Ok

En poursuivant votre navigation sur ce site, vous acceptez l'utilisation de cookies. Ces derniers assurent le bon fonctionnement de nos services. En savoir plus.

jeudi, 09 juin 2016

Frankfurt School Revisionism

ISFdddd.jpg

Frankfurt School Revisionism

Editor’s Note:

This is the transcript by V. S. of Richard Spencer’s Vanguard Podcast interview of Jonathan Bowden about the Frankfurt School and Cultural Marxism, released on February 16, 2012. You can listen to the podcast here [2]

Richard Spencer: Hello, everyone, and welcome back to Vanguard! And welcome back, Jonathan Bowden, as well, my partner in thought crime! How are you, Jonathan?

Jonathan Bowden: Yes, pleased to be here!

RS: Well, I mentioned thought crime. That’s quite an apt term for the subject of discussion this week and that is cultural Marxism, critical theory, and the Frankfurt School. Those are, of course, three distinct things, but they’re obviously interrelated as well and I think they can be discussed as one.

Jonathan, to get the discussion started I think it’d be a good idea to look at cultural Marxism historically and ask where it’s coming from and, in particular, what was the milieu like in interwar Germany where so many of these figures like Adorno and Benjamin and Horkheimer arose.

JB: Yes, I think you’ve got waves of feminism, as we discussed in a previous podcast, and now you’ve got waves of Marxism or waves within waves. Marxism, when it started out of course, had a lot of cultural theory attached to it, and Marx was heavily influenced by utopian socialist theory early on in the so-called Paris Manuscripts and that sort of thing. That was all junked, and Marxism became a heavily economically-concentric discourse, very reductive economically. An alleged science, now regarded 150 years on from those events as a sort of pseudo-science. This remained in play into the early stages of the 20th century, and Marxist parties tended to replicate that at a lower sort of political level.

But in and around the First World War with Gramsci’s ideas, which he wrote down in The Prison Notebooks when he was interned, a type of cultural discourse began to emerge whereby Gramsci had the idea that the superstructure and the base of society were disconnected so that things could exist at a cultural level which were not totally economically determined and couldn’t be held completely to be economically managed. Also, in order to discuss them you needed a wide field of reference.

Partly this was the desire of frustrated intellectuals who wanted to use Marxism. They also wanted to discuss culture, which was their abiding source of interest, but it was also an attempt to broaden the appeal of Marxian ideas. In the ’20s and ’30s in Germany, schools of writers began to emerge that were only concerned with man and society, in John Plamenatz’s term, and were not concerned really with econometrics or economic determinism at all and were only Marxian in this newfangled way and had a heavily theoretical take on life.

I remember a Marxian deconstructionist lecturer once telling me 30 years ago that the bourgeois goes to life with common sense but the Marxist with his theory. This theoretical overload whereby everything in life has to be theorized and every text that one comes across has to be subjected to critical analysis or critical theory gave rise to this school that was concerned with the examination of literary texts, with cultural anthropology, with sociology, with social psychology, with adaptations of most of the social sciences to life and were only vaguely concerned with economics.

Neumann_Behemoth_Structure_Practice.jpgFor instance, Franz Neumann’s large book, Behemoth, which is a Marxian analysis of the economics of National Socialist Germany, was one of the few works of economics that was ever written that came out of the Frankfurt School. Most of it was concerned with cultural critique and critical cultural theory involving very outlandish areas such as sociology of music, which was a particular area of Adorno’s concern.

RS: Let me jump in here and mention a few things. It’s worth pointing out that the Marxist project had failed on its own terms by the 1930s in the sense that Gramsci – and I think that some of his writings weren’t really known until much later in the ’50s – was put in prison by Fascists. In Italy, the Fascists had won, and they had defeated a lot of the Marxist parties. They had some proletarian support, I’m sure, and things like this. The whole Marxian project and economic determinism of capitalism creating these contradictions that create some sort of apocalyptic scenario and the proletariat rises up, that really hadn’t happened.

And also with Frankfurt School members, at least ostensibly they were highly critical of what the Soviet Union had become. The Soviet Union wasn’t really it. It wasn’t the utopia. It was maybe something they deemed a perversion.

So, those were certainly important factors, and also it’s worth pointing out that if we’re talking about the Frankfurt School milieu of Adorno and Benjamin you had people that probably weren’t that interested in economics. Benjamin, some of his great writings are on 19th-century culture in one book, but aphoristic writings about life in the modern age, and certainly Adorno was sort of a classical music snob. He was very interested in Beethoven and something like that.

Anyway, it’s a very interesting milieu that all of this came out of. But anyway, Jonathan, maybe you can talk about two things. Where was it going and what was really the essence of their cultural project?

JB: I think the essence of their cultural project was to revolutionarily change the way in which Western culture was thought about and received. So, it was a grandstanding ambition, at any rate. It was to totally change the way in which Western culture was perceived by those who had created it and by those who were the receptors of its creation. I think this involved, basically, an attempt to go back to the theory that pre-existed the French Revolution, because the big book by Horkheimer and Adorno, Dialectic of Enlightenment, is really about the pre-revolutionary theories and is a critique of the Enlightenment from the Left, not the Right.

But they begin by going back, as radical theorists always do, to first principles and criticize the Enlightenment. Their criticism of the Enlightenment is essentially that it is an attempt by scientific man or would-be scientific man to place himself at the heart of the universe to dominate nature and in so doing enact an enormous revenge. The great theory about Fascism in Dialectic of Enlightenment by Adorno and Horkheimer is that Fascism represents the revenge of a violated nature and is the revenge of a sociobiological current that would not exist if there weren’t attempts to entrap nature within the nexus of progress.

So, already you’re getting a strange idea here. You’re getting a sort of anti-progressive Leftism. You’re getting Leftism which is critical of capitalism and modernity whereas classical Marxism is extraordinarily in favor of capitalism and modernity but just wished to succeed it with another state: socialism and late modernity.

RS: Right. Or hypermodernity.

JB: Hypermodernity, yes.

RS: Well, let’s talk a little bit about this because, as we were talking about off-air when we were first thinking about doing a podcast on this, the mainstream conservative movement, at least in America, is actually somewhat familiar with the Frankfurt School. At least, its intellectuals are and they think they know it as the source of the 1960s and political correctness and so on and so forth. But I always feel that I don’t recognize Cultural Marxism in the way that it’s often depicted by movement ideologues.

So, let’s talk a little about this, put a little pressure on the idea of Enlightenment and dialectic of enlightenment. One of the key scenes, if you will, in that book, which I guess is worth reading but it’s an extremely difficult text to read . . . Just as an aside, I met this German when I was in graduate school and he mentioned that he only read Adorno in English translation because even in the original German language it’s extremely dense.

theodor-adorno.jpgBut anyway, Adorno and Horkheimer aren’t just seeing that Fascism is some reaction of capitalist forces against the Communist wave or something like that. They’re seeing Fascism as coming out of a bourgeois world, and they’re seeing something really wrong at the heart of bourgeois modernity, and I think they picture this in the form of Odysseus who wants to be bound at the mast and is going to renounce man’s more natural being and instead embrace a stern, hard modern man. There’s a world to be made, and we’ve got to go build it.

So, maybe talk a little more about this concept of enlightenment on the part of Horkheimer and Adorno and how this led to a kind of New Left. One that might even have some conservative tendencies in the sense of the abuses against nature.

JB: Yes, it’s an odd one actually, because it’s a sort of would-be foundational Leftism strongly influenced by Hegel, strongly influenced by the early Marx, strongly influenced by Plekhanov who taught Lenin a lot of his Marxism and was a Menshevik, technically, strongly influenced by Gramsci, whose texts would have been known to Marxian intellectuals at that time, and strongly influenced by the “culture of critique,” you could say.

Instead of seeing the Enlightenment as progressive, they see the Enlightenment as an Endarkenment, as a period that’s propriety to bourgeois revolutions which may not be entirely progressive and were afflicted with terror. So, they have a differentiated appreciation of these things. They also have to find the enemy somewhere else, because if the enemy is not really as classical Marxism depicted it and its alleged revolution led to Leninism and Stalinism they have to find their enemy somewhere else, and the enemy for the New Left influenced by the Frankfurt School is alienation. Alienation from modernity, alienation from culture which is capitalist in its predicates, alienation from what they call the culture industry, whereby modern man is totally trapped within the cultural space created by the economy and where there is no room at all for, in conservative terms, folk-based authenticity.

They would never use those sorts of terms, of course, and they would consider them to be reactionary, hubristic terms, but because there is a cultural pessimism, particularly about the cultural life of the masses under capitalist economics and even under socialist economics in the Eastern Bloc to a lesser extent, there is an opening out to vistas of cultural conservatism. This is the Frankfurt School’s inner secret.

I remember professor Roger Scruton, the conservative intellectual, about 25 years ago now included conservative features of the Frankfurt School under one of the headings of cultural conservatism in his dictionary of political philosophy and this caused a little bit of a stir.

But when you look at the fact that, although they sort of found Wagner rather loathsome in relation to what they regarded it as leading to, the classical sort of Schumann, Schubert, Mozart, Beethoven, Bruckner, sort of icons of Germanic, Middle European culture are exactly the icons that in particular they are the most in favor of. Just as classical Marxism is in favor of bourgeois politics and revolutionism over and against the mercantilism and semi-feudalism that preceded it as it looked to the socialism that it thought was going to replace it, they are in favor of radical bourgeois subjectivity epitomized by Beethoven, in their view, and his symphonies, which proclaims the sort of seniority of the bourgeois subject at a moment when the bourgeois subject feels itself to be empowered and all-conquering and the fleeting identification of the meta-subjectivity of the subject that Beethoven accords Napoleon Bonaparte, as he sees him to be an embodiment of the will of bourgeois man.

All of these ideas are there in Adorno’s sociology of music, which is in some ways a sort of Marxian cultural appreciation of great Western icons which could be considered as slightly rueful and slightly conservative with a small “c.” It’s as if he arrives at certain tentative cultural conclusions which are themselves outside of the nature of the theory which he’s allegedly espousing. He’s certainly not alienated by these sorts of musicologists at all.

The point, of course, is that they are the springboard for the modernist experiments of Schoenberg, Webern, and Berg, but that was a radical thing to say when they said it. That’s now regarded as an old hat statement in classical musical criticism. But that’s what they were with Mahler as an intermediary. Mahler between Bruckner and Schoenberg. That sort of thinking and a rejection of Sibelius, who was insulted quite severely by Adorno and the adoration of early to late Schoenberg as the future of music. This became the standard repertoire. The irony is it’s in culture that that theory had its most direct impact. Politically, they’ve had very little impact. It’s in the politics of culture that they’ve not conquered the board but they entered the fabric of what now exists at university level.

RS: Yes, I agree. Even in the fact of criticizing Wagner, the fact that you treat him as this major figure that must be confronted is way reactionary and has conservative tendencies. I mean, I don’t see anyone in the contemporary conservative movement to have much interest in these Romantic titans at all in that sense.

Let’s talk a little bit about the Frankfurt School’s journey to America. It’s quite an interesting one. The Frankfurt School was almost entirely Jewish. I don’t know if there were actually any exceptions to that. There might be.

frankfurt-school.jpg

JB: No, there aren’t. It’s unique in that sense. It’s almost stereotypical. Adorno was half Jewish, and a few of the others were this and that, but basically yes they were almost in toto.

RS: Right. And not only were they Jews but they were Marxists, so needless to say they weren’t accepted in the Third Reich, although they weren’t really directly . . . I guess the Frankfurt School was shut down. I don’t think any of them were, at least personally, persecuted. I know Adorno was even traveling back to Germany on occasion at that time. But anyway, they did move and they went to America and there was actually a kind of exile community in which I believe Schoenberg and Thomas Mann and Theodor Adorno were all living together in a Los Angeles suburb or something like that. It’s quite interesting!

But they also were received, ironically, by the elite. A lot of the Frankfurt School members actually worked for the OSS, which would eventually become the CIA during the Second World War, and they were also getting grants. I believe Adorno got a Rockefeller grant working at Columbia University. They definitely had a reception by the more elite American opinions.

Was it the Rockefeller grant that actually sponsored The Authoritarian Personality?

JB: Yes, that’s right.

RS: Yeah. So, let’s talk a little about this, the next stage of their journey when they became Americans.

JB: Yes, the American stage was interesting because in many ways it contradicts the pure theorizing that they were into, because, although they were given grants and cultural access by these people and seen as sort of honorific rebels against Fascism who had to be supported in the war of ideas, they had to change and water down their theory. They also had to adopt a lot more empirical studies, which was anathema to people like Adorno who hated empiricism. But, of course, empiricism is the Anglo-American way of looking at things. They had to adapt or die, basically. They had to adapt and they had to come up with theoretically-based nostrums that could lead to epidemiological testing and criminological types of testing and almost tick-box forms which ended in the slightly reductive program known as the pursuit of an authoritarian personality with this notorious F-Scale. F for Fascism.

Many of these tests are regarded as slightly embarrassing now and are quite redundant and also not very much used, because although certain people do have more authoritarian casts of personality than others it’s not really a predicate for political positioning because there’s all sorts of hard social democratic positions and authoritarian far Left positions, for example.

RS: Right.

JB: Which go with more authoritarian character structure and don’t align into the F-Scale which these people would like to make out.

However, they were very influential in the rebuilding of Germany after the Second World War, and this is where their theory enters into the mainstream in many ways, because one of their great points is, “What do you do in a democratic society with all the institutions of control, with all the valences of state and other forms of oppressiveness?” as they would see it: the military-industrial complex, the people who work in the security services, the people who work analyzing information on behalf of those services, the people who work in the large prisons and psychiatric environments that exist in all societies, particularly in Western societies?

They always had the view that these people needed to be watched in a way and needed to be prevented from having some of the natural affinities that they would otherwise have if you let them outside of the remit of your theory. This idea that you almost watched the authoritarian gatekeepers in society for signs of “incorrectness” has entered into the mainstream. Very much so.

RS: Yes, I agree that the conservative movement, the mainstream view of the Frankfurt School, that view is really one of Adorno and The Authoritarian Personality. That’s where their criticism really fits, but of course there’s so much more. But that’s certainly a way where you see critical theorists most directly attacking normal bourgeois people. If you have some, what we might call, healthy patriotic opinions that’s high up on the F-Scale.

JB: That’s right, yes.

RS: So, I think in some ways The Authoritarian Personality is probably Adorno and the rest of them at their most cartoonish or something, and it’s not really the most interesting.

JB: That’s right, and there’s a sort of theory by explicators of that school, like Martin Jay and others, that what they’re well known for, such as the F-Scale and so on which was really a concession to their friends and to the people that were giving them grants because what really interested them was this extraordinarily elaborate theory whereby everything in life, particularly in cultural life, was theorized in books like Negative Dialectics by Adorno and Aesthetic Theory, which was unfinished at his death and dedicated to Samuel Beckett, and his support for elements of the avant-garde in the counter-culture during the 1960s, which is a perverse Marxian support because it’s not based on the fact that it’s radical and that it’s coming from the age and that it’s countering that which exists formally, although there’s a little bit of that.

The reason he supports these things is that he believes that the cultural industry is so monolithic, the culture of entertainment and the degradation of the masses is so absolute that only in these little fissures and these tiny, little spaces which are opened up by the critical avant-garde, who often deny easy understanding and deny mediation and deny the audience the collateral of a closure at the end of a piece so that people go away happy or satisfied and that sort of thing, what they are doing is opening a space for genuine culture to exist. That’s why he dedicated it to Beckett, you see.

So, underneath a lot of this theorizing there is a pessimistic despair, a sort of morphology of despair, and that’s very unusual for a Leftist position. It’s usually associated with a Spenglerian, conservative cultural disdain and pessimism for the degradation of the masses under all forms of life and that wish the life of culture could extend and be deeper and be more transvaluated than it is.

mass-culture-and-criticism-of-the-frankfurt-school-8-638.jpg

RS: Right. You know, this is all quite interesting and at the risk of pushing this Adorno as conservative idea too far, actually recently there was a book of his music criticism. I guess not too recent. It was a book of translations and probably published in 2004 or so. I remember reading it, and he had an interesting essay where he in some ways rethought Wagner and had many positive things to say about Wagner. Believe it or not, he actually had positive things to say about Houston Stewart Chamberlain in the sense that Houston Stewart Chamberlain was a racialist thinker, a god of the far Right, racialist Right, and he said that he saw that one of his reactions against the culture of England and his Romantic embrace of Germany was a kind of reaction against the tyranny of industrialization and that he imagined a more unalienated, authentic world in Germany and that almost these Right-wing strivings were that reaction against capitalism or something. So, again, there is a lot of complexity to all these people and they’re not easily pigeon-holed.

I do want to talk about the 1960s, but before that let’s just put a little more pressure on the culture industry because I think that’s a very useful term for us. I think that’s a term we should be using and maybe even using it in a lot of the same ways that Adorno did. But maybe just talk a little bit more about that idea of the culture industry, what it is, and what Adorno was seeing in mid-20th century America.

JB: Yes, he basically had the idea that the masses were totally degraded by a capitalist and market-driven culture whereby from advertising through to popular cinema to the popular television that was beginning and that would replace cinema and add to it and was an extension of it you have a totally seamless environment in which the masses live which today would be characterized by the popular internet, by the big TV channels, by MTV, by pop music videos, by pop music in all of its various forms.

Don’t forget, Adorno was extraordinarily scathing about jazz, which is regarded as deeply unprogressive and his disgust and distaste for jazz is almost visceral.

RS: Racist!

JB: Yes, almost. In contemporary terms and the terms of the New Left, there is this sort of despairing mid-20th century Viennese intellectual who despises the culture of the masses and that comes very close to an elitist position. It may be a Left-wing elitist position, but it’s an elitist position nonetheless, and once you admit elitism in any area, even if it’s only the cultural one, cultural selectivity, you begin to adopt ramifications elsewhere that are unstoppable.

Although he could never be seen as a neo-conservative figure — these are people who believe that the family is a gun in the hands of the bourgeoisie and that criminality is directly proportionate to its punishment — in other words, you get more criminality because you punish people who are only victims anyway — so don’t forget, these are the sorts of conceits that the Frankfurt School believes in, but the very complexity of their analysis alienates them from populist Left-wing politics and alienates them from easy sloganeering, which is why they’ve been taken up by intellectuals and yet not by mainstream Leftist political movements because their work is just too difficult, it’s too abstruse, it’s too obsessed with fine art and high culture, particularly musical but also in the cinema.

Going back to an analyst called Kracauer in the 1920s, the intellectual analysis of Weimar cinema and expressionist cinema at that was very important to them and they saw that time of cinema’s use of the unconscious, as people would begin to call it later in the century after Freud’s cultural influence, led them into slightly interesting and creative cultural vistas that are not simple and are not reducible to political slogans, but they do ultimately tend to a type of rather pessimistic ultra-Leftist postmodernism.

exilJY8hOL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

RS: Yes. Well, let’s talk about the 1960s and the New Left and the hippies and the ’68 violent protests and so on and so forth.

What do you think the connections are between the two of them? I know that supposedly — I wasn’t there, of course — in Berkeley in 1968, they were chanting, “Marx, Mao, Marcuse!” Herbert Marcuse was, of course, from the same milieu as Adorno. He was a Hegelian professor and had an upper bourgeois Jewish background. He remained in America. Adorno would return to Central Europe, but he remained, and he is writing books like Eros and Civilization that were a kind of Marxian-Freudian liberation philosophy kind of thing that the future was about polymorphous perversity. These kinds of things. And certainly very different from Adorno’s more kind of fastidious bourgeois nature.

So, what are the connections between the youth movement of the 1960s and the Frankfurt School? Because in some ways it’s strange bedfellows. It’s different generations. The hippies and anti-war protestors probably couldn’t spell Hegel. A very wide gulf between the people like Adorno and these new kids. So, what are the connections? Do you think as the conservative movement would like to believe that the Frankfurt School were kind of the prophets of sick 1968 or is it a little more difficult?

JB: They are and they aren’t. I think that what happened is intermediate theorists emerged who are not as complicated and whose work could be assimilated to political struggle and sloganeering.

Marcuse is that example. Marcuse wrote several books, the most prominent of which is One-Dimensional Man and Eros and Civilization. One of which is a full-on Left-American attack on modern corporate America, where he anathematizes what will come to be known as the military-industrial complex and what was called the welfare-warfare state whereby welfare is paid in order to keep the masses bedded down and at the same time the perfect society is always engineered out of existence by endless wars in the Second and Third World which are always for the prospect of peace, but the peace never arrives, and there’s always just another war just around the corner, and, of course, the wars are to make profits for the military-industrial complex which is increasingly considered to be the most advanced capitalist part of America in which the political class is totally embedded.

RS: Right. So, what you’re saying is that they were absolutely correct.

JB: Of course, there are many similarities on the other side politically, because Harry Elmer Barnes edited a very large volume called Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace, which is very similar from a revisionist sort of school whether isolationist or American nationalist or American libertarian. The people who contributed to that book had a very similar analysis to the one that Marcuse would have of American foreign policy.

Of course, this was occurring in the era of the Cold War when the threat was seen to be the Soviet Union and, to a lesser extent, Maoist China and by arguing for pacifism and isolation you’re arguing for Communist victory elsewhere in the world by the logic of power politics. That’s how Cold War warriors and anti-Communists would have responded to the Marcuse front.

But Marcuse enabled Frankfurt School-related ideas to be politically assimilated by the growing forces of the student New Left, and that’s why they used him as the theorist of choice, because he’s exportable in student terms. He also put himself forward as a student leader, at least theoretically, something which the other Frankfurters were too fey and too theoretical and too abstract and abstruse ever to do. They never would have thought students would listen to their lectures even if they were talking Marxian analysis. Adorno, of course, died as a result of a student action in Germany in the late 1960s when the podium was stormed by some action front hippies or yippies who embraced Adorno — whether they had flowers in their hair, metaphorically, I’m not too sure — and they chanted that as an institution “Adorno is dead,” and Adorno collapsed and had a heart attack relatively soon afterwards and died.

RS: Oh gosh.

JB: This is taken as a sort metaphorization in a way that despite his sort of would-be leadership role of the theorist in relation to these people they were two different universes and the Frankfurt School intellectuals were deeply shocked actually that the West German popular press, particularly the center Right press, held them responsible morally for the emergence of terrorist organizations in West Germany, such as the Baader-Meinhof which later morphed into the Red Army Faction or RAF.

It’s only, of course, come out retrospectively during the latter stages of the Cold War and after the wall came down that the Stasi when the traditional sources of power in East Germany were heavily behind the RAF gave them military expertise and explosives and told them which sites to attack and so on, so that they were as much an extension of the oldest parts of the old Left as they were of the newest parts of the New Left.

Nevertheless, theorists are not always insightful about how the world will use their theory and the Frankfurt School is a classic example of ivory tower intellectuals who partly get a little bit broken up and mangled on the wheel of history.

But Marcuse is an intermediate speaker who the student Left are able to make use of because they can understand what he’s saying. Adorno and Horkheimer and Löwenthal are too abstract, basically. They’re on their own as theorists.

frankfurt-school-theory-15-638.jpg

RS: Yeah. Jonathan, to bring the discussion to a close, what do you think is the legacy of these thinkers? In some ways, this is a very big question, because I’m also kind of asking what is the legacy of the New Left and all of this and what is political correctness today. What does it mean and how is it connected with these 20th-century Marxisms?

JB: Yes, this is a difficult one because it’s so diffuse. Yet what I think has happened is they’ve changed the entire temperature which existed, particularly at the university level and amorphously the general media level that feeds out of that at the higher end. What’s happened is that once they lost the hard Left accretions of sympathy for the Soviet Union — witness a text like Marcuse’s Soviet Marxism, which although very short is extremely critical and he’d had been sent to a psychiatric unit or put in a camp for a text like that if he had produced that inside one of those societies, as Marcuse well knew.

You’ve got this great sort of uniformity and diffuseness of the contemporary Left which has collapsed into liberalism, seamlessly taken parts of its agenda over, is no longer associated with apologetic statements about Stalinism, distances itself from all Left-wing atrocities and has critiques of those as well, is part of the seamless liberal-Leftist course that straddles the center and goes right out to the softer reaches of the far Left, bifurcated from the hard Left beyond it.

In all of these institutions, Frankfurt School views play a role. They play a role in defeating the culture of conservatism in all areas: racial and ethnic, criminological and social, areas such as police studies, PhDs written about the prison service, modern theories about cinema. In all of these areas, in cultural studies is a discourse which has only emerged from art colleges in the last 20 years, which is heavily saturated with Frankfurt School-ish types of ideas.

You see the deconstruction and the breaking down of the prior cultural conservatism. They are the intellectual tip of the liberal society which has stepped away from the conservative societies of the 1950s and 1960s.

Up until the ’60s in the West, you had largely a stereotypical center Right to Rightish conservative society, polity, academy, media, and culture, and after that you have a step change to a liberal instead of a conservative society, media, culture, and cultural disseminating strata. This has continued throughout the decades since the 1960s. You’ve had about 50 years now. So, you have a situation where over this 50 year period throughout all of the institutions that matter soft Left theory, theory without hard edges and without endorsement of anti-humanist crimes committed by the ultra-Left all over the world, has become the default position for many people in the arts, in psychology, in medical practice, in psychiatric practice, in nearly all institutions of the state. With the exception of the military and the raw force-based criterion, the areas of state power that rely on the use of force, almost all other areas have been infected by these types of theory. Psychiatric institutions have been and, although it’s a bit of a stretch, the anti-psychiatric movement through R. D. Laing, through Fromm, and through Marcuse, is heavily influenced by at least a proportion of these sorts of ideas.

In the theory of Lyotard and in the theory of Deleuze, is the bourgeois really insane? Are schizophrenics the sane who walk amongst us? Deleuze and Guattari’s text Anti-Oedipus in which the schizophrenic is seen as the last redoubt of sanity in a mad capitalist world, which is by any rational credence insane. Therefore, you have to look to the insane to find the redoubt of sanity.

These sorts of ideas, post-Foucault in the late 20th century, are no longer that eccentric. They were once the most eccentric ideas you could have which conservatives essentially just laughed at. Now, they’ve taken over the institutions. But it’s been in a gradualist and would-be well-meaning and soft-minded sort of way, because this theory has taken over and cultural conservatives have retreated before it to such a degree that there’s hardly any of them left.

RS: I agree. You know, I might disagree with you slightly. I think Cultural Marxism has infected the military in the United States. It’s kind of incredible, but yet we have a major Army general claiming that diversity is the great strength of America’s armed forces as they go overseas to bring women into undergraduate colleges. So, it’s been quite a triumph!

One thing I would just mention, picking up on all these ideas you’ve put forward. I’ve always thought about this; there’s this staying power of let’s call it the postmodern New Left or Cultural Marxism. It’s had this long, decades-long staying power, and if you think about major avant-garde, modernist movements, they were a candle that burned really quickly. They almost burned themselves out.

If you just look at — just to pick one at random — the Blue Rider group or something like that. This is something that lasted maybe 4 years. Dadaism would kind of make a splash and then dissipate and go off into other movements and things like this.

cultural_marxism.png

If you look at the art galleries — conceptual art, postmodern art — they’ve been doing the same stuff for maybe 40 or 50 years now! If you look at women’s studies, African-American studies, critical race theory, all this kind of stuff, Foucault . . . I mean, it’s obviously changing, but it’s had this staying power that it’s almost become conservative, and I think this is a great irony.

I don’t know where avant-garde art can go. I don’t know how many times you need to, proverbially speaking, put a crucifix in piss. It’s one attempt to shock the bourgeoisie after another to the point that it becomes old and stale and certainly institutionalized in the sense that many people will go to get masters in fine arts in all these institutions and learn from the great masters of conceptual shock. So, this is a very strange thing about our culture where we have this conservatism amongst postmodern Cultural Marxism.

Do you think this is going to break down, or do you think, Jonathan, that because political correctness has become so obvious or because it’s become something easily ridiculed that it’s going to be overturned or at least come to an end? Do you see that or is that being a little too optimistic?

JB: It might be a bit too optimistic in the short run. I think it’s become institutionalized in a way which those art movements you categorized earlier on have not been for several reasons.

1) It’s a non-fictional area. It’s an academic area, and academics have tenure in mind, and these art movements are sudden, instantaneous, bohemian, and largely outsider movements. They usually row intensely with the major figures who sort of break from each other over a finite period. Surrealism almost came to an end when Breton insisted that they all join the Communist Party in France, but many of them didn’t want to do that. They joined it for discussion and alcoholic treats and to meet women and that sort of thing and to have a chance to exhibit. That’s why most people join art movements.

It’s also not particularly concerned with creation either. It’s concerned with reflexive creativity academically. So, somebody will go through the process of a first degree or second degree, they’ll get the PhD, which is influenced by one of these theoretical figures, and then they’ll become a tenured lecturer over time, and they provide a paradigm or a model for their students as they come up. So, the thing becomes replicating over a career path.

What you’ve had is you’ve had a couple of generations who’ve now done this within the academy, and they’ve also worked for a situation where there’s very little kick against them because there’s very little Right-wing left in the academy. It’s almost totally gone now. It almost can’t survive the pressure valves that have been put on it to such a degree that it’s almost impossible for it to survive. This has meant the rather desert-like, arid terrain of the new left, small “n,” small “l,” really, now dominates the tertiary sector of education, which is why the Left is so strong.

In a mass capitalist world where they feel that people are degraded by the cultural industry, nevertheless what you might call the PBS culture, the national endowments for the arts culture, is completely saturated with this sort of material, and there’s little way to shake it at the present time unless they’re radically disfunded or unless a way can be worked for forces of counter-culture to enter the university space again. Probably only on the internet is the space that they can now adopt and that, of course, is what’s happened for all of these ideas, such as this podcast we’re having today. They’ve gravitated towards the internet, because this is the only space left.

RS: Well, Jonathan, we are the counter-culture. I think that’s one thing that’s been clear to me for some time. But thank you once again for being on the podcast. This was a brilliant discussion, and I look forward to another one next week.

JB: Thanks very much! All the best!rticle printed from Counter-Currents Publishing: http://www.counter-currents.com

URL to article: http://www.counter-currents.com/2016/06/frankfurt-school-revisionism/

URLs in this post:

[1] Image: http://www.counter-currents.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/HorkheimerAdorno.jpg

[2] here: http://www.radixjournal.com/bowden/2014/7/24/frankfurt-school-revisionism

 

vendredi, 12 février 2016

Der „Nomos“ nach 1945 bei Carl Schmitt und Jürgen Habermas

carlКарл-Шмитт-большое-пространство-евразийство-евразийцы-Кофнер-4ПТ-Кофнер.jpg

Der „Nomos“ nach 1945 bei Carl Schmitt und Jürgen Habermas

 
Ex: http://www.katehon.com

Carl Schmitt (1888-1985) war ein früher Zeuge des Übergangs vom nationalstaatlichen Zeitalter zu supranationalen Ordnungen. Theoretisch antwortete er mit seiner Unterscheidung des „Begriffs des Politischen“ vom Staatsbegriff: „Der Begriff des Staates setzt den Begriff des Politischen voraus“1, meinte er und emanzipierte dadurch die Frage nach dem „Politischen“ von der herrschenden Allgemeinen Staatslehre und dem normativen Zwang zum Staat als „Monopol der legitimen Gewaltsamkeit“. Rückblickend sah er seine „Frage nach den neuen Trägern und den neuen Subjekten des Politischen“ als einen neuen „Anfang und Ansatz“ an.2 Die Aktualität seiner politischen Theorie für eine poststaatliche und postnationalstaatliche Betrachtungsweise wurde deshalb in den letzten Jahren auch verstärkt reklamiert.3 Finden sich bei ihm aber wirklich positive Ansätze zu einem Begriff supranationaler und –staatlicher Organisation, die unsere Gegenwart erhellen? Bietet sein Werk etwa profilierte Ansätze für eine aktuelle Verfassungstheorie Europas?

Betrachtet man seine Diagnosen näher, lässt sich daran zweifeln. Schmitt hat zwar den ganzen Prozess der Formierung Europas seit „Versailles“ und „Genf“ erlebt und publizistisch begleitet. Politisch optierte er aber für eine deutsche Hegemonie in „Mitteleuropa“ und sah die Entwicklungen nach 1945 skeptisch an. Vielleicht ist sein Spätwerk heute deshalb nur noch historisch. Es verbindet seine Diagnose der Europäisierung und Internationalisierung mit einer skeptischen Gesamtbetrachtung der „Legitimität“ dieses Prozesses und bringt die „geschichtliche Legitimität“ und „Substanz“ Europas dabei geradezu in einen Gegensatz zur Europäischen Union. Wie es dies macht, soll hier eingehender gezeigt werden. Schmitts „Großraumlehre“ kann heute aber politisch wohl nur dann noch aktuell sein, wenn man sie mit einem liberalen Universalismus versöhnt, wie das Jürgen Habermas4 in „Der gespaltene Westen“ machte. Die Studie endet deshalb mit einem Ausblick auf Habermas’ Transformation von Schmitts Denken.

I. Vorüberlegungen zu Schmitts Nachkriegsdiagnose


1. Deutungspole der Forschung: Schmitt hat zum europäischen Einigungsprozess nach 1945 nur noch wenig geschrieben. Auch seine Schüler und Enkelschüler publizierten dazu überraschend wenig. Geht man auf Schmitt selbst zurück, so sind verschiedene Lesarten seiner völkerrechtlichen Überlegungen möglich: Die erste, einfachste Rezeption beschränkt sich auf Schmitts theoretische „Lehre vom Bund“. Unlängst unternahm Christoph Schönberger5 einen nuancierten Versuch, sie für eine aktuelle poststaatliche Bundeslehre fruchtbar zu machen. Schmitt selbst lehnte dekontextualisierende Fortbildungen ab und betonte die „konkrete“ Bindung seiner „Positionen“ und „Begriffe“ an die analysierte „Lage“. Seine Bundeslehre war auf die Verhältnisse vor und nach 1933 zugeschnitten. Die Schlüsselbegriffe „Großraum“ und „Reich“ bezeichnen Pole möglicher Deutung, die insbesondere Lothar Gruchmann und Andreas Koenen entwickelten.

Gruchmann6 las Schmitt Großraum-Lehre als apologetische Krönung der nationalsozialistischen Völkerrechtslehre. Mathias Schmoeckel7 bietet weitere Differenzierungen. Dieser machtanalytischen Deutung steht die starke These von Andreas Koenen8 diametral entgegen, die Schmitts Gesamtwerk in den Kontext einer katholischen Reichsideologie stellt, die Schmitt seit den frühen 20er Jahren verfochten habe. In dieser Lesart muss die Großraumlehre vom vorgängigen Reichsbegriff her gelesen und Schmitt in den Zusammenhang einer katholischen Abendland-Ideologie gestellt werden, die nach 1945 in den Europadiskurs einging. Koenens voluminöse Darstellung, ein Pionierwerk archivalischer Entdeckung des politischen Akteurs, endete zwar mit Schmitts Karriereknick und „Fall“ von 1936/37, ohne die völkerrechtliche Deutung des Zweiten Weltkriegs noch näher zu berücksichtigen, die Gruchmann untersuchte. Dennoch sind die Pole möglicher Deutung mit Gruchmann und Koenen deutlich bezeichnet.

Entweder war Schmitt ein opportunistischer Machtanalytiker, der aktuelle imperiale Entwicklungen analysierte und ihnen den Schleier eines fragwürdigen Rechtsbegriffs überwarf, oder er war ein katholischer Abendland-Ideologe, der in prinzipieller Opposition zum Nationalsozialismus stand und mit seinem katholischen „Zähmungskonzept“ scheiterte. Machtanalytik erfolgt aus der Beobachterperspektive. Gelegentlich betonte Schmitt zwar, dass er „Abstand zu jeder politischen Festlegung“ hielt und nur „den Weg unbeirrter wissenschaftlicher Beobachtung gegangen“ (SGN 453) sei. Doch als Jurist fragte er über die politikwissenschaftliche Machtanalytik hinaus nach der „Legitimität“ einer Machtordnung. Niemals argumentierte er nur als neutraler Beobachter. Stets beschrieb er die Verhältnisse in normativer Absicht aus seiner Teilnehmerperspektive. Vermutlich argumentierte er dabei nicht nur als Nationalsozialist oder als katholischer Reichsideologe, sondern hatte darüber hinaus auch noch andere Vorstellungen und Absichten. Eine Lesart geht hier von Schmitts Historisierung des Staatsbegriffs aus und sieht vor 1933 schon Tendenzen zu einem poststaatlichen Begriff des Politischen. Sie lässt eine nationalistische Deutung zu: Schmitt entwickelte demnach einen anti-etatistischen Begriff des Politischen, der der nationalistischen Bewegung entgegen kam und deshalb seit 1933 auch völkische und rassistische Konnotationen aufnahm. Vielleicht entwickelte Schmitt aber nach 1945 noch neue „politische Ideen“ von der supranationalen Nachkriegsordnung oder vom „neuen Nomos der Erde“, die gegenwärtige Probleme berühren. Die Quellenbasis wuchs in den letzten Jahren durch die Publikation nachgelassener Texte, Übersetzungen und Briefwechsel. Erst heute lässt sich deshalb ein einigermaßen umfassendes Bild von Schmitts Sicht der Bundesrepublik, Europas und der „Einheit der Welt“ nach 1945 zeichnen.

2. Bundeslehre vor 1945: Schmitts Völkerrechtsdenken geht textgeschichtlich bis auf frühe Analysen von „Versailles“ und „Genf“ zurück und dann in die „Lehre vom Bund“ ein, die im vierten Teil der „Verfassungslehre“ entwickelt wird. Zu nennen sind hier vor allem die Broschüren „Die Rheinlande als Objekt internationaler Politik“ (1925) und „Die Kernfrage des Völkerbundes“ (1926) sowie später „Völkerrechtliche Großraumordnung“ (1939). 1940 stellte Schmitt die Bedeutung dieser völkerrechtlichen Arbeiten mit seiner Sammlung „Positionen und Begriffe“ heraus. Günter Maschke pointierte sie unlängst in ihrer nationalistischen Stoßrichtung gegen „Versailles“ durch seine eingehend kommentierte Ausgabe der Arbeiten zum Völkerrecht und zur internationalen Politik. Diese Edition ist eine der wichtigsten Herausforderungen an die aktuelle Diskussion.9

Schmitts Blick auf die völkerrechtlichen Probleme gilt zunächst dem Rheinland als „Objekt der internationalen Politik“. Schmitt kritisiert damals eine politische Instrumentalisierung des Völkerrechts und „Juridifizierung der Politik“ durch Versailles und Genf. Er fürchtet, dass die rechtliche Verschleierung der Machtverhältnisse dem „Unrecht der Fremdherrschaft“ noch einen „Betrug der Anonymität“ hinzufügt10 und das deutsche Volk darüber seinen moralisch-politischen Willen zur Selbstbestimmung verliert. Eine Gefahr sei die Verwechselung der bloßen „Stabilisierung“ des Status quo mit einem echten Frieden.11 Eine andere sei die Identifizierung des Völkerbundes mit einem bündischen „System europäischer Staaten“ (PB 89). 1928 publiziert Schmitt einen Vortrag „Der Völkerbund und Europa“, der von der „Europäisierung“ (PB 90) des Völkerbundes und aktuellen Tendenzen zur „Neubildung von Staaten und Staatensystemen“ (PB 89) ausgeht. Gerade weil er solche Tendenzen sieht, fragt er nach den Machtverhältnissen im Völkerbund und den bündischen Strukturen. Sehr drastisch formuliert er seine Problemsicht damals in einem Vortrag über „Völkerrechtliche Probleme im Rheingebiet“, der die „Abnormität“ (PB 98) der Entwicklungen vom Standpunkt nationaler Souveränität aus anprangert. Damals sieht Schmitt die politische Existenz Deutschlands als gefährdet an: „Denn es drängt sich jedem auf, wie sehr die Entwicklung der modernen Technik manche politischen Gruppierungen und Grenzen der früheren Zeit illusorisch macht und den überlieferten status quo beseitigt, wie sehr ‚die Erde kleiner’ wird und infolgedessen die Staaten und Staatensysteme größer werden müssen. In diesem gewaltigen Umwandlungsprozess gehen wahrscheinlich viele schwache Staaten unter.“ (PB 107 vgl. 179f). Im „Begriff des Politischen“ heißt es ähnlich warnend: „Dadurch, dass ein Volk nicht mehr die Kraft oder den Willen hat, sich in der Sphäre des Politischen zu halten, verschwindet das Politische nicht aus der Welt. Es verschwindet nur ein schwaches Volk.“ (BP 54). Schmitt sieht damals für Deutschland nicht einmal mehr die Alternative der „Verschweizerung“ gegeben, vor der Max Weber einst gewarnt hatte: die Möglichkeit, „sich einfach aus der Weltgeschichte zu verdrücken“ (PB 107). In dieser Lage stellt er sich nicht auf den alten Standpunkt des klassischen Nationalstaats, sondern akzeptiert die Tendenzen zu bündischen Zusammenschlüssen und fragt deshalb nach der „Substanz“ der neuen bündischen Strukturen.

Schmitt stellt eine „Kernfrage“, die jede authentische Aneignung seiner Bundeslehre übernehmen muss. Er macht die „Legitimierung des status quo davon abhängig, ob der Völkerbund ein echter Bund ist“ (FP 73). „Das eben ist entscheidend für die Kernfrage des Völkerbundes: Ob er mehr ist als ein Büro, auch mehr als ein Bündnis, ob er als wirklicher Bund betrachtet kann. Ist er ein echter Bund, so legitimiert er den status quo von Versailles“ (FP 82). Einen „echten Bund“ definiert Schmitt dabei durch eine eigene „Homogenität“ oder „Substanz“. Er geht von der gegebenen Machtlage aus, vom status quo, und fragt danach, ob dessen rechtliche „Garantien“ durch eine eigene „Homogenität“ getragen sind, die Legitimität verleiht. Homogenität stiftet Legitimität. Als Vorbild nennt Schmitt den klassischen Fall der Schweiz,12 während er das Beispiel der Heiligen Allianz von 1815 ausdrücklich scheut, was erneut13 seine Distanz zum klassischen Konservatismus14 und Legitimismus belegt. Wichtig ist hier auch, dass Schmitt die mangelnde Homogenität und Legitimität des Völkerbundes am Verhältnis zu den Großmächten USA und Russland festmacht. Ein Bund sei nur dann homogen, wenn dessen bestimmende Mächte auch Mitglieder sind. Wenn dagegen wichtige Mächte wie die USA draußen bleiben – heute etwa dem Internationalen Strafgerichtshof - und dem Bund in ihrer inneren Verfassung nicht entsprechen, kann der Bund nicht selbst bestimmend sein. 1934 reklamiert Schmitt die „Rechtssubstanz des europäischen Völkerrechtsdenkens“ (FP 406) für den Nationalsozialismus. 1936 proklamiert er: „Ein echter Bund europäischer Völker kann sich nur auf die Anerkennung der völkischen Substanz gründen und von der nationalen und völkischen Verwandtschaft dieser europäischen Völker ausgehen.“ Eine Hitlerrede gibt ihm damals die „bewusste Fundierung einer neuen europäischen Ordnung“. (PB 213) Formal spricht er dafür auch von einer „politischen Idee“ und definiert Reiche als „die führenden und tragenden Mächte, deren politische Idee in einen bestimmten Großraum ausstrahlt“ (SGN 295f) 1943 schreibt er noch: „Ebenso abstrakt und oberflächenhaft global sind die raum- und grenzenlosen Imperialismen des kapitalistischen Westens und des bolschewistischen Ostens. Zwischen beiden verteidigt sich heute die Substanz Europas.“ (SGN 447) Nach Schmitts Überzeugung schafft eine „politische Idee“ eine legitimierende „Homogenität“ und „Substanz“. Homogenität sei nicht gegeben, sondern aufgegeben und erzeugt. Schmitt formuliert diese politische Idee nicht nur nationalsozialistisch affirmativ, sondern auch polemisch: „Großraum gegen Universalismus“. Ein Bund ist ihm ein homogenes politisches Gebilde, das sich durch eine Idee politische Aufgaben gibt und in Spannung hält und dadurch selbst legitimiert. Ein rein wirtschaftlich oder technisch integriertes Gebilde dagegen sei kein „echter“, politischer Bund.15

3. Publizistische Reserven nach 1945: Schmitts publizistischer Schwerpunkt liegt nach 1945 fast ganz auf der Frage nach dem „neuen Nomos der Erde“. Schmitt zog sich damals weitgehend auf völkerrechtliche Fragen zurück und nahm zur Verfassungsgeschichte der Bundesrepublik kaum mehr öffentlich Stellung. Er beschränkte sich auf eine Rolle als Stichwortgeber an seine Schüler, die Frieder Günther16 aus den Quellen eindrücklich rekonstruierte. Der verfassungstheoretische Gegensatz der juristischen Schulen Schmitts und Smends prägte zwar den verfassungsrechtlichen Diskurs der frühen Bundesrepublik. Schmitt selbst aber griff in diesen Schulstreit nur noch zurückhaltend ein. In der Bundesrepublik konnte man bei Lebzeiten kaum lesen, was er über die Bundesrepublik dachte. Erst mit Öffnung der Nachlässe – Günthers Studie stützt sich nicht zuletzt auf denjenigen Roman Schnurs - und dem Erscheinen erster Briefwechsel mit Schülern und Freunden klärt sich das Bild. Grundsätzlich sah Schmitt die Bundesrepublik negativ. So schrieb er 1960: „Die Situation Deutschlands ist heute entsetzlich, viel schlimmer als die meisten ahnen, weil sie sich vom Wirtschaftswunder blenden lassen. Ich leide als alter Mann schwer darunter und fühle wahre Kassandra-Depressionen.“17 Ähnliche Formulierungen finden sich im „Glossarium“ und in den Briefwechseln vielfach. Mit öffentlichen Äußerungen aber hielt er sich nun zurück. Symptomatisch ist schon, dass er seine wichtigsten Bemerkungen zur frühen Bundesrepublik nur als Glossen zur Publikation älterer verfassungsrechtlicher Aufsätze notierte, während er sich im privaten Gespräch und Briefwechseln18 offener zeigte. Seine grundsätzliche Kritik an der „Tyrannei“ des bundesrepublikanischen „Wertdenkens“ veröffentlichte er zunächst nur als Privatdruck, der in eine Festschrift für Forsthoff einging und damit halböffentlich an seinen „Kreis“ adressiert war.

Schmitt verwies auf sein Alter und seine abnehmenden Kräfte. Er rechnete mit einer biblischen Lebensgrenze von 70 Jahren19 und machte deshalb seit den 60er Jahren auch „keine langfristigen Pläne“20 mehr. Zwar verstarb er erst 1985 im hohen Alter; doch nach seiner „Theorie des Partisanen“ publizierte er nur noch wenige verfassungsrechtliche Gegenwartsanalysen. Ausdrücklich meinte er: „Ich muss alle Arbeit meinen jüngeren Kollegen überlassen.“21 Verweise auf Lektüren traten an die Stelle eigener Erläuterungen. Schmitt konzipierte damals einen Abschluss seines Werkes. In diesem Zusammenhang steht die „Selbst-Edition“22 der „Verfassungsrechtlichen Aufsätze“. Der spekulative Aufsatz über „Nomos, Nahme, Name“ sollte dann sein „letzter Aufsatz“23 sein. Die letzte Monographie „Politische Theologie II“ war Jahre später eine autoritative Leseanweisung, eine „Legende“ zur politisch-theologischen Interpretation. Nur die „Theorie des Partisanen“ scheint als „Zwischenbemerkung“ aus diesem Werkabschluss herauszufallen. Damals hatte sich das neue „Kerneuropa“ gerade erst formiert und die heutige Größe und Bedeutung der EU war noch kaum abzusehen. Schmitts publizistische Zurückhaltung nach 1945 war eine literarisch bewusste Autorstrategie. Die Gründe für sein relatives Desinteresse an der Bundesrepublik und der frühen EU resultieren aber auch grundsätzlichen Zweifeln am politischen Charakter dieser neuen Gebilde.

Schmitts Distanz zur Bundesrepublik korrespondierte damals viel Sympathie für Francos autoritäres Spanien, das man vielleicht seine damalige Wahlheimat nennen könnte. Die Annäherung an Spanien bestand vor 1933 schon und wurde nach 1945 noch durch familiäre Bindungen – Schmitts einzige Tochter Anima heiratete nach Spanien – verstärkt. Die Briefwechseln mit Lúis Cabral de Moncada und Álvaro d’Ors belegen aber auch Distanz zum katholischen Naturrecht. Schmitt akzeptierte die neuzeitliche Ausdifferenzierung von Theologie und Jurisprudenz und den Schweigebefehl der Juristen an die Theologen (vgl. ECS 70ff) und wollte das Recht nicht „in die Bürgerkriegsparolen des Naturrechts“ (VRA 418) werfen. Politisch fürchtete er die Vereinnahmung jedes metapositiven Rechts durch die revolutionäre Linke. „Alle sind auf dem Weg nach Moskau. Das zum Thema Legitimität“,24 meinte er. Spanien verbürgte ihm damals aber noch die Möglichkeit einer Alternative, die den Gegner im Bürgerkrieg bezwang: die stete Möglichkeit eines anderen Europa gegenüber der radikalen Verwestlichung und Demokratisierung.25

Schmitts Europakonzeption ging deshalb auch nicht in der EU auf. Schmitt kannte ein anderes Europa und hielt an dessen Möglichkeit fest. Wenn er nach 1945 auch das politische Projekt der EU publizistisch kaum noch begleitete, schwieg er dennoch nicht über Europa. Das klingt schon in Titeln an. 1950 erscheinen das rechtsgeschichtliche Hauptwerk „Der Nomos der Erde im Völkerrecht des Jus Publikum Europaeum“, das autobiographische Bekenntnisbüchlein „Ex Captivitate Salus“, die „Aufsatzsammlung „Donoso Cortés in gesamteuropäischer Interpretation“ sowie „Die Lage der europäischen Rechtswissenschaft“. Drei dieser Publikationen tragen den Namen Europas schon im Titel. Zwei davon blicken auf die europäische Geschichte im Spiegel der Rechtswissenschaft zurück; eine weitere erörtert die politisch-theologische Bedeutung einer „gesamteuropäischen Interpretation“ im identifikatorischen Spiegel des Donoso Cortés. Der Rückblick auf die europäische Geschichte und die Besinnung auf die „gesamteuropäische Interpretation“ war Schmitts Ausgangspunkt für die Analyse der Nachkriegsentwicklung.

II. Positive Antworten nach 1945?

1. Ansätze zur Weiterführung der Frage nach dem „neuen Nomos der Erde“: Entstehungsgeschichtlich geht „Der Nomos der Erde“ auf die Kriegsjahre vor 1945 zurück. Die materialen Analysen zur Entwicklung des neuzeitlichen Völkerrechts, die spekulativen Überlegungen zum Verhältnis von „maritimer Existenz“ und Industrialisierung und auch der Rechtsbegriff von der Einheit von „Ordnung und Ortung“ finden sich vor 1945 schon in anderen Publikationen. Lediglich die „christliche“ Durchführung ist nun neu.

„Der Nomos der Erde“erörtert die Entstehung und Auflösung des neuzeitlichen europäischen Völkerrechts. Schmitt definiert das Recht einleitend erneut als „Einheit von Ordnung und Ortung“ (vgl. NE 13ff, 48, 157). Die „Ortung“ benennt den Raumaspekt des Rechts: Recht gilt nur im Rahmen einer räumlich begrenzten, effektiven Machtordnung: einer „Raumordnung“, sagt Schmitt. Völkerrechtsgeschichte ist in besonderem Maße politische Geschichte. Es liegt deshalb nahe, Epochen der Völkerrechtsgeschichte unter dem Gesichtspunkt ihrer hegemonialen Trägermacht zu unterscheiden.26 Schmitts Machtgeschichte des Völkerrechts befürwortet ein Gleichgewichtssystem mehrerer Großmächte gegenüber einer Hegemonialverfassung des Völkerrechts (vgl. NE 120, 160f, 164). Eine Besonderheit kennzeichnet dabei seinen Ansatz gegenüber einer reinen Machtgeschichte: Schmitt beschreibt die Weltgeschichte Europas und Globalisierung seines Rechts als Europas „Entortung“ (NE 149, 298) und „Entthronung“ aus der sakralen „Mitte der Erde“ (vgl. NE 188, 199, 206, 212, 255). Dabei konzentriert er sich in Fortsetzung früherer Diagnosen auf den Aufstieg der USA zur führenden Großmacht, den er historisch mit einem von England ausgehenden Übergang von einem „terranen“ zu einem „maritimen“ Rechtsdenken verbindet. In differenzierten Analysen führt Schmitt aus, dass das „maritime“ Rechtsdenken nicht die „Hegung“ (vgl. NE 69, 112ff.) des Feindbegriffs und Kriegsrechts kennt, die er als „Rationalisierung und Humanisierung“ des klassischen Völkerrechts auszeichnet. Die Auflösung des Jus Publicum Europaeum führte deshalb zu einem „Sinnwandel“ (NE 232ff, 270ff) der Anerkennung und des Krieges. Der Aufstieg der USA zerstörte den gemeineuropäischen, von der wirtschaftlichen Marktordnung bestimmten „Verfassungsstandard“ (vgl. NE 170ff, 181ff) des europäischen Gleichgewichtssystems, ohne einen neuen Nomos zu etablieren. „Der Nomos der Erde“ lässt sich deshalb 1950 als eine spekulative Endgeschichte des Abendlandes im Spiegel der Völkerrechtsgeschichte lesen. Diese endgeschichtliche Lesart bestärken damals auch die kleineren Publikationen „Ex Captivitate Salus“ und „Donoso Cortés in gesamteuropäischer Interpretation“.

Schmitt meidet nach 1945 zunächst eine positive Antwort auf die Frage nach einem „neuen Nomos“ und betont nur die Bedeutung der „Frage nach der großen Frage“ (SGN 559). So versucht er in „Nehmen / Teilen / Weiden“ „die Grundfrage jeder Sozial- und Wirtschaftsordnung vom Nomos her richtig zustellen“: also die „Frage“ richtig zu stellen. So schreibt er im Festschriftbeitrag für Ernst Jünger, der methodologische Überlegungen zum „geschichtlich-dialektischen Denken“ entwickelt: „Leider ist es nur allzu natürlich, dass die Menschen auf den neuen Anruf mit der alten Antwort reagieren, weil diese sich für eine vorangehende Epoche als richtig und erfolgreich erwiesen hat. Dies ist die Gefahr“ (SGN 544). Immer wieder beschwört er, eine geschichtliche Antwort sei „nur einmal wahr“ (VRA 415; SGN 563). Es komme deshalb darauf an, den aktuellen „Anruf der Geschichte“ richtig zu verstehen. Schmitt insisitiert hier, mit Nähen zur damaligen Philosophie (Gadamer), auf der Hermeneutik der Frage und scheut positive Aussagen zum „neuen Nomos“. Schmitt weist eine schnelle Auffassung des Ost-West-Gegensatzes als echte politische Systemalternative zurück.

Dennoch finden sich Ansätze zu einer positiven Beantwortung der „Frage eines neuen Nomos der Erde“, weshalb „Der Nomos der Erde“ auch nicht apokalyptisch gelesen werden muss. Ausgangspunkt ist die Diagnose der Entstehung und Auflösung des neuzeitlich-europäischen Völkerrechts: der Zerstörung des „Gleichgewichts“ der europäischen Mächte und „Substanz“ durch den Aufstieg der „westlichen Hemisphäre“. Schmitt bedenkt diesen Prozess amerikanischer Übernahme der Hegemonie im letzten Teil des „Nomos der Erde“ unter dem Titel „Frage eines neuen Nomos der Erde“. Er formuliert einen Genitivus Subjektivus: Nicht der Wissenschaftler fragt nach dem Nomos, sondern die Geschichte selbst stellt eine Frage, auf die der Mensch, in der „Frage nach der großen Frage“, antworten soll: „Die Frage selbst ist ein geschichtliches Ereignis, aus dem durch die konkrete Antwort von Menschen weitere geschichtliche Dispositionen erwachsen“. Indem die Menschen den „Ruf der Geschichte“ vernehmen, wagen sie sich, so Schmitt, in die große „Probe der Geschichtsmächtigkeit“ hinein und stehen in einem „Gericht“. (SGN 534) Diese Formulierungen lassen die geschichtstheologische Auslegung zu,27 dass „die Geschichte“, als Plan Gottes, selbst Akteur ist. Es klingt aber selbstwidersprüchlich, dass der Nomos die Frage nach seiner Existenz stellt. Denn wie kann er seine Existenz bezweifeln? Schmitt bestreitet, dass die westliche Hemisphäre einen neuen Nomos trägt, und sucht nach Alternativen. Er beschränkt sich nicht auf methodologische Bemerkungen zur Bedeutung der Frage, sondern gibt auch Ansätze zu einer positiven Antwort.

Nach 1945 konstatiert er zunächst eine Einigkeit und „Einheit der Welt“ in der Fortschrittsideologie eines geschichtsphilosophischen Planungs-Utopismus. Diese Auflösung des politischen Dualismus in eine ideologische Einheit betrachtet er aber nicht als echte, politische Lösung, weil er jeden Nomos als politisches „Pluriversum“ auffasst, das in Alternativen besteht. Deshalb hält er nach 1945 auch an der „Möglichkeit einer dritten Kraft“ (SGN 500) fest und spricht zunächst noch vom „deutschen Vorbehalt“ einer „tiefer gegründeten Weltsicht“ (SGN 512). Ein echter Nomos der Erde ist nach Schmitt nur als „Gleichgewicht“ mehrerer „Großräume“ möglich. Seine Frage lautet deshalb nach wie vor: „Großraum oder Universalismus“? Die Möglichkeit eines neuen politischen Pluriversums, das eine Gleichgewichtsordnung trägt, bindet er auch an die Frage nach der „dritten Dimension“ des Luft- und Weltraumes. Auch der „Aufbruch in den Kosmos“ sei nur eine Ausflucht vor der Aufgabe politischer Verteilung und Ordnung der „Erde“ (SGN 569). „Die neuen Räume, aus denen der neue Anruf kommt, müssen sich deshalb auf unserer Erde befinden“ (SGN 568), schreibt Schmitt.

Carl+Schmitt+%28media_126098%29.jpgSeine analytisch eingehendste Betrachtung der politischen Nachkriegsordnung ist der Vortrag „Die Ordnung der Welt nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg“, den Schmitt 1962 in Madrid hielt und bei Lebzeiten nur in einer spanischen Fassung publizierte. Nur hier verknüpft er seine Überlegungen auch mit der Entwicklung der UNO. Sein Ausgangspunkt ist die Dekolonialisierung und der „Antikolonialismus“ nach 1945, den Schmitt als „Propaganda“ und „Reflex“ der Zerstörung der alten, europäischen Raumordnung betrachtet. Diese „anti-europäische Propaganda“ begann „leider“, betont Schmitt, als „inner-europäische Kampagne“ (SGN 594). Gegenstück sei der „Nomos des Kosmos“ (SGN 595): „Der Anti-Kolonialismus ist nichts anderes als die Liquidierung einer historischen Vergangenheit auf Kosten der europäischen Nationen. Die Eroberung des Kosmos hingegen ist pure Zukunft“ (SGN 596), schreibt Schmitt. Dazwischen sei der gegenwärtige „Nomos der Erde“ zu suchen. Schmitt nähert sich ihm mit Überlegungen zum Kalten Krieg als „Teil des revolutionären Krieges“. Er rekapituliert hier Überlegungen zur Wiederkehr der Lehre vom „gerechten Krieg“. Deutlicher benennt er nun aber „drei Stadien des Kalten Krieges“ und kennzeichnet die Gegenwart dabei durch ein „pluralistisches Stadium“, in dem sich eine „erstaunliche Zahl neuer afrikanischer und asiatischer Staaten“ (SGN 602) der dualistischen Struktur des Ost-West-Gegensatzes nicht mehr fügten und die UNO zum Forum der politischen Organisation einer „dritten Front“ nutzten. In der „Theorie des Partisanen“ nennt er an dieser Stelle dann China und Maos „pluralistische Vorstellung eines neuen Nomos der Erde“ (TP 62).

1978 meint er: „Der Impuls zu überstaatlichen Räumen der industriellen Entwicklung hat bisher noch nicht zur politischen Einheit der Welt, sondern nur zu drei etablierten Großräumen geführt: USA, USSR und China.“ (FP 927)28 Die große Bedeutung dieser Bemerkungen innerhalb des Werkes liegt darin, dass Schmitt hier erstmals die Rolle des politischen Opponenten und Garanten des politischen Pluriversums von Deutschland an andere „Staaten“ übergibt. Dezidiert spricht er nun von einer „pluralistischen“ Verfassung der Welt und verlegt die Frage nach dem neuen Nomos der Erde dabei auf das Problem der Entwicklungshilfe: „Wenn Sie mich nun jetzt [...] fragen, was heute der Nomos der Erde sei, kann ich Ihnen klar antworten: es ist die Verteilung der Erde in industriell und und weniger entwickelte Zonen, verbunden mit der unmittelbar folgenden Frage nach demjenigen, der sie nimmt. Diese Verteilung ist heute die wirkliche Verfassung der Erde“ (SGN 605), schreibt Schmitt. Er denkt hier, auch mit Verweis auf die „Europäische Wirtschafts-Gemeinschaft“, nicht nur an die politische Gefügigkeit, mit der Entwicklungsländer die Hilfe erkaufen, sondern auch an die politische Kompetenz der „unterentwickelten Regionen und Völker“, ihre Bedeutung im Ost-West-Gegensatz auszuspielen und Ost und West zu erpressen. Mit der Entwicklungshilfe benennt Schmitt ein schwaches Instrument wirtschaftlicher Intervention. Sein allgemeiner Befund, dass West und Ost wirtschaftlich in unterentwickelte Regionen intervenierten und so die politische Unabhängigkeit dieser „dritten Front“ erodierten, ließe sich heute noch stärker formulieren.

2. „Superlegalität“ als Motiv: Ausführlicher als in diesem Vortrag beantwortet Schmitt die Frage eines neuen Nomos der Erde wohl nirgendwo. In seinem letzten größeren Aufsatz, 1973 geplant und erst 1978 anläßlich des 90. Geburtstags erschienen, bringt er die Entwicklung aber noch auf den Begriff der „legalen Weltrevolution“ und betrachtet diese Revolution dabei, laut Untertitel, als einen „politischen Mehrwert“, als „Prämie auf juristische Legalität und Superlegalität“. Der Bezug auf die Schrift „Legalität und Legitimität“ von 1932 ist deutlich. Schmitt überbietet sie nun durch die hyperbolische Rede von „Weltrevolution“ und „Superlegalität“ und blickt dabei ausführlich auf „Hitlers legale Revolution von 1933 bis 1945 als Präzedenzfall“ zurück. Der Text mischt Gegenwartsanalyse mit historischem Rückblick und ist in seiner zentralen Aussage nicht leicht zugänglich. Er wird deshalb als Schlusswort bislang auch kaum zur Kenntnis genommen. Dennoch bringt Schmitt hier seine Nachkriegssicht noch auf einen Punkt.

Schmitt geht von einem Buch des „spanischen Berufsrevolutionärs“ Santiago Carillo über den Eurokommunismus aus, das die legale Revolution als revolutionäres Mittel „für einen Durchbruch aus einem bäuerlichen Agrarland in eine moderne, d.h. industrielle Gesellschaft“ (FP 920) preist. Zeitgeschichtlicher Hintergrund ist die Transformation Spaniens nach Franco, über die sich Schmitt damals häufiger mit Álvaro d’Ors austauscht. In seinem Aufsatz rekapituliert er zunächst seine Terminologie zu „Legalität“ und „Legitimität“ und zur „politischen Prämie“ auf den legalen Machtbesitz. Er übernimmt dann von Maurice Hauriou den Begriff der „Superlegalität“ für die „verstärkte Geltungskraft bestimmter Normen“ und kommt auf die modernen „Fortschritts-Ideologien als treibende Motive der Superlegalität“ zu sprechen. In der legalen Weltrevolution wird der ideologisch überspannte Glaube an die „Legalität“ zu einer revolutionären Macht. Schmitt verbindet seine Überlegungen zur geschichtsphilosophischen „Einheit der Welt“ nun mit einer Kritik der Industrialisierung: „Heute geht es um das der wissenschaftlich-technisch-industriellen Entwicklung adäquate politische System der Gesellschaft: liberal-kapitalistisches, sozialistisch-kommunistisches oder liberal-sozialistisches System mit den jeweiligen Methoden der Beschleunigung (oder nötigenfalls der Aufhaltung) des industriellen Fortschritts.“ (FP 926) Die gegenwärtige „planetarische Industrienahme“ visioniert er als Ende der Politik in der Einheit der Welt: „Die Weltpolitik kommt an ihr Ende und verwandelt sich in Weltpolizei – ein zweifelhafter Fortschritt.“ (FP 926)

Schmitt blickt dann in die Geschichte zurück und behandelt Frankreich nach 1871 und das Deutsche Reich nach 1919 als „zwei präfaschistische Modelle der Superlegalität“. Dann behandelt er „Hitlers legale Revolution von 1933 bis 1945“ als „Präzedenzfall“ der Weltrevolution. Dabei betrachtet er den nationalistischen „Revanchismus“ nach Versailles als die „eigentliche Triebkraft der Hitlerschen Erfolge“ (FP 931). Die Antwort des Grundgesetzes, das „Tor der Legalität“ für verfassungsfeindliche Parteien „völlig zu verschließen“, nennt er einen Weg der „Superlegalität“ und nimmt sie so in den Prozess der legalen Weltrevolution hinein. Resultat sei die Formierung der „Menschheit als politisches Subjekt und Träger einer verfassunggebenden Gewalt“. Ausführlich kommt Schmitt hier auf ein Scheitern der EU zu sprechen: „Dem Fortschritt zur legalen Weltrevolution läuft kein politischer Wille zur politischen Einheit Europas oder gar zu einer Europäischen Revolution parallel“, meint er. „Wer sich in die über tausend Seiten des Standardwerks ‚Europäisches Gemeinschaftsrecht’ von H. P. Ipsen (Tübingen 1972) vertieft [...], den wird eine tiefe Trauer befallen. Die weltpolitischen Kräfte und Mächte, die um die politische Einheit der Welt kämpfen, sind stärker als das europäische Interesse an der politischen Einheit Europas.“ (FP 932) Schmitt sieht die politische Entwicklung Europas in der Fortschrittsideologie der Superlegalität, der forcierten ideologischen Universalisierung bestimmter Verfassungsideale untergehen. Hier wird einmal deutlich, dass der Festlegung auf China als alternativer, dritter Kraft eine klare Absage an die EU als Motor einer alternativen politischen Großraumbildung korrespondiert.

Wenn Schmitt bedauernd von einer fehlenden europäischen Revolution spricht, meint er keine legale, sondern eine legitime Revolution: eine politische Verfassungsentscheidung, die nicht durch die bestehenden Formen der Legalität korrumpiert wäre. Schmitt pointiert die „Superlegalität“ der Weltrevolution gegen eine „andere Art Legitimität“, auf die er weiter hofft, deren Möglichkeit er aber durch die herrschende Legitimität der Legalität gefährdet sieht. Immer wieder kritisierte er das „Legalitäts-Monopol des Gesetzesstaates“ (VRA 412) und die „Aufspaltung des Rechts in Legalität und Legitimität“ (VRA 422, 424, vgl. VRA 448ff), die Legitimität in Legalität und diese Legalität in eine technisch-funktionale Waffe des politischen Kampfes verwandelt habe. Der Gesetzgebungsstaat habe seine Legalität derart als Legitimitätsquelle monopolisiert, dass sich keine andere Art Legitimität mehr abzeichne. Warnend schreibt Schmitt: „Unsere vorliegende Analyse der Möglichkeit einer legalen Weltrevolution betrifft die Legalität, nicht die Legitimität einer Welt-Revolution.“ (FP 920) Immer wieder beschwört er das „Problem der Legalität“, dass die Legalität als einzige Legitimitätsquelle erscheint. „Legitimität erscheint dann als eine Art höherer Legalität“. (FP 923)

Schmitt sieht das politische Projekt der Europäischen Union nach 1945 also nicht als echte Alternative an. Mit der Niederlage Deutschlands im Zweiten Weltkrieg findet er in Europa keinen starken Träger eines alternativen politischen Willens mehr, Mitteleuropa als Großraum gegen den technizistischen Universalismus in Ost und West zu behaupten. Nur das autoritäre Spanien sei noch ein Erbe und Hüter der „geschichtlichen Legitimität“ und „Substanz“ des alten Europa. Machtpolitisch habe Europa ausgespielt, weil es keine Systemalternative zum ökonomisch-technischen „Fortschritt“ mehr formulierte. Wer sich auf die herrschende Legitimität der Legalität als Mittel der Revolution einlässt, hat nach Schmitt schon verloren. Deshalb entfallen ihm nach 1945 auch die historischen Alternativen des Faschismus und des Marxismus.

Bei diesem Befund scheint es eher unwahrscheinlich, dass das Spätwerk noch Anregungen für eine aktuelle Verfassungstheorie Europas bietet. Schmitt analysiert den Prozess der „Entthronung“29 Europas und sieht im damals langsam fortschreitenden und oft blockierten Einigungsprozess keine wirkliche Kraft zur alternativen Verfassungsgestaltung und Großraumordnung mehr. Er setzt seine Erwartungen an eine Verfassungsalternative derart fundamental an, dass schon die Angleichung der Wirtschaftsverfassung an den Westen jede Systemopposition ausschließt. So lehrt das Spätwerk zunächst, wie fundamental Schmitt die Idee der Verfassungsalternative verstand. Er betrachtet die EU gar nicht als echte Alternative. Buchstäblich kann er den EU-Prozess institutionell kaum noch anregen, weil die fundamentalen politischen, ökonomischen und kulturellen Eckdaten der Europäischen Union heute nicht zur Disposition stehen. Wer das politische Projekt Europas an einen Ausstieg aus dem Wirtschaftsliberalismus bindet und der Demokratisierung derart skeptisch gegenübersteht, kann allenfalls den Blick für Widerstände und Hemmnisse der Europäisierung schärfen.

III. Aktualisierung mit Habermas

Was würde Schmitt heute wohl über die EU denken? Vermutlich würde er seltene Perlen der osteuropäischen Geistesgeschichte ausgraben, die den EU-Prozess hinsichtlich seiner kulturellen, ökonomischen und politischen Kosten skeptisch beleuchten. Der EU-Prozess der 60iger und 70iger Jahre, den Schmitt noch wahrnahm, gab ihm wenig Vertrauen in ein politisches Europa. Den Großraum, der das politische „Pluriversum“ garantiert, suchte er zuletzt jenseits Europa. Sein spätes Interesse für die Dekolonialisierungsprozesse, für China und die globale „Verteilung“ der Industrialisierung ist bemerkenswert. Schmitt ahnte schon, dass Europas geschichtliche Stunde im imperialen Wettlauf abzulaufen scheint und die Auseinandersetzungen heute nicht nur zwischen Europa und den USA geführt werden. Neue weltpolitische Akteure wie China und Indien treten auf, die die Dominanz der USA gefährden. Die Entwicklungen nach dem 11. September 2001 konzentrieren unseren Blick auf die Auseinandersetzung des Westens mit dem islamistischen Weltterrorismus.30 Die „Theorie des Partisanen“ ist hier Schmitts aktuelle Grundschrift. Daneben wurden in den letzten Jahren aber noch Probleme der Industrialisierung Asiens und des weltpolitischen Auftritts neuer Akteure virulent. Schmitt ahnte diese Folgen globaler Industrialisierung. Freilich sah er sie im politischen Rahmen des „Weltbürgerkriegs“ vor 1989. Immerhin fragte er ausdrücklich danach, was „das der wirtschaftlich-technisch-industriellen Entwicklung adäquate politische System“ sei. Wer diese Frage heute mit dem bloßen Hinweis auf „Demokratie“ oder den westlichen Verfassungsstaat beantwortet, schaut nicht genau genug hin. Wir sehen heute, wie der liberaldemokratische Verfassungsstandard politisch und ökonomisch unter Druck gerät. Die Berliner Republik ist nicht mehr die alte Bonner Bundesrepublik. So erahnte Schmitt aktuelle Entwicklungen jenseits der Spannung von Europa und den USA noch. Sein Spätwerk wird allerdings oft auf die Monographien „Nomos der Erde“ und „Theorie des Partisanen“ verkürzt, wobei die Diagnose der „Entthronung“ Europas oder die Kritik am imperialen Stil der US-Völkerrechtspolitik im Vordergrund stehen.

Eine überraschend positive Aufnahme findet Schmitts Großraumtheorie jetzt bei Jürgen Habermas, der seine früheren Überlegungen zur politischen Theorie nun durch eine deutliche Absage an den „Weltstaat“ und Überlegungen zu einem komplexen „Mehrebenensystem“ der internationalen Politik präzisierte.


Ein Einfluss von Schmitt auf Habermas wurde wiederholt diskutiert. Er lag in der Frankfurter Luft. Schmitt war so etwas wie ein Hausjurist der Kritischen Theorie und Frankfurter Schule. Otto Kirchheimer und Franz Neumann, Ernst Fraenkel und Walter Benjamin hatten alle vor 1933 ihren Schmitt gelesen. Kirchheimer hatte bei Schmitt promoviert; er und Neumann trafen Schmitt in Berlin häufiger. Dessen politische Betrachtung des Rechts und der „Volkssouveränität“ war ihnen für die Ausarbeitung einer sozialistischen Rechtstheorie interessant. Früh kritisierte Kirchheimer31 allerdings Schmitts „Begriffsrealismus“, worunter er eine geschichtsphilosophische Überspannung juristischer Kategorien verstand. Neumann32 adaptierte Schmitts rechtstheoretische Diagnose einer Auflösung des rechtsstaatlichen Gesetzesbegriffs dann auch für seine Beschreibung des nationalsozialistischen „Behemoth“. Seitdem gab es einen juristischen Links-Schmittismus, dem Habermas in Frankfurt begegnete.

vonwaldstein-carl-schmitt.jpgKirchheimer, Neumann und Fraenkel waren Schmitt nicht unkritisch gefolgt. Sie hatten ihn politisch wie rechtstheoretisch abgeklärt rezipiert, so dass Berührungsscheu nach 1949 nicht nötig schien. Aus dem „Fall“ Schmitt ließ sich deshalb auch kein „Fall“ Habermas machen. Der von Ellen Kennedy33 formulierte Verdacht lautete dennoch vereinfacht gesagt, dass Habermas von seinen frühen politischen Schriften bis in die Deutung der „Friedensbewegung“ der 80er Jahre hinein um den Preis ideologischer Verblendung von Schmitt beeinflusst war. Habermas’ Replik „Die Schrecken der Autonomie“ grenzte den eigenen, kommunikationstheoretisch entwickelten Begriff der „normativen Grundlagen der Demokratie“ von Schmitt ab. Demnach hält Habermas nicht Schmitts Liberalismuskritik für fruchtbar, sondern dessen Überlegungen zu den normativen Grundlagen der Demokratie. Er schreibt:

„Aber man muss nicht, wie Carl Schmitt und später Arnold Gehlen, einem Hauriouschen Institutionalismus anhängen und an die stiftende Kraft von Ideen glauben, um der legitimierenden Kraft des Selbstverständnisses einer etablierten Praxis eine nicht unerhebliche faktische Bedeutung beizumessen. In diesem trivialeren Sinn kann man das Interesse an den geistesgeschichtlichen Grundlagen der parlamentarischen Gesetzesherrschaft auch verstehen“34.

Die Kontroversen führten zu der Klärung, dass Habermas Schmitts polemischer Trennung von Liberalismus und Demokratie nicht folgte.35 Damals arbeitete Habermas seine Diskurstheorie weiter aus. In den 90iger Jahren konnte er dann deren Konsequenzen für die praktische Philosophie ziehen. So half ihm die Kontroverse auch, seine Rechtstheorie und politische Theorie weiter zu entwickeln. Deshalb wuchs die Bedeutung von Schmitts Verfassungslehre für Habermas noch. Seine Diskurstheorie des Rechts36 antwortet auf Schmitts Unterscheidung von Liberalismus und Demokratie mit der Darstellung eines „internen Zusammenhangs“ zwischen der demokratischen Volkssouveränität und den liberalen Menschenrechten. Ähnlich wie Schmitt knüpft Habermas37 zwar die normative Geltung rechtssoziologisch an eine politische „Normalität“, wobei er den Normalzustand stärker an normative Standards rückbindet. Neuere Studien zur politischen Theorie machen dann aber die grundsätzliche Distanz zu Schmitts Verfassungslehre sehr deutlich. Habermas kritisiert heute Schmitts nationalistische Auslegung der Demokratie und spricht von einer „Substantialisierung des Staatsvolkes“ zur „Gleichartigkeit von Volksgenossen“.38 Dagegen vertritt er eine „prozeduralistische“ Auffassung von der demokratischen Willensbildung in universalistischer, weltbürgerlicher Perspektive. Deshalb konfrontiert er Schmitt auch mit Kant.39 Dabei konzentriert er sich auf Schmitts späte völkerrechtliche Schriften und bezieht keine pazifistische Gegenposition, sondern wendet sich nur gegen die pauschale politische Verwerfung jeglicher moralischer Rechtfertigung von Kriegen. Habermas schreibt:

„Der wahre Kern [von Schmitts Kritik] besteht darin, dass eine unvermittelte Moralisierung von Recht und Politik tatsächlich jene Schutzzonen durchbricht, die wir für Rechtspersonen aus guten, und zwar moralischen Gründen gewahrt wissen wollen.“40 „Die richtige Antwort auf die Gefahr der unvermittelten Moralisierung der Machtpolitik ist daher ‚nicht die Entmoralisierung der Politik, sondern die demokratische Transformation der Moral in ein positiviertes System der Rechte mit rechtlichen Verfahren ihrer Anwendung und Durchsetzung.’ Der Menschenrechtsfundamentalismus wird nicht durch den Verzicht auf Menschenrechtspolitik vermieden, sondern allein durch die weltbürgerliche Transformation des Naturzustandes zwischen den Staaten in einen Rechtszustand.“41

Übereinstimmend mit Schmitt lehnt Habermas eine direkte Moralisierung des Völkerrechts ab. Er argumentiert aber für die Entwicklung rechtlicher Verfahren des Austrags moralischer Ansprüche in der Politik. Schmitt wies immer wieder darauf hin, dass die „Totalität“ des Politischen das „Schicksal“ (BP 76f.) bleibe. Gleiches ließe sich für das Moralische sagen. So beruht der Standpunkt des klassischen Völkerrechts auf einer moralisch-politischen Bejahung des Rechts zum Krieg. Er verrechtlicht eine historisch bedingte Verhältnisbestimmung von Moral und Politik. Weil Schmitt ein Ende der Epoche der Staatlichkeit sah, musste er eigentlich auch für eine Weiterentwicklung des Völkerrechts und für eine neue Verhältnisbestimmung von Moral, Politik und Recht argumentieren. Er tat es aber aus politischen Gründen nicht: Weil er das „besiegte“ Deutschland nur als „Objekt“ des Völkerrechts ansah, bestand er auf dem staatlichen Souveränitätsprinzip. Habermas' „nationalistische“ Auffassung von Schmitts Verfassungsbegriff ließe sich zwar entgegenhalten, dass Schmitt nicht jede politische Einheit mit einem „substantialistischen“ Nationsverständnis identifizierte, sondern selbst mit dem politischen Entscheidungscharakter auch die Geschichtlichkeit jeder politischen „Substanz“ betonte. Seine Kritik an Schmitts politischer Denunziation moralischer Ansprüche in der Politik und Forderung nach einer komplexeren Theorie trifft aber in den Kern der Sache.

Die Kontroverse regte Habermas positiv dazu an, seine Rechtstheorie und politische Theorie auszuarbeiten. Heute ist ganz unbestreitbar, dass er sich mit Schmitts Verfassungslehre zentral auseinandersetzte. Autobiographisch meint Habermas heute zwar, dass ihm das „‚Weimarer Syndrom’ zu einem negativen Bezugspunkt“42 wurde. Spätestens mit „Die Einbeziehung des Anderen“ wurde aber auch klar, dass es ihm nicht nur um „Schadensabwicklung“43 ging, sondern dass er auch von Schmitts Verfassungstheorie lernte. Stets hielt er dabei an seiner scharfen Ablehnung des Existentialismus und Nationalismus fest. Jenseits der unbeirrten Ablehnung der politischen Positionen näherte er sich aber einigen Positionen Schmitts differenziert an.

„Der gespaltene Westen“ nimmt nun eine komplexe Verhältnisbestimmung von europäischen und universalen politischen Institutionen vor, die Ansätze zur „Entstaatlichung des Politischen“ (GW 191) bei Schmitt würdigt und für eine „modernisierte Großraumtheorie“ plädiert. Politisch profiliert Habermas seine Überlegungen heute scharf gegen die amerikanische Bush-Regierung und scheint sich damit Schmitts Opposition „Großraum gegen Universalismus“ anzunähern. Genauer betrachtet trifft dies aber nicht zu: Es ist gerade die konsequente Integration des menschenrechtlichen Universalismus in das politische Pluriversum, die kritische Umdeutung, die ihm eine Annäherung ermöglicht. Deshalb belegt seine Auseinandersetzung heute die Möglichkeit einer kritischen Aktualisierung Schmitts.

Scharf kritisiert Habermas den Bruch des Völkerrechts durch die amerikanische Bush-Regierung. „Die normative Autorität Amerikas liegt in Trümmern“ (GW 34), meint er und hofft auf einen „Widerspruch von Bündnispartnern [...] aus guten normativen Gründen“ (GW 39), der nicht zuletzt durch die – von Schmitt eingehend analysierte - „Abstiegserfahrung“ des alten Europa im 20. Jahrhundert ermöglicht wurde; sie schuf die „reflexive Distanz“, „aus der Perspektive der Besiegten sich selbst in der zweifelhaften Rolle von Siegern wahrzunehmen“ (GW 51) und so die Demütigungen der arabischen Welt besser zu verstehen. Schmitt hing der alten, geschichtstheologisch grundierten Überzeugung an, dass Reiche kommen und vergehen und jedes Volk im Gang der Weltgeschichte nur eine geschichtliche Stunde hat. Habermas dagegen kennt eine „zweite Chance Europas“.44 Er betrachtet die Geschichte als Lernprozess, in dem Nationen durch leidvolle Erfahrungen lernen.

Im „Streit zwischen Integrationisten und Intergouvernementalisten“ (GW 73) argumentiert er heute für den Ausbau der „Regierungsfähigkeit“ der EU zum politischen „Global Player“. Habermas begrüßt die „Idee einer gemeinsamen, von Kerneuropa ausgehenden Außen- und Sicherheitspolitik“ gegenüber dem „hegemonialen Unilateralismus der US-Regierung“ (GW 90): Wenn „die EU im Hinblick auf die universalistische Ausgestaltung der internationalen Ordnung gegen die USA einen konkurrierenden Entwurf zur Geltung bringen will, oder wenn wenigstens aus der EU heraus ein politisches Gegengewicht gegen den hegemonialen Unilateralismus entstehen soll, dann muss Europa Selbstbewusstsein und ein eigenes Profil gewinnen“ (GW 53). Habermas akzeptiert nun Schmitts Kritik am „diskriminierenden“ Kriegsbegriff und dessen Unterscheidung zwischen einer „Moralisierung und Verrechtlichung der internationalen Beziehungen“ (GW 103f). Er optiert für ein „globales Mehrebenensystem“, das nicht die Entwicklung zum Weltstaat nimmt, sondern die staatliche Ebene dem mittleren Bereich – in Europa der EU – zuordnet (GW 107) und dadurch eine „Weltinnenpolitik ohne Weltregierung“ ermöglicht.45 Kant sah sich politisch gezwungen, für einen „Völkerbund als Surrogat für den Völkerstaat“ (GW 125) zu optieren. Habermas wendet diese strategische Option in ein prinzipielles Argument. Er lehnt die „Weltrepublik“ als Lösung ab und optiert für eine „dezentrierte Weltgesellschaft“ im Mehrebenensystem ohne „gewaltmonopolisierende Weltregierung“ (GW 134ff). Eine „politisch verfasste Weltgesellschaft“ betrachtet er als mögliche und wünschbare Alternative zur „Weltrepublik“ und nähert sich damit Schmitt an, der den hegemonialen „Großraum“ gegen den weltstaatlichen „Universalismus“ setzte. Deshalb beschließt er seine Sammlung auch mit der Alternative „Kant oder Carl Schmitt?“ (GW 187ff) Zwar distanziert er sich durchgängig vom existentialistischen „Faschisten“ (GW 31, vgl. 26, 103f, 153). Dennoch findet er bei Schmitt nun anregende Ansätze zu „einer Entstaatlichung des Politischen“ (GW 191) und meint abschließend, dass „sich eine modernisierte Großraumtheorie als ein nicht ganz unwahrscheinlicher Gegenentwurf zur unipolaren Weltordnung des hegemonialen Liberalismus“ (GW 192f) empfiehlt.

Habermas differenziert Schmitts „moralkritisches Argument“.46 Wie Schmitt lehnt er den „Menschenrechtsfundamentalismus“ ab, schränkt ihn aber auf die „unvermittelte Moralisierung von Recht und Politik“ ein und besteht auf der moralphilosophischen Fundierung des Rechts, während Schmitt sich nur auf die juristische Beobachterperspektive beschränkte und nur den Missbrauch der Moralisierung und Politisierung des Rechts kritisierte, ohne seine eigenen moralischen Kriterien philosophisch auszuweisen. Beim Kosovo-Krieg rechtfertigte Habermas die militärische Intervention zwar als „Vorgriff auf einen künftigen kosmopolitischen Zustand“47 am Rande des Völkerrechtsbruchs. Heute aber distanziert er sich von einer solchen politischen Instrumentalisierung und richtet seine ganze Sammlung gegen die aktuelle Aufweichung des Völkerrechts. Er modernisiert nun die Großraumtheorie, mit deren Option für den politischen Pluralismus gegen den weltstaatlichen Universalismus, indem er den weltbürgerlichen Universalismus nicht gegen den „Großraum“ ausspielt, sondern ihn im Mehrebenensystem mit dem politischen Pluralismus der Großräume verbindet und den europäischen Zentralstaat dabei als Gegengewicht gegen die hegemoniale USA mit „Vorbildfunktion für andere Weltregionen“ (GW 177) preist. Seine Überlegungen zur Konstitutionalisierung des Völkerrechts sind deshalb mit Fragen nach der Konstitutionalisierung der EU eng verbunden. In dieser Verknüpfung zweier aktueller Konstitutionalisierungsprobleme liegt der wichtigste theoretische Anstoß von „Der gespaltene Westen“. Sie ersetzt Schmitts politische Alternative „Großraum gegen Universalismus“ durch eine differenzierte Verhältnisbestimmung im „Mehrebenensystem“, die den moralischen Anspruch des Universalismus in die Konstruktion eines globalen „politischen Pluriversums“ integriert. In diesen Überlegungen ist einer der wichtigsten Anstöße Schmitts enthalten: den Prozess der Europäisierung nämlich im globalen Kontext der „legalen Weltrevolution“ zu sehen. Habermas gibt ein Beispiel für eine universalistische Modernisierung der Großraumkonzeption. „Politischer Großraum mit menschenrechtlichem Universalismus“ statt „Großraum gegen Universalismus“ lautet gewissermaßen seine Antwort. Diese Adaption der Großraumlehre für das politische Projekt der Europäischen Union entspricht zwar nicht Schmitts politischer Antwort, Alternativen jenseits des alten Europa zu suchen. Schon weil solche Alternativen heute aber kaum zu finden sind, sollte man die Ansprüche an Verfassungsalternativen auch reduzieren und die kleinen Unterschiede nicht gering schätzen. Wenn die Wahl zwischen Lebensformen eingeschränkt ist und politische Verfassungsentscheidungen nicht mehr fundamentale ökonomische und kulturelle Differenzen betreffen, gibt es immer noch Optionen. Es macht noch einen Unterschied, ob man heute in Europa oder anderswo lebt. Wer diesen Unterschied nivelliert, begibt sich seiner Optionen. Deshalb lässt sich Schmitts Großraumtheorie heute nur in einer revidierten Fassung aktualisieren, die den politischen Pluralismus mit einem moralischen Universalismus verbindet.

Fußnoten:


1 Carl Schmitt, Der Begriff des Politischen. Text von 1963 mit einem Vorwort und drei Corollarien, Berlin 1963 (BP), 20; dazu vgl. Christoph Schönberger, Der Begriff des Staates im „Begriff des Politischen“, in: Reinhard Mehring (Hg.), Carl Schmitt: Der Begriff des Politischen. Ein kooperativer Kommentar, Berlin 2003, 21-44. Folgende Ausgaben und Siglen Schmitts werden hier noch zitiert: Positionen und Begriffe im Kampf mit Weimar - Genf - Versailles, Hamburg 1940 (PB); Der Nomos der Erde im Jus Publicum Europaeum, Köln 1950 (NE); Ex Captivitate Salus. Erinnerungen der Zeit 1945/47, Köln 1950 (ECS); Donoso Cortés in gesamteuropäischer Interpretation, Köln 1950 (DC); Verfassungsrechtliche Aufsätze aus den Jahren 1924-1954. Materialien zu einer Verfassungslehre, Berlin 1958 (VRA); Theorie des Partisanen. Zwischenbemerkung zum Begriff des Politischen, Berlin 1963 (TP); Staat, Großraum, Nomos. Arbeiten aus den Jahren 1916-1969, hrsg. von G. Maschke, Berlin 1995 (SGN); Carl Schmitt und Álvaro d’ Ors. Briefwechsel, hrsg. Montserrat Herrero, Berlin 2004 (SdO); Frieden oder Pazifismus? Arbeiten zum Völkerrecht und zur internationalen Politik 1924-1978, hrsg. Günter Maschke, Berlin 2005 (FP)
2 Carl Schmitt, Der Begriff des Politischen. Vorwort von 1971 zur italienischen Ausgabe, in: Helmut Quaritsch (Hg.), Complexio Oppositorum. Über Carl Schmitt, Berlin 1988, 269-273, hier: 271
3 Theoretisch besonders ambitioniert: Friedrich Balke, Der Staat nach seinem Ende. Die Versuchung Carl Schmitts, München 1996
4 Jürgen Habermas, Der gespaltene Westen, Frankfurt 2004 (GW)
5 Christoph Schönberger, Die Europäische Union als Bund. Zugleich ein Beitrag zur Verabschiedung des Staatenbund-Bundesstaat-Schemas, in: Archiv des öffentlichen Rechts 129 (2004), 81-120
6 Lothar Gruchmann, Nationalsozialistische Großraumordnung. Die Konstruktion einer ‚deutschen Monroe-Doktrin’, Stuttgart 1962; Mathias Schmoeckel, Die Großraumtheorie. Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte der Völkerrechtswissenschaft im Dritten Reich, Berlin 1994; ferner Felix Blindow, Carl Schmitts Reichsordnung. Strategien für einen europäischen Großraum, Berlin 1999. Maschke meinte in überspannter Polemik über Gruchmann und Schmoeckel: „Beide Autoren verharren ganz im Banne der re-education“ (SGN 358).
7 Schmitt nahm zu diesem Vorwurf schon im Rahmen seiner Nürnberger Vernehmung Stellung: Beantwortung der Frage: Wieweit haben Sie die theoretische Untermauerung der Hitlerschen Grossraumpolitik gefördert?, in: Helmut Quaritsch (Hg.), Carl Schmitt: Antworten in Nürnberg, Berlin 2000, 68ff
8 Andreas Koenen, Der Fall Carl Schmitts. Sein Aufstieg zum Kronjuristen des Dritten Reiches, Darmstadt 1995
9 Dazu meine Besprechung in der Internet-Zeitschrift HSK vom 25.5.2005
10 Carl Schmitt, Die Rheinlande als Objekt internationaler Politik, Köln 1925, in: FP 26-39
11 Dazu vgl. Carl Schmitt, Der Status quo und der Friede (1925), in: PB 33-42 und FP 51-59
12 Dazu vgl. Ernst-Wolfgang Böckenförde, Die Schweiz – Vorbild für Europa?, in: ders., Staat, Nation, Europa, Frankfurt 1999, 25-33
13 Dazu schon Carl Schmitt, Politische Romantik, 1919, 2. Aufl. München 1925; vgl. auch: ders., Illyrien (1925), in: SGN 483-488
14 Dazu orientierend Axel Schildt, Konservatismus in Deutschland. Von den Anfängen im 18. Jahrhundert bis zur Gegenwart, München 1998
15 Zur Kritik an einer einseitig marktwirtschaftlichen Integration der EU vgl. Ernst-Wolfgang Böckenförde, Welchen Weg geht Europa?, in: ders., Staat, Nation, Europa, Frankfurt 1999, 68-102
16 Frieder Günther, Denken vom Staat her. Die bundesdeutsche Staatsrechtslehre zwischen Dezision und Integration 1949-1970, München 2004
17 Brief vom 12.2.1960 an d’Ors, in: Carl Schmitt und Álvaro d’Ors. Briefwechsel, hrsg. Montserrat Herrero, Berlin 2004, 200
18 Aufschlussreich ist hier etwa der Briefwechsel mit Armin Mohler: Carl Schmitt, Briefwechsel mit einem seiner Schüler, hrsg. Armin Mohler, Berlin 1995
19 Carl Schmitt am 11.5.1961 an d’Ors, in: Carl Schmitt und Álvaro d’Ors. Briefwechsel, hrsg. Montserrat Herrero, Berlin 2004, 200
20 Schmitt am 17.7.1959 an d’Ors, in: Carl Schmitt und Álvaro d’Ors. Briefwechsel, 196, vgl. 242
21 Schmitt an d’Ors, Brief vom 6.1.1964, in: Carl Schmitt und Álvaro d’Ors. Briefwechsel, 236
22 Schmitt an d’Ors, Brief vom 3.3.1958, in: Carl Schmitt und Álvaro d’Ors. Briefwechsel, 185. Schmitt spricht hier davon, dass er auf Wunsch des Verlegers „noch einen Band völkerrechtlicher und einen 3. Band rechtsphilosophischer Aufsätze folgen lassen“ wolle. Diese briefliche Bemerkung ist in doppelter Hinsicht wichtig: Einerseits markiert sie Schmitts Selbstverständnis seiner Arbeitsschwerpunkte: Schmitt spricht von verfassungsrechtlichen, völkerrechtlichen und auch rechtsphilosophischen Aufsätzen. Andererseits zeigt sie, dass spätere Pläne zu weiteren Sammlungen, die im Nachlass belegt sind, nicht nur von den Schülern, sondern auch von Schmitt und seinem Verleger ausgingen. Wichtig ist auch, dass diese Dispositionen erheblich von den Editionen abweichen, die posthum durch Maschke realisiert wurden.
23 Schmitt an d’Ors, Brief datiert Weihnachten 1958, in: Carl Schmitt und Álvaro d’Ors. Briefwechsel, 191
24 Schmitt an d’Ors, Gründonnerstag 1950, in: Carl Schmitt und Álvaro d’Ors. Briefwechsel, 101
25 Dazu bes. Schmitt an d’Ors, Brief vom Gründonnerstag 1950, in: Carl Schmitt und Álvaro d’Ors. Briefwechsel, 99ff („Sie, lieber Don Álvaro, haben in ihrem Land den Bürgerkrieg in sich ausgetragen.“); vgl. DC 18f („sah, dass der innereuropäische Bürgerkrieg eine europäische und schließlich planetarische Angelegenheit werden musste“); vgl. SGN 592 („Im heutigen weltweiten Kampf war Spanien die erste Nation, die aus eigener Kraft und auf eine solche Weise siegte, dass nunmehr alle nicht-kommunistischen Nationen sich, was diesen Aspekt angeht, gegenüber Spanien auszuweisen haben.“)
26 Dazu vgl. Wilhelm Grewe, Epochen der Völkerrechtsgeschichte, Baden-Baden 1984.
27 So verstand es auch d’Ors, in: Carl Schmitt und Álvaro d’Ors. Briefwechsel, 152
28 Carl Schmitt, Die legale Weltrevolution. Politischer Mehrwert als Prämie auf juristische Legalität und Superlegalität, in: Der Staat 17 (1978), 321-339, hier: 329
29 Carl Schmitt, Der Begriff des Politischen. Vorwort von 1971 zur italienischen Ausgabe, in: Helmut Quaritsch (Hg.), Complexio Oppositorum. Über Carl Schmitt, Berlin 1988, 269-273, hier: 269
30 So jetzt Herfried Münkler, Imperien. Die Logik der Weltherrschaft – vom Alten Rom bis zu den Vereinigten Staaten, Berlin 2005
31 Otto Kirchheimer, Bemerkungen zu Carl Schmitt ‚Legalität und Legitimität’, in: ders., Von der Weimarer Republik zum Faschismus, Frankfurt 1976, 113-151
32 Franz Neumann, The Governance of the Rule of Law, London 1936; ders., Behemoth. The Structure and Practice of National Socialism, New York 1942
33 Vgl. Ellen Kennedy, Carl Schmitt und die „Frankfurter Schule“. Deutsche Liberalismuskritik im 20.Jahrhundert, in: Geschichte und Gesellschaft 12 (1986), S. 380-419.
34 Jürgen Habermas, Die Schrecken der Autonomie. Carl Schmitt auf Englisch, in: ders., Eine Art Schadensabwicklung, Frankfurt 1987, S. 101-114, hier: 112; vgl. auch ders., Carl Schmitt in der politischen Geistesgeschichte der frühen Bundesrepublik, in: ders., Die Normalität einer Berliner Republik, Frankfurt 1995, S. 112-122.
35 Dazu vgl. Alfons Söllner, Jenseits von Carl Schmitt. Wissenschaftsgeschichtliche Richtigstellungen zur politischen Theorie im Umkreis der ‚Frankfurter Schule’, in: Geschichte und Gesellschaft 12 (1986), 502-529; Ulrich K. Preuß, Carl Schmitt und die Frankfurter Schule: Deutsche Liberalismuskritik im 20. Jahrhundert. Anmerkungen zu dem Aufsatz von Ellen Kennedy, in: Geschichte und Gesellschaft 13 (1987), 400-418; Peter Haungs, Diesseits oder jenseits Carl Schmitt? Zu einer Kontroverse um die ‚Frankfurter Schule’ und Jürgen Habermas, in: Politik, Philosophie, Praxis. Festschrift für Wilhelm Hennis, Stuttgart 1988, 526-544; Hartmuth Becker, Die Parlamentarismuskritik bei Carl Schmitt und Jürgen Habermas, Berlin 1994; Christian Schüle, Die Parlamentarismuskritik bei Carl Schmitt und Jürgen Habermas, Neuried 1998
36 Jürgen Habermas, Faktizität und Geltung. Beiträge zur Diskurstheorie des Rechts und des demokratischen Rechtsstaaats, Frankfurt 1992
37 Jürgen Habermas, Die Normalität einer Berliner Republik, Frankfurt 1995
38 Jürgen Habermas, Inklusion - Einbeziehen oder Ausschließen?, in: ders., Die Einbeziehung des Anderen. Studien zur politischen Theorie, Frankfurt 1996, S. 160ff.
39 Jürgen Habermas, Kants Idee des ewigen Friedens - aus dem historischen Abstand von 200 Jahren, in: ders., Die Einbeziehung des Anderen, S. 192-236, bes. S. 226ff.
40 Ebd., S. 233.
41 Ebd., S. 236; Habermas zitiert K. Günther.
42 Jürgen Habermas,, Öffentlicher Raum und politische Öffentlichkeit. Lebensgeschichtliche Wurzeln von zwei Gedankenmotiven, in: ders., Zwischen Naturalismus und Religion, Frankfurt 2005, 15-26, hier: 24
43 Dazu vgl. Jürgen Habermas, Eine Art Schadensabwicklung, Frankfurt 1987, bes. 101ff
44 Jürgen Habermas, Vergangenheit als Zukunft, Zürich 1990, 97ff
45 Dazu jetzt weiterführend Jürgen Habermas, Eine politische Verfassung für die pluralistische Weltgesellschaft?, in: ders., Zwischen Naturalismus und Religion, Frankfurt 2005, 324-365
46 Jürgen Habermas, Die Einbeziehung des Anderen, 233
47 Jürgen Habermas, Zeit der Übergänge, Frankfurt 2001, 35