of tea in the West, and of the circumstances of this use in our social life, more especially among fashionable circles, it would be natural to draw comparisons which would show that, even in this seemingly commonplace field, as on the plane of ideas, all things of the Orient are diminished when imported into the Western world.

East and West, vol. 7, no. 3, October 1956, pp. 274–76

00:05 Publié dans Traditions | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0) | Tags : tradition, traditions, zen, japon, traditionalisme, julius evola | |  del.icio.us | | Digg! Digg |  Facebook

lundi, 31 août 2009

Le bouddhisme martial

staff%20fighting%201%20b&w%20web.jpg

 

 

Le bouddhisme martial

Examinons le rôle que peut parfois jouer le bouddhisme en temps de guerre, en prenant nos exemples dans l’histoire du Japon entre l’annexion de Taïwan (1895) et la défaite de 1945. En général, on va chercher les racines religieuses de l’impérialisme japonais dans le shintô, terme mixte sino-japonais signifiant la “voie des dieux” et dérivé du chinois “shendao”. Le terme japonais exact étant “kami no michi”, où l’on reconnait le terme “kami”, signifiant “dieu”, comme dans “kamikaze”, le “Vent des dieux”, allusion à la tempête qui coula en 1281 la flotte d’invasion mongole. Les pilotes “kamikaze”, prêts à se suicider dans l’action, devaient imiter cette tempête salvatrice en se jettant sur les porte-avions américains. Le “shintô” est en fait l’équivalent japonais du chamanisme, l’art d’entrer en contact avec les esprits. Cette religion, éminemment nationale, rend un culte à la dynastie impériale qu’elle pose comme descendante de la déesse solaire Amaterasu.

 

Pourtant, le bouddhisme, religion bien plus intellectuelle,  a apporté un soutien plus étayé à l’impérialisme japonais que le shintô, religion animiste. Les maîtres connus du bouddhisme zen, comme Suzuki Teitarô, alias Daisetsu (= “Grande Simplicité”), qui allait apporter la culture zen aux Etats-Unis après 1945, et Kodo Sawaki, le maître de Taisen Deshimaru, qui apportera, lui, le zen en Europe, enseignent tous deux la supériorité des Japonais et plaident pour leur droit à dominer les autres. Citons aussi Yamada Mumon, qui exprimera peut-être quelques vagues regrets, mais qui, encore dans ses vieux jours, avait déclaré que les autres pays asiatiques devaient se montrer reconnaissants à l’égard du Japon, parce que celui-ci, par son “auto-sacrifice”, avait ouvert la voie à leur décolonisation. Le bastion de la pensée pro-impérialiste a été l’école de Kyoto, qui combinait le bouddhisme à des éléments de philosophie occidentale.

 

National-socialisme et bouddhisme

 

Peut-on avancer l’hypothèse que l’impérialisme bouddhiste a trouvé quelque écho chez l’allié du Japon pendant la seconde guerre mondiale, l’Allemagne national-socialiste? Le régime national-socialiste avait interdit les “sectes” (cette législation inspire aujourd’hui la politique face aux sectes qu’adoptent la France et la Belgique). Contrairement à tous les mythes qui circulent aujourd’hui et qui veulent nous faire croire à des “racines occultes du nazisme”, le régime a fait dissoudre toutes les associations religieuses marginales et excentriques: l’odinisme, la franc-maçonnerie, l’anthroposophie de Rudolf Steiner, les petits clubs d’astrologie et les officines de diseuses de bonne aventure. Tous étaient frappés d’illégalité et, à partir de 1941, leurs adeptes étaient passibles du camp de concentration. Il y avait toutefois une exception: le bouddhisme qui, dans des cercles restreints, pouvait se déployer librement. Certains analystes critiques de cette époque en concluent qu’il y a un lien étroit entre bouddhisme et national-socialisme. Disons plutôt que l’exception faite en faveur du bouddhisme s’explique par un geste diplomatique destiné à ne pas irriter l’allié japonais.

 

Cependant, les faits l’attestent: il y avait, en Allemagne, à cette époque, un intérêt réel pour les aspects martiaux du bouddhisme, notamment par le biais des travaux d’Eugen Herrigel (“Le zen dans l’art du tir à l’arc”) et du Comte Karlfried von Dürckheim, que l’on trouve encore et toujours dans toute librairie “New Age”. La dimension martiale, mise en exergue dans cette Allemagne des années 30 et 40, n’est pas une simple projection des idées quiritaires, à la mode en Europe à cette époque, sur une tradition d’Extrême Orient. Les maîtres du bouddhisme reconnaissent pleinement qu’une telle dimension martiale existe dans leur religion; par exemple, le livre de Deshimaru, “Zen Way to Martial Arts” nous révèle un bouddhisme pratique, qui table sur la plus extrême simplicité et qui abandonne toute philosophie et toute dévotion; cette variante-là du bouddhisme a été la religion choisie par la caste féodale des samourais. Ce n’est pas un phénomène exclusivement japonais: la Chine avait, elle aussi, une longue tradition d’arts martiaux pratiquée dans les monastères bouddhistes; d’après la légende, cette tradition avait été importée en Chine par un moine venu d’Inde méridionale, Bodhidharma.

 

La mort n’est pas un événement grave

 

En quoi consiste le lien entre bouddhisme et arts martiaux, lien qui s’inscrit clairement dans la durée? Bouddha lui-même est issu de la caste des guerriers, mais il renonça à ce statut lorsqu’il  opta pour la vie d’ascète. Il se tint alors éloigné de toute forme de violence, notamment quand il n’entreprit rien contre une armée qui s’avançait pour exterminer son propre clan, celui des Shaka. Ou lorsqu’il para à une attaque contre sa personne sans faire usage de la violence, en attirant la brute, qui lui en voulait, dans un débat fécond. Pourtant, indubitablement, cet ascétisme avait une composante martiale. L’institution des ascètes itinérants est clairement dérivée de ces groupes de jeunes gens qui cherchaient l’aventure, en marge de la société établie. Dans ces marges, ils se soumettaient mutuellement à toutes sortes d’épreuves. Ces épreuves constituaient le lien entre l’exercice des arts militaires et les pénitences physiques imposées par la religion. Ce n’est donc pas un hasard s’ils ont attiré des hommes issus de la caste des guerriers comme Vardhamana Mahavira, fondateur du jaïnisme, et Siddhaartha Gautama, le futur Bouddha. 

 

Outre ce lien historique probable, il y a deux éléments fondamentaux du bouddhisme qui rend cette religion intéressante pour les samourais et les autres guerriers. D’abord, premier élément, la méditation aiguise véritablement l’attention sur le “hic et nunc”, sur l’ici et le maintenant. Elle postule le calme et la concentration totale en excluant la peur, les affects et les intérêts. C’est une telle disposition d’esprit dont le guerrier a besoin lorsqu’il fait face au danger et à la mort. Ensuite, deuxième élément, le bouddhisme a apporté la doctrine de la réincarnation en Chine et au Japon. Cette doctrine relativise la mort, car mourir ne signifie finalement pas autre chose que d’ôter ses vieux habits pour revenir demain, revêtu d’autres. Animés par cette idée, les guerriers trouvent plus supportable le souci, l’angoisse, qu’ils éprouvent quand ils s’avancent sur le champ de bataille. Mourir n’est pas vraiment une catastrophe et tuer n’est pas vraiment un crime, car qui meurt aujourd’hui revient quand même demain.

 

Le bouddhisme zen du beatnik Alan Watts

 

Caractéristique du “Grand Véhicule”, l’un des trois principaux courants du bouddhisme auquel appartient aussi la tradition zen: l’accent mis sur l’altruisme. D’une doctrine qui se focalise sur la “compassion” et sur la volonté de libérer tous les êtres conscients de leurs souffrances et de leur ignorance, on est passé, par distorsion, par une sorte de chemin de traverse,  à une doctrine du sacrifice de soi, comme par exemple, celui du samourai pour son seigneur. Le Japon moderne a interprété cette doctrine comme celle du sacrifice du soldat mobilisé pour son peuple et pour son empereur.

 

Malgré tout ces  antécédents, on s’étonnera de constater que le zen est devenu très à la mode aux Etats-Unis dans les années 50, alors que les Américains venaient de perdre des centaines de milliers de soldats dans la guerre contre le Japon. Ce sera surtout le beatnik Alan Watts qui travaillera à acclimater le zen aux Etats-Unis: le “beat zen” devait constituer une alternative fraîche et joyeuse aux religions alourdies par un ballast dogmatique trop important. Le “beat zen” était pur, était innocent. Cette attitude est typique de la réception favorable qui a toujours été accordée au bouddhisme en Occident moderne.

 

“Moestasjrik”/ “’t Pallieterke”.

(article tiré de “’t Pallierterke”, Anvers, 30 août 2006; trad. franç.: Robert Steuckers / 2009).