Ok

En poursuivant votre navigation sur ce site, vous acceptez l'utilisation de cookies. Ces derniers assurent le bon fonctionnement de nos services. En savoir plus.

dimanche, 01 juillet 2018

The Ancients on Speaking Rightly

ciceronorateur.jpg

The Ancients on Speaking Rightly

We are all faced with the challenge of speaking, and living, truths which are felt to be offensive by a great many of our countrymen, not to mention the powers that be. This is not a new problem. By definition, the natural diversity of men means that knowledge of the truth is highly unequally distributed and those who know most about the truth are necessarily a tiny minority. This minority must alone face the prejudices and ignorance of the masses and the violence of the state. The Ancients are in universal agreement in saying that the truth must be spoken carefully, with due regard for one’s social position, social harmony, and the general society’s necessarily limited ability to grasp the truth.

Hesiod, that most practical Grecian poet, said: “The tongue’s best treasure among men is when it is sparing, and its greatest charm is when it goes in measure. If you speak ill, you may well hear greater yourself” (Works and Days, 720-25). He advised to “never venture to insult a man for accursed soul-destroying poverty, which is the dispensation of the blessed ones who are for ever” (W&D, 715-20). And ought we not to be even kinder to those suffering from poverty of culture and soul?

On the positive side, Hesiod also eloquently described the almost magical ability of the heaven-blessed king to unite his community through right speech: “upon his tongue” the Muses “shed sweet dew, and out of his mouth the words flow honeyed; and the peoples all look to him as he decides what is to prevail with his straight judgments” (Theogony, 80-90). There was a unique ideal of isogoria – equality or freedom of speech, the right for each citizen to speak before the public –  in ancient Greece. This right however was, even for citizens, not unqualified and entailed responsibility, particularly with regard to the social consequences of one’s words.

In a faraway India, the followers of the Buddha paired gracious, truthful speech with perfect self-control. According to the Gandharan Dharmapada, Gautama said:

One who utters speech that isn’t rough
But instructive and truthful
So that he offends no one,
Him I call a Brahmin.

The one who does no wrong
Through body, speech, or mind,
Restrained in the three ways,
Him I call a Brahmin.

One perfectly calmed, ceased,
A gentle speaker, not puffed up,
Who illuminates the meaning and the Dharma,
Him I call a Brahmin. (Dharmapada, 1.22-24)

Lest one think this is but the fearful self-censorship of peasants and monks, the Norse poets have Odin say much the same thing. The Sayings of the High One (Hávamál) contain several verses advising caution in speech. Odin says:

He’s a wretched man, of evil disposition,
the one who makes fun of everything,
he doesn’t know the one thing he ought to know:
that he is not devoid of faults (Hávamál, 22)

Wise that man seems who retreats
when one guest is insulting another;
the man who mocks at a feast doesn’t know for sure
whether he shoots off his mouth amid enemies. (Háv., 31)[1] [2]

For, as Odin adds: “For those words which one man says to another, often he gets paid back” (Háv., 65). The foul-speaking, friendless man goes to the Assembly and finds himself “among the multitude and has few people to speak for him” (Háv., 62).[2] [3]

One must have the right speech, the most truthful speech possible, according to time and place and audience. The most important truths – those about life and death, about purpose and community – are rarely apprehended explicitly and rationally, nor do they need to be, operating at a far deeper psychological level. Your whole demeanor, your generous attitude ought to, without words, invite your kinsmen to live seriously and love their people. For as Aristotle said, so far as persuasion is concerned, the speaker’s “character contains almost the strongest proof of all” (Rhetoric, 1.2)

Unless you are a prophet (feel free to “announce yourself”), you must work with existing, living traditions, national and spiritual, whatever their imperfections, for these resonate with people and, if appealed to, invite them to higher purposes. (Actually, even the prophets, both ancient and modern, appealed to, expanded upon, and transformed existing traditions.) That which is bad in a tradition can be graciously understated, that which is good celebrated and glorified. You do not convince people with statistics and syllogisms, but by touching their soul. In terms of ethics, a living tradition is worth more than all the libraries and databases in the world.

All this is not to say that one should not say anything offensive to society. All the traditions are equally clear: there are times when truth must be adhered to openly, necessarily meaning the breaking of ties with society, one’s own family, one’s life. The point I would make is that this must not be done carelessly, but with self-mastery and effectiveness. The gains in terms of knowledge of truth must outweigh the costs in terms of social entropy, division, and hatred. Your words are actions. A generation cannot, and should not, be expected to abandon the religion and fundamental values it was brought up with (we ought to have a compassionate thought for the Boomers here). In all this, one should trust one’s instincts rather than calculate. Some truths are spoken in vain if one lacks power. As a Spartan once said: “My friend, your words require the backing of a city” (Plutarch, “Sayings of Lysander,” 8). Socrates lived cryptically his entire life, confounding convention and encouraging the good, choosing to die at precisely the moment when this would make truth resonate for the ages.

aristotelesrhetoric.jpgAbove all, we must shed from within ourselves the idea that we, personally, are “entitled” to free speech or that the masses can welcome the whole truth. If we still have these notions, then we are in fact still slaves to our time’s democratic naïveté. No, free speech is at once a duty and a prize, to be exercised only once we have become worthy, by our own personal excellence and self-mastery. That was, at any rate, the way Diogenes the Cynic saw things, calling free speech “the finest thing of all in life.”[3] [4] But this free speech was not to be used carelessly: the Dog’s notoriously vicious wit and outrageous behavior were always meant to benefit others educationally, metaphorically biting his “friends, so as to save them.”[4] [5] Do not worry about your right to freedom of speech: try to be worthy of freedom of speech.

On this point, I can do better here than quote the philosopher-emperor Julian, in his letter denouncing the so-called “Cynics” of his day, who had degenerated into something like a band of lazy and offensive hippies (my emphasis):

Therefore let him who wishes to be a Cynic philosopher not adopt merely their long cloak or wallet or staff or their way of wearing the hair, as though he were like a man walking unshaved and illiterate in a village that lacked barbers’ shops and schools, but let him consider that reason rather than a staff and a certain plan of life rather than a wallet are the mintmarks of the Cynic philosophy. And freedom of speech he must not employ until he have first proved how much he is worth, as I believe was the case with Crates and Diogenes. For they were so far from bearing with a bad grace any threat of fortune, whether one call such threats caprice or wanton insult, that once when he had been captured by pirates Diogenes joked with them; as for Crates he gave his property to the state, and being physically deformed he made fun of his own lame leg and hunched shoulders. But when his friends gave an entertainment he used to go, whether invited or not, and would reconcile his nearest friends if he learned that they had quarrelled. He used to reprove them not harshly but with a charming manner and not so as to seem to persecute those whom he wished to reform, but as though he wished to be of use both to them and to the bystanders. Yet this was not the chief end and aim of those Cynics, but as I said their main concern was how they might themselves attain to happiness and, as I think, they occupied themselves with other men only in so far as they comprehended that man is by nature a social and political animal; and so they aided their fellow-citizens, not only by practicing but by preaching as well. (To the Uneducated Cynics, 201-02)

Your words are a side effect, a very secondary one, of your way of life. How are you living?

Bibliography

 Aristotle (trans. H. C. Lawson-Tancred), The Art of Rhetoric (London: Penguin, 2004).

Hard, Robin, (ed. and trans.), Diogenes the Cynic: Sayings and Anecdotes with Other Popular Moralists (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012).

Hesiod (trans. M. L. West), Theogony and Works and Days (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988).

Julian (trans. Emily Wright), To the Uneducated Cynics: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/To_the_uneducated_Cynics [6]

Larrington, Carolyne (trans.), The Poetic Edda (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014).

Plutarch (trans. Richard Talbert and Ian Scott-Kilvert), On Sparta (London: Penguin, 2005)

Roebuck, Valerie (trans.), The Dhammapada (London: Penguin, 2010).

Notes

[1] [7] One could also cite verse 32:

Many men are devoted to one another
and yet they fight at feasts;
amongst men there will always be strife,
guest squabbling with guest.

[2] [8] More generally, one is struck at the degree to which the ethos of the Hávamál are in harmony with those of Homer and Hesiod, no doubt reflecting similar ways of life as farmers, wanderers, and conquerors.

[3] [9] Robin Hard (ed. and trans.), Diogenes the Cynic: Sayings and Anecdotes with Other Popular Moralists (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012), 50.

[4] [10] Ibid., 24.

 

Article printed from Counter-Currents Publishing: https://www.counter-currents.com

URL to article: https://www.counter-currents.com/2018/06/the-ancients-on-speaking-rightly/

URLs in this post:

[1] Image: https://www.counter-currents.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Freedom-of-Speech.jpg

[2] [1]: #_ftn1

[3] [2]: #_ftn2

[4] [3]: #_ftn3

[5] [4]: #_ftn4

[6] https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/To_the_uneducated_Cynics: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/To_the_uneducated_Cynics

[7] [1]: #_ftnref1

[8] [2]: #_ftnref2

[9] [3]: #_ftnref3

[10] [4]: #_ftnref4

 

 

vendredi, 23 mars 2018

The Black Sun: Dionysus, Nietzsche, and Greek Myth

dionys10.jpg

The Black Sun: Dionysus, Nietzsche, and Greek Myth

Gwendolyn Taunton

Ex: https://manticorepress.net


Affirmation of life even it its strangest and sternest problems, the will to life rejoicing in its own inexhaustibility through the sacrifice of its highest types – that is what I call the Dionysian…Not so as to get rid of pity and terror, not so as to purify oneself of a dangerous emotion through its vehement discharge – it was thus Aristotle understood it – but, beyond pity and terror, to realize in oneself the eternal joy of becoming – that joy which also encompasses joy in destruction…And with that I again return to that place from which I set out –The Birth of Tragedy was my first revaluation of all values: with that I again plant myself in the soil out of which I draw all that I will and can – I, the last disciple of the philosopher Dionysus – I, the teacher of the eternal recurrence(Nietzsche, “What I Owe to the Ancients”)

It is a well known fact that most of the early writings of the German philosopher, Friedrich Nietzsche, revolve around a prognosis of duality concerning the two Hellenic deities, Apollo and Dionysus. This dichotomy, which first appears in The Birth of Tragedy, is subsequently modified by Nietzsche in his later works so that the characteristics of the God Apollo are reflected and absorbed by his polar opposite, Dionysus. Though this topic has been examined frequently by philosophers, it has not been examined sufficiently in terms of its relation to the Greek myths which pertain to the two Gods in question. Certainly, Nietzsche was no stranger to Classical myth, for prior to composing his philosophical works, Nietzsche was a professor of Classical Philology at the University of Basel. This interest in mythology is also illustrated in his exploration of the use of mythology as tool by which to shape culture. The Birth of Tragedy is based upon Greek myth and literature, and also contains much of the groundwork upon which he would develop his later premises. Setting the tone at the very beginning of The Birth of Tragedy, Nietzsche writes:[spacer height=”20px”]

We shall have gained much for the science of aesthetics, once we perceive not merely by logical inference, but with the immediate certainty of vision, that the continuous development of art is bound up with the Apollonian and Dionysian duality – just as procreation depends on the duality of the sexes, involving perpetual strife with only periodically intervening reconciliations. The terms Dionysian and Apollonian we borrow from the Greeks, who disclose to the discerning mind the profound mysteries of their view of art, not, to be sure, in concepts, but in the intensely clear figures of their gods. Through Apollo and Dionysus, the two art deities of the Greeks, we come to recognize that in the Greek world there existed a tremendous opposition…[1]

Initially then, Nietzsche’s theory concerning Apollo and Dionysus was primarily concerned with aesthetic theory, a theory which he would later expand to a position of predominance at the heart of his philosophy. Since Nietzsche chose the science of aesthetics as the starting point for his ideas, it is also the point at which we shall begin the comparison of his philosophy with the Hellenic Tradition.

God-Bacchus-2.jpg

The opposition between Apollo and Dionysus is one of the core themes within The Birth of Tragedy, but in Nietzsche’s later works, Apollo is mentioned only sporadically, if at all, and his figure appears to have been totally superseded by his rival Dionysus. In The Birth of Tragedy, Apollo and Dionysus are clearly defined by Nietzsche, and the spheres of their influence are carefully demarcated. In Nietzsche’s later writings, Apollo is conspicuous by the virtue of his absence – Dionysus remains and has ascended to a position of prominence in Nietzsche’s philosophy, but Apollo, who was an integral part of the dichotomy featured in The Birth of Tragedy, has disappeared, almost without a trace. There is in fact, a simple reason for the disappearance of Apollo – he is in fact still present, within the figure of Dionysus. What begins in The Birth of Tragedy as a dichotomy shifts to synthesis in Nietzsche’s later works, with the name Dionysus being used to refer to the unified aspect of both Apollo and Dionysus, in what Nietzsche believes to the ultimate manifestation of both deities. In early works the synthesis between Apollo & Dionysus is incomplete – they are still two opposing principles – “Thus in The Birth of Tragedy, Apollo, the god of light, beauty and harmony is in opposition to Dionysian drunkenness and chaos”.[2] The fraternal union of Apollo & Dionysus that forms the basis of Nietzsche’s view is, according to him, symbolized in art, and specifically in Greek tragedy.[3] Greek tragedy, by its fusion of dialogue and chorus; image and music, exhibits for Nietzsche the union of the Apollonian and Dionysian, a union in which Dionysian passion and dithyrambic madness merge with Apollonian measure and lucidity, and original chaos and pessimism are overcome in a tragic attitude that is affirmative and heroic.[4]

The moment of Dionysian “terror” arrives when […] a cognitive failure or wandering occurs, when the principle of individuation, which is Apollo’s “collapses” […] and gives way to another perception, to a contradiction of appearances and perhaps even to their defeasibility as such (their “exception”). It occurs “when [one] suddenly loses faith in […] the cognitive form of phenomena. Just as dreams […] satisfy profoundly our innermost being, our common [deepest] ground [der gemeinsame Untergrund], so too, symmetrically, do “terror” and “blissful” ecstasy…well up from the innermost depths [Grunde] of man once the strict controls of the Apollonian principle relax. Then “we steal a glimpse into the nature of the Dionysian”.[5]

apollonooooooo.jpgThe Apollonian and the Dionysian are two cognitive states in which art appears as the power of nature in man.[6] Art for Nietzsche is fundamentally not an expression of culture, but is what Heidegger calls “eine Gestaltung des Willens zur Macht” a manifestation of the will to power. And since the will to power is the essence of being itself, art becomes “die Gestaltung des Seienden in Ganzen,” a manifestation of being as a whole.[7] This concept of the artist as a creator, and of the aspect of the creative process as the manifestation of the will, is a key component of much of Nietzsche’s thought – it is the artist, the creator who diligently scribes the new value tables. Taking this into accord, we must also allow for the possibility that Thus Spake Zarathustra opens the doors for a new form of artist, who rather than working with paint or clay, instead provides the Uebermensch, the artist that etches their social vision on the canvas of humanity itself.  It is in the character of the Uebermensch that we see the unification of the Dionysian (instinct) and Apollonian (intellect) as the manifestation of the will to power, to which Nietzsche also attributes the following tautological value “The Will to Truth is the Will to Power”.[8] This statement can be interpreted as meaning that by attributing the will to instinct, truth exists as a naturally occurring phenomena – it exists independently of the intellect, which permits many different interpretations of the truth in its primordial state. The truth lies primarily in the will, the subconscious, and the original raw instinctual state that Nietzsche identified with Dionysus. In The Gay Science Nietzsche says:

For the longest time, thinking was considered as only conscious, only now do we discover the truth that the greatest part of our intellectual activity lies in the unconscious […] theories of Schopenhauer and his teaching of the primacy of the will over the intellect. The unconscious becomes a source of wisdom and knowledge that can reach into the fundamental aspects of human existence, while the intellect is held to be an abstracting and falsifying mechanism that is directed, not toward truth but toward “mastery and possession.” [9]

Thus the will to power originates not in the conscious, but in the subconscious. Returning to the proposed dichotomy betwixt Dionysus and Apollo, in his later works the two creative impulses become increasingly merged, eventually reaching a point in his philosophy wherein Dionysus refers not to the singular God, but rather a syncretism of Apollo and Dionysus in equal quantity. “The two art drives must unfold their powers in a strict proportion, according to the law of eternal justice.”[10] For Nietzsche, the highest goal of tragedy is achieved in the harmony between two radically distinct realms of art, between the principles that govern the Apollonian plastic arts and epic poetry and those that govern the Dionysian art of music.[11] To be complete and  to derive ultimate mastery from the creative process, one must harness both the impulses represented by Apollo and Dionysus – the instinctual urge and potent creative power of Dionysus, coupled with the skill and intellectualism of Apollo’s craftsmanship – in sum both natural creative power from the will and the skills learnt within a social grouping. This definition will hold true for all creative ventures and is not restricted to the artistic process; ‘will’ and ‘skill’ need to act in harmony and concord.

apollo-chariot-1.jpg

In Nietzsche’s philosophy, Apollo and Dionysus are so closely entwined as to render them inseparable. Apollo, as the principle of appearance and of individuation, is that which grants appearance to the Dionysian form, without for Apollo, Dionysus remains bereft of physical appearance.

That [Dionysus] appears at all with such epic precision and clarity is the work of the dream interpreter, Apollo […] His appearances are at best instances of “typical ‘ideality,’” epiphanies of the “idea” or “idol”, mere masks and after images (Abbilde[er]). To “appear” Dionysus must take on a form.[12]

In his natural state, Dionysus has no form, it is only by reflux with Apollo, who represents the nature of form that Dionysus, as the nature of the formless, can appear to us at all. Likewise, Apollo without Dionysus becomes lost in a world of form – the complex levels of abstraction derived from the Dionysian impulse are absent. Neither god can function effectively without the workings of the other.  Dionysus appears, after all, only thanks to the Apollonian principle. This is Nietzsche’s rendition of Apollo and Dionysus, his reworking of the Hellenic mythos, forged into a powerful philosophy that has influenced much of the modern era. Yet how close is this new interpretation to the original mythology of the ancient Greeks, and how much of this is Nietzsche’s own creation? It is well known that Nietzsche and his contemporary Wagner both saw the merit in reshaping old myths to create new socio-political values. To fully understand Nietzsche’s retelling of the Dionysus myth and separate the modern ideas from that of the ancients, we need to examine the Hellenic sources on Dionysus.

apolyre.jpgMyths of Dionysus are often used to depict a stranger or an outsider to the community as a repository for the mysterious and prohibited features of another culture. Unsavory characteristics that the Greeks tend to ascribe to foreigners are attributed to him, and various myths depict his initial rejection by the authority of the polis – yet Dionysus’ birth at Thebes, as well as the appearance of his name on Linear B tablets, indicates that this is no stranger, but in fact a native, and that the rejected foreign characteristics ascribed to him are in fact Greek characteristics.[13] Rather than being a representative of foreign culture what we are in fact observing in the character of Dionysus is the archetype of the outsider; someone who sits outside the boundaries of the cultural norm, or who represents the disruptive element in society which either by its nature effects a change or is removed by the culture which its very presence threatens to alter. Dionysus represents as Plutarch observed, “the whole wet element” in nature – blood, semen, sap, wine, and all the life giving juice. He is in fact a synthesis of both chaos and form, of orgiastic impulses and visionary states – at one with the life of nature and its eternal cycle of birth and death, of destruction and creation.[14]  This disruptive element, by being associated with the blood, semen, sap, and wine is an obvious metaphor for the vital force itself, the wet element, being representative of “life in the raw”. This notion of “life” is intricately interwoven into the figure of Dionysus in the esoteric understanding of his cult, and indeed throughout the philosophy of the Greeks themselves, who had two different words for life, both possessing the  same root as Vita (Latin: Life) but present in very different phonetic forms: bios and zoë.[15]

Plotinos called zoë the “time of the soul”, during which the soul, in its course of rebirths, moves on from one bios to another […] the Greeks clung to a not-characterized “life” that underlies every bios and stands in a very different relationship to death than does a “life” that includes death among its characteristics […] This experience differs from the sum of experiences that constitute the bios, the content of each individual man’s written or unwritten biography. The experience of life without characterization – of precisely that life which “resounded” for the Greeks in the word zoë – is, on the other hand, indescribable.[16]

Zoë is Life in its immortal and transcendent aspect, and is thus representative of the pure primordial state. Zoëis the presupposition of the death drive; death exists only in relation to zoë. It is a product of life in accordance with a dialectic that is a process not of thought, but of life itself, of the zoë in each individual bios.[17]

Dyonisus-Figur-6_600x600.jpg

The other primary association of Dionysus is with the chthonic elements, and we frequently find him taking the form of snakes. According to the myth of his dismemberment by the Titans, a myth which is strongly associated with Delphi, he was born of Persephone, after Zeus, taking snake form, had impregnated her. [18] In Euripides Bacchae, Dionysus, being the son of Semele, is a god of dark and frightening subterranean powers; yet being also the son of Zeus, he mediates between the chthonic and civilized worlds, once again playing the role of a liminal outsider that passes in transit from one domain to another.[19] Through his association with natural forces, a description of his temple has been left to us by a physician from Thasos: “A temple in the open air, an open air naos with an altar and a cradle of vine branches; a fine lair, always green; and for the initiates a room in which to sing the evoe.”[20] This stands in direct contrast to Apollo, who was represented by architectural and artificial beauty. Likewise his music was radically different to that of Apollo’s; “A stranger, he should be admitted into the city, for his music is varied, not distant and monotone like the tunes of Apollo’s golden lyre”. (Euripides Bacchae 126-134, 155-156)[21]

Both Gods were concerned with the imagery of life, art, and as we shall see soon, the sun. Moreover, though their forces were essentially opposite, they two Gods were essentially representative of two polarities for the same force, meeting occasionally in perfect balance to reveal an unfolding Hegelian dialectic that was the creative process of life itself and the esoteric nature of the solar path, for just as Dionysus was the chthonic deity (and here we intentionally use the word Chthon instead of the word Gē  – Chthon being literally underworld and Gē being the earth or ground) and Apollo was a Solar deity; but not the physical aspect of the sun as a heavenly body, this was ascribed by to the god Helios instead. Rather Apollo represented the human aspect of the solar path (and in this he is equivalent to the Vedic deity Savitar), and its application to the mortal realm; rather than being the light of the sky, Apollo is the light of the mind: intellect and creation. He is as bright as Dionysus is dark – in Dionysus the instinct, the natural force of zoë is prevalent, associated with the chthonic world below ground because he is immortal, his power normally unseen. He rules during Apollo’s absence in Hyperborea because the sun has passed to another land, the reign of the bright sun has passed and the time of the black sun commences – the black sun being the hidden aspect of the solar path, represented by the departure of Apollo in this myth.

diowein.jpg

Apollo is frequently mentioned in connection to Dionysus in Greek myth. Inscriptions dating from the third century B.C., mention that Dionysos Kadmeios reigned alongside Apollo over the assembly of Theben gods.[22] Likewise on Rhodes a holiday called Sminthia was celebrated there in memory of a time mice attacked the vines there and were destroyed by Apollo and Dionysus, who shared the epithet Sminthios on the island.[23] They are even cited together in the Odyssey (XI 312-25), and also in the story of the death of Koronis, who was shot by Artemis, and this at Apollo’s instigation because she had betrayed the god with a mortal lover.[24] Also, the twin peaks on Parnassos traditionally known as the “peaks of Apollo and Dionysus.”[25] Their association and worship however, was even more closely entwined at Delphi, for as Leicester Holland has perceived:

(1) Dionysus spoke oracles at Delphi before Apollo did; (2) his bones were placed in a basin beside the tripod; (3) the omphalos was his tomb. It is well known, moreover, that Dionysus was second only to Apollo in Delphian and Parnassian worship; Plutarch, in fact, assigns to Dionysus an equal share with Apollo in Delphi[26]

A Pindaric Scholiast says that Python ruled the prophetic tripod on which Dionysus was the first to speak oracles; that then Apollo killed the snake and took over.[27] The association of Apollo and Dionysus in Delphi, moreover, was not limited to their connection to the Delphic Oracle. We also find this relationship echoed in the commemoration of the Great flood which was celebrated each year at a Delphian festival called Aiglē, celebrated two or three days before the full moon of January or February, at the same time as the Athenian Anthesteria festival, the last day of which was devoted to commemorating the victims of the Great Flood; this was the same time of the year when Apollo was believed at Delphi to return from his sojourn among the Hyperboreans. Moreover, Dionysus is said to have perished and returned to life in the flood.[28] Apollo’s Hyperborean absence is his yearly death – Apollonios says that Apollo shed tears when he went to the Hyperborean land; thence flows the Eridanos, on whose banks the Heliades wail without cease; and extremely low spirits came over the Argonauts as they sailed that river of amber tears.[29]

This is the time of Dionysus’ reign at Delphi in which he was the center of Delphic worship for the three winter months, when Apollo was absent. Plutarch, himself a priest of the Pythian Apollo, Amphictyonic official and a frequent visitor to Delphi,  says that for nine months the paean was sung in Apollo’s honour at sacrifices, but at the beginning of winter the paeans suddenly ceased, then for three months men sang dithyrambs and addressed themselves to Dionysus rather than to Apollo.[30] Chthonian Dionysus manifested himself especially at the winter festival when the souls of the dead rose to walk briefly in the upper world again, in the festival that the Athenians called Anthesteria, whose Delphian counterpart was the Theophania. The Theophania marked the end of Dionysus’ reign and Apollo’s return; Dionysus and the ghosts descended once more to Hades realm.[31] In this immortal aspect Dionysus is very far removed from being a god of the dead and winter; representing instead immortal life, the zoë, which was employed in Dionysian cult to release psychosomatic energies summoned from the depths that were discharged in a physical cult of life.[32]

tromaktiko6256.jpg

Dionysus is the depiction of transcendent primordial life, life that persists even during the absence of Apollo (the Sun) – for as much as Apollo is the Golden Sun, Dionysus is the Black or Winter Sun, reigning in the world below ground whilst Apollo’s presence departs for another hemisphere, dead to the people of Delphi, the Winter Sun reigns in Apollo’s absence. Far from being antagonistic opposites, Apollo and Dionysus were so closely related in Greek myth that according to Deinarchos, Dionysus was killed and buried at Delphi beside the golden Apollo.[33] Likewise, in the Lykourgos tetralogy of Aischylos, the cry “Ivy-Apollo, Bakchios, the soothsayer,” is heard when the Thracian bacchantes, the Bassarai, attacks Orpheus, the worshipper of Apollo and the sun. The cry suggests a higher knowledge of the connection between Apollo and Dionysus, the dark god, whom Orpheus denies in favour of the luminous god. In the Lykymnios of Euripides the same connection is attested by the cry, “Lord, laurel-loving Bakchios, Paean Apollo, player of the Lyre.”[34] Similarly, we find anotherpaean by Philodamos addressed to Dionysus from Delphi: “Come hither, Lord Dithyrambos, Backchos…..Bromios now in the spring’s holy period.”[35] The pediments of the temple of Apollo also portray on one side Apollo with Leto, Artemis, and the Muses, and on the other side Dionysus and the thyiads, and a vase painting of c.400 B.C. shows Apollo and Dionysus in Delphi holding their hands to one another.[36]

An analysis of Nietzsche’s philosophy concerning the role of Apollo and Dionysus in Hellenic myth thus reveals more than even a direct parallel. Not only did Nietzsche comprehend the nature of the opposition between Apollo and Dionysus, he understood this aspect of their cult on the esoteric level, that their forces, rather than being antagonistic are instead complementary, with both Gods performing two different aesthetic techniques in the service of the same social function, which reaches its pinnacle of development when both creative processes are elevated in tandem within an individual. Nietzsche understood the symbolism of myths and literature concerning the two gods, and he actually elaborated upon it, adding the works of Schopenhauer to create a complex philosophy concerning not only the interplay of aesthetics in the role of the creative process, but also the nature of the will and the psychological process used to create a certain type, which is exemplified in both his ideals of the Ubermensch and the Free Spirit. Both of these higher types derive their impetus from the synchronicity of the Dionysian and Apollonian drives, hence why in Nietzsche’s later works following The Birth of Tragedy only the Dionysian impulse is referred to, this term not being used to signify just Dionysus, but rather the balanced integration of the two forces. This ideal of eternal life (zoë) is also located in Nietzsche’s theory of Eternal Reoccurrence – it denies the timeless eternity of a supernatural God, but affirms the eternity of the ever-creating and destroying powers in nature and man, for like the solar symbolism of Apollo and Dionysus, it is a notion of cyclical time. To Nietzsche, the figure of Dionysus is the supreme affirmation of life, the instinct and the will to power, with the will to power being an expression of the will to life and to truth at its highest exaltation – “It is a Dionysian Yea-Saying to the world as it is, without deduction, exception and selection…it is the highest attitude that a philosopher can reach; to stand Dionysiacally toward existence: my formula for this is amor fati”’[37]  Dionysus is thus to both Nietzsche and the Greeks, the highest expression of Life in its primordial and transcendent meaning, the hidden power of the Black Sun and the subconscious impulse of the will.

GWT-7914138.jpg

To order at: https://manticorepress.net

Endnotes:

[1]James I. Porter, The Invention of Dionysus: An Essay on the Birth of Tragedy, (California: Stanford University Press, 2002), 40

[2]Rose Pfeffer, Nietzsche: Disciple of Dionysus, (New Jersey: Associated University Presses, Inc. 1977), 31

[3] Ibid.,31

[4] Ibid., 51

[5] James I. Porter, The Invention of Dionysus: An Essay on the Birth of Tragedy, 50-51

[6] Ibid., 221

[7] Ibid., 205-206

[8] Rose Pfeffer, Nietzsche: Disciple of Dionysus, 114

[9] Ibid, 113

[10] James I. Porter, The Invention of Dionysus: An Essay on the Birth of Tragedy, 82

[11] Rose Pfeffer, Nietzsche: Disciple of Dionysus, 32

[12] James I. Porter, The Invention of Dionysus: An Essay on the Birth of Tragedy, 99

[13]Dora C. Pozzi, and John M. Wickerman, Myth & the Polis, (New York: Cornell University 1991), 36

[14]Rose Pfeffer, Nietzsche: Disciple of Dionysus,  126

[15] Carl Kerényi, Dionysos Archetypal Image of Indestructible Life, (New Jersey: Princeton university press,  1996), xxxxi

[16] Ibid., xxxxv

[17] Ibid., 204-205

[18] Joseph Fontenrose, Python: A Study of Delphic Myth and its Origins (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980), 378

[19]Dora C. Pozzi, and John M. Wickerman, Myth & the Polis,  147

[20]Marcel Detienne, trans. Arthur Goldhammer Dionysos At Large, (London: Harvard Univeristy Press 1989), 46

[21]Dora C. Pozzi, and John M. Wickerman, Myth & the Polis,   144

[22] Marcel Detienne, trans. Arthur Goldhammer Dionysos At Large, 18

[23] Daniel E. Gershenson, Apollo the Wolf-God in Journal of Indo-European Studies, Mongraph number 8 (Virginia: Institute for the Study of Man 1991), 32

[24]Carl Kerényi, Dionysos Archetypal Image of Indestructible Life, (New Jersey: Princeton university press,  1996), 103

[25] Dora C. Pozzi, and John M. Wickerman, Myth & the Polis,  139

[26] Joseph Fontenrose, Python: A Study of Delphic Myth and its Origins (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980), 375

[27] Ibid., 376

[28]Daniel E. Gershenson, Apollo the Wolf-God in Journal of Indo-European Studies, Monograph number 8, 61

[29] Joseph Fontenrose, Python: A Study of Delphic Myth and its Origins (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980), 387

[30] Ibid., 379

[31] Ibid., 380-381

[32] Ibid., 219

[33] Ibid., 388

[34] Carl Kerényi, Dionysos Archetypal Image of Indestructible Life, (New Jersey: Princeton university press,  1996), 233

[35] Ibid.,217

[36] Walter F. Otto, Dionysus: Myth and Cult, (Dallas: Spring Publications, 1989) 203

[37] Rose Pfeffer, Nietzsche: Disciple of Dionysus,  261

lundi, 04 décembre 2017

L’esclave-expert et le citoyen

ACR-ATH402237.jpg

L’esclave-expert et le citoyen

À propos de : Paulin Ismard, La Démocratie contre les experts. Les esclaves publics en Grèce ancienne, Seuil


Ex: http://www.laviedesidees.fr

À Athènes, dans l’Antiquité, les tâches d’expertise étaient confiées à des esclaves publics, que l’on honorait mais qu’on privait de tout pouvoir de décision. C’est ainsi, explique P. Ismard, que la démocratie parvenait à se préserver des spécialistes.

PI-couv.jpgRecensé : Paulin Ismard, La Démocratie contre les experts. Les esclaves publics en Grèce ancienne, Paris, Seuil, 2015, 273 p., 20 €.

Dans la démocratie athénienne, avec la rotation de ses magistrats et de ses conseillers choisis pour un an, ceux qui, « à l’occasion », tenaient lieu d’experts stables, étaient, selon Paulin Ismard, les esclaves publics, mais ils n’incarnaient l’État que comme « pure négativité » (p. 30), car ils étaient, en tant qu’esclaves, exclus de la sphère politique. D’où le sous-titre du livre : Les esclaves publics en Grèce ancienne. Qui étaient ces esclaves publics (dêmosioi) et quel était leur rôle ? C’est le premier objet du livre.

Esclavages publics antiques et modernes

On lit d’abord de brillantes et utiles analyses sur l’historiographie de l’esclavage, que Paulin Ismard résume de façon extrêmement claire et convaincante, avec ses différentes « vagues » de comparaisons très idéologiques entre l’Antiquité et l’esclavage en Amérique, tantôt pour opposer l’humanité des Anciens à la cruauté des Modernes, tantôt pour légitimer l’esclavage moderne, tantôt pour le condamner comme on condamnait l’esclavage antique. Moses I. Finley y a ajouté la distinction entre sociétés à esclaves et les véritables sociétés esclavagistes (qui seraient apparues à dans l’Athènes classique). Cette historiographie laissait de côté de nombreux aspects du si divers et si massif « phénomène esclavagiste ». Les travaux des anthropologues permettent maintenant de mieux comprendre les différents types d’esclaves royaux, et plus généralement « les esclaves publics » qui sont l’objet du livre.

Mais la genèse des dêmosioi dans la Grèce archaïque est problématique. Paulin Ismard tente d’abord de suggérer (« un fil ténu », p. 32, « un sentier étroit », p. 42) une sorte de continuité entre les artisans (dêmiourgoi) de l’époque archaïque et les dêmosioi de l’âge classique. Il conduit agréablement le lecteur des aèdes et des héros attachés aux rois chez Homère à l’ingénieux Dédale, que son savoir a conduit à l’esclavage auprès des rois qui voulaient l’avoir à son service, selon un schéma traditionnel (attesté par exemple chez Hérodote pour le médecin Démocédès, au service du roi Darius) : sa mention par Xénophon, selon Paulin Ismard, « loin d’être innocente », ferait de Dédale « l’emblème du mal que le régime démocratique fait à celui qui sait » — une conclusion qui peut sembler faiblement étayée (p. 46-47). Quelques contrats conservés entre une cité et un dêmiourgos à l’époque archaïque dans diverses cités non démocratiques permettent de mieux observer les conditions concrètes de leur emploi : un archiviste en Crète, un scribe près d’Olympie. Dans un « constat » dont il reconnaît qu’il est « hypothétique », Paulin Ismard y voit « le statut de dêmosios confusément défini » (p. 53). Il est difficile cependant d’adhérer à la notion d’un « passage progressif du dêmiourgos de l’archaïsme au dêmosios de l’époque classique » : l’âge classique, bien sûr, et particulièrement à Athènes, continue d’avoir des dêmiourgoi libres et citoyens en abondance. Pour Aristote, il est vrai, dans une petite cité, on pourrait à la rigueur concevoir une équivalence entre esclaves publics et artisans effectuant des travaux publics (Politique, II, 7, 1267b15 : un texte difficile, qui pourrait être examiné). L’hypothèse traditionnelle lie le développement des esclaves publics aux progrès de la démocratie athénienne, avec ses institutions complexes et la rotation des charges qui limitait la continuité de l’action publique, et au développement, « main dans la main » (selon une célèbre formule de Finley associant démocratie et société esclavagiste, p. 58), de l’esclave-marchandise à Athènes.

Platon, dans un texte étonnant du Politique (290a), évoque « le groupe des esclaves et des serviteurs » dont on pourrait imaginer qu’ils constituent le véritable savoir politique de la cité. L’étude des esclaves publics éclaire la volonté platonicienne de séparer ceux que Paulin Ismard appelle joliment « les petites mains des institutions civiques » (p. 66) et le véritable homme politique. Pourtant, assistance aux juges, archivage, inventaires, comptabilité, surveillance de la monnaie, des poids et mesures, police, tout cela, que décrit très clairement et très utilement Paulin Ismard dans son chapitre « Serviteurs de la cité », était confié aux esclaves publics. Certaines tâches, rémunérées, attribuées le cas échéant par vote des citoyens, donnaient accès à des privilèges civiques ou religieux, comme la prêtrise de certains cultes. D’autres esclaves en revanche étaient affectés à divers chantiers, en grand nombre, si l’on pense à ceux qui exploitaient les mines du Laurion en Attique, qui ne sont pas examinés dans le livre, car ils ne rentrent guère dans la perspective adoptée. Par rapport à d’autres types d’esclaves publics, l’originalité grecque tiendrait à l’absence d’esclaves publics travaillant la terre (mais la documentation est limitée) ou enrôlés dans les armées (cela est corrigé p. 118 : il y avait de nombreux esclaves, en tout cas, dans la marine). Au total, les dêmosioi constituaient donc un ensemble extrêmement disparate, qui n’a jamais formé un corps, d’esclaves acquis surtout par achat.

Dans une inscription de la fin du IIe siècle, bien après la démocratie classique, à propos d’un préposé aux poids et mesures à Athènes, il est question d’une eleutheria (qu’il faudrait corriger en el[euth]era) leitourgia, un « service libre » : pour Paulin Ismard, un « service public » au sens où il assure la liberté des citoyens. Cette formule restituée, tardive et unique condenserait « le paradoxe qui réside au cœur du ‘miracle grec’, celui d’une expérience de la liberté politique dont le propre fut de reposer sur le travail des esclaves » (p. 92). Les esclaves publics grecs, bien que « corps-marchandises », étaient (ajoutons : parfois) d’« étranges esclaves » (chapitre 3), jouissant de certains privilèges des citoyens, dont l’accès à la propriété et peut-être à une certaine forme de parenté, ce qui pose quelquefois le problème de la distinction entre esclave et citoyen libre. L’emploi du mot dêmosios suffit-il en effet à établir la qualité servile ? L’épigraphiste Louis Robert mentionne un édit déplorant que des hommes libres exercent « une fonction d’esclaves publics », ainsi qu’une épitaphe commune à Imbros pour un citoyen de Ténédos et son fils qualifié de dêmosios, et conclut qu’un dêmosios avec patronyme doit désigner un homme libre exerçant des tâches publiques (BE 1981, 558). Le sens de ce type de patronyme est incertain. Pour le corpus assez comparable des actes d’affranchissements delphiques, où se pose aussi cette question, Dominique Mulliez observe que le nom au génitif renvoie au père naturel de l’affranchi, sans préjuger du statut juridique de la personne ainsi désignée ; il s’agit parfois de l’ancien maître de l’affranchi, lequel peut ou non se confondre avec le prostates. En ce qui concerne les dêmosioi, Paulin Ismard estime, lui, que « l’ensemble de la littérature antique (…) associe invariablement le statut de dêmosios au statut d’esclave » (p. 109). Il propose en ce sens une analyse nouvelle du statut d’un certain Pittalakos mentionné dans un plaidoyer d’Eschine, un dêmosios qu’il ne juge assimilé à un homme libre dans une procédure que faute d’un propriétaire individualisable. En Grèce, les esclaves publics pouvaient même recevoir des honneurs publics, ce qui interdit, note très justement Paulin Ismard, de faire de l’honneur une ligne de partage universelle entre liberté et esclavage (contrairement aux thèses de certains anthropologues).

ACR-CAR51_big.jpg

Expertise, esclavage et démocratie

Paulin Ismard se situe résolument dans la perspective du « malheur politique » contemporain, la séparation entre le règne de l’opinion et le gouvernement des experts : un savoir politique utile ne peut plus naître « de la délibération égalitaire entre non-spécialistes ». L’État, défini comme « organisation savante » (p. 11), exclut le peuple. C’est le second objet du livre que de situer la démocratie athénienne (et non plus « la Grèce ancienne ») par rapport à cette perspective. « L’expertise servile » y serait « le produit de l’idéologie démocratique », « qui refusait que l’expertise d’un individu puisse légitimer sa prétention au pouvoir » et cantonnait donc les experts hors du champ politique (p. 133, répété avec insistance).

Mais la documentation ne permet d’atteindre que quelques experts esclaves : des vérificateurs des monnaies, ayant seuls le pouvoir et la capacité d’en garantir la validité, un greffier dans un sanctuaire. Le cas de Nicomachos, chargé par Athènes de la transcription des lois pendant plusieurs années consécutives, est différent : on le connaît par des sources hostiles, qui insistent sur le fait que c’est un fils de dêmosios, mais c’est un citoyen athénien, qui n’a un « statut incertain » que dans la polémique judiciaire : voici donc un citoyen expert. Ce n’est pas le seul. Paulin Ismard lui-même évoque une page plus tôt les cas célèbres d’Eubule et de Lycurgue en matière financière ; et que dire, en matière militaire et diplomatique, de Périclès, réélu 14 fois stratège consécutivement ? Ajoutons, à un moindre niveau, les secrétaires mentionnés par la Constitution d’Athènes aristotélicienne : leur contrôle ne peut guère avoir été seulement « formel ».

Sur le plan idéologique, le fameux mythe de Protagoras, dans le Protagoras de Platon, explique que, contrairement aux compétences techniques réservées chacune à un spécialiste (à un dêmiourgos), une forme de savoir politique, par l’intermédiaire des notions de pudeur (ou respect) et de justice, a été donnée à tous les hommes. On y trouverait donc « une épistémologie sociale qui valorise la circulation de savoirs, même incomplets, entre égaux », « une théorie associationniste de la compétence politique », comme celle que développe l’historien américain Josiah Ober dans ses ouvrages récents sur la démocratie athénienne. Protagoras veut pourtant montrer — c’est le raisonnement qui explique ensuite le mythe dans le dialogue de Platon — que si tous les citoyens doivent partager une compétence minimale, il y a des gens plus compétents que d’autres en politique, et des maîtres, comme lui, pour leur enseigner cette expertise. Signalons à ce propos la virulence de ce débat dans le libéralisme radical anglais du XIXe siècle. John Stuart Mill, rendant compte en 1853 de l’History of Greece du banquier et homme politique libéral George Grote, cite avec enthousiasme ses pages sur le régime populaire :

« The daily working of Athenian institutions (by means of which every citizen was accustomed to hear every sort of question, public and private, discussed by the ablest men of the time, with the earnestness of purpose and fulness of preparation belonging to actual business, deliberative or judicial) formed a course of political education, the equivalent of which modern nations have not known how to give even to those whom they educate for statesmen / Le fonctionnement journalier des institutions athéniennes (qui habituaient chaque citoyen à entendre la discussion de toute sorte de question publique ou privée par les hommes les plus capables de leur temps, avec le sérieux et la préparation que réclamaient les affaires politiques et judiciaires) formait un cursus d’éducation politique dont les nations modernes n’ont pas su donner un équivalent même à ceux qu’elles destinent à la conduite de l’État ».

En revanche, lorsqu’un peu plus tard, en 1866, il commente un autre livre célèbre de Grote, Plato and the other Companions of Socrates, il condamne le relativisme qui est selon lui la conséquence inéluctable de sa position, et affirme avec Platon « the demand for a Scientific Governor » (« l’exigence d’un gouvernant possédant la science »), c’est-à-dire, dans les conditions modernes du gouvernement représentatif, « a specially trained and experienced Few » (« Un petit nombre de spécialistes éduqués et entraînés »).

« La figure de l’expert, dont le savoir constituerait un titre à gouverner, (…) était inconnue aux Athéniens de l’époque classique » (p. 11, 16) : c’est la thèse centrale. Le mot « expert » est ambigu. Le « gouvernement » des Athéniens s’exerçait principalement par l’éloquence, sous le contrôle des citoyens, dans une démocratie directe : c’est donc dans la maîtrise de l’éloquence que se logeait pour une part l’expertise de ceux que Mill appelle « the ablest men of the time ». La question de la rhétorique, qui est sans cesse débattue à l’époque, est absente dans le livre de Paulin Ismard, car aucun esclave n’a accès à la tribune. Or, comme Aristote l’écrit (et comme Platon le pensait), même la formation technique de certains citoyens à la rhétorique devait inclure une expertise politique extérieure à la technique du langage : « les finances, la guerre et la paix, la protection du territoire, les importations et les exportations, la législation » (Rhétorique I, 4, 1359b).

ACR-TH.jpg

« Polis », Cité, État

Le dernier chapitre aborde un autre point central de la réflexion sur l’Athènes classique, la notion de « Cité-État ». Après Fustel de Coulanges et sa « cité antique », a été inventé pour décrire les formes grecques d’organisation politique le concept de « Polis », ce « dummes Burckhardtsches Schlagwort » [1] (Wilamowitz), qu’on traduit ordinairement par « Cité-État ». Paulin Ismard, lui, prend ses distances à l’égard des travaux récents de l’historien danois Mogens H. Hansen, qui aboutissent à distinguer polis et koinônia, « cité » et « société » : il n’y a pas, selon lui, de polis distincte qui correspondrait peu ou prou à l’État moderne, la communauté athénienne « se rêvait transparente à elle-même » (p. 172). Dans cette perspective, confier l’administration, la bureaucratie (Max Weber est évoqué) aux esclaves publics permettait de « masquer l’écart inéluctable entre l’État et la société », dans une « tension irrésolue ».

L’esclave royal qui déclenche la tragédie d’Œdipe dans l’Œdipe-Roi de Sophocle détient le savoir qui met à bas les prétentions au savoir du Roi : voilà l’image que le « miroir brisé » de la tragédie tend pour finir, par l’intermédiaire de Michel Foucault, à Paulin Ismard. Le Phédon lui offre mieux encore : un dêmosios, le bourreau officiel d’Athènes, apportant le poison à Socrate, est accueilli par le philosophe comme le signe de l’effet qu’il suscite bien au-delà d’Athènes et des Athéniens, si bien que cet esclave se trouve placé dans la « position éminente » du « témoin ». De façon un peu étrange, le baptême du premier des Gentils, l’eunuque éthiopien des Actes des Apôtres complète ce « fil secret » (une métaphore récurrente) de « l’altérité radicale », « un ailleurs d’où peut se formuler la norme » (p. 200).

En fin de compte, la figure de l’esclave public, dont cet ouvrage remarquablement écrit propose une analyse très fouillée et neuve, sans toujours entraîner la conviction, permet à Paulin Ismard de mettre à distance le rêve de transparence qu’incarne pour beaucoup (par exemple pour Hannah Arendt) la démocratie athénienne classique.

Aller plus loin

On pourra lire la controverse, brièvement évoquée dans ce compte rendu, entre Christophe Pébarthe (Revue des Etudes Anciennes, 117, 2015, p. 241-247) et Paulin Ismard).

Sur George Grote et John Stuart Mill, voir Malcolm Schofield, Plato. Political Philosophy, Oxford, 2006, 138-144.

Sur la question de la science politique et de la rhétorique, voir une première approche dans Paul Demont, « Y a-t-il une science du politique ? Les débats athéniens de l’époque classique », L’Homme et la Science, Actes du XVIe Congrès international de l’Association Guillaume Budé, Textes réunis par J. Jouanna, M. Fartzoff et B. Bakhouche, Paris, Les Belles Lettres, 2011, p. 183-193.

Pour citer cet article :

Paul Demont, « L’esclave-expert et le citoyen », La Vie des idées , 25 novembre 2015. ISSN : 2105-3030. URL : http://www.laviedesidees.fr/L-esclave-expert-et-le-citoyen.html

dimanche, 12 novembre 2017

Salluste et les derniers instants de la République romaine

salltitre.jpg

Salluste et les derniers instants de la République romaine

par Charles Guiral

Ex: http://lenouveaucenacle.fr

sall2.gifLes éditions Allia ont fait paraître il y a quelques mois, dans la paisible tiédeur d’une fin d’été, une nouvelle traduction de La Guerre de Jugurtha écrite par Salluste peu de temps après l’assassinat politique de César. L’excellent travail philologique mené par Nicolas Ghiglion nous permet de nous faire une idée assez juste de cette fin de règne républicain et nous fait entrer de plain-pied dans un monde en proie à la désolation, à la corruption et aux assassinats.

Les souvenirs que je conserve de La Guerre de Jugurtha sont surtout liés à un traumatisme scolaire, puisque, n’ayant alors aucune idée claire sur cette guerre que mena la République romaine aux confins de son empire, je devais affronter, sur le terrain miné de la version latine, la langue sèche et concise de l’auteur Salluste, qui, pour les latinistes hésitants, est aussi périlleuse à traduire que l’historien Thucydide pour les hellénistes confirmés. Nicolas Ghiglion, dans cette nouvelle traduction publiée aux éditions Allia, relève avec intelligence le défi de traduire une œuvre complexe tant par sa langue que par le sujet qu’elle traite. Les quelques pages d’introduction placées au seuil du livre sont parfaitement éclairantes et nous permettent de saisir pleinement l’importance que revêt ce texte pour la compréhension du monde romain antique.

« Salluste nous entraîne au cœur d’un conflit qui, quoique se déroulant à des centaines de kilomètres du centre du pouvoir romain, aura des conséquences irréversibles pour la République ».

S’agit-il pour autant d’une énième traduction de La Guerre de Jugurtha ? On peut faire confiance au fondateur et directeur des éditions Allia, Gérard Berreby, pour ne pas se hasarder à publier une traduction d’un texte latin sans autre objectif que de concurrencer les Belles Lettres. Il s’agit plutôt de redonner à ce texte antique la place qui lui revient non seulement dans la littérature dite ancienne, mais aussi dans notre littérature contemporaine. Je me suis plongé dans ce texte comme on se plonge dans un roman d’aventures. Salluste nous entraîne au cœur d’un conflit qui, quoique se déroulant à des centaines de kilomètres du centre du pouvoir romain, aura des conséquences irréversibles pour la République.

sall1.jpg

Salluste et la société romaine

L’intrigue est assez simple : un roi d’Afrique du Nord (la région de Numidie) décide de se révolter contre le pouvoir romain qui, ne pouvant accepter cela, tente d’éteindre coûte que coûte la sédition. Jusque-là, rien de compliqué. Jugurtha est le petit-fils d’un grand roi numide, Massinissa avec lequel les Romains avaient conclu un traité de paix qui assurait une forme de stabilité dans la province d’Afrique. Il fut adopté et élevé par son oncle, après la mort de son père, l’aîné des fils de Massinissa. Très rapidement il se distingue de ses deux cousins, Adherbal et Hiempsal, par sa témérité et sa volonté de fer. Massinissa, sentant le pouvoir lui échapper, tente de se débarrasser de ce jeune homme qui commence à faire de l’ombre à ses deux fils naturels. Malheureusement la virtus – c’est-à-dire le courage et la valeur – de Jugurtha lors de la guerre de Numance conduit l’Etat romain à en faire son favori. Il est trop tard. Jugurtha a pris conscience du pouvoir qu’il a désormais et si son orgueil le conduit dans un premier temps à se débarrasser de ses ennemis intérieurs, il ne tardera pas à se retourner contre le Sénat et le peuple romain. Rome, sans le vouloir, a offert à Jugurtha les armes par lesquelles ce dernier tentera de la détruire. Salluste ne nous signale-t-il pas d’ailleurs que le jeune chef numide a appris le latin lors de la guerre de Numance !

« L’historien dresse inlassablement la liste de ceux qui préfèrent « prostituer la République » plutôt que de la défendre à tout prix ».

Le portrait que Salluste dresse de la société romaine à une époque où la République vit ses derniers instants constitue un véritable avertissement pour les siècles à venir. C’est la lutte de la cupidité contre la morale, de la lâcheté contre la virtus. Les passions se déchaînent et, au milieu du fracas des armes, au milieu des invectives, certains hommes se dressent pour dénoncer les maux qui ravagent la République tandis que d’autres s’activent dans l’ombre pour l’enterrer, en amassant au passage quelques richesses. On ne s’étonnera pas que la cupidité soit l’apanage quasiment exclusif de la noblesse romaine, et que la virtus soit un des signes distinctifs de la plèbe – Salluste est plébéien ! – et de ceux qui la composent. L’historien dresse inlassablement la liste de ceux qui préfèrent « prostituer la République » plutôt que de la défendre à tout prix. C’est d’abord le consul Lucius Calpurnius Bestia qui vend l’Afrique à Jugurtha pour quelques poignées d’or. L’armée et les plus hauts gradés n’échappent pas à la corruption et au déshonneur, à l’image du général Aulus qui, se trouvant en difficulté et acculé par Jugurtha, préfèrera accepter des conditions de repli infamantes plutôt que de mourir au combat. O tempora, o mores ! Il est loin le temps des Mucius Scaevola !

Noblesse et plèbe

« Je ne viens pas vous exhorter à prendre les armes contre l’injustice, comme l’ont souvent fait vos ancêtres. Il n’est pas besoin de violence, pas besoin de sécession : vos ennemis, par leur conduite, ont rendu leur ruine inévitable. »

Certains nobles sont pourtant prêts à aller à l’encontre de leur caste en prenant la défense de la République et en soutenant la plèbe. La séparation entre la plèbe et la noblesse n’est pas aussi nette que Salluste voudrait nous le faire croire. Ainsi, alors que Caïus Baebius, pourtant issu de la plèbe,  est prêt à vendre son âme et son honneur à Jugurtha, c’est Caïus Memmius, noble romain et premier lanceur d’alerte de l’histoire, qui prend la parole devant le peuple afin de l’exhorter à agir contre Jugurtha. On notera d’ailleurs l’étonnante modernité de ce discours que Salluste reproduit intégralement dans son ouvrage. Il nous semblerait presqu’entendre Etienne de La Boétie, dans son Discours de la servitude volontaire, seize siècles plus tard : « Je ne viens pas vous exhorter à prendre les armes contre l’injustice, comme l’ont souvent fait vos ancêtres. Il n’est pas besoin de violence, pas besoin de sécession : vos ennemis, par leur conduite, ont rendu leur ruine inévitable. » De la même manière, le proconsul Metellus, envoyé en Afrique pour remettre de l’ordre et découvrant une armée en proie aux turpitudes, fait montre d’une grande valeur. Salluste, malgré les origines nobles de ce personnage, se voit dans l’obligation de faire son éloge. Cependant ce dernier, malgré toutes ses qualités, ne pourra pas être sauvé. Chassez le naturel, il revient au galop ! La perfidie naturelle de Metellus, propre à tous les nobles, réapparaît lorsqu’un certain Marius, homo novus, sans origine patricienne mais plein d’une bonne volonté toute plébéienne, fait son apparition en terre africaine pour venir prêter main forte aux légions romaines. On dirait presque du Zola avant l’heure ! Son ascendance et son hérédité patriciennes le condamnent.

soldati-romani-roman-warriors.jpg

Il est difficile, à la lecture de Salluste, de ne pas être frappé par les ressemblances avec notre propre histoire. Et on en vient à croire, à l’instar de Bossuet, que les civilisations déclinent périodiquement et que ce que Salluste nous raconte ici n’est qu’un exemple parmi d’autres, dans une vision cyclique de l’histoire, du déclin des civilisations à travers les siècles. Ce n’est donc pas étonnant qu’on retrouve certaines idées de Salluste dans des textes modernes. Que penser, par exemple, de cette théorie énoncée au paragraphe XLI, selon laquelle la guerre serait un moyen généreux de maintenir la vertu, tandis que la paix n’apporterait que faiblesse et mollesse, que l’on retrouve quasiment mot pour mot dans le petit traité politique d’Emmanuel Kant intitulé Projet de paix perpétuel ?

Salluste, à la manière d’un guide qui nous mènerait à travers les ruines d’une grande civilisation disparue en nous racontant ce qu’elle fut du temps où elle était florissante, nous parle de notre histoire. Il est temps d’écouter la voix des Anciens.

La Guerre de Jugurtha, sur le site des éditions Allia 

jeudi, 09 mars 2017

GERMANICUS de Yann RIVIERE

germanicus.jpg

GERMANICUS de Yann RIVIERE 

par Hubert de Singly

Ex: http://www.culture-chronique.com 

Le dernier ouvrage de Joël Schmidt “La mort des César” raconte avec beaucoup de talent  la fin des soixante dix empereurs romains qui se succédèrent à la tête de l’Empire jusqu’à sa fin.  Mais il existe une catégorie de princes qui n’accédèrent jamais  à la magistrature suprême alors même qu’ils en avaient l’étoffe. Ce fut le cas de Germanicus qui mourut à 34 ans à Antioche manquant une consécration qui lui tendait les bras. Yann Rivière qui  connait parfaitement l’histoire politique et juridique de la Rome  Antique nous propose  une biographie serrée de plus de cinq cents pages  de celui qui fut le petit fils de Marc Antoine, l’époux d’Agrippine et le père de Galigula. 

germperrin2037703.JPG

   D’emblée l’historien s’interroge.  L’Empire n’aurait-il pas été plus puissant  si Germanicus n’était pas mort  si jeune ?  Son entreprise de consolidation de la domination romaine en Orient n’aurait-elle pas été menée à son terme?  S’il avait vécu, le roi des Parthes qui a pleuré sa mort n’aurait-il pas pas vécu en bonne entente avec Rome au cours  des années suivantes plutôt que de s’engager dans une guerre qui vida les caisses de l’Empire pour le contrôle de l’Arménie. Toutes ces hypothèses restent évidemment au conditionnel mais elles en disent long sur cette personnalité hors du commun. En effet peu de ses contemporains auraient pu imaginer que le fils de Livie et de Marc Antoine occuperait une telle place dans l’Etat Romain et qu’il contribuerait autant à la défense de l’Empire. Rappelons  qu’il brilla avec ses légions en Illyrie  et qu’il effaça le désastre de Varus en Germanie en infligeant une cruelle défaite au chef légendaire Arminius.  La suite de son ascension  se poursuit en Orient  où il consolida la paix  et joua un rôle politique de premier plan.  Il mourut persuadé qu’on l’avait  empoisonné  ce qui est bien possible et ce qui ne déplut pas forcément à Tibère qui assistait l’ascension de Germanicus avec inquiétude.  Reste que dans toutes les régions où il passa son souvenir resta vif longtemps  après sa disparition.

  Ce “Germanicus”  de Yann Rivière se lit comme un roman. Nous traversons  l’Empire au côté de l’un des personnages les plus flamboyants que Rome enfanta.   L’ouvrage est à fois un formidable récit et  une minutieuse reconstitution  historique. L’une des meilleures biographies historiques de l’année. 

Hugues DE SINGLY

CULTURE-CHRONIQUE.COM encourage ses lecteurs à se rendre en librairie  afin de soutenir le réseau des librairies françaises. Vous pouvez aussi cliquer sur le logo "Lalibrairie.com", votre commande sera alors envoyée chez le libraire de votre choix. Enfin, hormis "Amazon", la plupart des librairies en ligne que nous vous proposons sont aussi des librairies de centre-ville que nous vous encourageons à découvrir. La santé du livre dépend de la santé des librairies. 


En savoir plus sur http://www.culture-chronique.com/chronique.htm?chroniqueid=1687#XddOW37BipCFt0BJ.99

mercredi, 18 janvier 2017

Een pleidooi voor het studeren van Grieks en het Latijn in het secundair onderwijs

paestum.jpg

Paul Cordy:

GOOI ONS CULTUREEL ERFGOED NIET DOOR HET RAAM

Ex: http://www.doorbraak.be

Een pleidooi voor het studeren van Grieks en het Latijn in het secundair onderwijs

Wat hebben de film Troy van de Duitse regisseur Wolfgang Petersen met Brad Pitt in de hoofdrol, het pacifistisch verhaal Kassandra van de Oost-Duitse auteur Christa Wolf, de opera Elektra van Richard Strauss, de song More News From Nowhere van Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, de roman De Ramkoning van de Vlaamse auteur Rose Gronon, de roman Ulysses van James Joyce of het toneelstuk Troilus and Cressida van Shakespeare met elkaar gemeen? Allen bouwen ze voort op de bijna 3 000 jaar oude Ilias en Odyssee van de Griek Homeros. Dit is slechts een losse greep uit de vele werken die zich op beide boeken baseren of er naar verwijzen.

Geregeld steekt de discussie over de zin en onzin van vakken als Latijn en Grieks in ons secundair onderwijs de kop op. Maar in de marge van de discussie over de hervorming van het secundair onderwijs kreeg die discussie een nieuwe wending. Plots werd de suggestie gewekt dat er onder de noemer klassieke talen niet langer alleen Latijn en Grieks moest worden verstaan. Khalil El Jafoufi, de voorzitter van studentenvereniging Mahara, verwoordde dit in een opiniestuk in De Standaard het duidelijkst: waarom bieden we ook geen Hebreeuws en klassiek Arabisch aan? Per slot van rekening kan je ook van die dode talen iets opsteken. Er zijn echter zeer goede gronden om dat niet te doen en de deur te sluiten voor die piste – iets wat in de kersverse hervorming van het secundair onderwijs ook is gebeurd. Was dit alles een wat vreemde nevendiscussie in het geheel, of is dit toch een fundamentelere oprisping dan men zou denken. Bij mensen als El Jafoufi wellicht wel. Het is niet zo gek om uit zijn idee af te leiden dat hij daarmee een volwaardige erkenning zou opeisen voor de Arabische cultuur in Vlaanderen. Want met een aanbod klassiek Arabisch in ons onderwijs wijzigt ook de culturele status van dat Arabisch.

Er zijn volgens mij twee redenen waarom je tieners zes jaar lang dode talen laat bestuderen. De eerste is dat je hen op die manier leert om het fenomeen taal op een andere manier te benaderen dan wanneer ze, zoals dat bij levende talen gebeurt, moeten focussen op de actieve taalverwerving die het hen mogelijk maakt om in die talen vlot te communiceren. Leerlingen klassieke talen leren teksten zeer grondig te analyseren, ze ervaren hoe je op een wetenschappelijke manier aan taalbeschouwing doet en je daagt ze uit door op een zeer specifieke manier een taal te ontleden. Kan dat enkel met Latijn en Grieks? Wellicht niet. Je zou dezelfde resultaten kunnen bereiken door bijvoorbeeld Sanskriet of een andere klassieke taal aan te bieden.

Maar er is een tweede reden waarom je jongeren oude talen leert, en daar zijn de twee ‘klassieke’ klassieke talen – Latijn en Grieks – van onschatbare waarde, nemen ze zelfs een unieke positie in in onze cultuur. Wie zich zes jaar lang in één van die twee talen of in allebei onderdompelt, krijgt een enorme culturele bagage mee die hem of haar de kunst en cultuur van de eigen leefomgeving – en dat is voor ons toch nog altijd (West)-Europa – beter doet begrijpen. Het belang van die twee talen overstijgt het antieke tijdvak waarin ze gesproken werden. Latijn was jarenlang de lingua franca van onze wetenschap en ons kerkelijk en wereldlijk bestuur. Het is de taal die mee gebruikt werd om in de Renaissance onze samenleving op nieuwe sporen te zetten, het is de taal waarin de basis van ons rechtssysteem is gelegd.

Het lijstje in de inleiding spreekt al boekdelen voor wat betreft het belang van het Grieks. En dan had ik het nog maar over twee boeken, niet eens over de Griekse theaterteksten, filosofie, wetenschap… Gedurende onze hele cultuurgeschiedenis spelen thema’s uit de antieke oudheid een vaak prominente en soms minder zichtbare maar wel aanwezige rol. Je kan sleutelmomenten uit onze geschiedenis zoals de renaissance maar even goed de politieke omwentelingen ten tijde van de Verlichting niet volledig doorgronden als je de klassieke culturele achtergrond niet kent. En Latijn en Grieks zijn niet iets uit het verleden. Zoals bovenstaand lijstje toont worden tot op vandaag kunstenaars uitgedaagd door die duizenden jaren oude thema’s. En uiteraard, ook het klassiek Arabisch heeft boeiende en leerrijke teksten voortgebracht, maar die zullen nooit dezelfde sleutelrol spelen als onze Griekse en Latijnse erfenis wel doet om onze samenleving ten volle te kunnen begrijpen. Laat ons dus verder investeren om onze jongeren met die cultuurschat te confronteren en ze er in onder te dompelen, en laat ons dat Latijn en Grieks in ons secundair onderwijs blijven koesteren als onmisbare fundamenten van onze Vlaamse cultuur.

De auteur is Vlaams Volksvertegenwoordiger voor de N-VA en lid van de Commissie Onderwijs.

 

mardi, 05 juillet 2016

Les Vivants et les Dieux : Relire Plotin

Les Vivants et les Dieux :

Relire Plotin avec Luc Brisson & Jean-François Pradeau

Depuis quelques années, entouré d’une équipe de spécialistes, Luc Brisson dirige en édition de poche une retraduction systématique et raisonnée de l’ensemble de l’œuvre de Plotin.Or, la pensée de Plotin est réputée pour son extrême subtilité et pour la façon dont il a su reprendre en les dialectisant les thèmes majeurs de la philosophie de Platon, d’Aristote et du stoïcisme. Créateur de ce fait d’un système parfaitement original qui allie la plus grande rigueur rationnelle à l’expérience extatique, Plotin a évidemment besoin d’être largement « débroussaillé » avant que l’on n’aille à sa rencontre.

Invité(s) : Luc Brisson.  directeur de recherche en philosophie au CNRS - Jean-François Pradeau.  maître de conférences à l’université de Paris-X Nanterre

lundi, 04 juillet 2016

Ce qu'on doit au grec et au latin

baiser.jpg

Ce qu'on doit au grec et au latin

Ex: http://www.marianne.net
 
Face au déclin des cadres idéologiques modernes, il est utile et urgent de lire ou de relire Tacite, Plutarque ou Cicéron. Car l'humanisme antique et ses classiques indémodables ne sont pas que l'archéologie de la pensée, ils continuent de nous donner les clés pour comprendre nos problèmes existentiels et nos crises contemporaines.

« La Grèce et Rome sont la mémoire commune de nos cultures contemporaines, mémoire qui dépasse les frontières, transcende les langues, les religions et les nationalités, mais mémoire aujourd'hui menacée par la violence intégriste comme par l'utilitarisme libéral », expliquaient la philosophe Barbara Cassin et la philologue Florence Dupont dans une pétition « pour une refondation de l'enseignement des humanités » destinée à défendre les langues antiques face à la réforme du collège proposée par Najat Vallaud-Belkacem. « Si je lis la littérature grecque ou latine, c'est parce que Homère et Horace, Lucrèce et Aristote, Sénèque et Marc Aurèle me donnent des clés pour comprendre ma vie d'aujourd'hui », renchérit le critique William Marx dans une tribune intitulée « Le grec et le latin pour préserver l'esprit du 11 janvier ». De manière inattendue et intempestive, l'antiquité gréco-latine et son héritage reviennent hanter nos débats contemporains les plus brûlants. Sur le terrain des idées, les éditeurs n'hésitent pas à rééditer des textes rares et anciens pour les faire résonner avec nos problématiques : pour parler de nos relations avec Angela Merkel, pourquoi ne pas recourir à la Germanie de Tacite (De situ ac populis Germaniae, 98 après Jésus-Christ) puisque «[vis-à-vis de l'Allemagne] la leçon de Tacite reste d'actualité», comme le justifie la quatrième de couverture ? Pour s'opposer au fanatisme, la collection «Mille et Une Nuits» propose ainsi, pour moins de 3 €, un court traité de Plutarque tout aussi ravageur que ceux de Voltaire : De la superstition.

Face au libéralisme ploutocratique, autant revenir aux origines étymologiques du mot, en lisant l'une des deux éditions de la comédie d'Aristophane Ploutos disponibles à petit prix (celle de Fayard étant très directement sous-titrée : Dieu du fric). Les futurs candidats aux primaires pourront même s'appuyer sur les conseils de Cicéron à son frère pour être élu consul - opportunément réédités sous le titre de Petit manuel de campagne électorale... Face au déclin ou à la suspicion que connaissent nos cadres idéologiques modernes, force est de constater notre besoin de retourner à l'humanisme antique et à ses classiques indémodables : Quid novi sub sole ?

daphnisXTLY1qcj84mo1_1280.jpgDe fabuleux détours

Mémoire vivante de mythes et de fictions, les romans de l'univers gréco-latin méritent d'être écoutés, sans s'arrêter à un corpus prétendument scolaire. Aussi admirables que soient ces œuvres, qui mériteraient qu'on puisse retourner vers elles d'un œil neuf, ce serait se tromper que de limiter la littérature antique aux épopées d'Homère et de Virgile, à la tragédie grecque ou aux mythologies d'Hésiode. Loin d'offrir un intérêt simplement archéologique, les romans antiques (noirs, d'aventures, historiques ou de mœurs, pour employer des catégories modernes) offrent ainsi une invitation à de fabuleux détours, en possédant la vertu d'instiller du très nouveau au cœur du supposé connu, dans une forme d'exotisme intérieur à notre culture. Certes, au sens strict, le roman, qui est un terme construit au Moyen Age, n'existait pas dans l'Antiquité - pas plus que la lecture privée et à voix basse moderne : seuls quelques récits grecs de l'époque hellénistique (Daphnis et Chloé, de Longus ; Leucippé et Clitophon, d'Achille Tatius ; les Ethiopiques, d'Héliodore ; le Roman de Chairéas et de Callirhoé, de Chariton) et quelques textes latins (le Satiricon, de Pétrone, les Métamorphoses, d'Apulée) peuvent être appelés rétrospectivement romans - mais quels romans ! Contrairement à Zola qui réduisait tous les romans antiques à « la même histoire banale et invraisemblable », le lecteur moderne, peut-être moins obsédé par le réalisme du récit et la rationalité de l'intrigue, y trouvera des récits à suspense formidablement divertissants : par exemple ce texte aujourd'hui parfaitement oublié, le Roman de Chairéas et de Callirhoé, qui accumule les voyages en mer, les revers du destin, les histoires d'enlèvements, de reconnaissance, de fausses morts, en un véritable cliffhanger à faire pâlir ses successeurs. Voulez-vous l'enchantement d'amours hors le monde ? A défaut d'une psychologie moderne, Daphnis et Chloé, pastorale sensuelle et romantique par anticipation, ringardise dans son idéalisme bien des « romances » contemporaines. Capable de se moquer de ses propres lieux communs, comme dans le délicieux Leucippé et Clitophon, d'Achille Tatius, antiroman avant la lettre, le roman grec a pour thème principal les mésaventures d'un couple uni dans un univers hostile : face à l'adversité d'un monde cruel, désordonné et absurde, l'amour et le stoïcisme du couple sont les seules valeurs qui vaillent. Les héros redécouvrent dans un monde inhospitalier et instable « la surprise de vivre au présent », comme l'explique l'historien du roman Thomas Pavel : voilà des schémas et des thèmes que ne feront au fond que reprendre, en plus ou moins bien, nos best-sellers de l'été, pour nous accompagner dans nos problèmes existentiels - amor omnibus idem. Les Latins ont quant à eux marqué notre mémoire littéraire (et des cinéastes comme Pasolini ou Fellini) par la puissance scandaleuse de leurs romans de mœurs, mais on ne saurait pour autant les réduire aux banquets du Satiricon : érotisme souriant, magie et conte initiatique, roman picaresque se mêlent à la tradition grecque du roman d'aventures dans des récits parfaitement désaxés, sans qu'on sache si les Métamorphoses d'Apulée (appelées parfois aussi l'Ane d'or pour des raisons que des millénaires d'érudition n'ont pas vraiment réussi à élucider) détournent la métaphysique platonicienne au profit du burlesque ou, au contraire, font de l'humour une voie suprême d'accès aux mystères célestes.

On n'hésitera pas non plus à découvrir des textes qui ne sont pas des fictions au sens strict, mais qui peuvent aujourd'hui être lus en tant que telles : les formidables vies et chroniques romancées des historiens antiques. Si la bataille des Thermopyles est redevenue un mythe avec 300, le film de Zack Snyder, et sa suite, 300, naissance d'un empire, de Noam Murro, il faut lire ce que Les Belles Lettres appellent la Véritable Histoire de Thémistocle, à savoir le récit, tout haletant, et, en un sens, tout aussi romanesque, qu'ont produit Plutarque, Diodore et Hérodote sur la bataille de Salamine. La Vie d'Apollonios de Tyane, de Philostrate, est moins riche en documents qu'en épisodes fantastiques sur les cultes solaires orientaux : contrairement aux Vies parallèles édifiantes de Plutarque, c'est une vie imaginaire assez rocambolesque d'un illuminé comme celles que pourraient raconter les romanciers d'aujourd'hui. Sulfureuses et cruelles jusqu'à l'horreur sont les vies racontées par Suétone, dont les empereurs dépravés font passer DSK pour un petit-maître (lisez sa Vie de Néron), et, a fortiori, celles, plus mélancoliques, de Tacite (lisez sa Vie d'Agricola) : leur vision ironique du monde politique et leur nostalgie d'un âge d'or du pouvoir trouvent, mutatis mutandis, bien des échos dans notre imaginaire français ; elle nous permet, quoi qu'il en soit, de relativiser la gravité des turpitudes contemporaines. Quant à l'Histoire véritable, de Lucien de Samosate, que l'on peut trouver dans une collection des Belles Lettres en poche sous le titre de Voyages extraordinaires, c'est, derrière l'apparence d'un récit sérieusement géographique, une facétie qui nous emmène au-delà du monde connu pour moquer Homère et Platon. Plutôt que de rappeler doctement son importance dans l'histoire de la littérature (c'est le premier récit de science-fiction et le premier exemple de voyage sur la Lune), enivrons-nous plutôt de sa verve comique désopilante dirigée à l'encontre de toute forme d'héroïsme - c'est dire à quel point, avant même que le mot « littérature » existe, les écrivains antiques étaient capables à la fois de satisfaire et de moquer nos besoins de légendes.

Romans accessibles

hersent_daphnis.jpgFin août, paraîtra un volume de 1 200 pages compact et très accessible et préfacé par Barbara Cassin, Romans grecs et latins (Les Belles lettres). D'ici là, à l'exception des Ethiopiques, le roman-fleuve d'Héliodore, qui n'est hélas facilement lisible que dans le très beau volume de la Pléiade consacré par Pierre Grimal aux Romans grecs et latins, on retrouvera tous ces récits en poche et parfois gratuitement en ligne sur Gallica dans des éditions anciennes - lorsque ce n'est pas dans des éditions numériques gratuites et facilement téléchargeables pour nos liseuses, en goûtant alors le plaisir de revenir, sur ces machines électroniques, à cette forme de lecture tabulaire qui était celle de tous les écrits dans l'Antiquité... On pourra préconiser ainsi pour les plages d'avant la réforme du collège un programme de lecture vraiment original : son principe serait de redécouvrir dans notre Antiquité notre propre étrangeté - pour emprunter une formule au héros du Patient anglais, de Michael Ondaatje : « Assez de livres. Donnez-moi Hérodote, c'est tout. » De nobis fabula narratur.

Romans grecs et latins, édition dirigée par Romain Brethes et Jean-Philippe Guez, Les Belles Lettres, 1 200 p., 35 €.

Quand les anciens inventaient les manuels de psychologie 

 

epic414-gf.jpgEn juin 1993, la collection « Mille et Une Nuits » (Fayard) lança un nouveau concept éditorial, «le classique à 10 francs», avec une réussite immédiate : la Lettre sur le bonheur, d'Epicure, se vend à plus de 100 000 exemplaires. Il sera suivi par pléthore de manuels de vie antique, bien dignes de se trouver au rayon développement personnel des librairies : on compte rien moins que six éditions à moins de 10 € de De la brièveté de la vie, de Sénèque, (certaines étant habilement suivies du commentaire célèbre de Denis Diderot). En faisant un saut par-dessus la morale chrétienne, les traités de sagesse antique, ceux-là mêmes qui nourrirent la Renaissance, viennent réintroduire les valeurs épicuriennes ou stoïques dans nos existences pressées. Plutarque est particulièrement mis à l'ouvrage, et ses traités moraux, qui faisaient le délice de Montaigne, sont transformés pro bono en opuscules utiles vendus peu cher, car ne coûtant rien en droits d'auteur aux éditeurs : on trouvera chez Arléa De l'excellence des femmes (qui est tout sauf un traité féministe avant l'heure), Erotikos («l'érotique», proposé comme une réflexion sur les vertus et les inconvénients de l'homosexualité), la Conscience tranquille (qui souligne, nous dit-on, « le bonheur de vivre loin des passions » et « la vanité insupportable des bavardages ») ou encore quatre traités sur l'Ami véritable ou les pensées de l'historien hellénistique sur l'Intelligence des animaux, leurs droits et comportements. Cicéron servira évidemment à réfléchir sur la morale (le Traité des devoirs, c'est-à-dire le De officiis), sur la Vieillesse (c'est sous ce titre que plusieurs éditeurs reprennent en poche son Caton l'ancien), un autre éditeur proposant de fabriquer une trilogie Devant la mort, Devant la souffrance, le Bonheur en découpant en extraits les Tusculanes, recueil d'entretiens philosophiques du Ier siècle avant Jésus-Christ) actualisé et transformé en bréviaire. Pour quelques euros, Pline le Jeune servira, quant à lui, quelques millénaires avant Facebook et ses détracteurs, à réfléchir à la nécessité d'un Temps à soi : là encore, par un bien habile retitrage, les lettres de l'historien latin font résonner à notre profit « la douceur et noblesse de ce temps à soi, plus beau, peut-être, que toute activité ». De la philosophie émiettée en leçons de vie pour éditeur en quête de bon coup commercial et pour lecteur en peine de normes - lorsque ce n'est pas en viatiques en tout genre, comme en témoigne la traduction dans la collection « Retour aux grands textes » du savoureux, mais bien vain, Eloge de la calvitie du rhéteur alexandrin Synésios de Cyrène (IVe siècle) : voilà à quoi nous servent aussi les antiques...

jeudi, 17 mars 2016

War and the Iliad ~ Simone Weil

simone_weilforza.jpg

War and the Iliad ~ Simone Weil

THE ILIAD, or the Poem of Force

(L’Iliade, ou le poeme de la force)

Ex: https://chazzw.wordpress.com

The true hero, the true subject, the center of the “Iliad” is force.

Thus opens Simone Weil’s essay. She calls the Iliad the purest and loveliest of mirrors for the way it shows force as being always at the center of human history. Force is that x that turns those who are subjected to it into a thing. As the Iliad shows us time and time again, this force is relentless and deadly. But force not only works upon the object of itself, its victims – it works on those who posses it as well. It is pitiless to both. It crushes those who are its victims, and it intoxicates those who wield it. But in truth, no man ever really posseses it. As the Iliad clearly shows, one day you may wield force, and the next day you are the object of it.

In this poem there is not a single man who does not at one time or another have to bow his neck to force.

Weil points out that the proud hero of Homer’s poem, the warrior, is first seen weeping. Agamemnon has purposely humiliated Achilles, to show him who is master and who is slave. Ah, but later it is Agamemnon who is seen weeping. Hector is later seen challenging the whole Greek army and they know fear. When Ajax calls him out, the fear is in Hector. As quickly as that. Later in the poem its Ajax who is fearful: Zeus the father on high, makes fear rise in Ajax [Homer]. Every single man in the Iliad (Achilles excepted) tastes a moment of defeat in battle. 

Weil catches things, subtle things that show us the marvel of the Iliad. The tenet of justice being blind for instance, and its being meted out to all in the same way, without favoritism. He who lives by force shall die by force was established in the Iliad long before the Gospels recognized this truism.

Ares is just, and kills those who kill [Homer]

The weak and the strong both belong to the same species: the weak are never without some power, and the strong are never without some weakness. Achilles, of course, is Exhibit A. The powerful feel themselves indestructible, invulnerable. The fact of their power contains the seeds of weakness. Chickens, my friends, will always come home to roost. The very powerful see no possibility of their power being dimished – they feel it unlimited. But it is not. And this is where Weil gets deep into the heart of the matter. If we believe we are of the powerless then we see those who have what seems to be unlimited power as of another species, apart. And vice versa. The weak cannot possibly inherit the earth. They are …well. too weak, too different too apart, too unlike that powerful me. Dangerous thinking.

Thus it happens that those who have force on loan from fate count on it too much and are destroyed. 

But at that moment in time, this seems inconceivable, failing to realize that the power they have is not inexhaustible, not infinite. Meeting no resistance, the powerful can only feel that their destiny is total domination. This is the very point where the domineering are vulnerable to domination. The have exceeded the measure of the force that is actually at their disposal. Inevitably they exceed it since they are not aware that it is limited. And now we see them commited irretrievably to chance; suddenly things cease to obey them. Sometimes chance is kind to them, sometimes cruel. But in any case, there they are, exposed, open to misfortune; gone is the armor of power that formerly protected their naked souls; nothing, no shield, stands between them and tears.

Iliade-ou-le-poeme-de-la-force_8907.jpegOverreaching man is for Weil the main subject of Greek thought. Retribution, Nemesis. These are buried in the soul of Greek epic poetry. So starts the discussion on the nature of man. Kharma. We think we are favored by the gods. Do we stop and consider that they think they are favored by the gods. If we do, we quickly (as do they) put it out of our heads. Time and time again in the see-saw battle that Homer relates to us, we see one side (or the other) have an honorable victory almost in hand, and then want more. Overreaching again. Hector imagines people saying this about him.

Weil writes chillingly on death. We all know that we are fated to die one day. Life ends and the end of it is death. The future has a limit put on it by that fact. For the soldier, death is the future. Very similar to the way a person struggling with a surely deadly disease looks at death. It’s his future. As I struggle to deal with my brain cancer, struggle for the way to align it with the life remaining to me, I realize that my future is already defined by my death which is straight ahead. The future is death. It’s very much in my thoughts. Generally we live with a realization that we all die, as I’ve said. But the very indeterminate nature of that death, of that murky future, allows us to put it out of our minds. We go about the task of living. Terminal diseases make us think about the task of dying.

Once the experience of war makes visible the possibility of death that lies locked up in each moment, our thoughts cannot travel from one day to the next without meeting death’s face.

Weill tells us that the Iliad reveals to the reader the last secret of war. This secret is revealed in its similes. Warriors, those on the giving end of force, are turned into things. Things like fire, things like flood waters, things like heavy winds or wild beasts of the fields. But Homer has just enough examples of man’s higher aspirations, of his noble soul, to contrast with force, and give us what might be. Love, brotherhood, friendship. The seeds of these attributes, of these moments of grace, of these values in man, make the use of force by man all the more tragic and life denying.

I recall thinking as I read the Iliad that it was uncanny how many times I thought of the phrase ‘God is on our side’, so we shall prevail. The irony, or the bitter truth of this position is that the two opposing sides, if they had only one thing in common, it would be this simple belief: We are on the right side, and ‘they’ are on the wrong side.

Throughout twenty centuries of Christianity, the Romans and the Hebrews have been admired, read, imitated,  both in deed and word; their masterpieces have yielded an appropriate quotation every time anybody had a crime they wanted to justify.

Simone Weill concludes with her belief that since the Iliad only flickers of the genius of Greek epic has been seen. Quite the opposite, she laments.

Perhaps they will yet rediscover the epic genius, when they learn that there is no refuge from fate, learn not to admire force, not to hate the enemy, not to scorn the unfortunate.

Amen to that, Simone.       

vendredi, 11 mars 2016

L'Italia, Roma e il sacro

tumblr_o3s3z1Vfyk1rnng97o1_500.jpg

mardi, 12 janvier 2016

Le latin, discipline de l’esprit... par Antoine Desjardins

latinffffff.jpg

Le latin, discipline de l’esprit...

par Antoine Desjardins

Ex: http://metapoinfos.hautfort.com

Nous reproduisons ci-dessous un point de vue d'Antoine Desjardins, cueilli sur Causeur et consacré au projet d'éradication de l'enseignement du latin porté par les pédagogistes du ministère de l’Éducation Nationale. Professeur de Lettres modernes, Antoine Desjardins est membre de l'association Sauver Les Lettres.

Le latin, discipline de l’esprit

« Le grammairien qui une fois la première ouvrit la grammaire latine sur la déclinaison de “Rosa, Rosae” n’a jamais su sur quels parterres de fleurs il ouvrait l’âme de l’enfant. »

Péguy, L’Argent, 1913

Dès lors qu’on s’en prend au latin, à l’allemand (langues à déclinaisons), qu’on affaiblit ou qu’on dilue ces enseignements, on s’en prend à la grammaire mais aussi aux fonctions cognitives : à l’analyse et à la synthèse, à la logique, à la mémoire pourtant si nécessaire, à l’attention. On s’en prend à la computation sémantique et symbolique, au calcul (exactement comme on parle de calcul des variantes aux échecs), à la concentration. On s’en prend donc indirectement à la vigilance intellectuelle et à l’esprit critique.

« L’âme intellective » qu’Aristote plaçait au dessus de « l’âme animale », elle-même supérieure à « l’âme végétative » : voilà désormais l’ennemi.

Mais le pédagogisme a déclaré la guerre à cette âme. Il est un obscurantisme qui travaille à humilier l’intelligence cartésienne, présumée élitiste : il est un mépris de la mathématique et de la vérité, il sape le pari fondateur de l’instruction de tous, il nie les talents et la diversité, fabrique de l’homogène ou de l’homogénéisable. Il mixe et il broie, il ne veut rien voir qui dépasse. Il est d’essence sectaire et totalitaire. Il est un ethnocentrisme du présent  comme le souligne Alain Finkielkraut : « Ce qu’on appelle glorieusement l’ouverture sur la vie n’est rien d’autre que la fermeture du présent sur lui même. »  Il utilise à ses fins la violence d’une scolastique absconse,  jargon faussement technique destiné à exercer un contrôle gestionnaire. Le novmonde scolaire exige en effet sa novlangue. Activement promue par nos managers, elle est loin d’être anodine : elle montre l’idée que ces gens se font de ce qu’est la fonction première du langage : une machine à embobiner et à prévenir le crime par la pensée claire.

L’URSS, à qui ont peut faire bien des reproches, eut au moins cette idée géniale, à un moment, de faire faire des échecs à tout le monde ! Quel plaisir pour beaucoup d’enfants, quelle passion dévorante qui vit éclore tellement de talents. De très grands joueurs vinrent des profondeurs du petit peuple russe : c’est cela aussi ce que Vilar appelait l’élitisme pour tous, utopie pour laquelle je militerai sans trêve ! Si j’avais la tâche d’apprendre les échecs à mes élèves, je ne leur ferais pas tourner des pièces en buis avec une fraise à bois dans le cadre d’un EPI (enseignement pratique interdisciplinaire) ! Je leur apprendrais, pour leur plus grand bonheur, le déplacement des pièces, les éléments de stratégie et de tactique ! je les ferais JOUER : Je ne pars pas du principe désolant, pour filer mon analogie, que ce noble jeu est réservé à une élite, aux happy few, tout simplement parce que c’est faux ! Je ne pars pas du principe également faux que ce jeu est ennuyeux !

Le plaisir de décortiquer une phrase latine est unique : c’est un plaisir de l’intelligence et de la volonté, une algèbre sémantique avec ses règles, comme les échecs. On perce à jour une phrase de latin comme Œdipe résout l’énigme du Sphinx. Tout le monde devrait pouvoir y parvenir. Construire une maquette de Rome avec le professeur d’histoire ou un habit de gladiateur avec celui d’arts plastiques… ne relève pas du même plaisir ! Je pense que ce qui ressortit au périscolaire, même astucieux, ne doit plus empiéter sur le scolaire.

Mais la logique, aujourd’hui, est attaquée et l’Instruction avec elle. Des dispositifs « interdisciplinaires » nébuleux proposant des « activités » bas de gamme et souvent franchement ridicules, viennent jeter le discrédit sur les disciplines et dévorer leurs heures. Comme si des élèves qui ne possèdent pas les fondamentaux allaient magiquement se les approprier en « autonomie » en faisant n’importe quoi. Pauvre Edgar Morin ! La complexité devient… le chaos et la transmission, le Do it yourself. Portés par une logorrhée toxique produite en circuit industriel fermé, des « concepts » tristement inspirés du management portent la fumée et même la nuit dans les consciences. La « langue » des instructions officielles donnerait un haut-le-cœur à tous les amoureux du français : on nage dans des « milieux aquatiques standardisés », on finalise des « séquences didactiques », on travaille sur des « objectifs » (de production), on valide des « compétences » (Traité de Lisbonne), on doit « socler » son cours, donner dans le « spiralaire » et le « curriculaire », prévoir des « cartographies mentales ». Voilà à quoi devrait s’épuiser l’intelligence du professeur. Voilà où son désir d’enseigner devrait trouver à s’abreuver. Cela ne fait désormais plus rire personne… En compliquant la tâche du professeur, on complique aussi celle de l’élève. On plaque une complexité didactique artificieuse et vaine sur la seule complexité qui vaille : celle de l’objet littéraire, linguistique, scientifique, qui seul devrait mobiliser les ressources de l’intelligence.

Dans les années 2000, déjà, le grand professeur Henri Mitterand, spécialiste de Zola,  appelait le quarteron d’experts médiocres qui s’appliquaient et s’appliquent encore  à la destruction de l’école républicaine, les « obsédés de l’objectif » ! Depuis, ils sont passés aux « compétences » et noyautent toujours l’Institution : rien ne les arrête dans leur folie scientologico-technocratico-égalitaro-thanatophile. Finalement ces idéologues fiévreux ne travaillent pas pour l’égalité (vœu pieu) mais pour Nike, Google, Microsoft, Coca-Cola, Amazon, Bouygues, etc. Toutes les multinationales de l’entairtainment, de la bouffe, des fringues, de la musique de masse, disent en effet merci à la fin de l’école qui instruit : ce sont autant de cerveaux vierges et disponibles pour inscrire leurs injonctions publicitaires. Bon, il est vrai que nos experts travaillent aussi pour Bercy : l’offre publique d’éducation est à la baisse, il faut bien trouver des « pédagogies », si possible anti-élitistes et ultra démocratiques, pour justifier ou occulter ce désinvestissement de l’État et faire des économies.

Après trente ans de dégâts, il serait temps de remercier les croque-morts industrieux de la technostructure de l’E.N. qui travaillent nuit et jours à faire sortir l’école du paradigme instructionniste à coup de « réformes » macabres. Des experts pleins de ressentiment, capables de dégoûter pour toujours de la littérature (bourgeoise !) et de la science (discriminante !) des générations d’élèves ! Des raboteurs de talents qui, et c’est inédit, attaquent à présent, en son essence même, l’exercice souverain de l’intelligence : les gammes de l’esprit ! Ils n’ont toujours pas compris que l’élève joue à travailler et que l’art souriant du maître consiste à exalter ce jeu.Plus que jamais aujourd’hui, nos élèves ont besoin, avec l’appui des nouvelles technologies s’il le faut, mais pas toujours, de disciplines de l’esprit qui fassent appel à toutes les facultés mentales. Ils doivent décliner, conjuguer, mémoriser, raisonner, s’abstraire. Ils doivent apprendre la rigueur, la concentration et l’effort : toutes choses qu’un cours transformé en  goûter McDo interdisciplinaire ne permet guère. Ils ont besoin d’horaires disciplinaires substantiels à effectifs réduits, de professeurs  passionnés et bien formés et non d’animateurs polyvalents : la réforme du collège prend exactement le chemin inverse.

Quant à moi, dans l’œil de tous mes élèves, je la vois, oui, l’étincelle du joueur d’échecs potentiel, du latiniste en herbe qui s’ignore, du musicien ou du grammairien, du germaniste, de l’helléniste en herbe qui veut aussi faire ses gammes pour pouvoir s’évader dans la maîtrise. Déposer dans la mémoire d’un élève de ZEP, pour toujours, le poème fascinant et exotique de l’alphabet grec. Peu me chaut qu’on ne devienne pas Mozart ou Bobby Fischer ou Champollion, c’est cette étincelle ou cette lueur qu’il me plaît de voir grandir. L’innovation en passera désormais par une ré-institution de l’école et une réaffirmation de ses valeurs. Il faut participer à la reconstruction d’une véritable culture scolaire, où l’élève apprenne à conquérir sa propre humanité. Au lieu de moraliser, il faut instruire ! Au lieu d’abandonner l’élève il faut le guider.

latinlives_ba_img_0.jpg

Par la pratique assidue des langues, la lecture des grands textes, il faut maintenir les intelligences en état d’alerte maximum au lieu de baisser pavillon et de glisser plus avant dans l’entonnoir de la médiocrité en prêchant un catéchisme citoyen bas de gamme à usage commun. Il ne s’agissait pas pour Condorcet et les autres de fabriquer du citoyen pacifié, docile, lénifié, mais bien de porter partout la connaissance, l’esprit de doute méthodique, l’esprit scientifique, la fin des préjugés ! Dans le même mouvement, qu’on en finisse avec cette espèce de maximalisme égalitaire qu’on dirait inspiré de doux idéologues cambodgiens génocidaires. Comme l’a montré Ricœur en son livre sur l’histoire (La mémoire, l’histoire, l’oubli) une société dépense une grande violence pour ramener à chaque instant une position d’équilibre (égalité/normalité) quand il y a un déséquilibre (inégalité/anormalité). A grande échelle, cette violence peut s’avérer meurtrière et criminelle. Relisons notamment Hannah Arendt sur les questions d’éducation et sur l’analyse du totalitarisme. L’égalité ne saurait être l’égalisation, elle doit être l’égalité des chances : chacun a le droit de réussir autant qu’il le peut et autant qu’il le mérite.

Pour un pouvoir politique, quel qu’il soit, c’est prendre un grand risque d’émanciper le peuple, de le rendre autonome. L’école des « compétence » et de « l’employabilité » qu’une poignée de réformateurs nous impose est une école du brouillage et de l’enfumage des esprits, de l’asservissement du prof-exécutant et des élèves « apprenants ». En attaquant le latin, elle s’en prend de façon larvée non pas à un ornement scolaire, mais à sa substance même : la gymnastique de l’esprit.

Si, comme le pensait Valéry, la politique est l’art d’empêcher les gens de se mêler de ce qui les regarde, on comprend mieux que l’école programme désormais l’impuissance intellectuelle et l’art d’apprendre à ignorer.

Antoine Desjardins (Causeur, 6 janvier 2016)

samedi, 16 mai 2015

Maintenir et transmettre l’esprit de la culture antique

zeus.jpg

L'ANTIQUITÉ ET LES MONOTHÉISMES
 
Maintenir et transmettre l’esprit de la culture antique

Danièle Sallenave, académicienne*
Ex: http://metamag.fr
Il est un argument décisif en faveur des langues et cultures de l’antiquité auquel nos gouvernants auraient du penser avant de proposer des programmes qui voient leur effacement progressif.

Il paraît même étonnant qu’on n’y ait pas songé, alors que, dans le même temps, on se dit préoccupé par le retour de la religion et des affrontements religieux ! On a en effet décidé, pour se prémunir contre leur violence, de mettre en place un enseignement du « fait religieux », portant sur l’origine commune et l’histoire des trois monothéismes. Donc, naturellement, de l’Islam.

Mais alors il faudrait, impérativement, dresser en face de ce bloc monothéiste, l’édifice considérable du monde antique. Non que celui-ci ait ignoré la dimension religieuse, mais dans l’univers polythéiste des Grecs et des Romains, la religion ne se présente pas comme une vérité unique, garantie par sa source divine, ni comme un dogme. Les religions antiques sont constituées de représentations à la fois cosmologiques, sociales et politiques, bien éloignées de ce que nous appelons aujourd’hui du nom de religion. Et bien moins promptes à s’imposer par la force : ce qui est réprimé chez les Chrétiens, c’est moins leur croyance que leur refus public d'adhérer à la cité et à son culte.

Mais ce n’est pas seulement les religions antiques dont il faudrait réveiller l’étude et la connaissance, et la relative tolérance qui les marque : c’est le monde de pensée, d’art, de philosophie, dont les Grecs et les Romains furent porteurs pendant plus d’un millénaire. En un mot : cet humanisme, qui trouve ses fondements dès le Vème siècle avant notre ère avec la formule du penseur grec Protagoras, « l’homme est la mesure de toutes choses ». Inventions, audaces inouïes de l’Antiquité ! Jusque dans la confrontation avec l’esprit des religions : pour la première fois dans l’histoire de la pensée, avec le De natura rerum, Lucrèce pose les bases d’une philosophie matérialiste qui s’en prend à tous les « crimes » que les religions ont pu dicter.

La conversion d’un empereur romain, Constantin, fera du christianisme une religion d’état à valeur universelle. À partir de ce moment, le monde antique recule, ses dieux refoulés ne sont plus que les personnages de mythes inoffensifs. La pensée antique est destituée, elle perd tout fondement légitime, et se voit progressivement remplacée par une pensée, une morale, une culture issues de la christianisation. Comme l’avait déjà dit au IIème siècle un père de l’église, Tertullien, qui jugeait dangereuse la lecture de Platon : « Quand nous croyons, disait-il, nous ne voulons rien croire au-delà. Nous croyons même qu’il n’y a plus rien à croire ». Son apologétique de nouveau converti est une vigoureuse attaque de toutes les formes de la philosophie antique, à laquelle il refuse même ce nom.

D’où la forme que prend, à la fin du Moyen Age, le grand mouvement qui va marquer toute l’Europe, et qu’on a nommé à juste titre Renaissance. Ce sont en effet des années où « l’humanité renaissait » écrit Anatole France dans son Rabelais (1928). Et cet élan vers l’avenir s’appuie, paradoxalement, sur un retour, le retour à l’Antiquité, c’est-à-dire au monde d’avant la Bible. Les auteurs de la Renaissance retrouvent l’inspiration de Protagoras. C’est Marcile Ficin écrivant que « Le pouvoir humain est presque égal à la nature divine ». Érasme : « On ne naît pas homme, on le devient », et confiant le soin de cet avènement de l’homme dans l’homme à la pratique des antiquités grecques et romaines. Rabelais, pratiquant un évangélisme hostile à tout dogmatisme, demande aux lettres érudites et à la science de former « cet autre monde, l’homme ». Montaigne, enfin, pourtant profondément, chrétien, prend pour modèle de sagesse humaine non pas le Christ, qu’il ne cite jamais, mais Socrate.

Socrate fut condamné à boire la cigüe et les espérances de la Renaissance sombrèrent finalement dans l’atrocité des guerres de religion : cela ne retire rien à leur leçon. Maintenir et transmettre l’esprit de la culture antique, c’est garder ouvertes les voies d’un humanisme réfractaire à tout dogmatisme. C’est maintenir une vision plurielle de l’histoire, c’est refuser de se soumettre au monopole d’une vérité unique, porté par un livre unique, et imposée au monde avec l’invention du monothéisme.

mercredi, 06 mai 2015

Pourquoi il faut se remettre à Sénèque (et aussi au latin !)

Lucio_Anneo_Seneca_101.jpg_1306973099.jpg

Pourquoi il faut se remettre à Sénèque (et aussi au latin !)
 
Précepteur de Néron, Sénèque fut bien placé pour savoir que les bons conseils n'ont pas de bons suiveurs.
 
Ecrivain
Ex: http://www.bvoltaire.fr

Il est inepte et socialiste de se remettre au latin sans savoir pourquoi. Le latin, langue de Pétrone, de Virgile et d’une poignée de grands génies politiquement incorrects…

Précepteur de Néron, Sénèque fut bien placé pour savoir que les bons conseils n’ont pas de bons suiveurs. Pourtant, à vingt siècles de là, et dans les temps postmodernes désastreux et désabusés où nous vivons, nous ne pouvons que nous émerveiller de la justesse de ses analyses, comme si Sénèque faisait partie de ces penseurs qui cogitent dans ce que Debord appelait le présent éternel.

Et je lui laisse écrire à Lucilius :

Sur le quidam obsédé par l’argent et par la consommation : « Les riches sont plus malheureux que les mendiants ; car les mendiants ont peu de besoins, tandis que les riches en ont beaucoup. »

Sur l’obsession des comiques et de la dérision, si sensible depuis les années Coluche : « Certains maîtres achètent de jeunes esclaves effrontés et aiguisent leur impudence, afin de leur faire proférer bien à propos des paroles injurieuses que nous n’appelons pas insultes, mais bons mots. »

Sur la dépression, ou ce mal de vivre mis à la mode par les romantiques, Sénèque écrit ces lignes : « De là cet ennui, ce mécontentement de soi, ce va-et-vient d’une âme qui ne se fixe nulle part, cette résignation triste et maussade à l’inaction…, cette oisiveté mécontente. »

Sur le tourisme de masse et les croisières, Sénèque remarque : « On entreprend des voyages sans but ; on parcourt les rivages ; un jour sur mer, le lendemain, partout on manifeste la même instabilité, le même dégoût du présent. »

Extraordinaire, aussi, cette allusion au délire immobilier qui a détruit la terre : « Nous entreprendrons alors de construire des maisons, d’en démolir d’autres, de reculer les rives de la mer, d’amener l’eau malgré les difficultés du terrain… »

Une société comme la nôtre ne manque pas d’esquinter les gens, de les réduire à un état légumineux. Sénèque le sait, à son époque de pain et de jeux, de cirque et de sang : « Curius Dentatus disait qu’il aimerait mieux être mort que vivre mort » (Curius Dentatus aiebat malle esse se mortuum quam uiuere).

L’obsession du « people », amplifiée par Internet et ses milliers de portails imbéciles (parfois un million de commentaires par clip de Lady Gaga), est aussi décrite par le penseur stoïcien : « De la curiosité provient un vice affreux : celui d’écouter tout ce qui se raconte, de s’enquérir indiscrètement des petites nouvelles, tant intimes que publiques, et d’être toujours plein d’histoires (auscultatio et publicorum secretorumque inquisitio).

Je terminerai par l’obsession humanitaire de nos temps étiolés, dont Chesterton disait qu’ils étaient marqués par les idées chrétiennes devenues folles, voire idiotes : « C’est une torture sans fin que de se laisser tourmenter des maux d’autrui » (nam alienis malis torqueri aeterna miseria est).

Fort heureusement, on peut se remettre aux classiques grecs et romains grâce à remacle.org.