Ok

En poursuivant votre navigation sur ce site, vous acceptez l'utilisation de cookies. Ces derniers assurent le bon fonctionnement de nos services. En savoir plus.

dimanche, 01 juillet 2018

The Ancients on Speaking Rightly

ciceronorateur.jpg

The Ancients on Speaking Rightly

We are all faced with the challenge of speaking, and living, truths which are felt to be offensive by a great many of our countrymen, not to mention the powers that be. This is not a new problem. By definition, the natural diversity of men means that knowledge of the truth is highly unequally distributed and those who know most about the truth are necessarily a tiny minority. This minority must alone face the prejudices and ignorance of the masses and the violence of the state. The Ancients are in universal agreement in saying that the truth must be spoken carefully, with due regard for one’s social position, social harmony, and the general society’s necessarily limited ability to grasp the truth.

Hesiod, that most practical Grecian poet, said: “The tongue’s best treasure among men is when it is sparing, and its greatest charm is when it goes in measure. If you speak ill, you may well hear greater yourself” (Works and Days, 720-25). He advised to “never venture to insult a man for accursed soul-destroying poverty, which is the dispensation of the blessed ones who are for ever” (W&D, 715-20). And ought we not to be even kinder to those suffering from poverty of culture and soul?

On the positive side, Hesiod also eloquently described the almost magical ability of the heaven-blessed king to unite his community through right speech: “upon his tongue” the Muses “shed sweet dew, and out of his mouth the words flow honeyed; and the peoples all look to him as he decides what is to prevail with his straight judgments” (Theogony, 80-90). There was a unique ideal of isogoria – equality or freedom of speech, the right for each citizen to speak before the public –  in ancient Greece. This right however was, even for citizens, not unqualified and entailed responsibility, particularly with regard to the social consequences of one’s words.

In a faraway India, the followers of the Buddha paired gracious, truthful speech with perfect self-control. According to the Gandharan Dharmapada, Gautama said:

One who utters speech that isn’t rough
But instructive and truthful
So that he offends no one,
Him I call a Brahmin.

The one who does no wrong
Through body, speech, or mind,
Restrained in the three ways,
Him I call a Brahmin.

One perfectly calmed, ceased,
A gentle speaker, not puffed up,
Who illuminates the meaning and the Dharma,
Him I call a Brahmin. (Dharmapada, 1.22-24)

Lest one think this is but the fearful self-censorship of peasants and monks, the Norse poets have Odin say much the same thing. The Sayings of the High One (Hávamál) contain several verses advising caution in speech. Odin says:

He’s a wretched man, of evil disposition,
the one who makes fun of everything,
he doesn’t know the one thing he ought to know:
that he is not devoid of faults (Hávamál, 22)

Wise that man seems who retreats
when one guest is insulting another;
the man who mocks at a feast doesn’t know for sure
whether he shoots off his mouth amid enemies. (Háv., 31)[1] [2]

For, as Odin adds: “For those words which one man says to another, often he gets paid back” (Háv., 65). The foul-speaking, friendless man goes to the Assembly and finds himself “among the multitude and has few people to speak for him” (Háv., 62).[2] [3]

One must have the right speech, the most truthful speech possible, according to time and place and audience. The most important truths – those about life and death, about purpose and community – are rarely apprehended explicitly and rationally, nor do they need to be, operating at a far deeper psychological level. Your whole demeanor, your generous attitude ought to, without words, invite your kinsmen to live seriously and love their people. For as Aristotle said, so far as persuasion is concerned, the speaker’s “character contains almost the strongest proof of all” (Rhetoric, 1.2)

Unless you are a prophet (feel free to “announce yourself”), you must work with existing, living traditions, national and spiritual, whatever their imperfections, for these resonate with people and, if appealed to, invite them to higher purposes. (Actually, even the prophets, both ancient and modern, appealed to, expanded upon, and transformed existing traditions.) That which is bad in a tradition can be graciously understated, that which is good celebrated and glorified. You do not convince people with statistics and syllogisms, but by touching their soul. In terms of ethics, a living tradition is worth more than all the libraries and databases in the world.

All this is not to say that one should not say anything offensive to society. All the traditions are equally clear: there are times when truth must be adhered to openly, necessarily meaning the breaking of ties with society, one’s own family, one’s life. The point I would make is that this must not be done carelessly, but with self-mastery and effectiveness. The gains in terms of knowledge of truth must outweigh the costs in terms of social entropy, division, and hatred. Your words are actions. A generation cannot, and should not, be expected to abandon the religion and fundamental values it was brought up with (we ought to have a compassionate thought for the Boomers here). In all this, one should trust one’s instincts rather than calculate. Some truths are spoken in vain if one lacks power. As a Spartan once said: “My friend, your words require the backing of a city” (Plutarch, “Sayings of Lysander,” 8). Socrates lived cryptically his entire life, confounding convention and encouraging the good, choosing to die at precisely the moment when this would make truth resonate for the ages.

aristotelesrhetoric.jpgAbove all, we must shed from within ourselves the idea that we, personally, are “entitled” to free speech or that the masses can welcome the whole truth. If we still have these notions, then we are in fact still slaves to our time’s democratic naïveté. No, free speech is at once a duty and a prize, to be exercised only once we have become worthy, by our own personal excellence and self-mastery. That was, at any rate, the way Diogenes the Cynic saw things, calling free speech “the finest thing of all in life.”[3] [4] But this free speech was not to be used carelessly: the Dog’s notoriously vicious wit and outrageous behavior were always meant to benefit others educationally, metaphorically biting his “friends, so as to save them.”[4] [5] Do not worry about your right to freedom of speech: try to be worthy of freedom of speech.

On this point, I can do better here than quote the philosopher-emperor Julian, in his letter denouncing the so-called “Cynics” of his day, who had degenerated into something like a band of lazy and offensive hippies (my emphasis):

Therefore let him who wishes to be a Cynic philosopher not adopt merely their long cloak or wallet or staff or their way of wearing the hair, as though he were like a man walking unshaved and illiterate in a village that lacked barbers’ shops and schools, but let him consider that reason rather than a staff and a certain plan of life rather than a wallet are the mintmarks of the Cynic philosophy. And freedom of speech he must not employ until he have first proved how much he is worth, as I believe was the case with Crates and Diogenes. For they were so far from bearing with a bad grace any threat of fortune, whether one call such threats caprice or wanton insult, that once when he had been captured by pirates Diogenes joked with them; as for Crates he gave his property to the state, and being physically deformed he made fun of his own lame leg and hunched shoulders. But when his friends gave an entertainment he used to go, whether invited or not, and would reconcile his nearest friends if he learned that they had quarrelled. He used to reprove them not harshly but with a charming manner and not so as to seem to persecute those whom he wished to reform, but as though he wished to be of use both to them and to the bystanders. Yet this was not the chief end and aim of those Cynics, but as I said their main concern was how they might themselves attain to happiness and, as I think, they occupied themselves with other men only in so far as they comprehended that man is by nature a social and political animal; and so they aided their fellow-citizens, not only by practicing but by preaching as well. (To the Uneducated Cynics, 201-02)

Your words are a side effect, a very secondary one, of your way of life. How are you living?

Bibliography

 Aristotle (trans. H. C. Lawson-Tancred), The Art of Rhetoric (London: Penguin, 2004).

Hard, Robin, (ed. and trans.), Diogenes the Cynic: Sayings and Anecdotes with Other Popular Moralists (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012).

Hesiod (trans. M. L. West), Theogony and Works and Days (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988).

Julian (trans. Emily Wright), To the Uneducated Cynics: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/To_the_uneducated_Cynics [6]

Larrington, Carolyne (trans.), The Poetic Edda (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014).

Plutarch (trans. Richard Talbert and Ian Scott-Kilvert), On Sparta (London: Penguin, 2005)

Roebuck, Valerie (trans.), The Dhammapada (London: Penguin, 2010).

Notes

[1] [7] One could also cite verse 32:

Many men are devoted to one another
and yet they fight at feasts;
amongst men there will always be strife,
guest squabbling with guest.

[2] [8] More generally, one is struck at the degree to which the ethos of the Hávamál are in harmony with those of Homer and Hesiod, no doubt reflecting similar ways of life as farmers, wanderers, and conquerors.

[3] [9] Robin Hard (ed. and trans.), Diogenes the Cynic: Sayings and Anecdotes with Other Popular Moralists (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012), 50.

[4] [10] Ibid., 24.

 

Article printed from Counter-Currents Publishing: https://www.counter-currents.com

URL to article: https://www.counter-currents.com/2018/06/the-ancients-on-speaking-rightly/

URLs in this post:

[1] Image: https://www.counter-currents.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Freedom-of-Speech.jpg

[2] [1]: #_ftn1

[3] [2]: #_ftn2

[4] [3]: #_ftn3

[5] [4]: #_ftn4

[6] https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/To_the_uneducated_Cynics: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/To_the_uneducated_Cynics

[7] [1]: #_ftnref1

[8] [2]: #_ftnref2

[9] [3]: #_ftnref3

[10] [4]: #_ftnref4

 

 

vendredi, 23 mars 2018

The Black Sun: Dionysus, Nietzsche, and Greek Myth

dionys10.jpg

The Black Sun: Dionysus, Nietzsche, and Greek Myth

Gwendolyn Taunton

Ex: https://manticorepress.net


Affirmation of life even it its strangest and sternest problems, the will to life rejoicing in its own inexhaustibility through the sacrifice of its highest types – that is what I call the Dionysian…Not so as to get rid of pity and terror, not so as to purify oneself of a dangerous emotion through its vehement discharge – it was thus Aristotle understood it – but, beyond pity and terror, to realize in oneself the eternal joy of becoming – that joy which also encompasses joy in destruction…And with that I again return to that place from which I set out –The Birth of Tragedy was my first revaluation of all values: with that I again plant myself in the soil out of which I draw all that I will and can – I, the last disciple of the philosopher Dionysus – I, the teacher of the eternal recurrence(Nietzsche, “What I Owe to the Ancients”)

It is a well known fact that most of the early writings of the German philosopher, Friedrich Nietzsche, revolve around a prognosis of duality concerning the two Hellenic deities, Apollo and Dionysus. This dichotomy, which first appears in The Birth of Tragedy, is subsequently modified by Nietzsche in his later works so that the characteristics of the God Apollo are reflected and absorbed by his polar opposite, Dionysus. Though this topic has been examined frequently by philosophers, it has not been examined sufficiently in terms of its relation to the Greek myths which pertain to the two Gods in question. Certainly, Nietzsche was no stranger to Classical myth, for prior to composing his philosophical works, Nietzsche was a professor of Classical Philology at the University of Basel. This interest in mythology is also illustrated in his exploration of the use of mythology as tool by which to shape culture. The Birth of Tragedy is based upon Greek myth and literature, and also contains much of the groundwork upon which he would develop his later premises. Setting the tone at the very beginning of The Birth of Tragedy, Nietzsche writes:[spacer height=”20px”]

We shall have gained much for the science of aesthetics, once we perceive not merely by logical inference, but with the immediate certainty of vision, that the continuous development of art is bound up with the Apollonian and Dionysian duality – just as procreation depends on the duality of the sexes, involving perpetual strife with only periodically intervening reconciliations. The terms Dionysian and Apollonian we borrow from the Greeks, who disclose to the discerning mind the profound mysteries of their view of art, not, to be sure, in concepts, but in the intensely clear figures of their gods. Through Apollo and Dionysus, the two art deities of the Greeks, we come to recognize that in the Greek world there existed a tremendous opposition…[1]

Initially then, Nietzsche’s theory concerning Apollo and Dionysus was primarily concerned with aesthetic theory, a theory which he would later expand to a position of predominance at the heart of his philosophy. Since Nietzsche chose the science of aesthetics as the starting point for his ideas, it is also the point at which we shall begin the comparison of his philosophy with the Hellenic Tradition.

God-Bacchus-2.jpg

The opposition between Apollo and Dionysus is one of the core themes within The Birth of Tragedy, but in Nietzsche’s later works, Apollo is mentioned only sporadically, if at all, and his figure appears to have been totally superseded by his rival Dionysus. In The Birth of Tragedy, Apollo and Dionysus are clearly defined by Nietzsche, and the spheres of their influence are carefully demarcated. In Nietzsche’s later writings, Apollo is conspicuous by the virtue of his absence – Dionysus remains and has ascended to a position of prominence in Nietzsche’s philosophy, but Apollo, who was an integral part of the dichotomy featured in The Birth of Tragedy, has disappeared, almost without a trace. There is in fact, a simple reason for the disappearance of Apollo – he is in fact still present, within the figure of Dionysus. What begins in The Birth of Tragedy as a dichotomy shifts to synthesis in Nietzsche’s later works, with the name Dionysus being used to refer to the unified aspect of both Apollo and Dionysus, in what Nietzsche believes to the ultimate manifestation of both deities. In early works the synthesis between Apollo & Dionysus is incomplete – they are still two opposing principles – “Thus in The Birth of Tragedy, Apollo, the god of light, beauty and harmony is in opposition to Dionysian drunkenness and chaos”.[2] The fraternal union of Apollo & Dionysus that forms the basis of Nietzsche’s view is, according to him, symbolized in art, and specifically in Greek tragedy.[3] Greek tragedy, by its fusion of dialogue and chorus; image and music, exhibits for Nietzsche the union of the Apollonian and Dionysian, a union in which Dionysian passion and dithyrambic madness merge with Apollonian measure and lucidity, and original chaos and pessimism are overcome in a tragic attitude that is affirmative and heroic.[4]

The moment of Dionysian “terror” arrives when […] a cognitive failure or wandering occurs, when the principle of individuation, which is Apollo’s “collapses” […] and gives way to another perception, to a contradiction of appearances and perhaps even to their defeasibility as such (their “exception”). It occurs “when [one] suddenly loses faith in […] the cognitive form of phenomena. Just as dreams […] satisfy profoundly our innermost being, our common [deepest] ground [der gemeinsame Untergrund], so too, symmetrically, do “terror” and “blissful” ecstasy…well up from the innermost depths [Grunde] of man once the strict controls of the Apollonian principle relax. Then “we steal a glimpse into the nature of the Dionysian”.[5]

apollonooooooo.jpgThe Apollonian and the Dionysian are two cognitive states in which art appears as the power of nature in man.[6] Art for Nietzsche is fundamentally not an expression of culture, but is what Heidegger calls “eine Gestaltung des Willens zur Macht” a manifestation of the will to power. And since the will to power is the essence of being itself, art becomes “die Gestaltung des Seienden in Ganzen,” a manifestation of being as a whole.[7] This concept of the artist as a creator, and of the aspect of the creative process as the manifestation of the will, is a key component of much of Nietzsche’s thought – it is the artist, the creator who diligently scribes the new value tables. Taking this into accord, we must also allow for the possibility that Thus Spake Zarathustra opens the doors for a new form of artist, who rather than working with paint or clay, instead provides the Uebermensch, the artist that etches their social vision on the canvas of humanity itself.  It is in the character of the Uebermensch that we see the unification of the Dionysian (instinct) and Apollonian (intellect) as the manifestation of the will to power, to which Nietzsche also attributes the following tautological value “The Will to Truth is the Will to Power”.[8] This statement can be interpreted as meaning that by attributing the will to instinct, truth exists as a naturally occurring phenomena – it exists independently of the intellect, which permits many different interpretations of the truth in its primordial state. The truth lies primarily in the will, the subconscious, and the original raw instinctual state that Nietzsche identified with Dionysus. In The Gay Science Nietzsche says:

For the longest time, thinking was considered as only conscious, only now do we discover the truth that the greatest part of our intellectual activity lies in the unconscious […] theories of Schopenhauer and his teaching of the primacy of the will over the intellect. The unconscious becomes a source of wisdom and knowledge that can reach into the fundamental aspects of human existence, while the intellect is held to be an abstracting and falsifying mechanism that is directed, not toward truth but toward “mastery and possession.” [9]

Thus the will to power originates not in the conscious, but in the subconscious. Returning to the proposed dichotomy betwixt Dionysus and Apollo, in his later works the two creative impulses become increasingly merged, eventually reaching a point in his philosophy wherein Dionysus refers not to the singular God, but rather a syncretism of Apollo and Dionysus in equal quantity. “The two art drives must unfold their powers in a strict proportion, according to the law of eternal justice.”[10] For Nietzsche, the highest goal of tragedy is achieved in the harmony between two radically distinct realms of art, between the principles that govern the Apollonian plastic arts and epic poetry and those that govern the Dionysian art of music.[11] To be complete and  to derive ultimate mastery from the creative process, one must harness both the impulses represented by Apollo and Dionysus – the instinctual urge and potent creative power of Dionysus, coupled with the skill and intellectualism of Apollo’s craftsmanship – in sum both natural creative power from the will and the skills learnt within a social grouping. This definition will hold true for all creative ventures and is not restricted to the artistic process; ‘will’ and ‘skill’ need to act in harmony and concord.

apollo-chariot-1.jpg

In Nietzsche’s philosophy, Apollo and Dionysus are so closely entwined as to render them inseparable. Apollo, as the principle of appearance and of individuation, is that which grants appearance to the Dionysian form, without for Apollo, Dionysus remains bereft of physical appearance.

That [Dionysus] appears at all with such epic precision and clarity is the work of the dream interpreter, Apollo […] His appearances are at best instances of “typical ‘ideality,’” epiphanies of the “idea” or “idol”, mere masks and after images (Abbilde[er]). To “appear” Dionysus must take on a form.[12]

In his natural state, Dionysus has no form, it is only by reflux with Apollo, who represents the nature of form that Dionysus, as the nature of the formless, can appear to us at all. Likewise, Apollo without Dionysus becomes lost in a world of form – the complex levels of abstraction derived from the Dionysian impulse are absent. Neither god can function effectively without the workings of the other.  Dionysus appears, after all, only thanks to the Apollonian principle. This is Nietzsche’s rendition of Apollo and Dionysus, his reworking of the Hellenic mythos, forged into a powerful philosophy that has influenced much of the modern era. Yet how close is this new interpretation to the original mythology of the ancient Greeks, and how much of this is Nietzsche’s own creation? It is well known that Nietzsche and his contemporary Wagner both saw the merit in reshaping old myths to create new socio-political values. To fully understand Nietzsche’s retelling of the Dionysus myth and separate the modern ideas from that of the ancients, we need to examine the Hellenic sources on Dionysus.

apolyre.jpgMyths of Dionysus are often used to depict a stranger or an outsider to the community as a repository for the mysterious and prohibited features of another culture. Unsavory characteristics that the Greeks tend to ascribe to foreigners are attributed to him, and various myths depict his initial rejection by the authority of the polis – yet Dionysus’ birth at Thebes, as well as the appearance of his name on Linear B tablets, indicates that this is no stranger, but in fact a native, and that the rejected foreign characteristics ascribed to him are in fact Greek characteristics.[13] Rather than being a representative of foreign culture what we are in fact observing in the character of Dionysus is the archetype of the outsider; someone who sits outside the boundaries of the cultural norm, or who represents the disruptive element in society which either by its nature effects a change or is removed by the culture which its very presence threatens to alter. Dionysus represents as Plutarch observed, “the whole wet element” in nature – blood, semen, sap, wine, and all the life giving juice. He is in fact a synthesis of both chaos and form, of orgiastic impulses and visionary states – at one with the life of nature and its eternal cycle of birth and death, of destruction and creation.[14]  This disruptive element, by being associated with the blood, semen, sap, and wine is an obvious metaphor for the vital force itself, the wet element, being representative of “life in the raw”. This notion of “life” is intricately interwoven into the figure of Dionysus in the esoteric understanding of his cult, and indeed throughout the philosophy of the Greeks themselves, who had two different words for life, both possessing the  same root as Vita (Latin: Life) but present in very different phonetic forms: bios and zoë.[15]

Plotinos called zoë the “time of the soul”, during which the soul, in its course of rebirths, moves on from one bios to another […] the Greeks clung to a not-characterized “life” that underlies every bios and stands in a very different relationship to death than does a “life” that includes death among its characteristics […] This experience differs from the sum of experiences that constitute the bios, the content of each individual man’s written or unwritten biography. The experience of life without characterization – of precisely that life which “resounded” for the Greeks in the word zoë – is, on the other hand, indescribable.[16]

Zoë is Life in its immortal and transcendent aspect, and is thus representative of the pure primordial state. Zoëis the presupposition of the death drive; death exists only in relation to zoë. It is a product of life in accordance with a dialectic that is a process not of thought, but of life itself, of the zoë in each individual bios.[17]

Dyonisus-Figur-6_600x600.jpg

The other primary association of Dionysus is with the chthonic elements, and we frequently find him taking the form of snakes. According to the myth of his dismemberment by the Titans, a myth which is strongly associated with Delphi, he was born of Persephone, after Zeus, taking snake form, had impregnated her. [18] In Euripides Bacchae, Dionysus, being the son of Semele, is a god of dark and frightening subterranean powers; yet being also the son of Zeus, he mediates between the chthonic and civilized worlds, once again playing the role of a liminal outsider that passes in transit from one domain to another.[19] Through his association with natural forces, a description of his temple has been left to us by a physician from Thasos: “A temple in the open air, an open air naos with an altar and a cradle of vine branches; a fine lair, always green; and for the initiates a room in which to sing the evoe.”[20] This stands in direct contrast to Apollo, who was represented by architectural and artificial beauty. Likewise his music was radically different to that of Apollo’s; “A stranger, he should be admitted into the city, for his music is varied, not distant and monotone like the tunes of Apollo’s golden lyre”. (Euripides Bacchae 126-134, 155-156)[21]

Both Gods were concerned with the imagery of life, art, and as we shall see soon, the sun. Moreover, though their forces were essentially opposite, they two Gods were essentially representative of two polarities for the same force, meeting occasionally in perfect balance to reveal an unfolding Hegelian dialectic that was the creative process of life itself and the esoteric nature of the solar path, for just as Dionysus was the chthonic deity (and here we intentionally use the word Chthon instead of the word Gē  – Chthon being literally underworld and Gē being the earth or ground) and Apollo was a Solar deity; but not the physical aspect of the sun as a heavenly body, this was ascribed by to the god Helios instead. Rather Apollo represented the human aspect of the solar path (and in this he is equivalent to the Vedic deity Savitar), and its application to the mortal realm; rather than being the light of the sky, Apollo is the light of the mind: intellect and creation. He is as bright as Dionysus is dark – in Dionysus the instinct, the natural force of zoë is prevalent, associated with the chthonic world below ground because he is immortal, his power normally unseen. He rules during Apollo’s absence in Hyperborea because the sun has passed to another land, the reign of the bright sun has passed and the time of the black sun commences – the black sun being the hidden aspect of the solar path, represented by the departure of Apollo in this myth.

diowein.jpg

Apollo is frequently mentioned in connection to Dionysus in Greek myth. Inscriptions dating from the third century B.C., mention that Dionysos Kadmeios reigned alongside Apollo over the assembly of Theben gods.[22] Likewise on Rhodes a holiday called Sminthia was celebrated there in memory of a time mice attacked the vines there and were destroyed by Apollo and Dionysus, who shared the epithet Sminthios on the island.[23] They are even cited together in the Odyssey (XI 312-25), and also in the story of the death of Koronis, who was shot by Artemis, and this at Apollo’s instigation because she had betrayed the god with a mortal lover.[24] Also, the twin peaks on Parnassos traditionally known as the “peaks of Apollo and Dionysus.”[25] Their association and worship however, was even more closely entwined at Delphi, for as Leicester Holland has perceived:

(1) Dionysus spoke oracles at Delphi before Apollo did; (2) his bones were placed in a basin beside the tripod; (3) the omphalos was his tomb. It is well known, moreover, that Dionysus was second only to Apollo in Delphian and Parnassian worship; Plutarch, in fact, assigns to Dionysus an equal share with Apollo in Delphi[26]

A Pindaric Scholiast says that Python ruled the prophetic tripod on which Dionysus was the first to speak oracles; that then Apollo killed the snake and took over.[27] The association of Apollo and Dionysus in Delphi, moreover, was not limited to their connection to the Delphic Oracle. We also find this relationship echoed in the commemoration of the Great flood which was celebrated each year at a Delphian festival called Aiglē, celebrated two or three days before the full moon of January or February, at the same time as the Athenian Anthesteria festival, the last day of which was devoted to commemorating the victims of the Great Flood; this was the same time of the year when Apollo was believed at Delphi to return from his sojourn among the Hyperboreans. Moreover, Dionysus is said to have perished and returned to life in the flood.[28] Apollo’s Hyperborean absence is his yearly death – Apollonios says that Apollo shed tears when he went to the Hyperborean land; thence flows the Eridanos, on whose banks the Heliades wail without cease; and extremely low spirits came over the Argonauts as they sailed that river of amber tears.[29]

This is the time of Dionysus’ reign at Delphi in which he was the center of Delphic worship for the three winter months, when Apollo was absent. Plutarch, himself a priest of the Pythian Apollo, Amphictyonic official and a frequent visitor to Delphi,  says that for nine months the paean was sung in Apollo’s honour at sacrifices, but at the beginning of winter the paeans suddenly ceased, then for three months men sang dithyrambs and addressed themselves to Dionysus rather than to Apollo.[30] Chthonian Dionysus manifested himself especially at the winter festival when the souls of the dead rose to walk briefly in the upper world again, in the festival that the Athenians called Anthesteria, whose Delphian counterpart was the Theophania. The Theophania marked the end of Dionysus’ reign and Apollo’s return; Dionysus and the ghosts descended once more to Hades realm.[31] In this immortal aspect Dionysus is very far removed from being a god of the dead and winter; representing instead immortal life, the zoë, which was employed in Dionysian cult to release psychosomatic energies summoned from the depths that were discharged in a physical cult of life.[32]

tromaktiko6256.jpg

Dionysus is the depiction of transcendent primordial life, life that persists even during the absence of Apollo (the Sun) – for as much as Apollo is the Golden Sun, Dionysus is the Black or Winter Sun, reigning in the world below ground whilst Apollo’s presence departs for another hemisphere, dead to the people of Delphi, the Winter Sun reigns in Apollo’s absence. Far from being antagonistic opposites, Apollo and Dionysus were so closely related in Greek myth that according to Deinarchos, Dionysus was killed and buried at Delphi beside the golden Apollo.[33] Likewise, in the Lykourgos tetralogy of Aischylos, the cry “Ivy-Apollo, Bakchios, the soothsayer,” is heard when the Thracian bacchantes, the Bassarai, attacks Orpheus, the worshipper of Apollo and the sun. The cry suggests a higher knowledge of the connection between Apollo and Dionysus, the dark god, whom Orpheus denies in favour of the luminous god. In the Lykymnios of Euripides the same connection is attested by the cry, “Lord, laurel-loving Bakchios, Paean Apollo, player of the Lyre.”[34] Similarly, we find anotherpaean by Philodamos addressed to Dionysus from Delphi: “Come hither, Lord Dithyrambos, Backchos…..Bromios now in the spring’s holy period.”[35] The pediments of the temple of Apollo also portray on one side Apollo with Leto, Artemis, and the Muses, and on the other side Dionysus and the thyiads, and a vase painting of c.400 B.C. shows Apollo and Dionysus in Delphi holding their hands to one another.[36]

An analysis of Nietzsche’s philosophy concerning the role of Apollo and Dionysus in Hellenic myth thus reveals more than even a direct parallel. Not only did Nietzsche comprehend the nature of the opposition between Apollo and Dionysus, he understood this aspect of their cult on the esoteric level, that their forces, rather than being antagonistic are instead complementary, with both Gods performing two different aesthetic techniques in the service of the same social function, which reaches its pinnacle of development when both creative processes are elevated in tandem within an individual. Nietzsche understood the symbolism of myths and literature concerning the two gods, and he actually elaborated upon it, adding the works of Schopenhauer to create a complex philosophy concerning not only the interplay of aesthetics in the role of the creative process, but also the nature of the will and the psychological process used to create a certain type, which is exemplified in both his ideals of the Ubermensch and the Free Spirit. Both of these higher types derive their impetus from the synchronicity of the Dionysian and Apollonian drives, hence why in Nietzsche’s later works following The Birth of Tragedy only the Dionysian impulse is referred to, this term not being used to signify just Dionysus, but rather the balanced integration of the two forces. This ideal of eternal life (zoë) is also located in Nietzsche’s theory of Eternal Reoccurrence – it denies the timeless eternity of a supernatural God, but affirms the eternity of the ever-creating and destroying powers in nature and man, for like the solar symbolism of Apollo and Dionysus, it is a notion of cyclical time. To Nietzsche, the figure of Dionysus is the supreme affirmation of life, the instinct and the will to power, with the will to power being an expression of the will to life and to truth at its highest exaltation – “It is a Dionysian Yea-Saying to the world as it is, without deduction, exception and selection…it is the highest attitude that a philosopher can reach; to stand Dionysiacally toward existence: my formula for this is amor fati”’[37]  Dionysus is thus to both Nietzsche and the Greeks, the highest expression of Life in its primordial and transcendent meaning, the hidden power of the Black Sun and the subconscious impulse of the will.

GWT-7914138.jpg

To order at: https://manticorepress.net

Endnotes:

[1]James I. Porter, The Invention of Dionysus: An Essay on the Birth of Tragedy, (California: Stanford University Press, 2002), 40

[2]Rose Pfeffer, Nietzsche: Disciple of Dionysus, (New Jersey: Associated University Presses, Inc. 1977), 31

[3] Ibid.,31

[4] Ibid., 51

[5] James I. Porter, The Invention of Dionysus: An Essay on the Birth of Tragedy, 50-51

[6] Ibid., 221

[7] Ibid., 205-206

[8] Rose Pfeffer, Nietzsche: Disciple of Dionysus, 114

[9] Ibid, 113

[10] James I. Porter, The Invention of Dionysus: An Essay on the Birth of Tragedy, 82

[11] Rose Pfeffer, Nietzsche: Disciple of Dionysus, 32

[12] James I. Porter, The Invention of Dionysus: An Essay on the Birth of Tragedy, 99

[13]Dora C. Pozzi, and John M. Wickerman, Myth & the Polis, (New York: Cornell University 1991), 36

[14]Rose Pfeffer, Nietzsche: Disciple of Dionysus,  126

[15] Carl Kerényi, Dionysos Archetypal Image of Indestructible Life, (New Jersey: Princeton university press,  1996), xxxxi

[16] Ibid., xxxxv

[17] Ibid., 204-205

[18] Joseph Fontenrose, Python: A Study of Delphic Myth and its Origins (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980), 378

[19]Dora C. Pozzi, and John M. Wickerman, Myth & the Polis,  147

[20]Marcel Detienne, trans. Arthur Goldhammer Dionysos At Large, (London: Harvard Univeristy Press 1989), 46

[21]Dora C. Pozzi, and John M. Wickerman, Myth & the Polis,   144

[22] Marcel Detienne, trans. Arthur Goldhammer Dionysos At Large, 18

[23] Daniel E. Gershenson, Apollo the Wolf-God in Journal of Indo-European Studies, Mongraph number 8 (Virginia: Institute for the Study of Man 1991), 32

[24]Carl Kerényi, Dionysos Archetypal Image of Indestructible Life, (New Jersey: Princeton university press,  1996), 103

[25] Dora C. Pozzi, and John M. Wickerman, Myth & the Polis,  139

[26] Joseph Fontenrose, Python: A Study of Delphic Myth and its Origins (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980), 375

[27] Ibid., 376

[28]Daniel E. Gershenson, Apollo the Wolf-God in Journal of Indo-European Studies, Monograph number 8, 61

[29] Joseph Fontenrose, Python: A Study of Delphic Myth and its Origins (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980), 387

[30] Ibid., 379

[31] Ibid., 380-381

[32] Ibid., 219

[33] Ibid., 388

[34] Carl Kerényi, Dionysos Archetypal Image of Indestructible Life, (New Jersey: Princeton university press,  1996), 233

[35] Ibid.,217

[36] Walter F. Otto, Dionysus: Myth and Cult, (Dallas: Spring Publications, 1989) 203

[37] Rose Pfeffer, Nietzsche: Disciple of Dionysus,  261

mercredi, 21 février 2018

Greek Biopolitics and Its Unfortunate Demise in Western Thinking

aphroditeOOOOO.jpg

Greek Biopolitics and Its Unfortunate Demise in Western Thinking

Guillaume Durocher

Ex: http://www.theoccidentalobserver.net

greek-origins-of-biopolitics.jpgMika Ojakangas, On the Origins of Greek Biopolitics: A Reinterpretation of the History of Biopower
London and New York: Routledge, 2016

Mika Ojakangas is a professor of political theory, teaching at the University of Jyväskylä in Finland. He has written a succinct and fairly comprehensive overview of ancient Greek thought on population policies and eugenics, or what he terms “biopolitics.” Ojakangas says:

In their books on politics, Plato and Aristotle do not only deal with all the central topics of biopolitics (sexual intercourse, marriage, pregnancy, childbirth, childcare, public health, education, birthrate, migration, immigration, economy, and so forth) from the political point of view, but for them these topics are the very keystone of politics and the art of government. At issue is not only a politics for which “the idea of governing people” is the leading idea but also a politics for which the question how “to organize life” (tou zên paraskeuên) (Plato, Statesman, 307e) is the most important question. (6)

The idea of regulating and cultivating human life, just as one would animal and plant life, is then not a Darwinian, eugenic, or Nazi modern innovation, but, as I have argued concerning Plato’s Republic, can be found in a highly developed form at the dawn of Western civilization. As Ojakangas says:

The idea of politics as control and regulation of the living in the name of the security, well-being and happiness of the state and its inhabitants is as old as Western political thought itself, originating in classical Greece. Greek political thought, as I will demonstrate in this book, is biopolitical to the bone. (1)

Greek thought had nothing to do with the modern obsessions with supposed “human rights” or “social contracts,” but took the good to mean the flourishing of the community, and of individuals as part of that community, as an actualization of the species’ potential: “In this biopolitical power-knowledge focusing on the living, to repeat, the point of departure is neither law, nor free will, nor a contract, or even a natural law, meaning an immutable moral rule. The point of departure is the natural life (phusis) of individuals and populations” (6). Okajangas notes: “for Plato and Aristotle politics was essentially biopolitics” (141).

In Ojakangas’ telling, Western biopolitical thought gradually declined in the ancient and medieval period. Whereas Aristotle and perhaps Plato had thought of natural law and the good as pertaining to a particular organism, the Stoics, Christians, and liberals posited a kind of a disembodied natural law:

This history is marked by several ruptures understood as obstacles preventing the adoption and diffusion of the Platonic-Aristotelian biopolitical model of politics – despite the influence these philosophers have otherwise had on Roman and Christian thought. Among these ruptures, we may include: the legalization of politics in the Roman Republic and the privatization of everyday life in the Roman Empire, but particularly the end of birth control, hostility towards the body, the sanctification of law, and the emergence of an entirely new kind of attitude to politics and earthly government in early Christianity. (7)

mika.ojakangas.jpgOjakangas’ book has served to confirm my impression that, from an evolutionary point of view, the most relevant Western thinkers are found among the ancient Greeks, with a long sleep during the Roman Empire and the Middle Ages, a slow revival during the Renaissance and the Enlightenment, and a great climax heralded by Darwin, before being shut down again in 1945. The periods in which Western thought was eminently biopolitical — the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. and 1865 to 1945 — are perhaps surprisingly short in the grand scheme of things, having been swept away by pious Europeans’ recurring penchant for egalitarian and cosmopolitan ideologies. Okajangas also admirably puts ancient biopolitics in the wider context of Western thought, citing Spinoza, Nietzsche, Carl Schmitt, Heidegger, and others, as well as recent academic literature.

At the core of the work is a critique of Michel Foucault’s claim that biopolitics is a strictly modern phenomenon growing out of “Christian pastoral power.” Ojakangas, while sympathetic to Foucault, says the latter’s argument is “vague” (33) and unsubstantiated. Indeed, historically at least, Catholic countries with strong pastoral power tended precisely to be those in which eugenics was less popular, in contrast with Protestant ones.

It must be said that postmodernist pioneer Foucault is a strange starting point on the topic of biopolitics. As Ojakangas suggests, Foucault’s 1979 and 1980 lecture courses The Birth of Biopolitics and On the Government of the Living do not deal mainly with biopolitics at all, despite their titles (34–35). Indeed, Foucault actually lost rapidly lost interest in the topic.

Okajangas also criticizes Hannah Arendt for claiming that Aristotle posited a separation between the familial/natural life of the household (oikos) and that of the polis. In fact: “The Greek city-state was, to use Carl Schmitt’s infamous formulation, a total state — a state that intervenes, if it so wishes, in all possible matters, in economy and in all the other spheres of human existence” (17). Okajangas goes into some detail citing, contra Arendt and Foucault, ancient Greek uses of household-management and shepherding as analogies for political rule.

aristoteleseeeeeeee.jpg

Aristotle appears as a genuine forerunner of modern scientific biopolitics in Ojakangas’ account. Aristotle’s politics was at once highly conventional, really reflecting more widespread Greek assumptions, and his truly groundbreaking work as an empirical scientist, notably in the field of biology. For Aristotle “the aim of politics and state administration is to produce good life by developing the immanent potentialities of natural life and to bring these potentialities to fruition” (17, cf. 107). Ojakangas goes on:

Aristotle was not a legal positivist in the modern sense of the word but rather a representative of sociological naturalism, as for Aristotle there is no fundamental distinction between the natural and the social world: they are both governed by the same principles discovered by empirical research on the nature of things and living beings. (55–56)

And: “although justice is based on nature, at stake in this nature is not an immutable and eternal cosmic nature expressing itself in the law written on the hearts of men and women but nature as it unfolds in a being” (109).

This entailed a notion of justice as synonymous with natural hierarchy. Okajangas notes: “for Plato justice means inequality. Justice takes place when an individual fulfills that function or work (ergon) that is assigned to him by nature in the socio-political hierarchy of the state — and to the extent that everybody does so, the whole city-state is just” (111). Biopolitical justice is when each member of the community is fulfilling the particular role to which he is best suited to enable the species to flourish: “For Plato and Aristotle, in sum, natural justice entails hierarchy, not equality, subordination, not autonomy” (113). Both Plato and Aristotle adhered to a “geometrical” conception of equality between humans, namely, that human beings were not equal, but should be treated in accordance with their worth or merit.

platoIIIIIII.jpg

Plato used the concepts of reason and nature not to comfort convention but to make radical proposals for the biological, cultural, and spiritual perfection of humanity. Okajangas rightly calls the Republic a “bio-meritocratic” utopia (19) and notes that “Platonic biopolitico-pastoral power” was highly innovative (134). I was personally also extremely struck in Plato by his unique and emphatic joining together of the biological and the spiritual. Okajangas says that National Socialist racial theoriar Hans F. K. Günther in his Plato as Protector of Life (1928) had argued  that “a dualistic reading of Plato goes astray: the soul and the body are not separate entities, let alone enemies, for the spiritual purification in the Platonic state takes place only when accompanied with biological selection” (13).[1]

Okajangas succinctly summarizes the decline of biopolitics in the ancient world. Politically this was related to the decline of the intimate and “total” city-state:

It indeed seems that the decline of the classical city-state also entailed a crisis of biopolitical vision of politics. . . . Just like modern biopolitics, which is closely linked to the rise of the modern nation-state, it is quite likely that the decline of biopolitics and biopolitical vision of politics in the classical era is related to the fall of the ethnically homogeneous political organization characteristic of the classical city-states. (118)

The rise of Hellenistic and Roman empires as universal, cultural states naturally entailed a withdrawal of citizens from politics and a decline in self-conscious ethnopolitics.

cicero1.jpgWhile Rome had also been founded as “a biopolitical regime” and had some policies to promote fertility and eugenics (120), this was far less central to Roman than to Greek thought, and gradually declined with the Empire. Political ideology seems to have followed political realities.  The Stoics and Cicero posited a “natural law” not deriving from a particular organism, but as a kind of cosmic, disembodied moral imperative, and tended to emphasize the basic commonality of human beings (e.g. Cicero, Laws, 1.30).

I believe that the apparently unchanging quality of the world and the apparent biological stability of the species led many ancient thinkers to posit an eternal and unchanging disembodied moral law. They did not have our insights on the evolutionary origins of our species and of its potential for upward change in the future. Furthermore, the relative commonality of human beings in the ancient Mediterranean — where the vast majority were Aryan or Semitic Caucasians, with some clinal variation — could lead one to think that biological differences between humans were minor (an impression which Europeans abandoned in the colonial era, when they encountered Sub-Saharan Africans, Amerindians, and East Asians). Missing, in those days before modern science and as White advocate William Pierce has observed, was a progressive vision of human history as an evolutionary process towards ever-greater consciousness and self-actualization.[2]

Many assumptions of late Hellenistic (notably Stoic) philosophy were reflected and sacralized in Christianity, which also posited a universal and timeless moral law deriving from God, rather than the state or the community. As it is said in the Book of Acts (5:29): “We must obey God rather than men.” With Christianity’s emphasis on the dignity of each soul and respect for the will of God, the idea of manipulating reproductive processes through contraception, abortion, or infanticide in order to promote the public good became “taboo” (121). Furthermore: “virginity and celibacy were as a rule regarded as more sacred states than marriage and family life . . . . The dying ascetic replaced the muscular athlete as a role model” (121). These attitudes gradually became reflected in imperial policies:

All the marriage laws of Augustus (including the system of legal rewards for married parents with children and penalties for the unwed and childless) passed from 18 BC onwards were replaced under Constantine and the later Christian emperors — and even those that were not fell into disuse. . . . To this effect, Christian emperors not only made permanent the removal of sanctions on celibates, but began to honor and reward those Christian priests who followed the rule of celibacy: instead of granting privileges to those who contracted a second marriage, Justinian granted privileges to those who did not  (125)

The notion of moral imperatives deriving from a disembodied natural law and the equality of souls gradually led to the modern obsession with natural rights, free will, and social contracts. Contrast Plato and Aristotle’s eudaimonic (i.e., focusing on self-actualization) politics of aristocracy and community to that of seventeenth-century philosopher Thomas Hobbes:

I know that in the first book of the Politics Aristotle asserts as a foundation of all political knowledge that some men have been made by nature worthy to rule, others to serve, as if Master and slave were distinguished not by agreement among men, but by natural aptitude, i.e. by their knowledge or ignorance. This basic postulate is not only against reason, but contrary to experience. For hardly anyone is so naturally stupid that he does not think it better to rule himself than to let others rule him. … If then men are equal by nature, we must recognize their equality; if they are unequal, since they will struggle for power, the pursuit of peace requires that they are regarded as equal. And therefore the eighth precept of natural law is: everyone should be considered equal to everyone. Contrary to this law is PRIDE. (De Cive, 3.13)

It does seem that, from an evolutionary point of view, the long era of medieval and early modern thought represents an enormous regression as compared with the Ancients, particularly the Greeks. As Ojakangas puts it: “there is an essential rupture in the history of Western political discourse since the decline of the Greek city-states” (134).

DarwinMMMMMMM.jpg

Western biopolitics gradually returned in the modern era and especially with Darwin, who himself had said in The Descent of Man: “The weak members of civilized societies propagate their kind. No one who has attended to the breeding of domestic animals will doubt that this must be highly injurious to the race of man.”[3] And: “Man scans with scrupulous care the character and pedigree of his horses, cattle, and dogs before he matches them; but when he comes to his own marriage he rarely, or never, takes any such care.”[4] Okajangas argues that “the Platonic Aristotelian art of government [was] more biopolitical than the modern one,” as they did not have to compromise with other traditions, namely “Roman and Judeo-Christian concepts and assumptions” (137).

Okajangas’ book is useful in seeing the outline of the long tradition of Western biopolitical thinking, despite the relative eclipse of the Middle Ages. He says:

Baruch Spinoza was probably the first modern metaphysician of biopolitics. While Kant’s moral and political thought is still centered on concepts such as law, free will, duty, and obligation, in Spinoza we encounter an entirely different mode of thinking: there are no other laws but causal ones, the human will is absolutely determined by these laws, freedom and happiness consist of adjusting oneself to them, and what is perhaps most essential, the law of nature is the law of a self-expressing body striving to preserve itself (conatus) by affirming itself, this affirmation, this immanent power of life, being nothing less than justice. In the thought of Friedrich Nietzsche, this metaphysics of biopolitics is brought to its logical conclusion. The law of life is nothing but life’s will to power, but now this power, still identical with justice, is understood as a process in which the sick and the weak are eradicated by the vital forces of life.

I note in passing that William Pierce had a similar assessment of Spinoza’s pantheism as basically valid, despite the latter’s Jewishness.[5]

The 1930s witnessed the zenith of modern Western biopolitical thinking. The French Nobel Prize winner and biologist Alexis Carrel had argued in his best-selling Man the Unknown for the need for eugenics and the need for “philosophical systems and sentimental prejudices must give way before such a necessity.” Yet, as Okajangas points out, “if we take a look at the very root of all ‘philosophical systems,’ we find a philosophy (albeit perhaps not a system) perfectly in agreement with Carrel’s message: the political philosophy of Plato” (97).

Okajangas furthermore argues that Aristotle’s biocentric naturalist ethics were taken up in 1930s Germany:

Instead of ius naturale, at stake was rather what the modern human sciences since the nineteenth century have called biological, economical, and sociological laws of life and society — or what the early twentieth-century völkisch German philosophers, theologians, jurists, and Hellenists called Lebensgesetz, the law of life expressing the unity of spirit and race immanent to life itself. From this perspective, it is not surprising that the “crown jurist” of the Third Reich, Carl Schmitt, attacked the Roman lex [law] in the name of the Greek nomos [custom/law] — whose “original” meaning, although it had started to deteriorate already in the post-Solonian democracy, can in Schmitt’s view still be detected in Aristotle’s Politics. Cicero had translated nomos as lex, but on Schmitt’s account he did not recognize that unlike the Roman lex, nomos does not denote an enacted statute (positive law) but a “concrete order of life” (eine konkrete Lebensordnung) of the Greek polis — not something that ‘ought to be’ but something that “is”. (56)

Western biopolitical thought was devastated by the outcome of the World War II and has yet to recover, although perhaps we can begin to see glimmers of renewal.

MF-main.jpg

Okajangas reserves some critical comments for Foucault in his conclusion, arguing that with his erudition he could not have been ignorant of classical philosophy’s biopolitical character. He speculates on Foucault’s motivations for lying: “Was it a tactical move related to certain political ends? Was it even an attempt to blame Christianity and traditional Christian anti-Semitism for the Holocaust?” (142). I am in no position to pronounce on this, other than to point out that Foucault, apparently a gentile, was a life-long leftist, a Communist Party member in the 1950s, a homosexual who eventually died of AIDS, and a man who — from what I can make of his oeuvre — dedicated his life to “problematizing” the state’s policing and regulation of abnormality.

Okajangas’ work is scrupulously neutral in his presentation of ancient biopolitics. He keeps his cards close to his chest. I identified only two rather telling comments:

  1. His claim that “we know today that human races do not exist” (11).
  2. His assertion that “it would be childish to denounce biopolitics as a multi-headed monster to be wiped off the map of politics by every possible means (capitalism without biopolitics would be an unparalleled nightmare)” (143).

The latter’s odd phrasing strikes me as presenting an ostensibly left-wing point to actually make a taboo right-wing point (a technique Slavoj Žižek seems to specialize in).

In any event, I take Ojakangas’ work as a confirmation of the utmost relevance of ancient political philosophy for refounding European civilization on a sound biopolitical basis. The Greek philosophers, I believe, produced the highest biopolitical thought because they could combine the “barbaric” pagan-Aryan values which Greek society took for granted with the logical rigor of Socratic rationalism. The old pagan-Aryan culture, expressed above all in the Homeric poems, extolled the values of kinship, aristocracy, competitiveness, community, and manliness, this having been a culture which was produced by a long, evolutionary struggle for survival among wandering and conquering tribes in the Eurasian steppe. This highly adaptive traditional culture was then, by a uniquely Western contact with rationalist philosophy, rationalized and radicalized by the philosophers, untainted by the sentimentality of later times. Plato and Aristotle are remarkably un-contrived and straightforward in their political methods and goals: the human community must be perfected biologically and culturally; individual and sectoral interests must give way to those of the common good; and these ought to be enforced through pragmatic means, in accord with wisdom, with law where possible, and with ruthlessness when necessary.


[1]Furthermore, on a decidedly spiritual note: “ rather than being a Darwinist of sorts, in Günther’s view it is Plato’s idealism that renders him a predecessor of Nazi ideology, because race is not merely about the body but, as Plato taught, a combination of the mortal body and the immortal soul.” (13)

[2] William Pierce:

The medieval view of the world was that it is a finished creation. Since Darwin, we have come to see the world as undergoing a continuous and unfinished process of creation, of evolution. This evolutionary view of the world is only about 100 years old in terms of being generally accepted. . . . The pantheists, at least most of them, lacked an understanding of the universe as an evolving entity and so their understanding was incomplete. Their static view of the world made it much more difficult for them to arrive at the Cosmotheist truth.

William Pierce, “Cosmotheism: Wave of the Future,” speech delivered in Arlington, Virginia 1977.

[3] Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex (New York: Appleton and Company, 1882), 134.

[4]Ibid., 617. Interestingly, Okajangas points out that Benjamin Isaac, a Jewish scholar writing on Greco-Roman “racism,” believed Plato (Republic 459a-b) had inspired Darwin on this point. Benjamin Isaac, The Invention of Racism in Classical Antiquity (Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 2004), 128.

[5]Pierce, “Cosmotheism.”

vendredi, 19 janvier 2018

THUCYDIDES ON WAR: TO BE STUDIED BY THE MOST ABLE OF MILITARY THEORISTS

thucydideoooooooo.jpg

THUCYDIDES ON WAR: TO BE STUDIED BY THE MOST ABLE OF MILITARY THEORISTS

Ex: https://www.geopolitica.ru
 
To be able to wage modern warfare cannot be merely defeating the enemy through a series of military engagements as being witnessed in the early twenty-first century, for the so-called vanquished enemy will often times return, as we have  seen in the infested battle regions of Iraq and Syria.  Without the understanding that the most pragmatic and final assault on any enemy in combat, on the battle field, can only be achieved through a scientific military theory based both on a strategic objective and studied analysis of when to wage war, there can be no lasting success to the end of a political crisis which was only abated but not ended by the means of war. Then there will be no end to such conflict but only lulls and a general repeat of an unsatisfied stand-off of no peace and no war. But to strike against an enemy in the first place, allowing for no way out for the enemy to survive under any circumstance, is the heart of the matter in the first place, and in studying the various small battles and large battles in the work the History of the Peloponnesian War by the ancient Greek historian, Thucydides, we come to grips with all the various nuances that make up the character of warfare.
 
What is lacking in the various theaters of conflicts in these modern times is a balance between a fluid scientific analysis of how and when to enter into a conflict or war situation, and how to understand and engage the spatial art of war or conflict conception of such an endeavor which must cause human suffering in which the various actors, their armies and citizens realize why they must fight and die in such a human conflict when it arises.   
 
What we have instead in our time, are the various protagonists such as the United States with its imperialist hegemonic desires, not yet abated even as the country is in its decline with its Fascist regime kept alive by millions of submissive Americans ignorant of their own proto-Fascistic behavior. 
 
Then on the other side, we have the emerging Russian state coming out of the great Soviet era, with its own desire to again regain its world influence upon those countries arising from a colonial past, these countries not only in the Middle- Eastern region, but also in regions of Africa  stretching from the Democratic Republic of Congo to Yemen down to South America in such places as Venezuela, Ecuador and the former Soviet ally, Cuba.  However, what both the United States and Russia lack is the understanding where the center of gravity is in pursuing the defeat of an enemy - one must  not only assess the military strengths and weakness of the enemy, but also objectively analyze  the culture and spiritual qualities or lack of regarding the overall political will of the people at the central core of the conflict.  
 
Instead,  both the United States and the Russians regimes make their great mistake in that in their ceaseless propaganda war and intermediate cyber-space conflict, including their various proxy wars, in their attempt to manipulate wars of liberation. They offer no alternative revolutionary theory, no modern release for a liberation of political, spiritual and culture way of life that the common man, the ordinary citizen craves for and would be willing to die for in a just cause.  
 
As Thucydides posited, “History is Philosophy teaching by example,”  one could also enlarge upon that singular statement and say  a country which claims to have the means  to better the situation of a people in all ways of living and dying, must set an example through leadership mirroring political ethics which teach or exemplify how to live without exploiting the people during a period of egregious economic suffering, and thus maintaining a quality of life that although not rich in material gain, is rich in human creative endeavors, even if those endeavors are limited within the human condition. 
 
What we are faced with is an emerging Fascist regime in the United States which the American people willingly or unwilling cloak with a ‘Democratic’ spirit, while in Russia, they have an oligarchy pulled towards a need to become a so-called superpower on the world’s stage, while its people long to re-establish a Soviet way of life. Thus, we have two opposing political forces  locked in a deadly struggle in which the citizens of both countries, including the  peoples allied with the two countries, are part of the human tragedy playing out day by day within the borders and outside the borders of the United States and Russia.  
 
With this view in mind of the polarization of these two belligerent systems of political and economic powers that hold sway over much of the world, it is imperative for the ablest of modern military theorists not only re-study the account of the Peloponnesian War by Thucydides, but also study in very careful detail the various tactical battles which the great Greek historian recounts.
 
The psychology and methodology of how both opposing forces of Athens and Sparta went after each other  is instructive even in modern times, to better understand how an enemy might seek out in either an impulsive behavior or a calculated behavior to destroy an enemy position, or to politically intimidate an enemy at the first hint of weakness. 
 
In our time, I recommend astute generals and heads of state peruse  Thucidides' visionary “Melian Dialogue” pertaining to the surrender terms offered by the invading Athenian force to the military officers and citizens of Melos during the fighting of the Peloponnesian war, which the Melians rejected for what they believed was a Casus belli  or as the French would say “une guerre juste” ending in the butchery and enslavement of the citizens of Melos, something we even see today among ISIS (known also as Daesh) terrorists, as well as among the American armed forces with their proxy Saudi Arab ally killing thousands of Yemenis peoples  occurring in the country of Yemen. 
 
Clearly, slaughter is now manifested as a way of life not only in the Middle East, but among the cartel fights in Mexico with thousands of innocent Mexican citizens killed outright, as well in the deepest regions of Colombia and Brazil where the poor, working class and indigenous peoples are protesting their right not be used as slave labor nor their land defiled in the most horrendous  ecological destruction. All these examples, the modern military theorist must take into account if he or she  is to justify interest and ability to instruct others how to wage war scientifically and efficiently, beyond merely waging war for profit and nihilistic slaughter. It is through studying the written history of Thucydides that the art of war achieves its most coveted accomplishment - waging war to limit the excesses of war.
 
When Thucydides  asserted  “Wars spring from unseen and generally insignificant causes, the first outbreak being often but an explosion of anger,” he was proclaiming to those who would listen - and those who would listen being the few even to this day - that war even among the most sophisticated and shrewd, whether they be government leaders, diplomats or the most aware intellectuals, are not cognizant that war ignited in ancient times, and wars coming seemingly spontaneously out of economic and political repression in modern times, are the result of a particular “explosion of anger” - that anger being in the people’s  desire to have a healthy and sane life, even if that life is short lived, and for this reason alone, that anger is infused in all of us, to our dying days.  
 

dimanche, 14 janvier 2018

Jerarquía de saberes: más Aristóteles y menos pedagogía

aristoteles_ueber_toleranz_by_diefelsenburg-d7vvp76.jpg

Carlos X. Blanco:
 
Jerarquía de saberes: más Aristóteles y menos pedagogía
 
Ex: https://www.latribunadelpaisvasco.com

Extraño animal es el hombre. Hay en él un impulso, una fuerza que, por naturaleza, le lleva al saber, le fuerza a escapar de los recintos de la sensación y la fantasía.

Πάντες ἂνθροποι τοῦ εἰδέναι ὀρέγονται φύσει (980ª 21). [Aristóteles, Metafísica. En este artículo cito según la edición de García Yebra, editorial Gredos, segunda edición, 1982]

El saber y el comprender entran de lleno en el ámbito del deseo humano. Se trata de una apetencia (ὀρέγω). Las cosas dignas de ser amadas son objeto de aspiración. El animal humano, aun cuando nada necesite en un instante dado, y más allá de la necesidad concreta, es un animal que extiende su alma –por así decir- hasta los objetos de su interés.

aristoteles_483722c72d6fa6ff1e608d836b0808f5.jpg

Al margen de cualquier enfoque evolutivo, desde luego, Aristóteles señala una gradación en la escala zoológica. Ciertos animales viven sólo de imágenes (φαντασία), otros, le añaden el recuerdo a sus vidas (μνήμη), lo cual ya es semilla de experiencias, auque en escaso grado. Pero el hombre, como nos señala el Estagirita en el Libro I de la Metafísica, “participa del arte y del razonamiento” (980b 26).

La experiencia brota de múltiples recuerdos, que son “anudados”, por así decir. Y, análogamente, las experiencias son a su vez anudadas a un nivel superior en el “arte” (τέχνη). Ningún otro animal, más allá de la simple prevención ante peligros, es “astuto” y capaz de hacer uso de las experiencias múltiples anudadas: sólo el hombre.

Entiende aquí el Filósofo que la τέχνη surge y se apoya en lo empírico. El concepto (ὑπόληψις) es universal siempre que haya nacido (γίγνομαι) de múltiples experiencias (981ª). Nacer o llegar a ser: este es el sentido del verbo γίγνομαι: nunca se habla de un resultado mecánico o constructivo. Estas últimas acepciones las hemos de reservar a los modernos psicólogos cognitivos, imbuidos ya de un espíritu enteramente mecanicista. Desde la experiencia, el hombre con τέχνη puede volver a lo singular. Así, al médico, cuyo saber le capacita para curar a Calias, como hombre individual, como enfermo singular. Sólo de manera “no esencial” diríamos que el médico cura al hombre y no a éste hombre en singular llamado Calias. El médico exclusivamente teórico no es un verdadero médico.

AR-esp.jpg

Extendamos la analogía al campo educativo o a cualquier otro ámbito profesional (“técnico”) del ser humano. Esos “científicos de la educación” que nunca han dado clase a unos niños, esos pedagogos que, si bien son conocedores profundos de la legislación y de las teorías didácticas más a la moda, jamás han pisado más aulas que las universitarias... ¿qué “arte” poseen? ¿Cuál habrá de ser su τέχνη, en un sentido en el que verdaderamente posean autoridad y efectividad? Toda τέχνη hunde sus raíces en experiencias artesanales, que a su vez son sistemas de sensaciones “anudadas”. Pero hemos de distinguir al “técnico” (perito, entendido en una materia, τεχνιτης), del empírico (ἔμπειπος). La diferencia viene dada por el conocimiento de la causa. El técnico es el sabio profesional que se encuentra en posesión de una teoría nacida de sus experiencias, teoría que “devuelve” a su vez a ese fondo empírico en orden a comprenderlas mejor y actuar sobre ellas. Por el contrario, el artífice manual (χειροτέχνης) solamente conoce el qué, no el por qué. El operario se adiestra, contrae hábitos que le hacen capaz, y esto es así por costumbre (δι᾽ ἔθος) [981b].

Sólo puede enseñar aquel que sabe, aquel que posee el arte y no simplemente la habilidad de un oficio.

AR-edu.png

La pedagogía oficialmente impuesta en España, de manera especial a raíz de la L.O.G.S.E (1991), se inspira en una serie de teorías de linaje marxista y pragmatista. En tales teorías, no hay distingo entre el “saber qué” y el “saber por qué”, y además se pretende reducir todo conocimiento al “saber cómo”. Por esto, y en una dirección completamente anti-aristotélica, los oficios (formación profesional, “ciclos formativos”, “módulos profesionales”) han entrado de lleno en los institutos de Enseñanza Media, bajo un mismo techo, bajo una única dirección y gestión. Incluso en la educación secundaria obligatoria, la más generalista, la terminología “obrerista” ha calado de lleno en el nombre de las asignaturas y de las actividades (“talleres” de lengua o matemáticas, “recursos” para el aprendizaje, “tecnología”, etc.).

El enfoque aristotélico no ha de ser visto de manera ineludible como una teoría despectiva hacia los oficios manuales, si bien en la sociedad helena del siglo IV a. d. C. eran tratados como “serviles”. Los oficios son absolutamente necesarios para la vida, y el ser experto en los mismos es alzarse por encima del nivel medio en una vida digna y civilizada. Las sociedades infracivilizadas desconocen la importancia del oficio y del conocimiento empírico. Pero solamente nuestra sociedad de consumo de masa ha querido disfrazar las diferencias de clase, ocupación, preparación y talento (diferencias inevitables en toda cultura humana) por medio de una amalgama pedagógica, como es la amalgama entre el aprendizaje de oficios y la formación intelectual y moral de las personas. De manera parasitaria, el aprendizaje de los oficios se aloja bajo los mismos techos institucionales y en los mismos capítulos presupuestarios que la enseñanza media de corte intelectual y preparatoria para la Universidad. Hacer de los Institutos y de las Universidades unos “talleres” de ambiente cada vez más obrerista, así como pensar la ciencia, el conocimiento, en términos exclusivos de producción, son los rasgos que caracterizan la pedagogía impuesta hoy, tanto en su hebra marxista como en la más próxima al pragmatismo americano. El estudiante es un obrero que “maneja herramientas”, con lo cual, se ha asesinado lo más precioso en el hombre: su curiosidad, su capacidad de admiración, su ansia de conocimiento. En esas escuelas que quieren preparar a los púberes a la fábrica, a todos por igual, se animaliza al hombre, se le adiestra y se le instruye, si hay un poco de suerte, mas no se le educa.

aristoteles_educar_a.jpg

Aristóteles señala en el Libro I de la Metafísica cómo la ciencia nace del ocio, y recuerda que fue posible gracias a la existencia de una clase sacerdotal en Egipto (981b 25). Fácil resulta caer en un reduccionismo sociológico y trasladar a hoy todo el contexto de una civilización esclavista, con todas las consideraciones precedentes. Consideraciones sobre una sabiduría separada del trabajo manual y utilitario, un conocimiento supremo, jerárquicamente alzado sobre los oficios y las técnicas. Las ideologías, que no la filosofía auténtica, trataron en tiempos modernos de extender un continuum entre la práctica utilitaria y la contemplación desinteresada. Al no poder o no querer abolirse la división en clases sociales, todo un público cándido y “mediano” (pues es un sector de la sociedad que vive de labores que no son manuales del todo ni del todo intelectuales) se engaña a sí mismo, “naturalizando” y, por ende, negando el salto entre la praxis y la teoría (invocando a Gramsci, Dewey, Piaget o a algún otro santo de su devoción), negando el hiato entre conocimientos subordinados y conocimientos supremos. Ya que no pudieron abolir las clases sociales (igualitarismo, comunismo), decretaron abolir la jerarquía gnoseológica.

En términos de política educativa, se nos ha querido presentar como “progresista” la amalgama de saberes traducida en una imagen horizontal de los docentes: en un I.E.S. (Instituto de Enseñanza Secundaria) coexisten maestros de primera enseñanza, catedráticos de bachillerato, técnicos de Formación Profesional, maestros de taller, peluquería, mecánica, profesores de gimnasia, etc. Todos, reciben el mismo trato, casi el mismo salario, y desde luego idéntica consideración social. Los docentes en peluquería, gimnasia, tecnología y cocina comparten ya sus prerrogativas como educadores con los profesores de matemáticas, filosofía o griego. Que no se trata [la sabiduría, la ciencia primera] de una ciencia productiva, es evidente ya por los primeros que filosofaron. Pues los hombres comienzan y comenzaron siempre a filosofar movidos por la admiración...” (982b 11).

frases-de-aristoteles.jpg

Esta homologación, y el intento de ofrecernos toda esa mezcolanza como “educación” es el signo de nuestros tiempos. Es difícil luchar contra ese signo pues muy pronto el debate se interpreta como una lucha ideológica entre igualitaristas y reaccionarios. Que entre los saberes hay jerarquías fue algo ya firmemente sostenido por los filósofos clásicos (Platón, Aristóteles, Santo Tomás), La sabiduría está destinada a mandar, y no a obedecer. El sabio ha de ser obedecido por el menos sabio. La ciencia universal, el saber sobre el todo, impera sobre los saberes particulares, presos de la necesidad y la urgencia. Ya los primeros filósofos, dice Aristóteles, fueron hombres libres que crearon una ciencia libre: “

Ὄτι δ'οὐ ποιητική, δῆλον καὶ ἐκ τῶν πρώτων φιλοσοφησάντων· δὰι γὰρ τὸ θαυμάζειν οἱ ἄνθροποι καὶ νῦν καὶ τὸ πρῶτον ἤρζαντο φιλοσοφεῖν.

El sabio desinteresado, al igual que el amante de los mitos, emprende su búsqueda movido por la admiración.

διὸ καì ὁ φιλόμυθος θιλόσοφός πώς έστιν· ὁ γὰρ μῦθος σύγκειtαι ἐκ θαυμαγίων· [982b 18].

Todas las ciencias son más necesarias que la filosofía (entendida ésta como sabiduría y ciencia de los primeros principios y causas) pero mejor, ninguna.

ἀνακαιότεραι μὲν οὖν πᾶσαι ταύτης, ἀμεινων δ' οὐδεμία [983a 10].

lundi, 04 décembre 2017

L’esclave-expert et le citoyen

ACR-ATH402237.jpg

L’esclave-expert et le citoyen

À propos de : Paulin Ismard, La Démocratie contre les experts. Les esclaves publics en Grèce ancienne, Seuil


Ex: http://www.laviedesidees.fr

À Athènes, dans l’Antiquité, les tâches d’expertise étaient confiées à des esclaves publics, que l’on honorait mais qu’on privait de tout pouvoir de décision. C’est ainsi, explique P. Ismard, que la démocratie parvenait à se préserver des spécialistes.

PI-couv.jpgRecensé : Paulin Ismard, La Démocratie contre les experts. Les esclaves publics en Grèce ancienne, Paris, Seuil, 2015, 273 p., 20 €.

Dans la démocratie athénienne, avec la rotation de ses magistrats et de ses conseillers choisis pour un an, ceux qui, « à l’occasion », tenaient lieu d’experts stables, étaient, selon Paulin Ismard, les esclaves publics, mais ils n’incarnaient l’État que comme « pure négativité » (p. 30), car ils étaient, en tant qu’esclaves, exclus de la sphère politique. D’où le sous-titre du livre : Les esclaves publics en Grèce ancienne. Qui étaient ces esclaves publics (dêmosioi) et quel était leur rôle ? C’est le premier objet du livre.

Esclavages publics antiques et modernes

On lit d’abord de brillantes et utiles analyses sur l’historiographie de l’esclavage, que Paulin Ismard résume de façon extrêmement claire et convaincante, avec ses différentes « vagues » de comparaisons très idéologiques entre l’Antiquité et l’esclavage en Amérique, tantôt pour opposer l’humanité des Anciens à la cruauté des Modernes, tantôt pour légitimer l’esclavage moderne, tantôt pour le condamner comme on condamnait l’esclavage antique. Moses I. Finley y a ajouté la distinction entre sociétés à esclaves et les véritables sociétés esclavagistes (qui seraient apparues à dans l’Athènes classique). Cette historiographie laissait de côté de nombreux aspects du si divers et si massif « phénomène esclavagiste ». Les travaux des anthropologues permettent maintenant de mieux comprendre les différents types d’esclaves royaux, et plus généralement « les esclaves publics » qui sont l’objet du livre.

Mais la genèse des dêmosioi dans la Grèce archaïque est problématique. Paulin Ismard tente d’abord de suggérer (« un fil ténu », p. 32, « un sentier étroit », p. 42) une sorte de continuité entre les artisans (dêmiourgoi) de l’époque archaïque et les dêmosioi de l’âge classique. Il conduit agréablement le lecteur des aèdes et des héros attachés aux rois chez Homère à l’ingénieux Dédale, que son savoir a conduit à l’esclavage auprès des rois qui voulaient l’avoir à son service, selon un schéma traditionnel (attesté par exemple chez Hérodote pour le médecin Démocédès, au service du roi Darius) : sa mention par Xénophon, selon Paulin Ismard, « loin d’être innocente », ferait de Dédale « l’emblème du mal que le régime démocratique fait à celui qui sait » — une conclusion qui peut sembler faiblement étayée (p. 46-47). Quelques contrats conservés entre une cité et un dêmiourgos à l’époque archaïque dans diverses cités non démocratiques permettent de mieux observer les conditions concrètes de leur emploi : un archiviste en Crète, un scribe près d’Olympie. Dans un « constat » dont il reconnaît qu’il est « hypothétique », Paulin Ismard y voit « le statut de dêmosios confusément défini » (p. 53). Il est difficile cependant d’adhérer à la notion d’un « passage progressif du dêmiourgos de l’archaïsme au dêmosios de l’époque classique » : l’âge classique, bien sûr, et particulièrement à Athènes, continue d’avoir des dêmiourgoi libres et citoyens en abondance. Pour Aristote, il est vrai, dans une petite cité, on pourrait à la rigueur concevoir une équivalence entre esclaves publics et artisans effectuant des travaux publics (Politique, II, 7, 1267b15 : un texte difficile, qui pourrait être examiné). L’hypothèse traditionnelle lie le développement des esclaves publics aux progrès de la démocratie athénienne, avec ses institutions complexes et la rotation des charges qui limitait la continuité de l’action publique, et au développement, « main dans la main » (selon une célèbre formule de Finley associant démocratie et société esclavagiste, p. 58), de l’esclave-marchandise à Athènes.

Platon, dans un texte étonnant du Politique (290a), évoque « le groupe des esclaves et des serviteurs » dont on pourrait imaginer qu’ils constituent le véritable savoir politique de la cité. L’étude des esclaves publics éclaire la volonté platonicienne de séparer ceux que Paulin Ismard appelle joliment « les petites mains des institutions civiques » (p. 66) et le véritable homme politique. Pourtant, assistance aux juges, archivage, inventaires, comptabilité, surveillance de la monnaie, des poids et mesures, police, tout cela, que décrit très clairement et très utilement Paulin Ismard dans son chapitre « Serviteurs de la cité », était confié aux esclaves publics. Certaines tâches, rémunérées, attribuées le cas échéant par vote des citoyens, donnaient accès à des privilèges civiques ou religieux, comme la prêtrise de certains cultes. D’autres esclaves en revanche étaient affectés à divers chantiers, en grand nombre, si l’on pense à ceux qui exploitaient les mines du Laurion en Attique, qui ne sont pas examinés dans le livre, car ils ne rentrent guère dans la perspective adoptée. Par rapport à d’autres types d’esclaves publics, l’originalité grecque tiendrait à l’absence d’esclaves publics travaillant la terre (mais la documentation est limitée) ou enrôlés dans les armées (cela est corrigé p. 118 : il y avait de nombreux esclaves, en tout cas, dans la marine). Au total, les dêmosioi constituaient donc un ensemble extrêmement disparate, qui n’a jamais formé un corps, d’esclaves acquis surtout par achat.

Dans une inscription de la fin du IIe siècle, bien après la démocratie classique, à propos d’un préposé aux poids et mesures à Athènes, il est question d’une eleutheria (qu’il faudrait corriger en el[euth]era) leitourgia, un « service libre » : pour Paulin Ismard, un « service public » au sens où il assure la liberté des citoyens. Cette formule restituée, tardive et unique condenserait « le paradoxe qui réside au cœur du ‘miracle grec’, celui d’une expérience de la liberté politique dont le propre fut de reposer sur le travail des esclaves » (p. 92). Les esclaves publics grecs, bien que « corps-marchandises », étaient (ajoutons : parfois) d’« étranges esclaves » (chapitre 3), jouissant de certains privilèges des citoyens, dont l’accès à la propriété et peut-être à une certaine forme de parenté, ce qui pose quelquefois le problème de la distinction entre esclave et citoyen libre. L’emploi du mot dêmosios suffit-il en effet à établir la qualité servile ? L’épigraphiste Louis Robert mentionne un édit déplorant que des hommes libres exercent « une fonction d’esclaves publics », ainsi qu’une épitaphe commune à Imbros pour un citoyen de Ténédos et son fils qualifié de dêmosios, et conclut qu’un dêmosios avec patronyme doit désigner un homme libre exerçant des tâches publiques (BE 1981, 558). Le sens de ce type de patronyme est incertain. Pour le corpus assez comparable des actes d’affranchissements delphiques, où se pose aussi cette question, Dominique Mulliez observe que le nom au génitif renvoie au père naturel de l’affranchi, sans préjuger du statut juridique de la personne ainsi désignée ; il s’agit parfois de l’ancien maître de l’affranchi, lequel peut ou non se confondre avec le prostates. En ce qui concerne les dêmosioi, Paulin Ismard estime, lui, que « l’ensemble de la littérature antique (…) associe invariablement le statut de dêmosios au statut d’esclave » (p. 109). Il propose en ce sens une analyse nouvelle du statut d’un certain Pittalakos mentionné dans un plaidoyer d’Eschine, un dêmosios qu’il ne juge assimilé à un homme libre dans une procédure que faute d’un propriétaire individualisable. En Grèce, les esclaves publics pouvaient même recevoir des honneurs publics, ce qui interdit, note très justement Paulin Ismard, de faire de l’honneur une ligne de partage universelle entre liberté et esclavage (contrairement aux thèses de certains anthropologues).

ACR-CAR51_big.jpg

Expertise, esclavage et démocratie

Paulin Ismard se situe résolument dans la perspective du « malheur politique » contemporain, la séparation entre le règne de l’opinion et le gouvernement des experts : un savoir politique utile ne peut plus naître « de la délibération égalitaire entre non-spécialistes ». L’État, défini comme « organisation savante » (p. 11), exclut le peuple. C’est le second objet du livre que de situer la démocratie athénienne (et non plus « la Grèce ancienne ») par rapport à cette perspective. « L’expertise servile » y serait « le produit de l’idéologie démocratique », « qui refusait que l’expertise d’un individu puisse légitimer sa prétention au pouvoir » et cantonnait donc les experts hors du champ politique (p. 133, répété avec insistance).

Mais la documentation ne permet d’atteindre que quelques experts esclaves : des vérificateurs des monnaies, ayant seuls le pouvoir et la capacité d’en garantir la validité, un greffier dans un sanctuaire. Le cas de Nicomachos, chargé par Athènes de la transcription des lois pendant plusieurs années consécutives, est différent : on le connaît par des sources hostiles, qui insistent sur le fait que c’est un fils de dêmosios, mais c’est un citoyen athénien, qui n’a un « statut incertain » que dans la polémique judiciaire : voici donc un citoyen expert. Ce n’est pas le seul. Paulin Ismard lui-même évoque une page plus tôt les cas célèbres d’Eubule et de Lycurgue en matière financière ; et que dire, en matière militaire et diplomatique, de Périclès, réélu 14 fois stratège consécutivement ? Ajoutons, à un moindre niveau, les secrétaires mentionnés par la Constitution d’Athènes aristotélicienne : leur contrôle ne peut guère avoir été seulement « formel ».

Sur le plan idéologique, le fameux mythe de Protagoras, dans le Protagoras de Platon, explique que, contrairement aux compétences techniques réservées chacune à un spécialiste (à un dêmiourgos), une forme de savoir politique, par l’intermédiaire des notions de pudeur (ou respect) et de justice, a été donnée à tous les hommes. On y trouverait donc « une épistémologie sociale qui valorise la circulation de savoirs, même incomplets, entre égaux », « une théorie associationniste de la compétence politique », comme celle que développe l’historien américain Josiah Ober dans ses ouvrages récents sur la démocratie athénienne. Protagoras veut pourtant montrer — c’est le raisonnement qui explique ensuite le mythe dans le dialogue de Platon — que si tous les citoyens doivent partager une compétence minimale, il y a des gens plus compétents que d’autres en politique, et des maîtres, comme lui, pour leur enseigner cette expertise. Signalons à ce propos la virulence de ce débat dans le libéralisme radical anglais du XIXe siècle. John Stuart Mill, rendant compte en 1853 de l’History of Greece du banquier et homme politique libéral George Grote, cite avec enthousiasme ses pages sur le régime populaire :

« The daily working of Athenian institutions (by means of which every citizen was accustomed to hear every sort of question, public and private, discussed by the ablest men of the time, with the earnestness of purpose and fulness of preparation belonging to actual business, deliberative or judicial) formed a course of political education, the equivalent of which modern nations have not known how to give even to those whom they educate for statesmen / Le fonctionnement journalier des institutions athéniennes (qui habituaient chaque citoyen à entendre la discussion de toute sorte de question publique ou privée par les hommes les plus capables de leur temps, avec le sérieux et la préparation que réclamaient les affaires politiques et judiciaires) formait un cursus d’éducation politique dont les nations modernes n’ont pas su donner un équivalent même à ceux qu’elles destinent à la conduite de l’État ».

En revanche, lorsqu’un peu plus tard, en 1866, il commente un autre livre célèbre de Grote, Plato and the other Companions of Socrates, il condamne le relativisme qui est selon lui la conséquence inéluctable de sa position, et affirme avec Platon « the demand for a Scientific Governor » (« l’exigence d’un gouvernant possédant la science »), c’est-à-dire, dans les conditions modernes du gouvernement représentatif, « a specially trained and experienced Few » (« Un petit nombre de spécialistes éduqués et entraînés »).

« La figure de l’expert, dont le savoir constituerait un titre à gouverner, (…) était inconnue aux Athéniens de l’époque classique » (p. 11, 16) : c’est la thèse centrale. Le mot « expert » est ambigu. Le « gouvernement » des Athéniens s’exerçait principalement par l’éloquence, sous le contrôle des citoyens, dans une démocratie directe : c’est donc dans la maîtrise de l’éloquence que se logeait pour une part l’expertise de ceux que Mill appelle « the ablest men of the time ». La question de la rhétorique, qui est sans cesse débattue à l’époque, est absente dans le livre de Paulin Ismard, car aucun esclave n’a accès à la tribune. Or, comme Aristote l’écrit (et comme Platon le pensait), même la formation technique de certains citoyens à la rhétorique devait inclure une expertise politique extérieure à la technique du langage : « les finances, la guerre et la paix, la protection du territoire, les importations et les exportations, la législation » (Rhétorique I, 4, 1359b).

ACR-TH.jpg

« Polis », Cité, État

Le dernier chapitre aborde un autre point central de la réflexion sur l’Athènes classique, la notion de « Cité-État ». Après Fustel de Coulanges et sa « cité antique », a été inventé pour décrire les formes grecques d’organisation politique le concept de « Polis », ce « dummes Burckhardtsches Schlagwort » [1] (Wilamowitz), qu’on traduit ordinairement par « Cité-État ». Paulin Ismard, lui, prend ses distances à l’égard des travaux récents de l’historien danois Mogens H. Hansen, qui aboutissent à distinguer polis et koinônia, « cité » et « société » : il n’y a pas, selon lui, de polis distincte qui correspondrait peu ou prou à l’État moderne, la communauté athénienne « se rêvait transparente à elle-même » (p. 172). Dans cette perspective, confier l’administration, la bureaucratie (Max Weber est évoqué) aux esclaves publics permettait de « masquer l’écart inéluctable entre l’État et la société », dans une « tension irrésolue ».

L’esclave royal qui déclenche la tragédie d’Œdipe dans l’Œdipe-Roi de Sophocle détient le savoir qui met à bas les prétentions au savoir du Roi : voilà l’image que le « miroir brisé » de la tragédie tend pour finir, par l’intermédiaire de Michel Foucault, à Paulin Ismard. Le Phédon lui offre mieux encore : un dêmosios, le bourreau officiel d’Athènes, apportant le poison à Socrate, est accueilli par le philosophe comme le signe de l’effet qu’il suscite bien au-delà d’Athènes et des Athéniens, si bien que cet esclave se trouve placé dans la « position éminente » du « témoin ». De façon un peu étrange, le baptême du premier des Gentils, l’eunuque éthiopien des Actes des Apôtres complète ce « fil secret » (une métaphore récurrente) de « l’altérité radicale », « un ailleurs d’où peut se formuler la norme » (p. 200).

En fin de compte, la figure de l’esclave public, dont cet ouvrage remarquablement écrit propose une analyse très fouillée et neuve, sans toujours entraîner la conviction, permet à Paulin Ismard de mettre à distance le rêve de transparence qu’incarne pour beaucoup (par exemple pour Hannah Arendt) la démocratie athénienne classique.

Aller plus loin

On pourra lire la controverse, brièvement évoquée dans ce compte rendu, entre Christophe Pébarthe (Revue des Etudes Anciennes, 117, 2015, p. 241-247) et Paulin Ismard).

Sur George Grote et John Stuart Mill, voir Malcolm Schofield, Plato. Political Philosophy, Oxford, 2006, 138-144.

Sur la question de la science politique et de la rhétorique, voir une première approche dans Paul Demont, « Y a-t-il une science du politique ? Les débats athéniens de l’époque classique », L’Homme et la Science, Actes du XVIe Congrès international de l’Association Guillaume Budé, Textes réunis par J. Jouanna, M. Fartzoff et B. Bakhouche, Paris, Les Belles Lettres, 2011, p. 183-193.

Pour citer cet article :

Paul Demont, « L’esclave-expert et le citoyen », La Vie des idées , 25 novembre 2015. ISSN : 2105-3030. URL : http://www.laviedesidees.fr/L-esclave-expert-et-le-citoyen.html

jeudi, 05 octobre 2017

Aristote en politique: bien commun, cité heureuse et autarcie

aristote-philosophe.jpg

Pierre Le Vigan:

Aristote en politique: bien commun, cité heureuse et autarcie

      Les leçons d’Aristote, philosophe moral et politique (laissons de côté ici l3e naturaliste) ne sont pas caduques. Elles doivent bien entendu être lues et comprises dans leur contexte. Mais leurs principes restent en bonne part actuels. Rappels d’une doctrine.

      La notion de cité est déterminante dans la philosophie politique d’Aristote. Quelle forme prend cette détermination ?  Pour Aristote l’appartenance à la cité précède et en même temps influe de manière décisive sur la définition de sa philosophie politique, c’est-à-dire du bien en politique. En d’autres termes, l’hypothèse préalable d’Aristote à l’élaboration même de sa pensée politique, c’est que l’existence d’un monde commun, un monde qui s’incarne dans la cité,  précède la définition du bien commun et le conditionne. Pour comprendre ce cheminement, nous verrons d’abord ce que veut dire « la cité » pour Aristote (I). Nous examinerons quelle conception il en a.  Nous verrons ensuite (II) comment la pensée politique d’Aristote prend place dans son analyse de la pratique (praxis).

     La philosophie pratique est pour Aristote la « philosophie des choses humaines ». C’est donc la philosophie de la politique. La pensée aristotélicienne suppose un monde commun, la notion de cité et d’appartenance à la cité. Politikon vient de polis. L’étymologie de politique renvoie à la cité. La pensée d’Aristote n’est jamais une pensée hors sol. Elle part de la cité pour chercher le bien de la cité.

Une communauté d’hommes libres

     I - La cité (en grec polis) est un Etat avant d’être une ville. Mais c’est aussi une communauté d’hommes libres avant d’être un Etat. C’est une communauté de citoyens libres qui partagent la même histoire, les mêmes héros, les mêmes dieux, les mêmes rites et les mêmes lois. Fustel de Coulanges a souligné l’importance de la religion dans la fondation des cités (La cité antique, 1864). Ainsi, chaque cité grecque a un panthéon différent. La cité en tant que polis n’est pas d’abord une donnée spatiale. Mais il se trouve que (a fortiori dans un paysage accidenté comme celui de la Grèce, ou de la Grande Grèce [Sicile]), la cité correspond aussi à un lieu déterminé, à une géographie particulière. Cette communauté de citoyens dans un lieu particulier, c’est une communauté politique souveraine au côté d’autres communautés politiques, rivales, alliées ou ennemis.

AR-L-1.jpg   « Il est donc manifeste que la cité n'est pas une communauté de lieu, établie en vue de s'éviter les injustices mutuelles et de permettre les échanges. Certes, ce sont là des conditions qu'il faut nécessairement réaliser si l'on veut qu'une cité existe, mais quand elles sont toutes réalisées, cela ne fait pas une cité, car [une cité] est la communauté de la vie heureuse, c'est-à-dire dont la fin est une vie parfaite et autarcique pour les familles et les lignages » (Politiques, III, 9, 6-15).  

     Dans Politiques (nous nous référerons à la traduction de Pierre Pellegrin, Garnier Flammarion, 1990), Aristote s’attache à déterminer quels doivent être les rapports des hommes entre eux. C’est là le cœur de la politique. Cela ne concerne que les hommes qui vivent dans un cadre politique, c’est-à-dire dans une cité. Les Barbares sont donc exclus et, à l’intérieur même de la cité, les esclaves et les femmes. Les Barbares sont certes, tout comme les esclaves et les femmes, des êtres rationnels, mais ce ne sont pas des êtres politiques.

     Que sont les êtres politiques au sens grec ? Si l’homme possède le langage, et pas seulement la voix, c’est qu’il est destiné à vivre en société. Par le langage, l’homme peut se livrer au discours et à la délibération. Aristote explique cela ainsi : «  § 10. […] la parole est faite pour exprimer le bien et le mal, et, par suite aussi, le juste et l'injuste ; et l'homme a ceci de spécial, parmi tous les animaux, que seul il conçoit le bien et le mal, le juste et l'injuste, et tous les sentiments de même ordre, qui en s'associant constituent précisément la famille et l'État. § 11. On ne peut douter que l'État ne soit naturellement au-dessus de la famille et de chaque individu ; car le tout l'emporte nécessairement sur la partie, puisque, le tout une fois détruit, il n'y a plus de parties, plus de pieds, plus de mains, si ce n'est par une pure analogie de mots, comme on dit une main de pierre ; car la main, séparée du corps, est tout aussi peu une main réelle. […] § 12. Ce qui prouve bien la nécessité naturelle de l'État et sa supériorité sur l'individu, c'est que, si on ne l'admet pas, l'individu peut alors se suffire à lui-même dans l'isolement du tout, ainsi que du reste des parties ; or, celui qui ne peut vivre en société, et dont l'indépendance n'a pas de besoins, celui-là ne saurait jamais être membre de l'État. C'est une brute ou un dieu.  » Or chacun comprendra que les brutes sont plus courantes que les dieux.

    Aristote poursuit : « § 13. La nature pousse donc instinctivement tous les hommes à l'association politique. Le premier qui l'institua rendit un immense service ; car, si l'homme, parvenu à toute sa perfection, est le premier des animaux, il en est bien aussi le dernier quand il vit sans lois et sans justice. […]. Sans la vertu, c'est l'être le plus pervers et le plus féroce ; il n'a que les emportements brutaux de l'amour et de la faim. La justice est une nécessité sociale ; car le droit est la règle de l'association politique, et la décision du juste est ce qui constitue le droit » (Politiques I, 1253a).

      Mais, comment vivre bien en société, c’est-à-dire en fonction du bien ? Comment faire ce qu’ordonne la vertu ? « Comment atteindre à ce noble degré de la vertu de faire tout ce qu’elle ordonne » (Politiques, IV, 1, 6).

     Comment s’incarne cette recherche de la vertu ? Aristote voyait pour la cité trois types de constitutions possibles : la monarchie, l’aristocratie, le gouvernement constitutionnel (politeia) ou république. Le premier type, la monarchie, est le gouvernement d’un seul, qui est censé veiller au bien commun. Le deuxième type, l’aristocratie est censée être le gouvernement des meilleurs. Le troisième type, le gouvernement constitutionnel, ou encore la république, est censé être le gouvernement de tous.

     Ces trois régimes ont leur pendant négatif, qui représente leur dévoiement. Il s’agit de la tyrannie, perversion de la monarchie, de l’oligarchie (gouvernement de quelques-uns) comme dévoiement de l’aristocratie, de la démocratie comme perversion du gouvernement constitutionnel (Politiques, III, 7, 1279a 25). « Aucune de ces formes ne vise l’avantage commun » conclut Aristote.

 AR-L-2.jpg   Notons que la démocratie est, pour Aristote, le gouvernement des plus pauvres, à la fois contre les riches et contre les classes moyennes. Le terme « démocratie » est ainsi pour Aristote quasiment synonyme de démagogie. (Cela peut choquer mais nos élites n’ont-elles pas la même démarche en assimilant toute expression des attentes du peuple en matière de sécurité et de stabilité culturelle à du « populisme », terme aussi diabolisateur que polysémique, comme l’a montré Vincent Coussedière dans Eloge du populisme et Le retour du peuple. An I ?) 

    Pour Aristote, la politique est un savoir pratique. Il s’agit de faire le bien. Dans la conception aristotélicienne de la cité, tout le monde est nécessaire mais tout le monde ne peut être citoyen. Seul peut être citoyen celui qui n’est pas trop pris par des tâches utiles. « Le trait éminemment distinctif du vrai citoyen, c’est la jouissance des fonctions de juge et de magistrat » (Politiques, II, 5, 1257a22). Le paysan et l’artisan ne peuvent être citoyens, pas plus que le commerçant.

      L’esclavage, qui n’était pourtant pas très ancien dans la Grèce antique, est justifié par Aristote. Il permet aux citoyens de s’élever au-dessus de certaines tâches matérielles. « Le maître doit autant que possible laisser à un intendant le soin de commander à ses esclaves, afin de pouvoir se livrer à la vie politique ou à la philosophie, seules activités vraiment dignes d'un citoyen » (Politiques, I, 2, 23). La vision qu’a Aristote de la société est incontestablement hiérarchique.  

     Toutefois, l’inégalitarisme d’Aristote n’empêche pas qu’il défende l’idée d’un minimum à vivre pour tous. « Aucun des citoyens ne doit manquer des moyens de subsistance » (Politiques, VII, 10, 1329a). Ce point de vue est logique car Aristote définit le but de la communauté comme « la vie heureuse » : « Une cité est la communauté des lignages et des villages menant la vie heureuse c’est-à-dire dont la fin est une vie parfaite et autarcique. Il faut donc poser que c'est en vue des belles actions qu'existe la communauté politique, et non en vue de vivre ensemble ». (Politiques, III, 9, 6-15).

        Le bonheur de la cité et l’autarcie sont donc liés. L’autarcie est l’une des conditions du bonheur, et un signe du bonheur. Cela, qui est notre cité, est limité et cela est bien, justement parce que ce qui est bien tient dans des limites. Que nous disent les limites ? Que le bien a trouvé sa place. Qu’il est à sa place. Cette notion d’autosuffisance ou encore d’autarcie s’oppose à un trop grand pouvoir des commerçants, c’est-à-dire de la fonction marchande. C’est aussi une vision hiérarchique où sont respectées les diversités et les inégalités, car si toutes les diversités ne sont pas des inégalités, beaucoup le sont.

     La question de la taille de la cité n’est pas un détail dans la pensée d’Aristote. Elle fait partie du politique, comme le remarque Olivier Rey (dans Une question de taille, Stock, 2014). « Une cité première, note Aristote, est nécessairement celle qui est formée d’un nombre de gens qui est le nombre minimum pour atteindre l’autarcie en vue de la vie heureuse qui convient à la communauté politique [...]. Dès lors, il est évident que la meilleure limite pour une cité, c’est le nombre maximum de citoyens propre à assurer une vie autarcique et qu’on peut saisir d’un seul coup d’œil. » (Politiques, VII). En d’autres termes, dès que l’autarcie est possible, la cité doit cesser de grandir.

       Ni trop petite ni trop grande, telle doit donc être la cité. C’est le concept de médiété que l’on retrouve ici. La cité doit être comprise entre 10 et 100 000 habitants, précise Aristote (Ethique à Nicomaque, IX, 9, 1170 b 31). Il est évident que 10 est un chiffre que l’on ne doit pas prendre au premier degré. Aristote veut dire que la population de la cité doit au moins excéder une famille, qu’elle est toujours autre chose et plus qu’une famille. L’idée d’un maximum d’habitants est la plus importante à retenir. Etre citoyen n’est plus possible pour Aristote dans une cité trop grande, trop peuplée. Et il semble bien que le chiffre de 100 000 habitants soit l’ordre d’idée à retenir. (On notera que les circonscriptions françaises pour les députés étaient à l’origine de la IIIe République de 100 000 habitants. Un vestige des conceptions d’Aristote ?). En résumé, Aristote rejette le gigantisme.

     Rappelons ce qu’Aristote dit de la vertu majeure de médiété. « Ainsi donc, la vertu est une disposition à agir d'une façon délibérée, consistant en une médiété relative à nous, laquelle est rationnellement déterminée et comme la déterminerait l'homme prudent. Mais c'est une médiété entre deux vices, l'un par excès et l'autre par défaut ; et c'est encore une médiété en ce que certains vices sont au-dessous, et d'autres au-dessus de "ce qu'il faut" dans le domaine des affections aussi bien que des actions, tandis que la vertu, elle, découvre et choisit la position moyenne. C'est pourquoi, dans l'ordre de la substance et de la définition exprimant la quiddité, la vertu est une médiété, tandis que dans l'ordre de l'excellence et du parfait, c'est un sommet » (Ethique à Nicomaque, II, 6, 1106b7-1107a8).      Disons-le autrement : la vertu est l’absence d’excès, ni excès de prudence qui serait alors timidité peureuse ni excès de témérité, qui serait hardiesse inconsciente, et cette façon de s’écarter des excès est une excellence. Pour la cité, le principe est le même : il s’agit de suivre une ligne de crête entre les excès que serait une trop petite et une trop grande taille. En tout état de cause, la question de la bonne taille est importante. Du reste, on ne peut remédier à une trop grande taille par la fermeture des frontières. Selon Aristote, il ne suffirait pas « d’entourer de remparts » tout le Péloponnèse pour en faire une cité (Politiques, III, 1, 1276a). Il faut éviter la démesure. Après, il est trop tard.

     C’est parce qu’elle est parfaitement adaptée à elle-même que la cité tend par nature à l’autarcie. Sa finitude est sa perfection. « Cette polis représente la forme la plus haute de la communauté humaine », note Hannah Arendt (La politique a-t-elle encore un sens ? L’Herne, 2007). Néanmoins, la coopération, l’association entre cités est possible. C’est l’isopolitéia, le principe d’une convention ou encore association entre cités dont l’un des aspects était souvent le transfert de populations pour rétablir les équilibres démographiques (cf. Raoul Lonis, La cité dans le monde grec, Nathan, 1994 et Armand Colin, 2016). Exemple : Tripoli veut dire « association de trois cités ».

*

     II – Comment la politique s’inserre-t-elle dans ce qu’Aristote appelle praxis ? Et quelles conséquences peut-on en tirer sur la cité ?

    Praxis, technique et production

   AR-L-3.jpgDans la philosophie d’Aristote, on rencontre plusieurs domaines : la theoria (la spéculation intellectuelle, ou  contemplation), l’épistémé (le savoir), la praxis (la pratique) et la poiesis (la production, qui est précisément la production ou la création des œuvres). Nous avons donc quatre domaines.   La theoria c’est, à la fois, ce que nous voyons et ce que nous sommes. L’epistémé, c’est ce que nous pouvons connaitre. La poiesis, c’est ce que nous faisons. La praxis, c’est comment nous le faisons.

      Praxis et poiesis sont proches sans se confondre. La production (poiesis) est inclue dans la pratique (praxis). C’est parce que nous travaillons de telle façon que nous produisons tel type de choses. Mais tout en étant inclue, elle s’y oppose. En effet, la pratique trouve sa fin en elle-même, elle n’a pas besoin de se justifier par une production, par un objet produit, une œuvre produite. La pratique est liée à notre être propre.

    Pour le dire autrement, la production est une action, mais toute action n’est pas une production. Certaines pratiques ne sont pas des productions. Elles n’ont pas pour objet une œuvre comme produit. Un exemple est celui de la danse.

    Une production a par contre sa fin à l’extérieur d’elle-même : travailler pour construire une chaise, ou un attelage de chevaux, par exemple. En outre, ce qui relève de la production mobilise aussi la techné, l’art des techniques. Avec la poiesis, il s’agit de produire quelque chose d’extérieur à soi, ou d’obtenir un résultat extérieur à soi (par exemple, réaliser un bon chiffre d’affaire pour un commerçant). Par opposition à cela, la pratique ou praxis possède en elle-même sa propre fin. Elle est en ce sens supérieure à la production. Ainsi, bien se conduire, qui est une forme de praxis, est une activité immanente à soi.    

         L’enjeu de la praxis est toujours supérieur à celui de la poiesis. Le but ultime de la praxis, c’est le perfectionnement de soi. Ce qui trouve en soi sa propre fin est supérieur à ce qui trouve sa fin à l’extérieur de soi.

     Or, qu’est-ce qui relève de l’action hors la production ? Qu’est-ce qui relève de la praxis ? C’est notamment l’éthique et la politique. Les deux sont indissociables. Ce sont des domaines de la pratique. Là, il s’agit moins de chercher l’essence de la vertu que de savoir comment pratiquer la vertu pour produire le bien commun.  « L’Etat le plus parfait est évidemment celui où chaque citoyen, quel qu’il soit, peut, grâce aux lois, pratiquer le mieux la vertu, et s’assurer le plus de bonheur. » (Politiques, IV, 2, 1324b). L’ordre social et politique optimum est celui qui permet la pratique de la vertu, qui travaille ainsi à atteindre le bien commun. C’est ce qui permet le bonheur des hommes dans la cité.

       Si la vertu politique ne se confond pas avec la philosophie, les deux se nourrissent réciproquement. En recherchant la sagesse, l’homme arrive à la vertu, qui concerne aussi bien l’individu que l’Etat et est nécessaire dans les deux cas. En effet, la politique est « la plus haute de toutes les sciences » (Politiques, III, 7).

      Comment pratiquer la vertu ? Est-ce une question de régime politique ? Qu’il s’agisse de monarchie, d’aristocratie ou de république (régime des citoyens), tous ces régimes peuvent être bons selon Aristote selon qu’ils modèrent les désirs extrêmes et sont animés par la vertu. La politique a des conditions en matière de morale et en matière d’éducation. Dans le même temps, il n’y a pas de morale (ou d’éthique) ni d’éducation qui n’ait de conséquences politiques. Les deux se tiennent. (Platon, ici d’accord avec Aristote, avait souligné que la politique était avant tout affaire d’éducation, d’expérience et de perfectionnement de soi).

       En tout état de cause, le collectif, le commun doit primer sur l’individuel. En matière d’éducation, c’est l’Etat qui doit enseigner ce qui est commun, la famille assurant l’éducation dans le domaine privé. « C’est une grave erreur de croire que chaque citoyen est maitre de lui-même ; chacun appartient à l’Etat. » (Politiques, V, 1, 2) (Mais l’Etat n’est pas un lointain, c’est un proche car nous avons vu que les cités avec des populations de grande taille sont proscrites).

     La philosophie d’Aristote n’est pas égalitariste, avons-nous déjà noté : chacun a sa place et sa fonction. Pierre Pellegrin résume cela en expliquant que pour Aristote « chacun doit recevoir proportionnellement à son excellence ». Aristote ne pense pas que les hommes soient tous les mêmes même si « tous les hommes pensent que la vie heureuse est une vie agréable » (Ethique à Nicomaque, 1153b15), et que le bonheur est ce « qui est conforme à la vertu la plus parfaite, c'est-à-dire celle de la partie de l'homme la plus haute » (Ethique à N., X, 7).    

         La justice, c’est que chacun fasse ce qu’il doit faire en allant vers la perfection dans sa fonction.  Le bien suprême, le bonheur (eudaimonia) des  hommes consiste dans la pleine réalisation de ce qu’ils sont dans la société. Il y a chez Aristote un lien permanent entre justice et politique d’une part, morale et éducation d’autre part. Ce lien consiste à faire prévaloir en nous la partie rationnelle de notre âme sur la partie irrationnelle.

            Les idées d’Aristote sont toutes conçues par rapport à la cité. C’est à la fois leur limite et leur force. Aristote suppose un préalable à toute pensée politique. C’est l’existence d’un monde commun, une cité commune, un peuple commun. Le bien commun, c’est la justice, et la condition de la justice, c’est l’amitié (philia).  « La justice ira croissant avec l’amitié » (Ethique à Nicomaque, VII, 11).

  AR-L-4.jpg      L’amitié n’est pas le partage des subjectivités comme dans le monde moderne, c’est autre chose, c’est l’en-commun de la vertu. « La parfaite amitié est celle des hommes vertueux et qui sont semblables en vertu. » (Ethique à Nicomaque, VIII, 4, 1156 b, trad. Jules Tricot). Hannah Arendt a bien vu cela. Elle rappelle que l’amitié n’est pas l’intimité mais un discours en commun, un « parler ensemble » (Vies politiques, 1955, Gallimard, 1974). « Pour les Grecs, l’essence de l’amitié consistait dans le discours », écrit Hannah Arendt. Le monde commun créé par le partage de l’amitié implique un sens commun du monde et des choses, comme l’avait vu aussi Jan Patocka (Essais hérétiques sur la philosophie de l’histoire, Verdier, 1981). L’amitié  contribue à la solidité de la cité. « Toute association est une parcelle de la cité » (« comme des parcelles de l’association entre des concitoyens »).  Le principe de l’amitié n’est pas véritablement différent de celui de la politique. Il implique la justice et la vérité. « Chercher comment il faut se conduire avec un ami, c'est chercher une certaine justice, car en général la justice entière est en rapport avec un être ami » (Ethique à Eudème, VII, 10, 1242 a 20).

       La politique est donc affaire de contexte – ce qui est une autre façon de parler de monde commun : « il ne faut pas seulement examiner la meilleure organisation politique, mais aussi celle qui est possible » (Politiques, IV, 1, 1288b).

      Pour Aristote, l’homme n’entre jamais en politique en tant qu’homme isolé. Il porte toujours un monde, qui est celui des siens, celui de  sa cité. Après avoir expliqué que la cité vise naturellement l’autarcie, c’est à dire le fait de se suffire à soi, Aristote explique : « Il est manifeste […] que la cité fait partie des choses naturelles et que l’homme est un animal politique  et que celui qui est hors cité, naturellement bien sûr et non par le hasard des circonstances, est soit un être dégradé soit un être surhumain, et il est comme celui qui est injurié en ces termes par Homère : ’’sans lignage, sans foi, sans foyer’’ (...). Il est évident que l'homme est un animal politique plus que n'importe quelle abeille et que n'importe quel animal grégaire. Car, comme nous le disons, la nature ne fait rien en vain ; et seul parmi les animaux l'homme a un langage » (Politiques, I, 2, 1252a).

    La cité d’Aristote n’existe pas que pour satisfaire les besoins. En visant la vie heureuse, qui est un objectif collectif même s’il concerne chacun, elle condamne l’individualisme et met au premier plan l’amitié. Celle-ci n’est pas une affaire privée mais une affaire publique. La vie heureuse est l’affaire de tous et c’est un projet pour tous. Elle est ce qui anime une cité dans laquelle règne la justice.  « Il n’y a en effet qu’une chose qui soit propre aux hommes par rapport aux autres animaux : le fait que seuls ils aient la perception du bien, du mal, du juste, de l’injuste et des autres notions de ce genre. Or, avoir de telles notions en commun, c'est ce qui fait une famille et une cité. » (Politiques, I, 2, 1253a8). L’individu seul pourrait ne viser que son plaisir. La cité le pousse à dépasser sa subjectivité pour se hisser vers la recherche du bien commun.

Pierre Le Vigan.

Pierre Le Vigan est écrivain. https://www.amazon.fr/-/e/B004MZJR1M

Son dernier livre est Métamorphoses de la ville. Disponible en Format numérique ou broché

 https://www.amazon.fr/M%C3%A9tamorphoses-ville-Romulus-Co...

 

dimanche, 04 décembre 2016

The Prehistoric Origins of Apollo

apollon-avec-integrations_483336ffa9b9f5505d8a129187e85070.jpg

The Prehistoric Origins of Apollo

By Prof. Fritz Graf, PhD.
Ex: http://sciencereligionmyth.blogspot.com 

Apollo’s name has no clear parallels in other Indo-European languages, and he is the only Olympian god whose name does not figure on the Linear B tablets (a word fragment on a Cnossus tablet has been read as a form of his name, but the reading is highly conjectural and has convinced few scholars). The absence may well be significant. We possess well over a thousand texts that come from the palaces of Thebes in Boeotia, Mycenae, and Pylus in the Peloponnese, Cnossus and Chania on Crete, that is from practically the entire geographical area of the Mycenaean world, with the exception of the west coast of Asia Minor. Only a fraction contains information on religion, not only the names of gods and their sanctuaries, but also month names that preserve a major festival and personal names that contain a divine name (so-called theophoric names); but the sample is large enough to preserve almost all major Greek divine names. Thus, there is enough material to make an omission seem statistically significant and not just the result of the small size of the sample. But the absence creates a problem: if Apollo did not exist in Bronze Age Greece, where did he come from?

Scholars have attempted several answers. None has remained uncontested. There are four main possibilities: Apollo could be an Indo-European divinity, present although not attested in Bronze Age Greece, or introduced from the margins of the Mycenaean world after its collapse; or he was not Greek but Near Eastern, with again the options of a hidden presence in Bronze Age Greece or a later introduction. Scholars who accepted the absence of Apollo from the Mycenaean pantheon had two options. If he had no place in Mycenaean Greece, he had to come from elsewhere, at some time between the fall of this world and the epoch of Homer and Hesiod, that is during the so-called “Dark Age” and the following Geometric Epoch. During most of this period, Greece had isolated itself from Near Eastern influences but was internally changed by population movements, especially the expansion of the Dorians from the mountains of Northwestern Greece, outside the Mycenaean area, into what had constituted the core of the Mycenaean realm, the Peloponnese, Crete, and the Southern Aegean. Thus, a Dorian origin of Apollo was an almost obvious hypothesis; but since the Dorians were Greeks, albeit with a different dialect, one had to come up with a Greek or at least an Indo-European etymology for his name to make this convincing. If, however, scholars could find no such etymology, they assumed an Anatolian or West Semitic origin: in Western Anatolia, Greeks had already settled during Mycenaean times but arrived again in large numbers during the Dark Age, and contacts with Phoenicia became frequent well before Homer, as the arrival of the alphabet around 800 BCE shows. Finally, if one did not accept Apollo’s absence in the Linear B texts as proof of his historical absence in the Mycenaean world (after all, the argument was based on statistics only), or if one accepted the one fragment from Cnossus, there was even more occasion for Anatolian or Near Eastern origins, in the absence of an Indo-European etymology.

A Bronze Age Apollo of whatever origin could find corroboration in Apollo’s surprising and early presence on the island of Cyprus. Excavations have found several archaic sanctuaries, some being simple open-air spaces with an altar, others as complex as the sanctuary of Apollo Hylatas at Kourion that may have contained a rectangular temple as early as the sixth or even late seventh century BCE. Inscriptions in the local Cypriot writing system attest several cults of Apollo with varying epithets, from Amyklaios to Tamasios, and a month whose name derives from Apollo Agyieus.

apollon2.jpgIn a way, Apollo should not exist on Cyprus, or only in later times, if he was Dorian or entered the Greek world after the collapse of the Bronze Age societies. Cyprus, the large island that bridged the sea between Southern Anatolia and Western Syria, was inhabited by a native population; Greeks arrived at the very end of the Mycenaean period. They must have been Mycenaean Greeks who were displaced by the turmoil at the time when their Greek empire was crumbling. They brought with them their language, a dialect that was akin to the dialect of Arcadia in the Central Peloponnese to where Mycenaeans retreated from the invading Dorians, and they brought with them their writing system, a syllabic system closely connected with Linear A and B that quickly developed its own local variation and survived until Hellenistic times; then it was ousted by the more convenient Greek alphabet. The long survival of this system shows that, after its importation in the eleventh century BCE, Cypriot culture was very stable and only slowly became part of the larger Greek world. There was no later Greek immigration, either large-scale or modest, during the Iron Age: when Phoenicians immigrated in the eighth century, Cypriot culture, if anything, turned to the Near East. It is only plausible to assume that the Mycenaean settlers also brought their cults and gods with them: thus, the gods and festivals attested in the Cypriot texts are likely to reflect not Iron Age Greek religion but the Mycenaean heritage imported at the very end of the Bronze Age.

This leaves room for many theories and ideas that followed the pattern I outlined above. Only two attempts have commanded more than passing attention, a derivation from the Hittite pantheon in Bronze Age Anatolia and a Dorian hypothesis that made Apollo the main divinity of the Dorians who pushed south from their original home in Northwestern Greece, once the fall of the Mycenaean Empire let them do so.

Apollo and the Hittites
 
In 1936, Bedřich Hrozný, the Czech scholar who deciphered the Hittite language, claimed to have read the divine name Apulunas on several late Hittite altars inscribed in Hittite hieroglyphs, together with the name Rutas. He immediately understood them as antecedents of Apollo and Artemis and defined Apulunas’ function as that of a protector of altars, sacred areas, and gates. He thus added, as he thought, proof to the idea that Apollo, his sister, and, implicitly, their mother Leto were Anatolian divinities: after all, had not Homer insisted on their protection of Troy, and did not all three have a close conection with Lycia? The reading has been rejected by other specialists – but Hittite Apollo did not disappear: he surfaced as Appaliunas, a divinity in a (damaged) list of oath divinities invoked by the Hittite king Muwattalis and king Alaksandus of Wilusa; the text immediately preceding Appaliunas is broken. Since scholars identify Wilusa with Ilion, Apollo seems to appear in Troy, and Manfred Korfmann, the German archaeologist who impressively changed the accepted archaeological image of Bronze Age Troy, immediately adopted the idea and helped popularize it: Homer’s Apollo, the protector of the Trojans, seemed well established in Aegean prehistory, in the very city Homer was singing about.

Problems remain, besides Apollo’s absence from Linear B and the thorny question of how the Iliad relates to Bronze Age history, even after the rejection of Hrozný’s reading. Contemporary proponents of an Anatolian Apollo still follow Hrozný and point to Apollo’s Lycian connection that is already present in Homer; they feel encouraged by Wilamowitz, the most influential classicist in Hrozný’s time, who had concurred. But Lycian inscriptions found since then in Xanthus, where Leto had her main shrine, have cast severe doubts on whether Wilamowitz was right. Neither Leto’s nor Apollo’s name is attested in the indigenous texts, among which pride of place belongs to a text dated to 358 BCE, written in Lycian, Greek, and Aramaic. As in a few other indigenous texts, Leto is “The Mother of the Sanctuary” (meaning the one in Xanthus), without a proper name. Only in the Aramaic text has what one would call the Apolline triad, Lato (l’tw’), Artemus (’rtemwš) and a god called Hšatrapati, the Iranian Mitra Varuna as the equivalent of the young powerful god whom Greeks called Apollo. In the Lycian text, the Greek personal name Apollodotus, “given by Apollo” was rendered in Lycian in way that made clear that the Lycian equivalent of Apollo was Natr-, a name of uncertain etymology but one that has no linguistic relation whatsoever with Apollo. No member of the Apolline triad, then, had a Lycian name that sounded like Leto, Apollo, or Artemis: the names were Greek, not indigenous to Lycia. Lycia may have been Apollo’s country in myth (and in Homer), but not in history. The sanctuary of Xanthus does not transform Hittite cults into the Iron Age, and a Bronze Age Anatolian Apollo seems far-fetched, to say the least. This directs our quest back to Greece.

Apollo and the Dorian Assembly 
 
In different Greek dialects, Apollo’s name took several forms. Ionians and Athenians called him Apollōn, Thessalians syncopated this to Aploun; many Dorians used the form Apellōn that resonated with the Cypriot Apeilōn. Several scholars, most authoritatively Walter Burkert, pointed out that there was a Greek dialectal word with which the Dorian form of the god’s name, Apellōn, was already connected in antiquity: whereas most Greeks called their assembly ekklesia, the Spartans used the term apella. In their dialect, then, Apellon would be “the Assembly God.” In the Dorian states, the assembly of all free adult men was the supreme political instrument: at least once a year, these men assembled to decide on all central matters of politics. Apollo as its god would fit his role in the archaic city-states that I worked out in the last chapter. To make this work, we have to assume that apella was already the term for this institution among the early Northwestern Greeks, before the Dorians entered the Peloponnese. This assumption can be backed by the fact that most Dorian cities had a month named Apellaios. Greek month names derive from the names of festivals, not from the names of gods: Apellaios leads to a festival named Apellai. Such a festival is attested in Delphi, outside the Dorian dialectal area but within the West Greek area: it is the main festival of a Delphian brotherhood, a phratry. As we saw in the last chapter, phratries are closely connected with Apollo as their protector and with citizenship: this again connects the god and the festival with the same archaic political and cultic nexus.

Apollon-Piombino.jpgIn this reading, Apollo arrived in Greece with the Dorians who slowly moved into the Peloponnese and from there took over the towns of Crete, after the fall of Mycenaean power. Four centuries later, at the time of Homer and Hesiod, the god had become an established divinity in all of Greece, and a firm part of the narrative tradition of epic poetry. Such an expansion presupposes some degree of religious and cultural interpenetration and exchange throughout Greece during the Dark Ages. This somewhat contradicts the traditional image of this period as a time when the single communities of Greece were mostly turned towards themselves, with little connection with each other. But such a picture is based mainly on the rather scarce archaeological evidence; communication between people, even migration, does not always leave archaeological traces, and cults are based on myths and narratives, not on artifacts. And well before Homer, communications inside Greece opened up again, as shown by the rapid spread of the alphabet or of the so-called Proto-Geometric pottery style that both belong to the ninth or early eighth centuries BCE.

The main obstacle to this hypothesis is Apollo’s well-attested presence on Cyprus, in a form, Apeilon, that is very close to the Dorian Apellon: would not Apollo then be a Cypriot? Burkert removed this obstacle with the assumption of a very early import to Cyprus from Dorian Amyclae; Amyclae, we remember, had an important and old shrine of the god. Another scenario is possible as well: the Mycenaean lords who fled to Cyprus did so only after their society integrated a part of the Dorian intruders and their tutelary god Apollo. After all, the pressure of the Dorians must have been felt for quite a while, and their bands that were organized around the cult of Apollo could have started to trickle south even before the fall of the kingdoms, and blended in with the Mycenaeans.

Overall, then, I am still inclined to follow Burkert’s hypothesis that is grounded in social and political history, rather than to accept somewhat vague Anatolian origins – even if I am aware that the neat coincidence of etymology and function might well be yet another of these circular mirages of which the history of etymologizing divine names is so full. And it needs to be stressed that the picture of a simple diffusion from the invading Dorians to the rest of Greece is somewhat too neat. Things, as often, are messier, for two reasons: there are clear traces of Near Eastern influence in Apollo’s myth and cult, and there are vestiges of a Mycenaean tradition that cannot be overlooked.

Mycenaean Antecedents
 
The most obvious Mycenaean antecedent of Apollo is the god Paiawon who is attested in two Linear B texts from Cnossus on Crete. One text is too fragmentary to teach us much, the other is rather laconic and presents a list of recipients of offerings: “to Atana Potinija, Enyalios, Paiawon, Poseidaon” – that is “Lady Athana” (the Mycenaean form of Athena), Enyalios (a name that Homer uses as a synonym of Ares, whereas local cult distinguishes the two war gods), Paean, and Poseidon. The list cannot inform us on any function besides the fact that Paiawon seems to be a major divinity, on the same level as the other three who from Homer onwards appear among the twelve Olympian gods. In the language of Homer, the Mycenaean Paiawon develops to Paiēōn; in other dialects this double vowel is simplified to Paiān or Paiōn. All three forms are attested in extant Greek texts; and we dealt with the problem that, in Homer, Paeon seems an independent mythological person, the physician of Olympus, whereas in later Greek, Paean is an epithet of Apollo the Healer to whom the paean was sung and danced. It should be pointed out that the refrain of any paean always was “ie Paean,” regardless whether it was sung for Apollo or Asclepius or even, in a rare case, to Dionysus. I feel tempted to see this as a vestige of the god Paean’s former independence and even to imagine that the paean as a ritual form goes back to the Bronze Age as well. Proof, of course, is impossible. But maybe it is no coincidence that Cretan healers and purifiers were famous in later Greece: Bronze Age remnants survived better in Crete, and the paean was connected with healing and purification. This does not mean that Apollo as such was a Mycenanean god; if anything, it rather suggests the contrary, that a non-Mycenaean Apollo absorbed the formerly independent Mycenaean healing god Paiawon, perhaps including one of his rituals, the song-and-dance paean. 

Near Eastern Influences
 
Greece was always at the margins of the ancient Near Eastern world; it has always been tempting to look for Oriental influences in Greek culture and religion. In the case of Apollo, theories went from partial influences to wholesale derivation. Wilamowitz, at one time the leading classical scholar in Germany, derived Apollo from Anatolia, stirring up a controversy whose ideological resonances are unmistakable; after all, from the days of Winckelmann, Apollo seemed the most Greek of all the gods. Others went even further, stressing the god’s absence in Linear B, and made him come from Syria or Phoenicia. This is wildly exaggerated; but there can be no doubt that partial influences exist. They are best visible in two areas: healing and the calendar.

In the past, arguments from the calendar were paramount. In the calendar of the Greeks, a month coincides with one cycle of the moon: the first day thus is the day when the moon will just be visible, the seventh day is the day when the moon is half full and as such clearly visible. Apollo is connected with both days. The seventh day is somewhat more prominent: every month, Apollo receives a sacrifice on the seventh day, all his major festivals are held on a seventh, and his birthday is on the seventh day of a specific month. But already in Homer, he is also connected with new moon, noumēnía: he is Noumenios, and his worshippers can be organized in a group of noumeniastai. Long ago, Martin P. Nilsson, the leading scholar on Greek religion in the first half of the last century, connected this with the Babylonian calendar where the seventh day is very important. He went even further. Every lunar calendar will, rather fast, get out of step with the solar cycle that defines the seasonal year; to remedy this, all systems invented intercalation, the insertion of additional days. Greek calendars introduced an extra month every ninth year, to cover the gap between the solar and the lunar cycle. According to Nilsson, they did so under Babylonian influence that was mediated through Delphi: Delphi’s main festivals were originally held every ninth year, and only Delphi would have enough influence in the Archaic Epoch to impose such a system upon all Greek states. However, this is very speculative; Nilsson certainly was wrong in his additional assumption that Delphi also introduced the system of months: month names are already attested in the Greek Bronze Age. Still, the connection of Apollo’s seventh day with the prominence of the same day in the Mesopotamian calendar is interesting.

As to healing, it seems by now established that itinerant Near Eastern healers visited Greece during the Archaic Age and left their traces. The most tangible trace is the role the dog plays in the cult of Asclepius: the dog is central to the Mesopotamian goddess of healing, Gula, two of whose statuettes were dedicated in seventh-century Samos. In Akkadian, Gula is also called azugullatu, “Great Physician”: the word may be at the root of Asclepius’ name, and it resonates in a singular cult title of Apollo on the island of Anaphe, Asgelatas. Later, Greeks turned the epithet into Aiglatas, from aigle “radiance,” and told the story that Apollo appeared to the Argonauts as a radiant star to save them from shipwreck. This looks like the later rationalization of a word that nobody understood anymore and that may be a trace of an Oriental healer who instituted this specific cult. Another Oriental detail is the plague arrows Apollo shoots in Iliad 1, as we saw, and his role as an armed gatekeeper to keep away pestilence that is attested in several Clarian oracles.

apollon.gif

Yet another area of Oriental influence is Apollo’s role in divine genealogy. To Hesiod and, to a lesser degree, to Homer, Apollo is the oldest son of Zeus: Zeus is the god who controls the present social, moral, and natural order, Apollo is his crown prince and, so to speak, designated successor, if Zeus were ever to step back. This explains, among other things, Apollo’s direct access to Zeus’ plans and knowledge. A similar constellation recurs in West Semitic and Anatolian mythologies. Here, the god most closely resembling Zeus in function and appearance is the Storm God in his different local forms; he is also the god of kings and of the present political and moral world order. In Hittite mythology, his son is Telepinu, a young god whose mythology talks about his disappearance in anger and whose rituals may have been be connected with the New Year’s festival to secure the continuation of the social and natural order. In some respects, the young and tempestuous Telepinu reminds one of Apollo.

In narratives from Ugarit in Northern Syria, the Storm God is accompanied by Reshep, the plague god or “Lord of the Arrow.” In bilingual inscriptions from Cyprus, his Phoenician equivalent, also called Reshep, becomes Greek Apollo. In iconography, Reshep is usually represented as a warrior with a helmet and a very short tunic, walking and brandishing a weapon with his raised right arm; these images are attested in the Eastern Mediterranean from the late Bronze Age to the Greek Archaic Age. In Cyprus, such a god appears in a famous bronze image from the large sanctuary complex at Citium; since he wears a helmet adorned with two horns, some scholars understood him as the Bronze Age version of the later Cypriot Apollo Keraïtas, “Horned Apollo.”

Greek Apollo, most of the time, looks very different. But a very similar statuette has been found in Apollo’s sanctuary at Amyclae in Southern Sparta. Here, it must reflect Apollo’s archaic statue in this sanctuary that we know from Pausanias’ description:

"I know nobody who might have measured its size, but I guess it must be about thirty cubits high. It is not the work of Bathycles [the sculptor who made the base for the image], but old and not worked with artifice. It has no face, and its hands and feet are added from stone, the rest looks like a bronze column. On its head, it has a helmet, in its hands a lance and a bow."
(Description of Greece, 3.10.2)

An image on a coin shows not only that the body could be dressed in a cloak to soften the strangeness of its shape but also that it brandished the lance with its raised right hand: the coincidence with the Reshep iconography seems perfect, and the Oriental influence almost obvious. It has even been suggested that the place name Amyclae is Near Eastern: there is a Phoenician Reshep Mukal, “Mighty Reshep,” whom the Cypriot Greeks translated as Apollo Amyklos. The Greek epithet cannot derive from the place name (it would have to be Amyklaîos), but it shares the same verbal root; its basic phonetic structure is the same as that of mukal. Thus, one wonders whether it was Phoenician or Cypriot sailors who first founded a sanctuary on this lonely promontory on one of the trade routes to the west.

Summary 
 
Apollo’s origins are complex and not fully explained. He is not attested in the Mycenaean Linear B texts (with a very uncertain exception), but well established in Greek religion at the time of Homer and Hesiod, and central in fundamental political and social institutions of the Archaic Epoch. There are obvious Near Eastern influences in his myths and even in some aspects of his cult; but neither a West Semitic origin nor an Anatolian origin of the god are convincing, and his protection of the Trojans needs not to reflect such an origin. The absence of Linear B documents is intriguing and puzzling; but his early presence in Cyprus does not necessarily invalidate the conclusion drawn from this absence, that he was unknown in Mycenaean religion. It is possible that he was not present here, whereas the Northwestern Greeks worshipped him already in the Bronze Age as the protector of their apéllai, the warriors’ assemblies. As protector of warriors, he entered, with them, the former Mycenaean area at the very beginning of the Transitional Period between the Bronze and the Iron Age (the Greek “Dark Age”): this allows for several centuries of transformations and adaptations, and it is not inconceivable that Apolline warriors even sailed to Cyprus among the Mycenaean refugees and settlers.

dimanche, 30 octobre 2016

Zeus et Europe, une hiérogamie cachée et l'annonce d'un destin européen

rapto de Europa escultura de Oscar Alvariño Punta del Este Uruguay.jpg

Zeus et Europe, une hiérogamie cachée et l'annonce d'un destin européen

par Thomas Ferrier

Ex: http://thomasferrier.hautetfort.com

Zeus est qualifié d’Eurôpos, c'est-à-dire « au large regard », chez Homère. En sanscrit, dans le Rig-Veda, le dieu suprême Varuna est décrit comme Urucaksas, forme parallèle de sens exactement identique. De longue date, non sans raison, Varuna et le grec ont été comparés, l’un et l’autre venant alors de la forme originelle indo-européenne *Werunos, au sens de « dieu de l’espace » (c'est-à-dire le dieu vaste). En Inde comme en Grèce, ce surnom du dieu céleste *Dyeus est devenu une divinité en tant que telle.

Les Grecs, sous l’influence probable de la théogonie hourrite ou hatti, influence indirecte due vraisemblablement aux Hittites, ont multiplié les divinités jouant le même rôle. On peut ainsi souligner qu’Hypérion, Hélios et Apollon sont redondants, de même que Phébé, Séléné et Artémis (sans oublier Hécate). C’est aussi le cas du dieu suprême qui est ainsi divisé en trois dieux séparés que sont Ouranos, Cronos et Zeus. En réalité, tout porte à croire que Zeus est le seul et unique dieu du ciel, malgré Hésiode, et qu’Ouranos n’a jamais été à l’origine qu’une simple épiclèse de Zeus. De même, Varuna a sans doute été un des aspects de Dyaus Pitar, avant de se substituer à lui, et de ne plus laisser à son nom d’origine qu’un rôle très effacé dans la mythologie védique.

Ce Zeus Eurôpos, ce « Dyaus Urucaksas », a selon la tradition grecque de nombreuses épouses. Or une déesse est qualifiée d’Eurôpê à Lébadée en Béotie et à Sicyone dans le Péloponnèse. Ce nom d’Eurôpê, dont le rattachement à une racine phénicienne ‘rb est purement idéologique, et ne tient pas une second d’un point de vue étymologie, est nécessairement la forme féminine d’Eurôpos. Or ce n’est pas n’importe quelle déesse qui est ainsi qualifiée, elle et uniquement elle, de ce nom d’Eurôpê, indépendamment de la princesse phénicienne, crétoise ou thrace qu’on appelle ainsi, et qui n’est alors qu’une vulgaire hypostase. C’est Dêmêtêr, mot à mot la « Terre-mère », version en mode olympien de Gaia (ou Gê) et peut-être déesse d’origine illyrienne, même si non nom apparaît vraisemblablement dès l’époque mycénienne.

Il existe en effet en Albanie moderne une déesse de la terre, qui est qualifiée de Dhé Motë, ce qui veut dire la « tante Terre » car le sens de motë, qui désignait bien sûr la mère, a pris ensuite le sens de tante. De même, le nom albanais originel de la tante, nënë, a pris celui de la mère. Cela donne aussi une déesse Votrë Nënë, déesse du foyer analogue à la déesse latine Vesta et à la grecque.

Le nom de Dêmêtêr, qu’il soit purement grec ou illyrien, a le sens explicite de « Terre-mère » et remonte aux temps indo-européens indivis, où elle portait alors le nom de *Đγom (Dhghom) *Mater. Ce n’était pas alors n’importe quelle divinité mais sous le nom de *Diwni [celle de *Dyeus], elle était ni plus ni moins l’épouse officielle du dit *Dyeus (le « Zeus » indo-européen). L’union du ciel et de la terre, de Zeus Patêr et de Dêô (Δηώ) Matêr donc, remonte ainsi à une époque antérieure même aux Grecs mycéniens.

Il est donc logique qu’à un Zeus Eurôpôs soit unie une Dêmêtêr Eurôpê, l’un et l’autre étant des divinités « au large regard », l’un englobant l’ensemble du ciel et la seconde l’ensemble de la terre, à une époque où celle-ci était encore considérée comme large et plate, d’où ses deux noms divins en sanscrit, à savoir Pŗthivi (« la plate »), c'est-à-dire Plataia en grec et Litavis en gaulois, et Urvi (« la large »).

europanew.jpg
L’union de Zeus sous la forme d’un taureau avec Europe est donc une hiérogamie, une union sacrée entre le ciel et la terre, union féconde donnant naissance à trois enfants, Minos, Eaque et Rhadamanthe, chacun incarnant l’une des trois fonctions analysées par Georges Dumézil. La tradition grecque évoque d’autres unions de même nature, ainsi celle de Poséidon en cheval avec Dêmêtêr en jument, cette déesse ayant cherché à lui échapper en prenant la forme de cet animal. Dans le cas d’Europe, on devine qu’elle aura elle-même pris la forme d’une vache.

Le nom d’Europe qui désigne le continent qui porte son nom indique qu’elle est la Terre par excellence, mère nourricière du peuple grec vivant sur un continent béni par Zeus lui-même. Lui donner une origine phénicienne, à part pour des raisons poétiques bien étranges, est donc un contre-sens auquel même certains mythographes antiques se firent prendre.

Et que son premier fils se soit nommé Minôs, là encore, ne doit rien au hasard. Bien loin d’être en vérité un ancien roi de Crète, il était surtout un juge infernal et le plus important. Or Minôs n’est en réalité que le premier homme, celui que les Indiens appellent Manu, d’où les fameuses lois qui lui sont attribuées, et les Germains Manus. L’idée que le premier homme devienne à sa mort le roi des Enfers n’est pas nouvelle. Le dieu infernal Yama et son épouse Yami ayant été par exemple le premier couple mortel. Minôs est le « Manus » des Grecs, bien avant qu’Hésiode invente Deucalion. Et s’il juge les hommes au royaume d’Hadès, la seule raison en est qu’il est celui qui a établi les anciennes lois.

Ainsi l’Europe est-elle non seulement la Terre par excellence, l’épouse de Zeus en personne, dont Héra n’est qu’un aspect, celui de la « belle saison » et de la « nouvelle année » (sens de son nom latin Junon), mais elle est la mère des hommes, la matrice de la lignée des éphémères, ou du moins d’une partie d’entre eux.

Europa est ainsi la mère de Gallia et de Germania, de Britannia et d’Italia, d’Hispania et d’Hellas et désormais mère aussi de nouvelles nations comme la Polonia, la Suecia et la Ruthenia (Russie), depuis les fjords de Thulé jusqu’à Prométhée sur sa montagne, depuis la Lusitania jusqu’aux steppes profondes de Sarmatia.

Thomas FERRIER (Le Parti des Européens)

samedi, 24 septembre 2016

La Théogonie d'Hésiode

Dionysos-et-Ariane.jpg

La Théogonie d'Hésiode

 
Ex: http://lesocle.hautetfort.com 

Si nous devons remonter aux sources premières de notre mémoire, quel sont nos plus anciens textes sacrés ? Aux côtés de l'Iliade et de l'Odyssée, piliers premiers de notre tradition, on trouvera immanquablement la Théogonie d'Hésiode. Décrivant la naissance des Dieux, la Théogonie nous rappelle notre véritable nature, celle d'enfants des Dieux à qui nous devons nous efforcer de ressembler. Pour y parvenir, Hésiode nous chante l'ordre cosmique incarné par les Dieux et le premier d'entre eux: Zeus. Comprendre cet ordre, c'est ce qui nous permet de méditer notre métaphysique: la métaphysique de l'Absolu, élément indispensable d'une nouvelle Renaissance européenne.  

Structure de l’œuvre: La Théogonie est un hymne aux Dieux. L'appréhension par le lecteur de sa dimension lyrique et religieuse est donc fondamentale pour faire vivre l'hommage d'Hésiode aux Muses et aux souverains de notre monde.

Gwendal Crom, pour le SOCLE

La critique positive de la Théogonie au format .pdf

H-1.jpgLa Théogonie 1 d'Hésiode s'ouvre par l'honneur rendu aux Muses, filles de Zeus, celles qui font les grands rois et les grands poètes en rendant leurs paroles plus douces que le miel. Hésiode tient son pouvoir d'elles, filles de la Mémoire (Mnémosyne), merveilleuses créatures baignant leur corps dans la Fontaine du Cheval (l'Hippocrène), en la montagne Hélicon, « grandiose et inspirée ». Ces rires et ces chants que perçoit le poète, ce sont ceux de la mémoire, dont les échos rebondissent sans fin sur l'onde de la source pérenne.

Ainsi se dessine la volonté des Dieux, tel est le devoir religieux des poètes (les aèdes) : transmettre la mémoire des hommes et de ceux qui ne meurent pas. Citons Diodore de Sicile : « Parmi les Titanides, on attribue à Mnémosyne l'art du raisonnement : elle imposa des noms à tous les êtres, ce qui nous permet de les distinguer et de converser entre nous ; mais ces inventions sont aussi attribuées à Mercure. On doit aussi à Mnémosyne les moyens de rappeler la mémoire des choses passées dont nous voulons nous ressouvenir, ainsi que son nom l'indique déjà » 2. Car nommer, c'est-à-dire, donner une vie, une signification, c'est ce qui permet de donner un sens à la Vie elle-même. Une Vie que l'on met en relation avec la Vie d'hier et la Vie de demain par les flots de la destinée. Une Vie, un Cosmos que les Muses célèbrent et que l'on célèbre à travers elles.

Filles de Zeus, les Muses inspirent poètes et rois. Elles illuminent l'accord passé entre les hommes et les Dieux. Les Rois guident les hommes quand Zeus guide les Dieux mais toujours existe un incessant échange entre ces deux mondes, et ce, par le biais du poète. Parler de deux mondes est d'ailleurs une erreur. Il n'en existe qu'un et c'est au travers de la personne du poète que se fait jour cette vérité. Plus prosaïquement, le fait que les Muses inspirent ces deux types d'homme illustre parfaitement la dualité de la première fonction dans la tripartition indo-européenne : un versant politique et un versant sacré 3,4 ainsi que leur intrication.

I. Une généalogie

Cet hommage rendu, commençons par le commencement. Au commencement se trouve Faille (Chaos) dont naissent Gaïa (la Terre), Nyx (Nuit), Erèbe (Ténèbres) et enfin Eros (Amour), le principe d'union des contraires. Nuit et Ténèbres donnent naissance à Feu d'en haut (Ether) et lumière du jour (Héméra). Puis Gaïa donne naissance à Ouranos (Ciel) et Pontos (Océan infertile, dît le Flot). Enfin, Ciel et Terre donnent naissance à Océan. Ciel engrosse ensuite Terre continuellement. Mais Ouranos est un Dieu jaloux qui refuse de partager avec ses enfants. Il enferme sa progéniture dans les replis de la Terre. Tous ces enfants nés de lui, Ouranos les appelle « Titans ». Le dernier-né parmi eux, c'est Cronos Pensées-Retorses. Malgré la haine farouche que tous les enfants du Ciel éprouvent pour leur père, lui seul a le courage de répondre à l'appel de sa mère outragée (vers 170):

« Mère, moi, je l'ai promis ;

et je saurais l'exécuter, l'acte.

Je n'ai aucun respect pour ce père

indigne de son nom, le nôtre.

Il a, le premier, inventé des méfaits écœurants ».

Une nuit, alors que Ciel vient s'étendre sur Terre pour l'engrosser à nouveau, Cronos suit le plan élaborée par sa mère. Il saisit la longue serpe qu'elle a confectionnée et il émascule ce père tyrannique. Il jette les testicules au loin dans la mer. De l'écume bouillonnante en sort alors Aphrodite, déesse de l'amour, celle qui a Eros pour compagnon et que Désir suit partout. Avant que les testicules n'atteignent la mer, elles laissent échapper quelques gouttes de sang sur le sol dont jailliront après quelques années les Géants, les Erinyes et les Nymphes.

Avant d'aller plus avant vers la naissance de Zeus, Hésiode nous entretient de la descendance de la Nuit et des Ténèbres. Elle compte « le triste Destin et la noire Tueuse, et la Mort » mais aussi le Sommeil et les Rêves. Parmi ses enfants, on trouve les trois Moires qui donnent à leur naissance, leur part à chaque être, homme comme Dieu. Nuit enfanta également Indignation, Tromperie et Bonne Amitié, Vieillesse et Jalousie. Jalousie enfanta à son tour Travail, Oubli et Faim ainsi que Souffrances, Querelles et Combats, Assassinats et Massacres d'Hommes. Jalousie encore enfanta Réclamations, Mépris des lois et Démence (« qui s'accordent ensemble » nous dit Hésiode) et enfin Serment « qui plus que tout autre fait souffrir sur la terre les hommes, lorsque l'un d'eux, sachant ce qu'il fait, se parjure ».

Vient ensuite la progéniture de Pontos et de Gaïa : Nérée, Thaumas, Porkys, Kètô et Eurybiè. Ce sont là des divinités marines primordiales. De nombreuses créatures mythologiques (Sirènes, Harpies, Gorgones...) les ont pour parents. Naissent les Vents, les Fleuves, le Soleil, l'Aurore, la Lune et les Etoiles. On voit ici que chaque élément du Cosmos est sacré, divin. Les concepts eux-mêmes sont divins tels Vouloir-être-premier, Victoire, Pouvoir et Force, qui partout accompagneront Zeus et obéiront à lui seul. Enfin, une place de choix est accordée à la déesse Hécate qui conservera ses prérogatives après la prise de pouvoir du puissant Cronide.

De Zeus enfin il est question. Rhéïa, forcée par Cronos, donne naissance à plusieurs Dieux immédiatement avalés par Cronos. Car lui aussi ne veut pas partager son pouvoir, lui aussi sombre dans l'hubris (soit le fait d'avoir voulu plus que sa juste part, d'avoir sombré dans la démesure). Et ses parents Terre et Ciel lui avaient prédit qu'il serait détrôné par l'un de ses enfants. Rhéïa demande donc conseil à ses parents (Ciel et Terre également) et elle lange une pierre qu'elle donne à Cronos pour qu'il la mange à la place de Zeus. Zeus grandit ensuite sur la montagne Aïgaïôn puis au moyen de la ruse, revient faire vomir ses frères et sœurs à Cronos.

zeussssss.jpg

Figure I: Roi des Dieux et Dieu des Rois, Zeus incarne la première fonction et l'ordre cosmique des Indo-européens.

Alors se déclenche la guerre entre les Dieux Olympiens commandés par Zeus et les Titans fidèles à Cronos. Zeus reçoit le Foudre des trois cyclopes ouraniens, arme et symbole de celui qui commande aux Dieux et aux hommes. Mais pendant dix longues années, les Titans et les Olympiens se combattent sans que ne se dessine un vainqueur. Zeus délivre alors les puissants Hécatonchires prisonniers du Tartare où Cronos les avait enfermés. L'un d'eux (ils sont trois comme les Cyclopes), Kottos le parfait, lui répond en ces termes (vers 655):

        « Ô puissant, ce que tu révèles, nous le savons.

        Mais aussi savons que ton esprit est fort et plus forte ta pensée.

        Tu as sauvé les Immortels du froid des malédictions.

        Grâce à ta sagesse échappant au brouillard obscur,

        Echappant aux entraves cruelles, nous sommes revenus ici,

        Prince fils de Cronos, quand nous n'espérions plus.

        Maintenant l'esprit tendu, avec réflexion, nous nous battrons pour vous

        Dans la dure bataille nous affronterons les Titans en un combat Terrible ».

La guerre qui suit est apocalyptique. Les Hécatonchires (ils ont cent bras) font pleuvoir un déluge de roche sur les Titans pendant que Zeus fait s'abattre sans répit la foudre sur eux (vers 700).

        « Un brûlure monstrueuse atteignit la Faille.

        C'était pour qui voyait avec ses yeux, entendait avec ses oreilles,

        Comme si la terre, comme si le ciel immense par-dessus se heurtaient ».

Les Titans sont vaincus. Ils sont enfermés dans le Tartare, gardés pour l'éternité par les puissants Hécatonchires. Furieuse du sort réservé à ses enfants, Gaïa couche avec le Tartare et enfante alors Typhôeus, la plus puissante entité jamais engendrée par la Terre. De ses épaules jaillissent cent têtes de serpents dont les yeux crachent le feu et sa voix fait trembler les montagnes. Zeus se lève alors et après un combat tout aussi apocalyptique que le précédent, il détruit Typhon, et sa dépouille enflammée fait fondre la Terre. Zeus sera le seul maître, l'Univers jusqu'à Faille elle-même en fut le témoin. La Terre devra donc s'y plier.

II. Un ordre nouveau

Généalogie des Dieux et des concepts, la Théogonie porte en elle est une conception de l'univers et des hommes. L'ordre et les conflits qui règnent chez les Dieux sont un reflet des combats qui animent le monde des hommes ainsi que de l'ordre idéal qui doit y régner. Comme le dit Alain de Benoist 5, il y a toujours un échange, une incessante réciprocité entre le monde des Dieux et celui des hommes mangeurs de pain. Comme l'illustre l'acte du sacrifice (vers 555), les hommes et les Dieux partagent, les hommes et les Dieux communient ensemble. Ils évoluent dans un monde sacré comme nous l'avons vu dans la partie précédente. Le Cieux et la Terre, les Vents et les Flots, le Soleil et la Lune sont tout aussi divins que Zeus et Héra. Ils dessinent un monde où l'enchantement va de pair avec le respect. Qui oserait piller une Terre divine, qui oserait polluer une nature sacrée ?

Mais cela va au-delà des considérations sur la simple nature. L'enseignement principal, c'est que l'homme ne saurait se rendre maître du Cosmos. Comme dans les autres traditions indo-européennes, le mythos grec donne naissance à un homme libre (dont l'aboutissement est le héros) mais contenu dans les limites de la mesure sans quoi il aura à en payer le prix. Et les Moires qui ont donné leur part à chaque homme et chaque Dieu veilleront à punir celui qui se sera montré coupable d'hubris. D'hubris il est question lorsque Cronos engloutit un à un ses enfants ou quand Ouranos enferme les siens dans les replis de leur mère la Terre. Pleins d'hubris, ils refusent de partager, de laisser à chacun sa juste part. Ouranos, Gaïa et leurs descendants Titans sont prompts à sombrer dans l'hubris par nature. Ces Dieux anciens personnifient les forces primitives, chaotiques de la Nature. Ils sont la Terre, le Ciel, forces brutes qui ignorent la notion d'ordre et d'harmonie, ils détruisent immédiatement ce qu'ils ont créé et ne laissent subsister qu'un monde bouillonnant, fertile mais sans forme ni sens. Ce sont des forces du passé (sans doute représentent-elles les divinités pré-indo-européennes) que remplacèrent les forces nouvelles des Dieux indo-européens. On pensera notamment au panthéon nordiques où les Dieux Vanes (liés à la fécondité) après un temps en lutte avec les Dieux Ases (liés à a souveraineté et à la guerre) conclurent une trêve avec ces derniers 6. Les divinités de la nature ne sont pas exclues (pas plus que l'homme en deviendrait le maître) mais elles ne sont plus prépondérantes (les Titans sont exilés dans le Tartare pendant que Perséphone et Aphrodite sont vénérées par les hommes).

D'un point de vue terrestre, il semble inéluctable dans l'histoire des hommes, nécessaire pour ces derniers, de passer d'une société tributaire des aléas de la nature à une société où l'homme se trace un destin et où la société dans son ensemble s'organise autour de cette idée. Telle est l'essence des Dieux Olympiens et des hommes qui les suivent : le pouvoir de rentrer dans l'histoire et de la faire.

Tel est donc le nouvel ordre olympien. Un panthéon où Zeus est le maître incontesté mais où il agit en souverain et non en tyran. Il compose avec les autres Dieux et leur demande leur avis. On pensera aux honneurs que Zeus accorde à Hécate (vers 410), à l'aide qu'il requiert de la part des Hécatonchires (vers 640) et à la reconnaissance qu'il accorde à Styx (vers 400). Préfigurant l'ordre régnant dans les sociétés indo-européennes, Zeus est le souverain des Dieux tout comme le roi est le souverain des hommes libres. Et si c'est en invoquant Zeus que les hommes prêtent serment 7, ce n'est pas par son nom que jure les autres Dieux (comme nous le verrons par la suite). La tyrannie d'un seul sur tous les autres n'existe pas et comme le montre la Théogonie, tout ceux qui s'y essayent (Ouranos, Cronos) finissent immanquablement par chuter.

Oreste-poursuivi-par-les-Furies-par-William-Bouguereau.jpg

Figure II: Les remords d'Oreste par William Bouguereau. Chez les hommes comme chez les Dieux, malheur au parjure, malheur à celui qui attente au sacré !

Tout comme la société humaine, la société divine est régie par les mêmes fondements (respect de l'ordre cosmique, vision tripartite du monde) et les mêmes codes. L'un de ceux-ci, le plus remarquable, est le rituel du serment. Ce Serment que la Théogonie présente comme l'enfant de la Nuit et qui « plus que tout autre fait souffrir sur la terre les hommes, lorsque l'un d'eux, sachant ce qu'il fait, se parjure » (vers 230). Remarquable en effet de constater que selon la Théogonie, la plus grande cause de souffrance pour les hommes est le parjure. Remarquable enfin de trouver naturellement en écho à la souffrance des hommes qui parjurent, un écho dans le rituel du serment chez les Dieux. Nous parlions précédemment de la reconnaissance qu'a accordée Zeus à Styx. Ce qu'il lui a donné en récompense c'est d'être celle par laquelle les Dieux jureront (vers 780). Lorsque la parole d'un Immortel est mise en doute, alors l'on envoie quérir l'eau du Styx et l'Immortel la verse à terre en prêtant serment. Comme chez les hommes, malheur au parjure ! (vers 790)

        « Si l'un de ceux qui ne meurt pas, seigneur des neiges de l'Olympe,

        La verse à terre pour faire un serment qui n'a pas de vérité,

        Il cesse de respirer, reste à terre pendant toute une année.

        Il ne peut pas s'approcher de l'ambroisie ni du nectar qui nourrissent ;

        Il est étendu sur un lit qu'on lui a fait,

        Sans souffle et sans paroles, dans un coma dangereux.

        Quand, après une longue année sa maladie se termine,

        Il subit une épreuve nouvelle, qui vient après l'autre.

        Pendant neuf ans il reste à l'écart des Dieux qui vivent sans fin.

        On ne le laisse se mêler ni aux conseils, ni aux fêtes,

        Pendant neuf années entières.

     A la dixième année il revient se mêler aux Immortels qui ont leur maison sur l'Olympe ».

Telle est la sanction pour l'Immortel qui a failli : la perte de son immortalité. Cela montre à quel point la société des Dieux est le reflet idéal de celle des hommes, à quel point les hommes sont donc capables en retour de divinité s'ils se montrent « pareils aux Dieux ». On ne s'étonnera donc pas de remarquer que le qualificatif le plus accordé aux héros dans l'antiquité hellénique est « divin ». Plus qu'une capacité d'ascension pour les hommes, la divinité est un idéal, une tenue que les meilleurs représentants de la race se doivent d'atteindre. Le poète est entre autres là pour rappeler cette évidence aux hommes et aux rois, que la Théogonie appelle à juste titre les « élèves de Zeus » (vers 80). La frontière est pourtant claire entre les hommes et les Dieux. De démesure, il ne saurait être question. Il faut le rappeler, l'hubris est la pire faute que puisse commettre un homme. Le « Connais-toi toi-même » gravé sur le fronton du temple de Delphes n'est pas un appel à l'introspection. Il enjoint chacun à connaitre sa place dans l'univers. A chacun, homme comme Dieu de remplir son rôle, et de la manière la plus parfaite qui soit. C'est la condition de l'harmonie.

III. Une métaphysique de l’Absolu

L'harmonie : c'est ce qui se dessine au sein de la Théogonie. C'est un « cosmos », soit étymologiquement un « monde ordonné » et non un chaos. La Théogonie c'est l'arrivée de l'ordre dans la création afin de lui donner un sens, une harmonie. L'ordre n'est pas seulement amené par l'accession de Zeus au trône divin et qui n'en est que le parachèvement. L'ordre, ce sont aussi des règles métaphysiques intangibles, comme le peut être la gravitation dans notre monde. Ces règles naissent avec le Cosmos lui-même et se diversifient, se complexifient en même temps que lui.

Nous avions déjà parlé des Muses, filles de la Mémoire et de Zeus. Remontons encore une fois au tout début. De Faille survint Gaïa, Nyx (la Nuit), Erèbe (Ténèbres) et Eros (Amour). De Nuit et de Ténèbres viendront Feu d'en haut (Ether) et Lumière du jour (Héméra). On retiendra de ce Fiat Lux la survenue depuis le quasi-Néant (Nuit et Ténèbres sont un peu plus que l'absence de toute chose), de l'énergie et de la matière. Mais surtout, notre attention est attirée par Eros. L'un des quatre premiers principes/concepts/Dieux est celui de l'Amour. Il est le Dieu de la puissance créatrice, il est l'incarnation de « l'union des contraires » si cher aux Hellènes. Il est important de préciser qu'Eros n'est pas le Désir qui est une entité distincte. C'est précisément ici qu'intervient le génie de l'antique paganisme. Les Anciens n'ignoraient pas la dualité des principes régissant l'existence mais ils en recherchaient le dépassement. Ils ne faisaient pas un choix qui verrait magnifier un principe aux dépens de celui qui lui était associé. Ils ne choisissaient pas non plus une voie qui amènerait les deux principes à se neutraliser, sorte de juste milieu. Non. Pour nos ancêtres, la solution résidait dans l'union des contraires par leur dépassement dialectique. Prenons la figure d'Aphrodite. Née des testicules d'Ouranos tranchées et jetées à la mer par Cronos, il est dit d'elle que partout où elle allait (vers 195) :

        « Eros fut son compagnon,

        Et le beau Désir la suivit,

        Dès le moment de sa naissance,

        Puis quand elle monta chez les Dieux »

Aphrodite est le dépassement dialectique de l'Amour et du Désir. Elle permet le dépassement du concept de perpétuation, d'union que constitue Eros et de celui du simple désir amoureux que constitue Désir. Aphrodite, c'est l'écume (la semence) née du Ciel venue fertiliser la Terre et ses habitants. A la fois violente comme le peut être le désir et douce comme la tendresse, Aphrodite a pour époux Arès, le Dieu des fureurs guerrières. De par ses prérogatives et les relations qu'elle noue avec les autres entités, elle montre l'étendue et les limites de son champ d'action. Elle montre également qu'il ne saurait y avoir de concept agissant seul, isolé, sans conséquences sur le monde extérieur. La plupart d'entre nous préfèrerons la compagnie d'Aphrodite à celle d'Arès mais nous ne devons pas nous faire d'illusion sur le risque toujours existant de le voir faire irruption quand nous frayons avec elle.

On pensera alors à l'Iliade 8. C'est à cause du désir de Pâris pour la belle Hélène que la guerre de Troie eut lieu.

Ce n'est l'un qu'un exemple parmi d'autre, et parmi les plus simples à comprendre. Toute la Théogonie est construite selon cette logique. Elle dessine une totalité dialectique où chaque divinité, chaque concept, chaque homme a son importance dans la perfection, dans l'ordre de l'univers.

athbor2141_small_1.jpgFigure III: Athéna à la borne. Comme pour la déesse, nos méditations doivent porter sur la notion de limite, d'absolu, de perfection.

Poursuivons maintenant avec la progéniture de la Nuit. Tout d'abord, les trois Moires qui accordent leur part de bien et de mal à chaque homme (de bonheur et de malheur) et qui soulignent de par leur naissance, que la destinée n'est que l'enchainement des causes et des conséquences que chaque homme se doit d'assumer. S'accorde à la divinité celui qui (homme comme Dieu) saura rester à la place qui lui est due. Cela ne doit pas laisser penser que la société des Hellènes est fataliste comme pouvait l'être celle des Etrusques. Non, la part qui revient à chacun peut émerger après une longue lutte. Ce que nous dit l'existence des trois Destinées, c'est que la vie ne peut être appréhendée sans sa dimension tragique, que l'on ne peut vouloir toujours plus sans en avoir à en payer le prix un jour ou l'autre et que l'homme sage ne maudira point les Dieux et l'Univers quand il sera frappé par les coups du sort (des conceptions que l'on retrouve bien exprimée dans le stoïcisme 9,10).

Et ces coups du sort sont également enfants de la Nuit. La Mort bien évidemment mais également la Misère qui fait mal, la Tromperie et la Vieillesse effroyable, la Jalousie qui enfanta à son tour bien des maux. Ce sont l'Oubli et les Souffrances, les Querelles et les Combats et, nous dit la Théogonie, le Mépris des lois et la Démence qui « s'accordent ensemble ». C'est enfin, rappelons-le une dernière fois, ce Serment qui fait tant souffrir les hommes quand ils se parjurent. Même les maux participent à l'ordre du monde et sont sacrés, incarnés par des divinités. Un monde sans souffrance ne serait plus le monde tout comme il est insensé de s'étonner de la présence de la Mort, nécessaire au renouvellement perpétuel des générations.

Nous avons évoqué précédemment la figure de la déesse Styx, fille d'Océan et fleuve des Enfers. Elle accouru la première à l'appel de Zeus pour combattre les Titans. Le fait que parmi les enfants de Styx se trouvent Vouloir-être-premier, Victoire aux belles chevilles, Pouvoir et Force ne devra donc étonner personne, surtout lorsque l'on sait que depuis cet appel (vers 385):

        « Ils n'ont pas de maison, où ils seraient loin de Zeus,

        Pas de lieu, pas de route, où ils iraient sans l'ordre du Dieu ;

        Toujours ils occupent un siège près de Zeus Fracas-de-Foudre ».

Nous le voyons encore une fois. Tout est sacré, même les sentiments et les idées, les concepts comme les sensations. Les Dieux sont les forces profondes animant l'univers et que l'homme sage se doit de vénérer. Car le but de l'homme sage est de vivre en harmonie avec l'univers. Donc de connaître les lois qui l'animent. Les stoïciens arrivèrent à la même conclusion par l'usage de la raison. Ceci n'est pas étonnant, car quand bien même un philosophe utilise uniquement la logique pour arriver à ses conclusions, ce sont les mythes qui ont façonné l'âme de son peuple et dont il est l'un des dépositaires qui déterminent ses représentations fondamentales. Les penseurs hellènes n'étaient pas de joyeux athées accessoirement doués pour la philosophie et les sciences. Toute leur âme répondait à une métaphysique bien précise. Cette métaphysique est celle de la borne, de la limite. C'est la métaphysique de l'Absolu. C'est une métaphysique dictée par le rejet d'une faute majeure : l'hubris. Savoir trouver sa place, la mesure en tout, l'intrication du beau et du bien, la sacralité de l'univers, la perfection comme horizon... ce sont là quelques manifestations de cette métaphysique de l'Absolu contenue dans la Théogonie. On est loin de la métaphysique de l'illimité qui gouverne aujourd'hui nos existences. Un monde de la consommation, de la croissance sans fin. Un monde où la nature (aujourd'hui circonscrite à la Terre mais demain extensible à l'Univers entier) est une vaste réserve de matière première. Un monde où l'homme est devenu la démesure de toute chose pour prendre à rebours les propos de Protagoras. Une sécularisation du « Dieu les bénit, et Dieu leur dit: Soyez féconds, multipliez, remplissez la terre, et l'assujettissez; et dominez sur les poissons de la mer, sur les oiseaux du ciel, et sur tout animal qui se meut sur la terre » de la Genèse 11.

Invoquons de nouveau l'Iliade et la description du bouclier d'Achille dont nous parlions dans une précédente critique positive 12 :

« Dans ce texte sacré de notre continent, le plus ancien écrit d'Europe, composé au VIIIe siècle avant notre ère, nous pouvons trouver la figuration de la cité sur le bouclier d'Achille (chant XVIII de l'Iliade). Forgé et décoré par Héphaïstos, le bouclier montre la société antique, représentée par deux cités, l'une en paix, l'autre en guerre mais toutes deux inscrites dans l'ordre cosmique (symbolisé par la voute céleste) défini par la tri-fonctionnalité européenne. La première ville représente le 1er ordre (cérémonies, justice, cercle sacré). La seconde ville représente le 2nd ordre (guerre). En plus des deux villes est représenté le monde agricole (3ème ordre), joyeux et opulent. A l'extrême bord du bouclier est placé l'Océan (notion de limite, de borne). Ici, le monde agricole est richesse et joie, il permet l'émergence des villes et en garantie l'harmonie. La séquence nature-surnature-civilisation est une continuité et non une rupture. Non seulement le divin les englobe mais ces trois composantes participent également au divin ».

Cette métaphysique est notre bien le plus précieux. Malmenée depuis des siècles, oubliée par bien des nôtres, il n'appartient qu'à nous d'y revenir. Comment ? En nous laissant traverser par la perfection des sculptures antiques de Praxitèle et de Phidias dont Rodin fut l'un des plus dignes descendants. En s'imposant une plus grande frugalité sans sombrer dans l'ascétisme, comme le recommandait Dominique Venner, pour se concentrer sur les choses fondamentales. En cultivant l'esprit (l'exigence) d'excellence dans nos travaux. En renouant avec le sentiment de la nature comme nous l'enseignent et nous l'ont enseigné tant de nos maîtres. Toutes ces choses que Dominique Venner nous a enjoint de retrouver, d'entretenir en nous et parmi les nôtres 13. La Théogonie est avec l'Iliade une des sources majeures de ce grand ressourcement. Les autres sources immémoriales de l'Europe partageant les mêmes eaux, chacun pourra y trouver cette métaphysique de l'Absolu. Du cycle arthurien aux Eddas, de la figure de Cúchulainn à celle de Siegfried, de la sagesse des druides à celle des stoïciens, nous avons à portée de main de quoi renouer avec notre véritable relation au cosmos, celle de nos origines.

Pour le SOCLE 

L'enseignement fondamental de la Théogonie est de revenir à une métaphysique de l'Absolu. Ce que nous percevons à travers ce témoignage d'Hésiode pour y parvenir, c'est:

  • La condamnation de l'hubris
  • Le Cosmos est sacré
  • Tout est partie du Cosmos : hommes, Dieux, forces, concepts, idées...
  • Hommes et Dieux doivent être guidés par les mêmes principes
  • L'importance du serment
  • L'ordre est voulu, le chaos est permanent

Bibliographie

  1. Théogonie. Hésiode. Folio Classique
  2. Bibliothèque historique, V, LXVII. Diodore de Sicile
  3. Jupiter, Mars, Quirinus. Georges Dumézil. NRF Gallimard
  4. Vu de droite. Alain de Benoist. Le labyrinthe
  5. Comment peut-on être païen ? Alain de Benoist. Albin Michel
  6. Les religions de l'Europe du nord. Régis Boyer, Evelyne Lot-Falck. Fayard-Delanoël
  7. Dictionnaire de la mythologie gréco-romaine. Annie Collognat. Omnibus
  8. L'Iliade. Homère. Traduit du grec par Frédéric Mugler. Babel
  9. Le Manuel. Epictète. GF-Flammarion
  10. Pensées pour moi-même. Marc-Aurèle. GF-Flammarion
  11. Genèse 1:28
  12. Critique positive de « Comment peut-on être païen». Gwendal Crom. Le SOCLE
  13. Un samouraï d'Occident. Dominique Venner. Editions Pierre-Guillaume de Roux

mardi, 20 septembre 2016

Rightist Critique of Racial Materialism

racmat.jpg

Rightist Critique of Racial Materialism

 
Ex: http://www.katehon.com

While France and England gave materialistic, anti-traditional expressions to the concept of “the people” that was taking shape since the French Revolution, German Idealism was a return to a spiritual, metaphysical direction. The German Revolution moved in a volkish direction, where the volk was seen as the basis of the state, and the notion of a volk-soul that guided the formation and development of nations became a predominant theme that came into conflict with the French bourgeois liberal-democratic ideals derived from Jacobinism. Fichte had laid the foundations of a German nationalism in 1807-1808 with his Addresses to the German Nation. Although like possibly all revolutionaries or radicals of the time, beginning under the impress of the French Revolution, by the time he had delivered his addresses to the German nation, he had already rejected Jacobinism. Johann Heder had previously sought to establish the concept of the volk-soul, and of each nation being guided by a spirit. This was a metaphysical conception of race, or more accurately volk, that preceded the biological arguments of the Frenchman Count Arthur de Gobineau. Herder stated that the volk is the only class, and includes both King and peasant, and that “the people” are not the same as the rabble that are championed by Jacobinism and later Marxism. 

Houston Stewart Chamberlain - Occult History Third Reich - Peter Crawford.jpgFrench and English racism was introduced to Germany by the Englishman Houston Stewart Chamberlain who had a seminal influence on Hitlerism. English Darwinism, a manifestation of the materialistic Zeitgeist that dominated England, was brought to Germany by Ernst Haeckel; although Blumenbach had already begun to classify race according to cranial measurements during the 18th century. Nonetheless, biological racism reflects the English Zeitgeist of materialism. It provided primary materialistic doctrines to dethrone Tradition. Its application to economics also provided a scientific justification for the “class struggle” of both the capitalistic and socialistic varieties. Hitlerism was an attempt to synthesis the English eugenics of Galton and the evolution of Darwin with the metaphysis of German Idealism. Italian Traditionalist Julius Evola attempted to counter the later influence of Hitlerian racism on Italian Fascism by developing a “metaphysical racism,” and the concept of the “race of the spirit,” which has its parallels in Spengler, whose approach to race is in the Traditionalist mode of the German Idealists.

Because the Right, the custodian of Tradition within the epoch of decay, has been infected by the spirit of materialism, there is often a focus on secondary symptoms of culture disease, such as in particular immigration, rather than primary symptoms such as usury and plutocracy. “Race” becomes a matter of skull measuring, rather than spirit, élan and character. Hence the character of a civilisation and of a people is discerned via the types of bone and skull found amidst the ruins. History then becomes a matter of counting and measuring and statistics. How feeble such attempts remain is demonstrated by the years of controversy surrounding the racial identity of Kennewick Man in North America, having first thought to have been a Caucasian, and now concluded to have been of Ainu/Polynesian descent. The Traditionalist does not discount “race”. Rather it plays a central role. How “race” is defined is another matter. 

Trotsky called “racism” “Zoological materialism”. As an “economic materialist”, that is, a Marxist, he did not explain why his own version of materialism is a superior mode of thinking and acting than the other. They arose, along with Free Trade capitalism, out of the same Zeitgeist that dominated England at the time, and all three refer to a naturalistic life as struggle. The Traditionalist rejects all forms of materialism. The Traditionalist does not see history as unfolding according to material, economic forces, or racial-biological determinants. The Traditionalist sees history as the unfolding of metaphysical forces manifesting within the terrestrial. Spengler, although not a Perennial Traditionalist, intuited history over a broad expanse as a metaphysical unfolding. Although a man of the “Right”, he rejected the biological interpretation of history as much as the economic. So did Evola.

The best known exponents of racial determinism were of course German National Socialists, the reductionist doctrine being expressed by Hitler: 

“…This is how civilisations and empires break up and make room for new creations. Blood mixture, and the lowering of the racial level which accompanies it, are the one and only cause why old civilisations disappear…” 

The USA provided a large share of racial theorists of the early 20th century, whose conception of the rise and fall of civilisation was based on racial zoology, and in particular on the superiority of the Nordic not only above non-white races, but above all sub-races of the white, such as the Dinaric, Mediterranean and Alpine. Senator Theodore G. Bilbo of Mississippi wrote a book championing the cause of segregation, and more so, the “back-to-Africa” movement, stating that miscegenation with the Negro will result in the fall of white civilisation. He briefly examined some major civilisations. Bilbo wrote that Egyptian civilisation was mongrelised over centuries, “until a mulatto inherited the throne of the Pharaohs in the Twenty-fifth dynasty. This mongrel prince, Taharka, ruled over a Negroid people whose religion had fallen from an ethical test for the life after death to a form of animal worship”. This should be “sufficient warning to white America!” Because Sen. Bilbo had started from an assumption, his history was flawed. As will be shown below, it was Taharka and the Nubian dynasty that renewed Egypt’s decaying culture, which had degenerated under the white Libyan dynasties.  Sen. Bilbo proceeds with similar brief examinations of Carthage, Greece, and Rome. 

julius%20evola%20sintesi%20e%20dottrina%20della%20razza%20heopli.jpegJulius Evola, while repudiating the zoological primacy of “racism” as another form of materialism and therefore anti-Traditional, suggested that a “spiritual racism” is necessary to oppose the forces seeking to turn man into an amorphous mass; as interchangeable economic units without roots; what is now called “globalisation”. 

Evola gives the Traditionalist viewpoint when stating that there “have been many cases in which a culture has collapsed even when its race has remained pure, as is especially clear in certain groups that have suffered slow, inexorable extinction despite remaining as racially isolated as if they were islands”. He gives Sweden and The Netherlands as recent examples, pointing out that although the race has remained unchanged, there is little of the “heroic disposition” those cultures possessed just several centuries previously. He refers to other great cultures as having remained in a state as if like mummies, inwardly dead, awaiting a push “to knock them down”. These are what Spengler called Fellaheen, spiritually exhausted and historically passé. Evola gives Peru as an example of how readily a static culture succumbed to Spain. Hence, such examples, even as vigorous cultures such as that of the Dutch and Scandinavian, once wide-roaming and dynamic, have declined to nonentities despite the maintenance of racial homogeneity. 

The following considers examples that are often cited as civilisations that decayed and died as the result of miscegenation.

Greek

A case study for testing the miscegenation theory of cultural decay is that of the Hellenic. The ancient Hellenic civilisation is typically ascribed by racial theorists as being the creation of a Nordic culture-bearing stratum. The same has been said of the Latin, Egyptian, and others. Typically, this theory is illustrated by depicting sculptures of ancient Hellenes of “Nordic” appearance. Such depictions upon which to form a theory are unreliable: the ancient Hellenes were predominantly a mixture of Dinaric-Alpine-Mediterranean. The skeletal remains of Greeks show that from earliest times to the present there has been remarkable uniformity, according to studies by Sergi, Ripley, and Buxton, who regarded the Greeks as an Alpine-Mediterranean mix from a “comparatively early date.” American physical anthropologist Carlton S. Coon stated that the Greeks remain an Alpine/Mediterranean mix, with a weak Nordic element, being “remarkably similar” to their ancient ancestors.

American anthropologist J. Lawrence Angel, in the most complete study of Greek skeletal remains starting from the Neolithic era to the present, found that Greeks have always bene marked by a sustained racial continuity. Angel cited American anthropologist Buxton who had studied Greek skeletal material and measured modern Greeks, especially in Cyprus, concluding that the modern Greeks “possess physical characteristics not differing essentially from those of the former [ancient Greeks]”. The most extensive study of modern Greeks was conducted by anthropologist Aris N. Poulianos, concluding that Greeks are and have always been Mediterranean-Dinaric, with a strong Alpine presence. Angel states that “Poulianos is correct in pointing out ... that there is complete continuity genetically from ancient to modern times”. Nikolaos Xirotiris did not find any significant alteration of the Greek race from prehistory, through classical and medieval, to modern times. Anthropologist Roland Dixon studied the funeral masks of Spartans and identified them as of the Alpine sub-race. Although race theorists often stated that Hellenic civilisation was founded and maintained by invading Dorian “Nordics”, Angel states that the northern invasions were always of “Dinaroid-Alpine” type. A recent statistical comparison of ancient and modern Greek skulls found “a remarkable similarity in craniofacial morphology between modern and ancient Greeks.”

If miscegenation and the elimination of an assumed Nordic (Dorian) culture-bearing stratum cannot account for the decay of Hellenic civilisation, what can? Contemporary historians point out the origins. The Roman historian Livy observed: 

“The Macedonians who settled in Alexandria in Egypt, or in Seleucia, or in Babylonia, or in any of their other colonies scattered over the world, have degenerated into Syrians, Parthians, or Egyptians. Whatever is planted in a foreign land, by a gradual change in its nature, degenerates into that by which it is nurtured”.

tarn-2.jpgHere Livy is observing that occupiers among foreign peoples “go native”, as one might say. The occupiers are pulled downward, rather than elevating their subjects upward, not through genetic contact but through moral and cultural corruption. The Syrians, Parthians and Egyptians, had already become historically and culturally passé, or Fellaheen, as Spengler puts it. The Macedonian Greeks in those colonies succumbed to the force of etiolation. Alexander even encouraged this in an effort to meld all subjects into one Greek mass, which resulted not from a Hellenic civilisation passed along by multitudinous peoples, but in a chaotic mass from which Greece did not recover, despite the Greeks staying racially intact. Unlike the Jews in particular, the Greeks, Romans and other conquerors did not have the strength of Tradition to maintain themselves among alien cultures. Dr. W. W. Tarn stated of this process:

“Greece was ready to adopt the gods of the foreigner, but the foreigner rarely reciprocated; Greek Doura (the Greek temple in Mesopotamia) freely admitted the gods of Babylon, but no Greek god entered Babylonian Uruk. Foreign gods might take Greek names; they took little else. They (the Babylonian gods) were the stronger, and the conquest of Asia (by the Greeks) was bound to fail as soon as the East had gauged its own strength and Greek weakness.”

Spengler pointed out to Western Civilisation and the current epoch that one of the primary symptoms of culture decay is that of depopulation. It is a sign literally that a Civilisation has become too lazy to look beyond the immediate. There is no longer any sense of duty to the past or the future, but only to a hedonistic present. Polybius (b. ca. 200 B.C.) observed this phenomenon of Hellenic Civilisation like Spengler did of ours, writing: 

tarn-1.jpg“In our time all Greece was visited by a dearth of children and generally a decay of population, owing to which the cities were denuded of inhabitants, and a failure of productiveness resulted, though there were no long-continued wars or serious pestilences among us. If, then, any one had advised our sending to ask the gods in regard to this, what we were to do or say in order to become more numerous and better fill our cities,—would he not have seemed a futile person, when the cause was manifest and the cure in our own hands? For this evil grew upon us rapidly, and without attracting attention, by our men becoming perverted to a passion for show and money and the pleasures of an idle life, and accordingly either not marrying at all, or, if they did marry, refusing to rear the children that were born, or at most one or two out of a great number, for the sake of leaving them well off or bringing them up in extravagant luxury. For when there are only one or two sons, it is evident that, if war or pestilence carries off one, the houses must be left heirless: and, like swarms of bees, little by little the cities become sparsely inhabited and weak. On this subject there is no need to ask the gods how we are to be relieved from such a curse: for any one in the world will tell you that it is by the men themselves if possible changing their objects of ambition; or, if that cannot be done, by passing laws for the preservation of infants”.

Do Polybius’ thoughts sound like some unheeded doom-sayer speaking to us now about our modern world? If the reader can see the analogous features between Western Civilisation, and that of Greece and Rome then the organic course of Civilisations is being understood, and by looking at Greece and Rome we might see where we are heading.

Roman

Another often cited example of the fall of civilisation through miscegenation is that of Rome. However, despite the presence of slaves and traders of sundry races, like the Greeks, today’s Italians are substantially the same as they were in Roman times. Arab influence did not occur until Medieval times, centuries after the “fall of Rome”, with Arab rule extending over Sicily only during 1212-1226 A.D. The genetic male influence on Sicilians is estimated at only 6%. The predominant genetic influence is ancient Greek. The African have a less than  1% frequency  throughout Italy other than in , , and where there are frequencies of 2% to  3% . Sub-Saharan, that is, Negroid, mtDNA have been found at very low frequencies in Italy, albeit marginally higher than elsewhere in Europe, but date from 10,000 years ago. This study states: “….mitochondrial DNA studies show that Italy does not differ too much from other European populations”. Although there are small regional variations, “The mtDNA haplogroup make-up of Italy as observed in our samples fits well with expectations in a typical European population”. 

Hence, an infusion of Negroid or Asian genes during the epoch of Rome’s decline and fall is lacking, and the reasons for that fall cannot be assigned to miscegenation. What slight frequency there is of non-Caucasian genetic markers entered Rome long before or long after the fall of Roman Civilisation. There was no “contamination of Roman blood”, but of Roman spirit and élan.  

declinerome.jpgAlien immigration introduces cultural elements that dislocate the social and ethical basis of a Civilisation and aggravate an existing pathological condition. The English scholar Professor C. Northcote Parkinson, writing on the fall of Rome, commented that the Roman conquerors were subjected “to cultural inundation and grassroots influence”. Because Rome extended throughout the world, like the present Late Western, the economic opportunities accorded by Rome drew in all the elements of the subject peoples, “groups of mixed origin and alien ways of life”. “Even more significant was what the Romans learnt while on duty overseas, for men so influenced were of the highest rank”. Parkinson quotes Edward Gibbon’s Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, referring to the Roman colony of Antioch: 

“…Fashion was the only law, pleasure the only pursuit, and the splendour of dress and furniture was the only distinction of the citizens of Antioch. The arts of luxury were honoured, the serious and manly virtues were the subject of ridicule, and the contempt for female modesty and reverent age announced the universal corruption of the capitals of the East…” 

Roman historian Livy wrote of the opulence of Asia being brought back to Rome by the soldiery:

“…it was through the army serving in Asia that the beginnings of foreign luxury were introduced into the City. These men brought into Rome for the first time, bronze couches, costly coverlets, tapestry, and other fabrics, and - what was at that time considered gorgeous furniture - pedestal tables and silver salvers. Banquets were made more attractive by the presence of girls who played on the harp and sang and danced, and by other forms of amusement, and the banquets themselves began to be prepared with greater care and expense. The cook whom the ancients regarded and treated as the lowest menial was rising in value, and what had been a servile office came to be looked upon as a fine art. Still what met the eye in those days was hardly the germ of the luxury that was coming”.

The moral decay of Rome resulted in the displacement of Roman stock, not by miscegenation, but by the falling birth-rate of the Romans. Such population decline is itself a major symptom of culture decay. The problem that it signifies is that a people has so little consciousness left as to its own purpose as a culture that its individuals do not have any responsibility beyond their own egos. Professor Tenney Frank, foremost scholar on the economic history of Rome, also considered the results of population decline, from the top of the social hierarchy downward: 

“The race went under. The legislation of Augustus and his successors, while aiming at preserving the native stock, was of the myopic kind so usual in social lawmaking, and failing to reckon with the real nature of the problem involved. It utterly missed the mark. By combining epigraphical and literary references, a fairly full history of the noble families can be procured, and this reveals a startling inability of such families to perpetuate themselves. We know, for instance, in Caesar’s day of forty-five patricians, only one of whom is represented by posterity when Hadrian came to power. The Aemilsi, Fabii, Claudii. Manlii, Valerii, and all the rest, with the exception of Comelii, have disappeared. Augustus and Claudius raised twenty-five families to the patricate, and all but six disappear before Nerva’s reign. Of the families of nearly four hundred senators recorded in 65 A. D. under Nero, all trace of a half is lost by Nerva’s day, a generation later. And the records are so full that these statistics may be assumed to represent with a fair degree of accuracy the disappearance of the male stock of the families in question. Of course members of the aristocracy were the chief sufferers from the tyranny of the first century, but this havoc was not all wrought by delatores and assassins. The voluntary choice of childlessness accounts largely for the unparalleled condition. This is as far as the records help in this problem, which, despite the silences is probably the most important phase of the whole question of the change of race. Be the causes what they may, the rapid decrease of the old aristocracy and the native stock was clearly concomitant with a twofold increase from below; by a more normal birth-rate of the poor, and the constant manumission of slaves 

While allusions to “race” by Professor Frank are enough for “zoological materialists” to spin a whole theory about Rome’s decline and fall around miscegenation of the “white race” with blacks and Orientals, we now know from the genetics that despite the invasions over centuries, the Italians, like the Greeks, have retained their original racial composition to the present. What Frank is describing, by an examination of the records that show a disappearance of the leading patrician families, is that Rome was in a spiritual crisis, as all civilisations are when they regard child-bearing as a burden. Traditionalists such as Evola pointed out that the “secret of degeneration” of a civilisation is that it rots from the top downward, and as Spengler pointed out, one of the primary signs of that rot is childlessness. That there were Roman statesmen with the wisdom to understand what was happening is indicated by Augustus’ efforts to raise the birth-rate, but to no avail. Of this symptom of moral decay, Professor Frank wrote: 

“In the first place there was a marked decline in the birthrate among the aristocratic families. … As society grew more pleasure-loving, as convention raised artificially the standard of living, the voluntary choice of celibacy and childlessness became a common feature among the upper classes. …”

RomanEmpire_117.svg.png

Urbanisation, the magnetic pull of the megalopolis, the depopulation of the land and the proletarianism of the former peasant stock as in the case of the West’s Industrial Revolution, impacted in major ways on the fall of Rome. A. M. Duff wrote of the impact of rural depopulation and urbanisation:

“But what of the lower-class Romans of the old stock? They were practically untouched by revolution and tyranny, and the growth of luxury cannot have affected them to the same extent as it did the nobility. Yet even here the native stock declined. The decay of agriculture. … drove numbers of farmers into the towns, where, unwilling to engage in trade, they sank into unemployment and poverty, and where, in their endeavours to maintain a high standard of living, they were not able to support the cost of rearing children. Many of these free-born Latins were so poor that they often complained that the foreign slaves were much better off than they, and so they were. At the same time many were tempted to emigrate to the colonies across the sea which Julius Caesar and Augustus founded. Many went away to Romanize the provinces, while society was becoming Orientalized at home. Because slave labour had taken over almost all jobs, the free born could not compete with them. They had to sell their small farms or businesses and move to the cities. Here they were placed on the doles because of unemployment. They were, at first, encouraged to emigrate to the more prosperous areas of the empire to Gaul, North Africa and Spain. Hundreds of thousands left Italy and settled in the newly-acquired lands. Such a vast number left Italy leaving it to the Orientals that finally restrictions had to be passed to prevent the complete depopulation of the Latin stock, but as we have seen, the laws were never effectively put into force. The migrations increased and Italy was being left to another race. The free-born Italian, anxious for land to till and live upon, displayed the keenest colonization activity.” 

The foreign cultures and religions that had come to Rome from across the empire changed the temperament of the Romans masses who were uprooted and migrating to the cities; where as in the nature of the cites, as Spengler showed,  they became a cosmopolitan mass. Frank writes of this: 

“This Orientalization of Rome’s populace has a more important bearing than is usually accorded it upon the larger question of why the spirit and acts of imperial Rome are totally different from those of the republic. There was a complete change in the temperament! There is today a healthy activity in the study of the economic factors that contributed to Rome’s decline. But what lay behind and constantly reacted upon all such causes of Rome’s disintegration was, after all, to a considerable extent, the fact that the people who had built Rome had given way to a different race. The lack of energy and enterprise, the failure of foresight and common sense, the weakening of moral and political stamina, all were concomitant with the gradual diminution of the stock which, during the earlier days, had displayed these qualities. It would be wholly unfair to pass judgment upon the native qualities of the Orientals without a further study, or to accept the self-complacent slurs of the Romans, who, ignoring certain imaginative and artistic qualities, chose only to see in them unprincipled and servile egoists. We may even admit that had these new races had time to amalgamate and attain a political consciousness a more brilliant and versatile civilization might have come to birth.” 

Fall-of-the-Roman-Empire.jpgWhat is notable is not that the Romans miscegenated with Orientals, but that the uprooted, amorphous masses of the cities no longer adhered to the Traditions on which Roman civilisation was founded. The same process can be seen today at work in New York, London and Paris. Duff wrote of this, and we might consider the parallels with our own time: 

“Instead of the hardy and patriotic Roman with his proud indifference to pecuniary gain, we find too often under the Empire an idle pleasure-loving cosmopolitan whose patriotism goes no further than applying for the dole and swelling the crowds in the amphitheatre”. 

The Roman Traditional ethos of severity, austerity and disdain for softness that Emperor Julian attempted to reassert was greeted by “fashionable society” with “disgust”. Parkinson remarks that “there is just such a tendency in the London of today, as there was still earlier in Boston and New York”. These “world cities” no longer reflect a cultural nexus but an economic nexus, and hence one’s position is not based on how one or one’s family unfolds the Traditional ethos, but on whether or how one accumulates wealth. 

Indian

social_pyramid_f02.jpgIndia is the most commonly cited example of a civilisation that decayed through miscegenation, the invading Aryans imparting a High Culture on India and then forever falling into decay because of miscegenation with the low caste “blacks”, or Dravidians. However, Genetic research indicates that the higher castes have retained to the present a predominately Caucasian genetic inheritance.

“As one moves from lower to upper castes, the distance from Asians becomes progressively larger. The distance between Europeans and lower castes is larger than the distance between Europeans and upper castes, but the distance between Europeans and middle castes is smaller than the upper caste-European distance. … Among the upper castes the genetic distance between Brahmins and Europeans (0.10) is smaller than that between either the Kshatriya and Europeans (0.12) or the Vysya and Europeans (0.16). Assuming that contemporary Europeans reflect West Eurasian affinities, these data indicate that the amount of West Eurasian admixture with Indian populations may have been proportionate to caste rank.

“…As expected if the lower castes are more similar to Asians than to Europeans, and the upper castes are more similar to Europeans than to Asians, the frequencies of M and M3 haplotypes are inversely proportional to caste rank.

“…In contrast to the mtDNA distances, the Y-chromosome STR data do not demonstrate a closer affinity to Asians for each caste group. Upper castes are more similar to Europeans than to Asians, middle castes are equidistant from the two groups, and lower castes are most similar to Asians. The genetic distance between caste populations and Africans is progressively larger moving from lower to middle to upper caste groups. 

“…Results suggest that Indian Y chromosomes, particularly upper caste Y chromosomes, are more similar to European than to Asian Y chromosomes.

“…Nevertheless, each separate upper caste is more similar to Europeans than to Asians.”

Citing further studies, “…admixture with African or proto-Australoid populations” is “occasional”. 

The chaos that afflicted India seems to have been of religio-cultural type rather than racial. Despite the superficiality of dusky hues, the Indian ruling castes have retained their Caucasian identity to the present. The genetic contribution of Australoids and Africans was minor. 

Egyptian

Like India, Egypt is often cited as an example of a civilisation that was destroyed primarily by miscegenation, with Negroids. However, despite the myriad of invasions and population shifts, today’s Egyptians are still more closely related genetically to Eurasia than Africa. Migrations between Egypt, Nubia and Sudan have not been extensive enough to “homogenise the mtDNA gene pools of the Nile River Valley populations”, although Egyptians and Nubians are more closely related than Egyptians and southern Sudanese. However, significant differences remain. Even now, today’s Egyptians have primary genetic affinities with Asia, and North and Northeast Africa. The least affinity is to the populations of Sub-Sahara.  The Haplotype  M1, with a high frequency among Egyptians,  hitherto thought to be of Sub-Saharan origin,  is of Eurasian origin.  

Miscegenation with Nubian “slaves” and mercenaries seems unlikely to have caused Egypt’s decay. While a Nubian or “black” pharaoh is alluded to by racial-zoologists as a sign of Egyptian decay, the Nubian civilisation had an intimate connection with the Egyptian and was itself impressive and of early origins. 

Nubian civilisation, with palaces, temples and pyramids, flourished as far back as 7000 B.C. 223 pyramids, twice the number of Egypt, have been found along the Nile of the Nubian culture-region. The Nubian civilisation was of notably long duration surviving until the Muslim conquest of 1500 A.D. The Egyptians have viewed the Nubians either as a “conquered race or a superior enemy”. Hence, Egyptian depictions of shackled black slaves, give a widely inaccurate impression of the Nubian.  Nubians became the pharaohs of Egypt’s 25th dynasty, providing stability where previously there had been ruin caused by civil wars between warlords, ca. 700 B.C. The Nubians were the custodians of Egyptian faith and culture at a time when Egypt was decaying. They regarded the restoration of the faith of Amun as their duty. It was the Nubian dynasties (760-656 B.C.), especially the rulership of Taharqa, which revived and purified Egyptian culture and religion. It was under the “white” rule of the Libyan pharaohs of the 21st dynasty (1069-1043 B. c.) that Egypt began a sharp decline. Ptolemaic (Greek) rule (332-30 B.C.) under Ptolemy IV (222 to 205 B.C.) brought to the rich and sumptuous pharaohs’ court “lax morals and vicious lifestyle” ending in “decadence and anarchy”. Byzantine rule (395 to 640 A.D.) through Christianisation wrought destruction on the Egyptian heritage, which was succeeded by Islamic rule. Of the long vicissitudes of Egypt’s rise and fall, it was the Nubian dynasty that had restored Egyptian cultural integrity. References to Nubians on the throne of the pharaohs tell no more of the causes of Egypt’s decay than if historians several millennia hence sought to ascribe the causes of the USA’s  culture retardation to Obama’s presidency as a “black”. 

kushiteempire1.jpg

We see in Egypt as in Rome, the Moorish civilisation, India and others, the causes of culture decay and fall as being something other than miscegenation. The contemporary Westerner should look for answers beyond this if only because he can see for himself that the West’s decay has no relationship to miscegenation. The number of Americans describing themselves as “mixed race” was just under 9 million in 2010. Of the 3,988,076 live births in the USA in 2014  368,213 were non-white.  The USA did not become the global centre of culture-pestilence because of its mixed race population. What is more significant than the percentages of miscegenation, are the percentages of population decline caused by such factors as the limitation of children, and the rates of abortion. Twenty-one percent of all pregnancies in the USA are aborted. Such depopulation statics are an indication of culture pathology. 

gallery-1431027249-122315523.jpgOf Egypt’s chaos contemporary sages observed, as they did of Rome and India, a disintegration of authority, traditional religion, and the founding ethos and mythos around which a healthy culture revolves. Egypt was often subjected to invasions and to natural disasters. These served as catalysts for culture degeneration. The papyrus called The Admonitions of an Egyptian Sage, state that after invasions and what seems to have been a class war, Egypt fell apart, there was family strife, the noble families were dispossessed by the lowest castes, authority was disrespected and overthrown, lawlessness and plunder were the norm, and the nobility was attacked: “A man looks upon his son as an enemy. A man smites his brother (the son of his mother)”. Craftsmanship has become degraded: “No craftsmen work, the enemies of the land have spoilt its crafts”. There is rebellion against the Uraeus or Re. “A few lawless men have ventured to despoil the land of the kingship”. It appears that the foundations of Traditional society, god, monarch, family and land, have been caste asunder. Further, “Asiatics” have seized the land from the ancestral occupiers, and have so insinuated themselves into the Egyptian culture that one can no longer tell who is Egyptian and who is alien: “There are no Egyptians anywhere”. “Women are lacking and no children are conceived”. Evidently there is a population crisis; that perennial symptom of decay. The political and administrative structure has collapsed, with “no officers in their place”. The laws are trampled on and cast aside. “Serfs become lords of serfs”.  The writings of the scribes are destroyed. 

What is being described is not a sudden upheaval, although the allusion to natural disasters and Asiatic invasion would imply this. The breakdown of regal authority, civil authority, depopulation, laws, family bonds, religious faith, agriculture and the social structure, imply an epoch of decline into chaos. The social structure has been inversed, as though a communistic revolution had occurred. “He who possessed no property is now a man of wealth. The prince praises him. The poor of the land have become rich, and the possessor of the land has become one who has nothing. Female slaves speak as they like to their mistresses. Orders become irksome. Those who could not build a boat now possesses ships. “The possessors of robes are now in rags”. “The children of princes are cast out in the street”. 

With this inversion of hierarchy has come irreligion and the degradation of religion. The ignorant now perform their own rites to the Gods. Wrong offerings are made to the Gods.  “Right is cast aside. Wrong is inside the council-chamber. The plans of the gods are violated, their ordinances are neglected… Reverence, an end is put to it”.

Ipuwer’s admonition was not only to rid Egypt of its enemies but to return to the Traditional ethos. This meant the reinstitution of proper religious rites, and the purification of the temples. “A fighter comes forth,” Ipuwer prophesises, to “destroy the wrongs”. “Is he sleeping? Behold, his might is not seen”. The Egyptians await an avatar, the personification of the Sun God Re (which Tradition states was the first of the Pharaohs) an Arthur who sleeps but will awaken, a redeemer that is a universal symbol from the Hindu Kalki, to Jesus in the vision of John of Patmos, the Katehon of Orthodox Russia, and many others across time and place. 

Nefertiti2-Re_158267t.jpgIpuwer avers to Egypt having gone through such epochs, alluding to his saying nothing other than what others have said before his time.

The Pharaoh is castigated for allowing Egypt to fall into chaos, with his authority being undermined, and without taking corrective actions. The Pharaoh as God-king, in terms of Tradition, had not maintained his authority as the nexus between the earthly kingdom and the Divine. The Pharaoh had caused “confusion throughout the land”. Certainty of the social hierarchy, crowned by the God-king, is the basis of Traditional societies. It seems that Egypt had entered into an epoch of what a Westerner could today identify in our time as that of scepticism and secularism. Chaos follows with the undermining of Cosmos.

Nefer-rohu warned Pharaoh of similar chaos. Likewise there would be “Asiatic” invasions, natural disasters, Re withdrawing his light, and again the inversion of hierarchy: 

“The weak of arm is now the possessor of an arm. Men salute respectfully him whom formerly saluted. I show thee the undermost on top, turned about in proportion to the turning about of my belly. It is the paupers who eat the offering bread, while the servants jubilate. The Heliopolitan Nome, the birthplace of every god, will no longer be on earth”.

It is notable, again, that Nefer-rohu identifies the chaos with the breaking of the nexus with the divine, and the social order that has become “the undermost on top”. Also of interest is that Nefer-rohu refers to a redeemer, who has a Nubian mother, uniting Egypt and driving out the Asiatics, and the Libyans (the whitest of races of the region) and defeating the rebellious.  Chaos resulted not from bio-genetic-race-factors but from a falling away of the regal and religious authority. If there is a race-factor it is in regard to Nubians being the custodians of Egyptian culture in periods of Egyptian decay, analogous to the revitalising “barbarians” who wept over the decaying Roman Empire.

Islamic 

Islam had its Golden Age and rich civilisation, centred in Morocco, and extending into Spain.  It is in ruins like civilisations centuries prior.  The cultures that flourished in Morocco, both Islamic and pre-Islamic, were Berber. The Islamic civilisation they established with the founding of the Idrisid dynasty in 788 A. D. was ended by the invasion of the Fatimids from Tunisia ca. 900 A.D. Chaos ensued. Although there was a revival of High Culture during the 11th and 14th centuries, dynasties fell in the face of tribalism.  The 16th century saw a revival initiated by al-Ghalin, several decades of wars of succession after his death in 1603, and continuing decline under Saadi dynastic rule during 1627 to 1659. 

stanlane.jpgCaucasoid mtDNA sequences are at frequencies of 96% in Moroccan Berbers, 82% in Algerian Berbers and 78% in non-Berber Moroccans. The study of Esteban et al found that Moroccan Northern and Southern Berbers have only 3% to 1% Sub-Saharan mtDNA. Although difficult to define, since “Berber” is a Roman, not an indigenous term, the estimate for present day Morocco is 35% to 45% Berber, with the rest being Berber-Arab mixture. The primary point is that the Moroccan civilisation had ruling classes, whether pre-Islamic or Islamic, that remained predominantly Berber-Caucasian for most of its history, whether during its epochs of glory or of decline. Miscegenation does not account for the fall of the Moorish Civilisation. 

The High Culture of Moorish Spain (Andalusia) was brought to ruin and decay not by miscegenation between “superior” Spaniards” and “inferior” Moors but by the overthrow of the Moorish ruling caste. Friedrich Nietzsche had observed this culture denegation with the fall of Moorish Spain (Andalusia). Stanley Lane-Poole wrote of the history of decay:

“The land, deprived of the skilful irrigation of the Moors, grew impoverished and neglected; the richest and most fertile valleys languished and were deserted; most of the populous cities which had filled every district of Andalusia fell into ruinous decay; and beggars, friars, and bandits took the place of scholars, merchants, and knights. So low fell Spain when she had driven away the Moors. Such is the melancholy contrast offered by her history”.

Ibn Khaldun (1332-1406), a well-travelled sage, grappled with the same problems confronting Islamic Civilisation as those Spengler confronted in regard to The West. A celebrated scholar, political adviser, and jurist, Ibn Khaldun’s domain of influence extended over the whole Islamic world. His major theoretical work is Muqaddimah (1377), intended as a preface to his universal history, Kitabal-Ibar, where he sought to establish basic principles of history by which historians could understand events.  His theory is cyclic and morphological, based on “conditions within nations and races [which] change with the change of periods and the passage of time”. Like Evolahe was pessimistic as to what can be achieved by political action in the cycle of decline, writing that the “past resembles the future more than one drop of water another”.

Ibn Khaldun stated that history can be understood as a recurrence of similar patterns motivated by the drives of acquisition, group co-operation, and regal authority in the creation of a civilisation, followed by a cycle of decay. These primary drives become distorted and lead to the corrupting factors of luxury and domination, irresponsibility of authority and decline.

Like Spengler, in regard to the peasantry, Ibn Khaldun traces the beginning of culture to group or familial loyalty starting with the simple life of the rural - and desert – environments. The isolation and familial bonds lead to self-reliance, loyalty and leadership on the basis of mutual respect. Life is struggle, not luxury. According to Ibn Khaldun, when rulership becomes centralised and divorced from such kinship, free reign is given to luxury and ease.  Political alliances are bought and intrigued rather than being based on the initial bonds and loyalties. Corruption pervades as the requirements of luxury increase. The decadence starts from the top, among the ruling class, and extends downward until the founding ethos of the culture is discarded, or exists in name only.

timbre-citation-ibn-khaldoun_les-arabes.pngIbn Khaldun begins from the organic character of the noble family in describing the analogous nature of cultural rise and fall, caused by a falling away of the original creative ethos with each successive generation:

“The builder of the family’s glory knows what it cost him to do the work, and he keeps the qualities that created his glory and made it last. The son who comes after him had personal contact with his father and thus learned those things from him. However, he is inferior to him in this respect, inasmuch as a person who learns things through study is inferior to a person who knows them from practical application. The third generation must be content with imitation and, in particular, with reliance upon tradition. This member is inferior to him of the second generation, inasmuch as a person who relies upon tradition is inferior to a person who exercises judgment.

“The fourth generation, then, is inferior to the preceding ones in every respect. Its member has lost the qualities that preserved the edifice of its glory. He despises those qualities. He imagines that the edifice was not built through application and effort. He thinks that it was something due to his people from the very beginning by virtue of the mere fact of their descent, and not something that resulted from group effort and individual qualities. For he sees the great respect in which he is held by the people, but he does not know how that respect originated and what the reason for it was. He imagines it is due to his descent and nothing else. He keeps away from those in whose group feeling he shares, thinking that he is better than they”.

For Ibn Khaldun’s “generation” we might say with Spengler “cultural epoch”. Ibn Khaldun addresses the causes of this cultural etiolation, leading to the corrupting impact of materialism. Again, his analysis is remarkably similar to that of Spengler and the decay of the Classical civilisations:  

“When a tribe has achieved a certain measure of superiority with the help of its group feeling, it gains control over a corresponding amount of wealth and comes to share prosperity and abundance with those who have been in possession of these things. It shares in them to the degree of its power and usefulness to the ruling dynasty. If the ruling dynasty is so strong that no-one thinks of depriving it of its power or of sharing with it, the tribe in question submits to its rule and is satisfied with whatever share in the dynasty’s wealth and tax revenue it is permitted to enjoy. ... Members of the tribe are merely concerned with prosperity, gain and a life of abundance. (They are satisfied) to lead an easy, restful life in the shadow of the ruling dynasty, and to adopt royal habits in building and dress, a matter they stress and in which they take more and more pride, the more luxuries and plenty they acquire, as well as all the other things that go with luxury and plenty.

“As a result the toughness of desert life is lost. Group feeling and courage weaken. Members of the tribe revel in the well-being that God has given them. Their children and offspring grow up too proud to look after themselves or to attend to their own needs. They have disdain also for all the other things that are necessary in connection with group feeling.... Their group feeling and courage decrease in the next generations. Eventually group feeling is altogether destroyed. ... It will be swallowed up by other nations.

Ibn Khaldun refers to the “tribe” and “group feeling” where Spengler refers to nations, peoples, and races. The dominant culture becomes corrupted through its own success and its culture become static; its inward strength diminishes in proportion to its outward glamour. Hence, the Golden Age of Islam is over, as are those of Rome and Athens. New York, Paris, and London are in the analogous cultural epochs to those of Fez, Rome and Athens. The “world city” becomes the focus of a world civilisation that ends as cosmopolitan and far removed from its founding roots. Our present “world-cities’” – in particular, New York and The City of London - are the control centres of world politics, economics, and mass-culture by the fact of their also being the centres of banking. These world-cities are the prototypes for a world civilisation that continues to be called “Western”, under the leadership of the USA, a rotting centre like Fez and Rome.

The Muslim determination of what is “progress” and what is “decline” has a spiritual foundation:

“The progressiveness or backwardness of society at any given point of time is determinable in relative terms. It can be compared to other contemporary societies [like the Spenglerian method] or to its own state in the past. … for Muslim society although economic progress is not frowned upon, it is placed lower on the order of priorities as compared to other factors; e.g. the acquisition of knowledge or the provision of justice. There is also a tradition (Hadis) of the Holy Prophet that lists the symptoms of society that is in a pathological state of decline. These outward symptoms point to an underlying malaise in the society but can also provide a useful starting point for corrective actions for stopping or reversing the onset of decline”.  The high and low points of Muslim civilisation can be identified as those of a “Golden Age” or of an “Abyss”.

Comparable to the warnings of other sages, in an epoch of decline again there is an inversion of hierarchy, or more specifically here, of character, the Hadith stating that those in such a society would be corrupted, while others might resist within themselves:

“There will be soon a period of turmoil in which the one who sits will be better than one who stands and the one who stands will be better than one who walks and the one who walks will be better than one who runs. He who would watch them will be drawn by them. So he who finds a refuge or shelter against it should make it as his resort”.

Hebrew “Race”

A Traditionalist “race”, conscious of its nexus with the Divine as the basis of culture, endures regardless of contact with foreigners because of its inward strength. This allows it to accept foreigners not only without weakening the cultural organism but even strengthening it; because it accepts foreign input on its own terms. A Traditionalist “race” surviving over the course of millennia without succumbing to the cyclical laws of decay is the Jewish. They are the Traditionalist “race” par excellence. No better example can be had than this People that has maintained its nexus with its Divinity as the basis of cultural survival, whose religion is a race-founding and race-sustaining mythos. 

Phineas.jpgContrary to the beliefs of certain racial ideologues, including extreme Zionists and ultra-Orthodox Jews, this survival is not the result of bans on miscegenation. The Jewish law as embodied in the Torah, the first five books of the Old Testament, is based not on zoological race but on a race mythos. The Mosaic Law demands “race purity” in the Traditionalist sense; that of a community of belief in a heritage and a destiny. 

Bizarrely, some white racists have adopted the Torah commandments as being based on genetic purity, in their belief that whites are the true Israelites. For example the priest Phineas, at the time of Moses is held in esteem by such white supremacists because he speared an Israelite and a Midianite in the act of copulation. At this time apparently the Midianites were seducing Israel away from its God, towards Baal. A purge of Israel took place. However the chapter in its entirety makes plain this was a matter of religion, not miscegenation. The nexus between Israel and the Divine was being broken by the influence of “the daughters of Moab.” Israel’s Divinity is recorded as having threatened wrath because of “my insistence on exclusive devotion.” The Divine nexus was established for eternity with the line of Phineas because he had “not tolerated any rivalry towards his god”.  Moses himself had married the daughter of a Midianite priest, so the issue with the Midianites was clearly religious, and specifically that such foreign influences would break Israel’s nexus with the Divine that renders them a “special people”. Where marriages with Hittites, Amorites, Canaanites, et al are prohibited it is because this nexus would be subverted. However, in the same book Deuteronomy, where the Israelite war code is being established, when a city has been defeated the adult males are to be eliminated, and the women and children are to be taken to be grafted on to Israel. The commandments for this type of “scorched earth policy” were based on preventing foreigners from teaching Israel their religions. There are precise laws as to marrying a non-Israelitish captive woman, who after a month of mourning for the deaths of her family, will have the marriage consummated and thereby become part of Israel. 

Jeremiah (ca. 600 B.C.), son of the high priest Hilkiah, was one of the most significant voices against culture-decay, analogous to Ipuwer the Egyptian sage,  Titus Livius, and Cato the Censor, in Rome, and our own Spengler and Evola. He warned that Israel would prosper while the nexus with Tradition and ipso facto with the Divine was maintained; Israel would fall physically if it fell away morally from that Tradition. Jeremiah saw the destruction of the Temple of Solomon and the carrying into Babylonian captivity of Judah. As with the other Civilisations that have fallen, the first symptom had been a subversion of its founding religion. Interestingly, religious decay would be quickly proceeded by an invasion of foreigners, reminiscent of Ipuwer’s warning of Egypt’s invasion by “Asiatics”. Hence, Jeremiah warns that invasion is imminent as a punishment for Israel’s departure from the Traditional faith: “I will pronounce my judgments on my people because of their wickedness in forsaking me, in burning incense to other gods and in worshiping what their hands have made”. From their self-styled role as a Holy People, they had fallen from the oath of their forefathers, Jeremiah/YHWH admonishing: “The priests did not ask, ‘Where is the LORD?’ Those who deal with the law did not know me; the leaders rebelled against me. The prophets prophesied by Baal, following worthless idols. ‘Therefore I bring charges against you again,’ declares the LORD. ‘And I will bring charges against your children’s children’”. Jeremiah states that the priesthood has become corrupted, from whence the rot proceeds downward. “The prophets prophesy lies, the priests rule by their own authority, and my people love it this way. But what will you do in the end?” Specifically, all of Israel had become motivated by greed. The admonition was to stand at the “crossroads” as to what paths to follow, and choose “the ancient paths”. 

“From the least to the greatest, all are greedy for gain; prophets and priests alike, all practice deceit. They dress the wound of my people as though it were not serious. ‘Peace, peace,’ they say, when there is no peace. Are they ashamed of their detestable conduct? No, they have no shame at all; they do not even know how to blush. So they will fall among the fallen; they will be brought down when I punish them,” says the LORD. This is what the LORD says: “Stand at the crossroads and look; ask for the ancient paths, ask where the good way is, and walk in it, and you will find rest for your souls. But you said, ‘We will not walk in it’”.

Greed, or what we now call materialism, has been the common factor of the fall of Civilisations, referred to by sages and philosophers up to our own Spengler, Brooks Adams, and Evola. The other common factor, as we have seen, has been the corruption of religion and the priestly caste, the priests and the prophets being condemned by Jeremiah.

The perennial survival of the Israelites is based on their adherence to Tradition. Prophets such as Jeremiah are the Jews’ constant warning to stay true to their “ancient paths” or destruction will result. The Jews worldwide have had, when not a King over Israel, the focus of a coming King-Messiah, Jerusalem, the Ark of the Covenant, and the Temple of Solomon (including the plans to rebuild the Temple as another focus for the future) as their world axial points, and the Mosaic Law as a universal code of living across time and place.These axial points have formed and maintained the Jews as a metaphysical race. Whatever others might think of some of their laws and beliefs their maintenance of a Traditional nexus has allowed them to supersede the cyclic laws of decay perhaps like no other people, to overcome decline and be restored, while paradoxically being the carriers of cultural pathogens among other civilisations (Marxism, Freudianism). 

What the genetics of races shows, past and present, is that miscegenation has not been a cause for the collapse of civilisations. Perhaps dysgenics might cause such a collapse, but hitherto there seems scant evidence for it. By focusing to the point of ideological obsession and dogma on the assume causes of culture-death being that of miscegenation, the actual causes are overlooked. Perhaps civilisation, theoretically, might die through dysgenics, whether racial or otherwise, but it seems that before such a dysgenic process has ever taken place the morphological laws of organic life and death have intervened as witnessed by those such as Livy, Cato, Ibn Khaldun, and in our time Spengler, Evola and Brooks Adams.

vendredi, 01 juillet 2016

Le christianisme a dérobé le «logos» philosophique grec

delphes_tholos_sanctuaire_athena_pronaia_1281.jpg

Le christianisme a dérobé le «logos» philosophique grec

Ecrivain et enseignant

Ex: http://www.slate.fr

index.jpgRecension:

Les enfants d'Héraclite. Une brève histoire politique de la philosophie des Européens, par Gérard Mairet

Acheter ce livre

Ne s’agissant pas d’une étude nouvelle sur la philosophie d’Héraclite, il convient d’attirer l’attention du lecteur sur le titre et sous-titre complets de l’ouvrage. C’est toute la philosophie politique, appliquée à la question de l’Europe, qui y est en jeu, centrée sur une grande affaire qui regarde, justement, les Européennes et les Européens. En effet, Gérard Mairet, philosophe et professeur émérite des universités, s’attaque à la notion d’Europe chrétienne et de racines chrétiennes de l’Europe (on présuppose même toujours qu’il y en a!).

C’est l’illusion complaisante d’une «philosophie chrétienne» (de la soumission de la raison et de la nature à la foi) qui a permis la fabrication de cette légende des «racines» chrétiennes de l’Europe. Le fait de faire remonter «ce qu’on appelle Europe» aux doctrines de l’Église, c’est faire comme si les conciles avaient fondé l’Europe –d’où les racines!

La question, il est vrai, concerne non le christianisme, à l’évidence un des éléments constitutifs de la culture européenne, mais ce qu’on entend par Europe. Car, insiste Mairet, l’Europe a son origine dans le Logos et non dans la religion, mais on veut l’oublier. Cette idéologie des racines de l’Europe a son fondement dans un vol, celle du Logos philosophique (grec) par le christianisme, vol qui aboutit à de nombreux drames contemporains, et à l’injonction qui nous est encore faite par beaucoup: on ne badine pas avec les dieux!

Vaste larcin

 - Le temps grec: de Héraclite, conçu comme un héros de la pensée humaine, Mairet dit qu’il fut le premier philosophe et surtout qu’il le fut parce qu’il a posé le Logos: le discours à l’écoute de la raison des choses, le discours qui pose l’unité des opposés. Avec Héraclite, le raisonnement (logos) s’émancipe du divin et des poètes. C’est la raison qui ordonne la pensée du monde, non les récits héroïques, non les allégories poétiques. C’est là une attitude théorique radicale. D’autant plus que ce Logos est associé à la démocratie. Il passe de la nature à l’homme, c’est-à-dire à la polis. Passer à l’homme veut dire se mettre à l’écoute de l’homme dans la cité. Le Logos passe au citoyen et à la démocratie:

«En effet, si elle est bien le pouvoir du peuple, la force du grand nombre, c’est parce que la démocratie est le régime politique où la multitude prend la parole. D’où la meilleure et la plus simple définition de la démocratie; elle est le régime où la parole politique appartient au peuple, le peuple y prend la parole.»Délibérer, cela suppose une technique de l’argumentation, une capacité démonstrative visant à faire valoir la justesse de son opinion, et à refuser les dogmes.

Le corpus philosophique des Grecs est relégué sous la catégorie de doxa (opinion païenne)

photo-rabbin-daniel-farhi-héraclite.jpg- Le temps chrétien: donc le Moyen Âge, et la subtile déstructuration du Logos Grec au profit de Dieu, du Christ et de l’empereur, donc l’invention du théologicopolitique. Dès lors que le logos-raison (répétons-le: inventé par les Grecs et notamment Héraclite) passe au logos-foi, la philosophie change de figure, ou plutôt elle est disqualifiée en faveur de la «théologie du Logos». Ainsi les chrétiens ont-ils opéré un vaste larcin sur le dos d’Héraclite et de quelques autres. Désormais, le logos-foi ne tolère pas le logos-raison. Ce n’est que lorsque les philosophes s’emploieront à faire resurgir le logos-raison du fonds théologique du logos-foi, que la philosophie renaîtra au détriment de la théologie.

Voici le larcin chrétien (vers 150 de notre ère):

«Au commencement était le Verbe, et le Verbe était tourné vers Dieu, et le Verbe était Dieu.»

(Évangiles)

On sait que le mot «parole» ou le mot «Verbe» traduisent logos; dans l’original grec, logos et theos (dieu) sont sans majuscule. Grâce aux majuscules, l’énoncé «le Verbe était Dieu» induit l’idée que le texte dit autre chose que «la parole était dieu». Originairement, c’est l’auteur de l’évangile (ou plutôt de son prologue), Jean, qui opère l’identification du Logos à Jésus en faisant de celui-ci le Christ. La révolution en question consiste en effet à faire passer le logos, de la philosophie à ce qui sera quelques décennies plus tard une «religion».

Coup de génie

C’est la révolution par la fin: Jésus achève la philosophie car il l’accomplit en atteignant le but que celle-ci s’était donné (la Vérité), d’Héraclite au logos spermatikos des stoïciens. Du coup, Jésus-Christ-Logos l’achève en y mettant aussi un terme définitif. Si vous dites que le Logos est le Messie (Christos), vous sortez de la philosophie pour entrer dans la mystique et le religieux.

Tel est le tour de force –surtout le coup de génie– de Justin qui, probablement, ne pouvait pas savoir la portée de ce qu’il venait de faire! Il sous-entend que la vérité ne pouvant être qu’une, ce n’est pas dans la philosophie des Grecs qu’on la trouve. Justin se sent fondé à reléguer le corpus philosophique des Grecs sous la catégorie de doxa (opinion païenne). Lui qui cherchait la vérité, dès lors qu’il la trouve, ne peut faire autrement que d’en décréter l’avènement définitif et absolu. Définitif et absolu, c’est bien de cela qu’il s’agit car, contrairement au logos philosophique du paganisme, le logos philosophique des chrétiens n’émane pas des hommes ni des meilleurs d’entre eux, mais de Dieu même. Il y a un logos humain qui s’efface devant le Logos divin. Le montage du larcin chrétien est défini par Justin qui ouvre l’ère d’une police de la pensée. La philosophie chrétienne opère la mutation de la philosophie tout court en théologie et se met en situation de faire de celle-là la servante de celle-ci.

- L’époque moderne: elle est rendue possible par la transmission arabe de la science grecque (entre 650 et 750, les Arabes recueillent le legs scientifique et philosophique de l’Antiquité grecque qui leur est transmis notamment par les écoles d’Alexandrie, et d’Antioche). Ce retour du logos philosophique allait produire le retrait du logos chrétien. Un retrait qui ne s’est pas fait dans la bonne humeur mais dans le rapport de force, dans et par la guerre (jusqu’aux Saints-Barthélémy(s)). L’Europe se substitue à la chrétienté. On enterre le Moyen Âge. On découvre d’autres mondes (entrent en scène les Indiens et le cortège colonial)... Défilent alors La Boétie, Machiavel, Spinoza, Descartes (heureusement défendu contre les mauvais lecteurs), Hegel...

Pensée de l’altérité

Mairet poursuit alors en se demandant si nous n’avons pas gardé de la religion une forme de pensée de l’altérité dommageable. On le voit à notre rapport aux Indiens: leur extermination ou, dans le meilleur des cas, leur totale marginalisation vient de ce que les nations indiennes possèdent, par définition et par nature, l’identité américaine que sont venus chercher les Européens.

Ce qui revient exactement au raisonnement tenu sur les Indiens par les chrétiens. La preuve? Le raisonnement déployé par les chrétiens à l’égard des Indiens, et réutilisé récemment par le pape Benoît XVI: ceux qui n’adhèrent pas à la foi sont simplement en puissance d’y adhérer sans le savoir encore. À l’évidence (de la papauté), les Indiens n’ont pas été massacrés par les occidentaux, mais finalement heureusement convertis d’autant plus qu’ils attendaient le christianisme sans le savoir! Si l’âme est naturellement chrétienne, qui peut échapper au Christ?

Ne peut-on renverser le propos, en forme de reprise laïque: si les Indiens sont reconnus comme étant les Américains, alors les immigrants n’ont pas d’identité. En d’autres termes, ou bien ce sont les Indiens qui sont les Américains, ou bien les Européens ont l’espoir de devenir des Américains. Ceux-ci en quittant l’Europe cessent d’être européens et veulent être américains. C’est d’ailleurs ce que nous racontent les westerns: le western raconte l’introduction de la loi et de l’ordre dans l’étendue sauvage, par l’extermination des Indiens et de la canaille (essentiellement bandits, tueurs à gage et grands propriétaires terriens faisant régner leur loi privée) pour laisser place au fermier, cet individu moral entrepreneur, et bientôt à l’ingénieur (télégraphe, chemin de fer, etc.).

Que reste-t-il de l'Europe si elle n'est pas capable de se défaire des raisonnements qui conduisent indéfiniment à la guerre?Alors que reste-t-il de l’Europe si elle n’est pas capable de se défaire des raisonnements qui conduisent indéfiniment à la guerre?

Mairet écrit :

«Les multiples transfigurations et translations du logos n’ont heureusement pas toujours pris la tournure sinistre du génocide.»

Elles ont cependant toujours accompagné les soubresauts de l’histoire, à commencer par l’histoire de l’Europe et, par extension, celle de la planète. Si l’antienne rebattue des «racines chrétiennes de l’Europe» est à inscrire au registre mièvre de l’apologétique, il n’en reste pas moins que la pensée et les traditions chrétiennes sont évidemment constitutives de la culture européenne, comme le sont le judaïsme et l’islam, qui ne peuvent en être séparés. Or, ces piliers constitutifs de ce que nous sommes, nous autres Européens, ne seraient ni reconnaissables, ni compréhensibles en leur état sans l’élément intellectuel qui les pense, la philosophie.

mardi, 21 juin 2016

The Four Elements of National Identity in Herodotus

herodotus.jpg

The Four Elements of National Identity in Herodotus

The Western Classical notion of identity comes to us from Herodotus’ Histories, written in the 5th century B.C. It’s from Herodotus that we have the story of the 300 Spartans at Thermopylae, told in the broader context of the entire Hellenic world’s successful resistance of the Persian invasion. In order to do that, the Spartans (Dorians) and Athenians (Ionians) had to overcome their differences and join together to defend what was common to both of them as Greeks. 

In Book VIII, there is a scene in which the Athenians explain to a messenger from Sparta why the Spartans should side with the Athenians and not the Persians. (It should be remembered that both the ancient Greeks and ancient Persians were Indo-European peoples.)

“First and foremost of these is that the images and buildings of the gods have been burned and demolished, so that we are bound by necessity to exact the greatest revenge on the man who performed these deeds, rather than to make agreements with him. And second, it would not be fitting for the Athenians to prove traitors to the Greek people, with whom we are united in sharing the same kinship and language, with whom we have established shrines and conduct sacrifices to the gods together, and with whom we also share the same way of life.” (VIII:144.2)

In this passage are no less than four criteria for being a Greek, or Hellene: common religion, common blood, common language, and common customs. (One could argue that customs are almost entirely derivative of religion and blood, but we will stick to the four-part formulation in the text.) That was 2500 years ago, but in my opinion this is still the best and most comprehensive working definition of national identity. This is because one can extract it fro m this particular situation in ancient history and apply it to virtually anywhere in the world at any time.  The four elements of identity are either present or absent, to varying degrees, and a people are correspondingly either strong or weak.

The story of the Greek resistance to Persian tyranny is the story of the self-realization and self-actualization of a people. When the four elements of identity are in place, they work together synergistically to form a kind of collective body, capable of functioning as an organic whole. The Persian army was numerically much stronger than the Greek, but most of their soldiers were conscripts from conquered territories who were forced into service. They were Persians in name only.

It’s interesting to note that the Athenians tell the Spartan messenger that the most important reason for opposing the Persians is their desecration of Greek religious shrines. (It should be remembered that the Spartans were known as both the fiercest warriors of the ancient world and also the most pious, dividing their time more or less equally between military training and religious ritual. How Evolian.) The Classical notion of identity is thus supportive of the Traditionalist view of the primacy of religious faith — that “culture comes from the cult,” as Russell Kirk put it — but it also checks it by including the other criteria. Common faith alone will not suffice, even if it is ultimately the most important unifying factor of a culture.

It should also be noted that the Classical definition of identity comes to us from a time prior to the reign of Homo economicus. (Though even then, Herodotus has the Persian king Cyrus mocking the Athenians for having “a place designated in the middle of their city [the agora, marketplace] in which they gather to cheat each other.”) It is a formula for the cohesion of a people and the health of a culture. It is not necessarily a formula for dominance in the world, particularly economic dominance.

Finally, the Classical definition of identity represents an ideal, a standard. As with other standards, there are bound to be deviations and variations. Elsewhere in The Histories, Herodotus tells us that the Athenians were originally Pelasgians — pre-Indo-European inhabitants of Greece — who “learned a new language when they became Hellenes.” (I:57.3 – I:58) The dominant influence on Classical Greek culture and identity was probably Dorian, the Indo-Europeans who conquered Greece from the north. But these Pelasgians were apparently able to assimilate and “become Hellenes,” although history shows us that Athens was always culturally and spiritually different from Sparta. Still, at the time of the Greco-Persian war, the Athenians and Spartans must have had enough in common for the Athenians to cite the four elements of their common identity to the Spartan messenger.

But the further one moves from the quadripartite Classical definition of identity, the more the strength and cohesion of a people is diluted. This is so because the elements which give rise to feelings of otherness gain in power, and consequently the elements of commonality diminish. Classical identity works because it’s based on nature, both human psychological nature and larger biological nature.

Applying this model to the history of Western civilization, we can see that the peak of Western identity in terms of cohesion and strength was probably the Middle Ages. Despite the diversity of European customs and languages, Latin was the lingua franca that united the educated peoples of every European country, and Christianity was the faith of the whole continent. One could go to any church in Western Europe and partake in the same Latin mass. The racial identity of Europeans was, I think, a given — an obvious fact of nature that need not even be dwelt upon. This entire scenario stands in stark contrast to contemporary Europe and North America, where racial, linguistic, religious and cultural diversity are pushed to further and further extremes, with predictable consequences.

The coming together of the greater Hellenic world to resist the Persian invasion offers an inspiration and a model for contemporary Western people who value their identity and heritage. However, it should also be remembered that ultimately, the differences between Athens and Sparta proved greater than their commonalities, and the two city-states destroyed each other in the Peloponnesian War, a mere fifty years or so after their shared victory over the Persians.

Perhaps the unspoken fifth element of identity is a common enemy.

Source: https://martinaurelio.wordpress.com/2016/06/11/four-eleme... [2]

Article printed from Counter-Currents Publishing: http://www.counter-currents.com

URL to article: http://www.counter-currents.com/2016/06/the-four-elements-of-national-identity-in-herodotus/

URLs in this post:

[1] Image: http://www.counter-currents.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/herodotusbust.jpg

[2] https://martinaurelio.wordpress.com/2016/06/11/four-elements-of-identity/: https://martinaurelio.wordpress.com/2016/06/11/four-elements-of-identity/

mercredi, 15 juin 2016

The Ancient Greeks: Our Fashy Forefathers

GST5.jpg

The Ancient Greeks:
Our Fashy Forefathers

Nigel Rodgers
The Complete Illustrated Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece [2]
Lorenz Books, 2014

“Western civilization” is certainly not fashionable in mainstream academia these days. Nonetheless, the ancient Greek and Roman heritage remains quietly revered in the more thoughtful and earnest circles. Quite simply, virtually all of our social and political organization, to the extent these are thought out, ultimately go back to Greek forms, reflected in the invariably Greek words for them (“philosophy,” “economy,” “democracy” . . .). Those who still have that instinctive pride of being European or Western always go back to the Greeks, to find the means of being worthy of that pride.

Thus I came to the Illustrated Encyclopedia produced by Nigel Rodgers. Life is short, and lots of glossy pictures certainly do help one get the gist of something. Rodgers does not limit himself to pictures of ancient Greek art, though that of course forms the bulk. There are also photos of the sites today, to better imagine the scene, and many paintings from later epochs imagining Greek scenes, the better show Greece’s powerful influence throughout Western history. The Encyclopedia is divided into two parts: First a detailed chronological history of the Greek world, second a thematic history showing different facets of Greek life.

GST2.jpgThe ancient Greeks are more than strange beings so far as post-60s “liberal democracy” is concerned. Certainly, the Greeks had that egalitarian and individualist sensitivity that Westerners are so known for.

Many Greek cities imagined that their legendary founders had equally distributed land among all citizens. As inequality and wealth concentration gradually rose over time, advocates of redistribution would cite these founding myths. (Rising inequality and revolutionary equality seems to be a recurring cycle in human history.)

Famously, Athens and various other Greek cities were full-fledged direct democracies, a kind of regime which is otherwise astonishingly rare. This was of course limited to only full male citizens, about 10 percent of the population of this “slave state.” (Alain Soral, that eternal mauvaise langue, once noted that the closest modern state to democratic Athens was . . . the Confederate States of America.)

The Greeks were individualists too, but not in the sense that Americans are, let alone post-60s liberals. Their “kings” seem more like “chiefs,” with a highly variable personal authority, rather than absolute monarchs or oriental despots.

In all other respects, the Greeks were extremely “fash”: misogynistic, authoritarian, warring, enslaving, etc. One could say that, by the standards of the United Nations, the entire Greek adventure was one ceaseless crime against humanity.

The most proto-fascistic were of course the Spartans, that famous militaristic and communal state, often idealized, as most recently in the popular film 300. Sparta would be a model for many, cited notably by Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Adolf Hitler (who called the city-state “the first Volksstaat). Seven eighths of Sparta’s population was made of helots, subjects dominated by the Spartiate full-time warriors.

The Greeks generally were enthusiastic practitioners of racial citizenship. Leftists have occasionally (rightly) pointed to the fact that the establishment of democracy in Athens was linked to the abolition of debt. But one should also know that Pericles, the ultimate democratic politician, paired his generous social reforms with a tightening of citizenship criteria to having two Athenian parents by blood. (The joining of more “progressive” redistribution with more “exclusionary” citizenship makes sense: The more discriminating one is, the more generous one can be, having limited the risk of free-riding.)

In line with this, the Greeks practiced primitive eugenics so as to improve the race. The most systematic in this respect was Sparta, where newborns with physical defects were left in the wilderness to die. By this cruel “post-natal abortion” (one can certainly imagine more human methods), the Spartans thus made individual life absolutely secondary to the well-being of the community. This is certainly in stark contrast to the maudlin cult of victimhood and personal caprice currently fashionable across the West.

GST1.jpg

Athenian democracy was also known for the systematic exclusion of women, who seemed to have had lives almost as cloistered and private as that of pious Muslims. The stark limitations on sex (arranged marriages, the death penalty for adultery) may have also contributed to the similar Greek penchant for pederasty and bisexuality. Homosexuals were not a discrete social category (how sad for anyone to make their sexual practices the center of their identity!). Homosexual relationships, in parallel to wives, were often glorified as relations of the deepest friendship and entire regiments of male lovers were organized (e.g. the Sacred Band of Thebes [3]), with the idea that by such bonds they would fight to the death.

To this day, it is not clear if we have ever matched the intellectual and moral level of the Greeks (and I do not confuse morality with sentimentality, the recognition of apparently unpleasant truths is one of the greatest markers of genuine moral courage). Considering the education, culture (plays), and politics that a large swathe of the Greek public engaged in, their IQs must have been very high indeed.

Some argue we have yet to surpass Homer in literature or Plato in philosophy. (In my opinion, our average intellectual level is clearly much lower and our educated public probably peaked in consciousness and morality between the 1840s and 1920s. Our much superior science and technology is of no import in this respect, we’ve simply acquired more means of being foolish, something which could well end in the extinction of our dear human race.)

Homer’s influence over the Greeks was like “that of the Bible and Shakespeare combined or to Hollywood plus television today” (29). (Surely another marker of our catastrophic moral and intellectual decline. Of course, in a healthy culture, audiovisual media like cinema and television would be propagating the highest values, including the epic tales of our Greek heritage, among the masses.)

GST3.jpg

Homer glorified love of honor (philotimo) and excellence (areté), a kind of individualism wholly unlike what we have come to know. This was a kind of competitive individualism in the service of the community. They did not glorify individual irresponsibility or fleeing one’s community (which, to some extent, is the American form of individualism). If the hoplite citizen-soldiers did not fight with perfect cohesion and discipline, then the city was lost.

Dominique Venner has argued [4] that Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey should again be studied and revered as the foundational “sacred texts” of European civilization. (I don’t think the Angela Merkels and the Hillary Clintons would last very long in a society educated in “love of honor” and “excellence.”)

Plato, often in the running for the greatest philosopher of all time, was an anti-democrat, arguing for the rule of an enlightened elite in the Republic and becoming only more authoritarian in his final work, the Laws. Athenian democracy’s chaos, defeat in war with Sparta, and execution of his mentor Socrates for thoughtcrime no doubt contributed to this. Karl Popper argued Plato, the founder of Western philosophy, paved the way for modern totalitarianism, including German National Socialism.

The Greek city-states were tiny by our standards: Sparta with 50,000, Athens 250,000. One can see how, in a town like Sparta, one could through daily ritual and various practices (e.g. all men eating and training together) achieve an incredible degree of social unity. (Of course, modern technology could allow us to achieve similar results today, as indeed the fascists attempted and to some extent succeeded.) Direct democracy was similarly only possible in a medium-sized city at most.

The notion of citizenship is something that we must retain from the Greeks, a notion of mutual obligation between state and citizen, of collective responsibility rather than the selfish tyranny of ethnic and plutocratic mafias. Rodgers argues that polis may be better translated as “citizen-state” rather than “city-state.” The polis sometimes had a rather deterritorialized notion of citizenship, emigrants still being citizens and in a sense accountable to the home city. This could be particularly useful in our current, globalizing age, when technology has so eliminated cultural and economic borders, and our people are so scattered and intermingled with foreigners across the globe.

The ancient Greeks are also a good benchmark for success and failure: Of repeated rises and falls before ultimate extinction, of successful unity in throwing off the yoke of the Persian Empire (with famous battles at Thermopylae and Marathon . . .), and of fratricidal warfare in the Peloponnesian War.

The sheer brutality of the ancient world, as with the past more generally, is difficult for us cosseted moderns to really grasp. Conquered cities often (though not always) faced the extermination of their men and the enslavement of their women and children (often making way for the victors’ settlers). Alexander the Great, world-conqueror and founder of a still-born Greco-Persian empire, was ruthless, with frequent preemptive murders, hostage-taking, the razing of entire cities, the crucifixion of thousands, etc. He seems the closest the Greeks have to a universalist. (Did Diogenes’ “cosmopolitanism” extend to non-Greeks?) The Greeks thought foreigners (“barbarians”) inferior, and Aristotle argued for their enslavement.

GST4.jpg

The Greeks’ downfall is of course relevant. The epic Spartans gradually declined into nothing due to infertility and, apparently, wealth inequality and female emancipation. Alexander left only a cultural mark in Asia upon natives who wholly failed to sustain the Hellenic heritage. One Indian work of astronomy noted: “Although the Yavanas [Greeks] are barbarians, the science of astronomy originated with them, for which they should be revered like gods.”

One rare trace of the Greeks in Asia is the wondrous Greco-Buddhist statues [5] created in their wake, of serene and haunting otherworldly beauty.

The Jews make a late appearance upon the scene, when the Seleucid Hellenic king Antiochus IV made a fateful faux pas in his subject state of Judea:

Not realizing that Jews were somehow different form his other Semitic subjects, Antiochus despoiled the Temple, installed a Syrian garrison and erected a temple to Olympian Zeus on the site. This was probably just part of his general Hellenizing programme. But the furious revolt that broke out, led by Judas Maccabeus the High Priest, finally drove the Seleucids from Judea for good. (241)

No comment.

There is wisdom: “Nothing in excess,” “Know thyself.”

So all that Alt Right propaganda using uplifting imagery from Greco-Roman statues and history, and films like Gladiator and 300, and so on, is both effective and completely justified.

Article printed from Counter-Currents Publishing: http://www.counter-currents.com

URL to article: http://www.counter-currents.com/2016/06/the-ancient-greeks-our-fashy-forefathers/

URLs in this post:

[1] Image: http://www.counter-currents.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/WarriorStele.jpg

[2] The Complete Illustrated Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece: http://amzn.to/1tfxVr3

[3] Sacred Band of Thebes: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacred_Band_of_Thebes

[4] Dominique Venner has argued: http://www.theoccidentalobserver.net/2016/04/the-testament-of-a-european-patriot-a-review-of-dominique-venners-breviary-of-the-unvanquished-part-1/

[5] Greco-Buddhist statues: https://www.google.be/search?q=greco-buddhist+art&client=opera&hs=eHN&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiyte7tipvNAhWKmBoKHfcVCaAQ_AUICCgB&biw=1177&bih=639

[6] Image: http://www.counter-currents.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/IdentityEuropa.jpg

lundi, 16 mai 2016

Heraclitus, change, and flow

heraclitus.jpg

Heraclitus, change, and flow

The ancient philosopher Heraclitus of Ephesus (530-470 BC) is one of the most important thinkers in history. Heraclitus’ views on change and flow stand in stark contradition to the picture of the static universe presented by his predecessor Parmenides (5th century BCE), and fed into the work of untold philosophers from Marcus Aurelius (121 AD–180 AD) to Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900 AD).

Heraclitus’ philosophy is a good starting point for anyone concerned with change in life. Heraclitus said that life is like a river. The peaks and troughs, pits and swirls, are all are part of the ride. Do as Heraclitus would – go with the flow. Enjoy the ride, as wild as it may be.

Heraclitus was born into a wealthy family, but he renounced his fortune and went to live in the mountains. There, Heraclitus had plenty of opportunity to reflect on the natural world. He observed that nature is in a state of constant flux. ‘Cold things grow hot, the hot cools, the wet dries, the parched moistens’, Heraclitus noted. Everything is constantly shifting, changing, and becoming something other to what it was before.

Heraclitus concluded that nature is change. Like a river, nature flows ever onwards. Even the nature of the flow changes.

Heraclitus’ vision of life is clear in his epigram on the river of flux:

‘We both step and do not step in the same rivers. We are and are not’ (B49a).

One interpretation of this passage is that Heraclitus is saying we can’t step into the same river twice. This is because the river is constantly changing. If I stroll down the banks of the Danube, the water before my eyes is not the same water from moment to moment. If the river is this water (which is a debatable point – the river could be its banks, the scar it carves in the landscape, but let’s leave this aside), it follows that the Danube is not the same river from moment to moment. We step into the Danube; we step out of it again. When we step into it a second time, we step into different water and thus a different river.

Moreover, we step into and out of the river as different beings.

Most interpretations of Heraclitus’s river fragment focus on the idea of the river in a state of flux. But Heraclitus says more than this in this fragment: ‘We are and are not’.

The river changes and so do you.

We are familiar with the principle of biological generation and corruption. Heraclitus puzzled over this principle two thousand years before the birth of the modern biological sciences and drew the ultimate lesson for the human condition. As material beings, we live in a world of flux. Moreover, we are flux. As physical bodies, we are growing and dying all the time, consuming light and resources to replicate our structure, while shedding matter continuously.

Change and death are ubiquitous features of the natural world. Maybe this is what Heraclitus meant when he said, in his inimitable way:

‘Gods are mortal, humans immortal, living their death, dying their life’.

Or maybe not. With Heraclitus we can’t be sure. What we know of Heraclitus comes from his commentators (nothing survives of his original work), and so Heraclitean epigrams can seem dubious in provenance, attributable to other authors. Everything changes, and history has changed a dozen times since Heraclitus’ time; yet I believe we can still take value from Heraclitus, particularly in a time like today, which is so clearly calling out for deep institutional and infrastructural change (I am speaking to people who are looking to make deep changes in our environmental and energy systems; our political, representative and regulatory systems; in our economic system – market capitalism – which is intrinsically indebted to the kind of society we really don’t want to be, an industrial society).

I think that Heraclitus gets it right. Reality is change and flow.

jeudi, 17 mars 2016

War and the Iliad ~ Simone Weil

simone_weilforza.jpg

War and the Iliad ~ Simone Weil

THE ILIAD, or the Poem of Force

(L’Iliade, ou le poeme de la force)

Ex: https://chazzw.wordpress.com

The true hero, the true subject, the center of the “Iliad” is force.

Thus opens Simone Weil’s essay. She calls the Iliad the purest and loveliest of mirrors for the way it shows force as being always at the center of human history. Force is that x that turns those who are subjected to it into a thing. As the Iliad shows us time and time again, this force is relentless and deadly. But force not only works upon the object of itself, its victims – it works on those who posses it as well. It is pitiless to both. It crushes those who are its victims, and it intoxicates those who wield it. But in truth, no man ever really posseses it. As the Iliad clearly shows, one day you may wield force, and the next day you are the object of it.

In this poem there is not a single man who does not at one time or another have to bow his neck to force.

Weil points out that the proud hero of Homer’s poem, the warrior, is first seen weeping. Agamemnon has purposely humiliated Achilles, to show him who is master and who is slave. Ah, but later it is Agamemnon who is seen weeping. Hector is later seen challenging the whole Greek army and they know fear. When Ajax calls him out, the fear is in Hector. As quickly as that. Later in the poem its Ajax who is fearful: Zeus the father on high, makes fear rise in Ajax [Homer]. Every single man in the Iliad (Achilles excepted) tastes a moment of defeat in battle. 

Weil catches things, subtle things that show us the marvel of the Iliad. The tenet of justice being blind for instance, and its being meted out to all in the same way, without favoritism. He who lives by force shall die by force was established in the Iliad long before the Gospels recognized this truism.

Ares is just, and kills those who kill [Homer]

The weak and the strong both belong to the same species: the weak are never without some power, and the strong are never without some weakness. Achilles, of course, is Exhibit A. The powerful feel themselves indestructible, invulnerable. The fact of their power contains the seeds of weakness. Chickens, my friends, will always come home to roost. The very powerful see no possibility of their power being dimished – they feel it unlimited. But it is not. And this is where Weil gets deep into the heart of the matter. If we believe we are of the powerless then we see those who have what seems to be unlimited power as of another species, apart. And vice versa. The weak cannot possibly inherit the earth. They are …well. too weak, too different too apart, too unlike that powerful me. Dangerous thinking.

Thus it happens that those who have force on loan from fate count on it too much and are destroyed. 

But at that moment in time, this seems inconceivable, failing to realize that the power they have is not inexhaustible, not infinite. Meeting no resistance, the powerful can only feel that their destiny is total domination. This is the very point where the domineering are vulnerable to domination. The have exceeded the measure of the force that is actually at their disposal. Inevitably they exceed it since they are not aware that it is limited. And now we see them commited irretrievably to chance; suddenly things cease to obey them. Sometimes chance is kind to them, sometimes cruel. But in any case, there they are, exposed, open to misfortune; gone is the armor of power that formerly protected their naked souls; nothing, no shield, stands between them and tears.

Iliade-ou-le-poeme-de-la-force_8907.jpegOverreaching man is for Weil the main subject of Greek thought. Retribution, Nemesis. These are buried in the soul of Greek epic poetry. So starts the discussion on the nature of man. Kharma. We think we are favored by the gods. Do we stop and consider that they think they are favored by the gods. If we do, we quickly (as do they) put it out of our heads. Time and time again in the see-saw battle that Homer relates to us, we see one side (or the other) have an honorable victory almost in hand, and then want more. Overreaching again. Hector imagines people saying this about him.

Weil writes chillingly on death. We all know that we are fated to die one day. Life ends and the end of it is death. The future has a limit put on it by that fact. For the soldier, death is the future. Very similar to the way a person struggling with a surely deadly disease looks at death. It’s his future. As I struggle to deal with my brain cancer, struggle for the way to align it with the life remaining to me, I realize that my future is already defined by my death which is straight ahead. The future is death. It’s very much in my thoughts. Generally we live with a realization that we all die, as I’ve said. But the very indeterminate nature of that death, of that murky future, allows us to put it out of our minds. We go about the task of living. Terminal diseases make us think about the task of dying.

Once the experience of war makes visible the possibility of death that lies locked up in each moment, our thoughts cannot travel from one day to the next without meeting death’s face.

Weill tells us that the Iliad reveals to the reader the last secret of war. This secret is revealed in its similes. Warriors, those on the giving end of force, are turned into things. Things like fire, things like flood waters, things like heavy winds or wild beasts of the fields. But Homer has just enough examples of man’s higher aspirations, of his noble soul, to contrast with force, and give us what might be. Love, brotherhood, friendship. The seeds of these attributes, of these moments of grace, of these values in man, make the use of force by man all the more tragic and life denying.

I recall thinking as I read the Iliad that it was uncanny how many times I thought of the phrase ‘God is on our side’, so we shall prevail. The irony, or the bitter truth of this position is that the two opposing sides, if they had only one thing in common, it would be this simple belief: We are on the right side, and ‘they’ are on the wrong side.

Throughout twenty centuries of Christianity, the Romans and the Hebrews have been admired, read, imitated,  both in deed and word; their masterpieces have yielded an appropriate quotation every time anybody had a crime they wanted to justify.

Simone Weill concludes with her belief that since the Iliad only flickers of the genius of Greek epic has been seen. Quite the opposite, she laments.

Perhaps they will yet rediscover the epic genius, when they learn that there is no refuge from fate, learn not to admire force, not to hate the enemy, not to scorn the unfortunate.

Amen to that, Simone.       

mercredi, 03 février 2016

Archéologie de l'idée démocratique

Discurso_funebre_pericles.PNG

Archéologie de l'idée démocratique

Ex: http://www.leblancetlenoir.com

Le débat actuel sur la différence entre république et démocratie ne peut faire l'économie d'une réflexion sur l'origine de la démocratie, un système politique en soi surprenant, non naturel, multiforme. Qu'on le simplifie à l'extrême (pour l'étudier) à la prise d'une décision par le biais d'un accord commun, ou en fonction d'un bien général, ou encore par un affrontement ritualisé, et l'on découvre aussitôt que la décision s'inscrit dans un contexte pré-déterminé et imposant son orientation. La décision annoncée est plus dépendante de ce contexte qu'il n'y paraît. L'analyse la fait même disparaître au profit d'une substructure où se dissimulent les vraies décisions inavouées.

Comment en faire le dévoilement ? Guy-R Vincent, l'auteur de l'ouvrage intitulé Des Substitutions comme principe de la pensée - Etude de récits mythiques grecs et sanscrits – nous propose un parcours original : mythologue comparatiste, il ne consacre qu'un chapitre à cette question : chapitre IV, « Le pouvoir démocratique et ses substitutions » (p. 207-244). Il s'agit de l'extension d'une analyse portant des récits mythiques où un personnage (dieu ou humain) se fait remplacer (substitution) par un autre personnage réel (dieu ou humain) ou par un simulacre (statue, animal, …).

Le récit mythique le plus célèbre (il reste une pièce d'Euripide sur ce thème) en Europe est celui-ci : le roi Admète doit mourir mais le dieu Apollon, pour services rendus, lui a accordé qu'il pourrait se faire remplacer dans la mort, le jour venu. Admète cherche donc une personne consentante : ses meilleurs amis refusent, ses vieux parents aussi, ne reste que son épouse Alceste pour accepter. Alceste lui demande toutefois de respecter les enfants qu'ils ont eus (au cas où Admète se remarierait) et s'enfonce dans les Enfers. Admète ressent le vide laissé par cette disparition et songe à faire fabriquer un « double » d'Alceste (un artefact : statue ou poupée) quand survient Héraclès. Les lois de l'hospitalité imposent qu'Admète taise son chagrin ; il reçoit donc dignement son hôte, qui finit par découvrir le deuil de toute la maisonnée. Héraclès a honte de son comportement bruyant et descend aux Enfers chercher Alceste. Il fait croire au roi qu'il lui a trouvé une nouvelle épouse (le roi n'en veut pas) mais en soulevant le voile de cette femme, il s'aperçoit de la vérité.

Tout se termine donc bien et peut faire penser à un conte heureux. Le lecteur peut alors, pour marquer sa fascination ou son intérêt, facilement se fourvoyer vers des pistes psychologiques ou sociologiques : l'amour conjugal, la fidélité et l'hospitalité, le droit des enfants, l'égoïsme masculin, la solitude de chacun devant la mort… Mais ces solutions d'analyse ne sont jamais celles qu'envisage un mythe. Par exemple, dans ce cas précis, rien n'affirme qu'Alceste aime son époux (les mariages sont contractuels dans l'Antiquité) et ses motifs sont de cet ordre : l'obéissance est obligatoire ; sauvegarder le roi garant du monde est nécessaire ; il faut éliminer les risques d'une continuité rompue (en amont par les parents d'Admète ne voulant pas mourir à la place de leur fils et en aval par ses enfants qui pourraient être délaissés).

Le recensement d'autres mythes empruntés au monde grec et indien permet de dégager un processus très particulier auquel l'auteur donne le nom de « substitution ». Il le pense universel (d'autres aires culturelles en rendent compte ; que l'on pense à Abraham remplaçant dans un sacrifice par un bouc son fils Isaac ) et antérieur à d'autres modes constitutifs de la pensée (comme le rapprochement par similitude ou contiguïté où ceci ressemble à cela, où ceci fait suite à cela, à la base de la métaphore, du signe mathématique « égal », des premières catégories construites sur des similitudes). Ce processus se fait en deux phases : a) une première phase où un mode d'existence (figuré dans le mythe par un personnage) se confronte à un autre mode et en conçoit la menace (répartition des rôles : prédateur/proie), puis fonde un double de soi (un leurre substitutif) et détourne l'attention du potentiel menaçant, au risque de s'affaiblir ou de se faire « doubler » par son leurre ; b) une seconde phase où le substitut se détache de sa source et s'implante dans un autre contexte qu'il perturbe et modifie (transfert sur un autre plan) : soit il maintient son attache avec son origine (il permet l'action modificatrice de ce nouveau milieu), soit il se détache et s'autonomise (il permet une ouverture caractérisant un autre aspect du réel).

La substitution est ce processus complexe et créatif, processus qui engendre des perturbations nombreuses que l'on peut regrouper dans des classes de perturbation spécifiques à certains domaines (le livre en aborde d'autres, comme la peinture, le calcul, le langage...). Celui de la démocratie en est donc un parmi d'autres. Si l'on veut simplifier, on dira qu'une pièce de remplacement n'est jamais identique à celle qu'elle est censée remplacer et provoque des troubles en partie positifs. Inadéquation inventive. Pour illustration, donnons Ulysse se faisant appeler « Personne », selon un jeu de mots basé sur son nom (outis = personne /Odys = début de son nom), pour leurrer le Cyclope menaçant, et sauver ses compagnons en les faisant sortir de la grotte du Cyclope par un subterfuge (ils sont cachés sous le ventre des moutons). Scène pré-démocratique en soi : à une menace, répond un remplacement nominal (« Personne » est le délégué d'Ulysse) et la sauvegarde d'un groupe humain. Cette anecdote peut être placée sur d'autres plans : pourquoi pas celui de la lutte contre la tyrannie, mais aussi celui de la résistance des défenses immunitaires dont il faut baisser la garde en cas d'allergie ou de greffe ? Le mythe substitutif a cette vertu d'extrême plasticité.

Venons-en donc à la démocratie. Le point de vue peut paraître iconoclaste : tout est remplacement. Le député, élu du Peuple, n'est qu'un substitut, rien de plus. La sacralité de sa fonction est, elle même, fondée sur le remplacement du droit divin par un droit venu d'en bas (le Peuple souverain remplace le Ciel pour fonder la légitimité). Il n'est plus l'émanation inspirée d'une volonté collective mais une pièce rapportée dont on sait qu'elle ne peut que provoquer des perturbations. Cela explique déjà que la démocratie soit un régime agité (cf. l'excitation des périodes électorales) et que les critiques alternent entre une constatation (on tient peu compte de la volonté populaire, si bien que l'on parle de déficit démocratique) et une hésitation (prendre l'avis de tous, surtout si les membres sont incultes, pour chaque opération, est infaisable et non souhaitable ; autant réduire la représentativité). Entre hyperdémocratisme et hypodémocratisme si l'on veut. Et il est vrai que l'histoire nous montre que dans certains cas, il a été heureux que l'on ne suive pas l'avis de la majorité (du Peuple) comme dans d'autres, l'inverse fut fatal : trop de pouvoirs entre les mains de quelques représentants malveillants ou bornés ont conduit à des catastrophes. Cela renvoie alors à la notion de « hasard » avec laquelle s'ouvre l'origine de la démocratie : et si les décisions démocratiques renvoyaient au hasard ? Il suffit de si peu, parfois, pour aller dans un sens ou l'autre. On est loin d'une prise de décision posée, rationnelle, intelligente, telle que le système tient à le faire croire.

En effet, la mythologie grecque évoque des scènes de tirage au sort pour prendre une décision. Ce n'est plus la décision d'un seul (le roi des dieux, le patriarche) qui s'impose, mais on place entre ses mains un dispositif : dans l'Iliade (VII, 1-205), on met des jetons dans un casque, chacun étant donc à égalité et on retire un jeton ; ailleurs (XXII, 209-213), Zeus pèse sur une balance les destins des guerriers : le roi des dieux accepte de se voir destitué de son pouvoir d'aider l'un ou l'autre. C'est le destin qui commande. La démocratie, si elle tire son origine de ces dispositifs, doit en avoir conservé des traits que nous ne voyons plus mais toujours agissant. On se souvient que, devant l'afflux des inscriptions d'étudiants dans une université, un tirage au sort avait été proposé au grand dam des intéressés. Et pourtant n'était-il pas égalitaire ? Dispositif trop rudimentaire, même s'il demeure en fondement occulte de la démocratie.

demath267651.jpgLa démocratie s'est développée en inventant de nouveaux dispositifs plus complexes. Un parcours historique se fait alors de la Grèce, de Rome, du trust médiéval, vers la révolution industrielle, jusqu'à nos jours. Chaque fois, un dispositif de substitution est conçu dont les perturbations et les débordements sont admis pour permettre des solutions décisionnelles. C'est par la perturbation contrôlée progressivement que le système s'installe et se fait admettre. Système délicat à manier, instable, accentuant les inégalités mais permettant une permanence : on se confie paradoxalement à ce qui trouble l'ordre public, pour développer et complexifier cette organisation politique. Situation très curieuse.

Il n'y a pas tant de continuité entre Athènes, Rome, le féodalisme, etc. que des dispositifs nouveaux et orientés vers des objectifs différents. La démocratie est plurielle, elle ne sert pas les intérêts du Peuple, elle sert des projets qui préoccupent à un moment donné les hommes ou des groupes d'hommes. Au Moyen Age, au moment des croisades, les fiefs sont laissés vacants et confiés à des hommes de confiance (« trustee » agissant pour un « cestui que trust ») qui remplacent le chevalier parti au loin. L'orphelin et l'orpheline sont entre les mains du trustee qui se rémunère pour ses services, peut abuser de son pouvoir, faire en sorte que le réel propriétaire de retour ne retrouve rien de son bien (fait fréquent en politique où des remplaçants ne rendent pas le siège qu'ils devaient momentanément occuper), comme il peut préserver un patrimoine, l'augmenter, être un modèle de bonne gestion. C'est ce que narre Walter Scott dans Ivanhoé : le roi Richard-Coeur de lion a confié son royaume à son frère, le roi Jean ; tous deux des Normands ; Cédric, père d'Ivanhoé, est un saxon qui veut marier sa pupille Rowena à un descendant saxon de sang royal, au détriment de son propre fils Ivanhoé, amoureux de Rowena ; Ivanhoé se tourne alors vers Richard-Coeur de lion, lui aussi dépossédé par son frère le roi Jean. Un jeu complexe entre le tuteur (trustee), le tutorisé (cestui que trust), le propriétaire (ou constituant) est en cause, où les rôles peuvent s'échanger et se superposer. Par exemple : Cédric est à la fois le tuteur et le constituant en tant que responsable d'une pupille (à marier au mieux) et propriétaire voulant donner à un saxon l'héritage de la royauté et ainsi accroître son bien personnel par alliance. L'on a oublié que W. Scott était un homme de loi important en son temps, un juriste d'obédience libérale. La fiducie ou confiance est une superbe invention d'une grande souplesse : en déléguant le pouvoir à un ou plusieurs membres, en leur confiant un héritage à faire fructifier, en choisissant de récompenser le trustee, en surveillant les exactions ou en les favorisant, on voit combien ce système de délégation s'approche de la démocratie et possède des moyens étendus pour répondre à diverses situations (mort des bénéficiaires, accords multiples, prises de risque…). Le bien circule, n'est pas bloqué ou en jachère. Les montages actuels de sociétés-écrans sont des formes démocratiques d'une certaine manière : cascade décisionnelle, étages successifs d'intervention, camouflages qui aident à l'acceptation, commissions multiples nécessitant des spécialistes (technostructure).

On lira les pages limpides consacrées à Athènes et à Rome mais si l'on arrive au XIXème siècle, c'est pour voir s'instaurer un autre dispositif qui gauchit à nouveau le système démocratique. Pour l'auteur, il est fortement lié à l'utilisation des machines et des rouages. Il faut canaliser une énergie (celle d'une nation), la répartir et l'amplifier, à la façon dont une machine est une force productive remplaçant la force humaine. Le mythe requis est d'une lucidité quelque peu effrayante : le taureau de Phalaris. Phalaris est un tyran de la Sicile antique auquel un ingénieur nommé Périlaos (nom symptomatique : « celui qui a le peuple autour de lui ») propose un instrument de torture : on introduit dans le ventre d'un taureau en bronze des condamnés, on fait chauffer le métal par un feu en dessous, les condamnés hurlent de douleur mais leurs cris sont transformés au niveau des cornes en un air de flûte agréable. Phalaris est outré et enferme l'inventeur dans son taureau avant de le précipiter du haut d'une falaise. Les cris et gémissements du Peuple ne sont-ils pas transformés ? Parfois on les rend indistincts, on les couvre de mélodies officielles, parfois on les soulage et l'on détruit les motifs de leur existence. Or la Révolution industrielle est liée à deux machines capitales : la machine à tisser et la machine à vapeur. Ce n'est donc plus un bien hérité à partager et à augmenter qui importe, mais la matérialisation d'une force pour le bien de tous (République) ou de quelques uns (une classe sociale), ou d'une Nation à visée impérialiste. Il n'empêche que la prise de décision imite la machinerie faite de rouages dans le but de créer un dynamisme, selon des engrenages distincts. La difficulté est de déterminer un centre pour organiser tous ces rouages : ce rôle est imparti au suffrage universel qui creuse momentanément un potentiel central, lequel se déplace (on est loin d'un modèle monarchique où le roi est le centre désigné pour tous et pour toujours) au gré des pressions. On peut vouloir que chacun ressemble à chacun (effort d'égalitarisation : compenser les inégalités, équilibrer les chances d'ascension sociale), que l'ordonnancement commun descende en cascade et se répète à différents niveaux (hiérarchisation), que l'on sépare le blé de l'ivraie, selon des vitesses d'évolution différentes (catégorisation : ville/campagne ; secteur industriel/ services...), que les rôles permutent (inter-échangéabilité, mixité, parité). C'est tout ce que peut proposer le système ainsi conçu : le regroupement des énergies selon quatre principes ou rouages latents. Autant de centrages momentanés.

Or, un simple regard sur nos technologies, montre qu'au monde des machines à rouage a succédé le monde des systèmes miniaturisés où l'interconnexion se fait par des échanges électroniques incessants. Ce dernier modèle omniprésent exerce son influence sur ce que nous attendons de la démocratie actuellement : la prospérité généralisée au lieu de la mobilisation antérieure. Le système étant régi par un ancien paradigme, bien des pouvoirs prédominants échappent à un choix démocratique, ne serait-ce que le pouvoir médiatique, non élu, surveillé par le pouvoir politique et en même temps le concurrençant. L'élu (maire, député, sénateur, président…) tient moins son pouvoir des urnes que de son accès aux media. Le citoyen attend de son vote moins à consentir des efforts collectifs (ce que continue à proclamer l'impétrant politique, surtout s'il a conquis le pouvoir) qu'une interactivité rapide (des mesures aux effets immédiats, que l'on peut rapidement changer) et une sécurisation de ses échanges (déplacements et placements, contrats souples et parallèles). Autant dire combien le système démocratique fondé sur une représentation démodée où chacun (même le plus « imbécile » était réquisitionné) a besoin de s'inventer à nouveau.

Mais s'adapter à ces demandes contemporaines est certainement pernicieux, trop lié à des avantages personnels antinomiques entre eux. C'est seulement en se rapprochant d'un modèle qualitatif (l'accumulation de besoins non satisfaits produisant un « saut » correcteur, à la manière dont une lame de scie pressée à chaque bout « flambe », c'est-à-dire adopte d'inverser sa courbure, de convexe devenant concave ou l'inverse) que la démocratie peut véritablement se modifier. Des inversions (le mot est curieusement à la mode : « inversion de la courbe du chômage », inversion dans les énergies à utiliser, transition en tous genres) sont souhaitées et souhaitables, pour orienter l'Humanité vers des finalités où elle se reconnaîtra mieux. « Infinitiser » est le mot employé : terme énigmatique car il ne désigne pas, dans cette analyse, le long terme mais un horizon interne reconstruit. Que faut-il entendre par là ? L'auteur s'en tire par une pirouette mythologique : Aphrodite anime la statue de Pygmalion ; le sculpteur Pygmalion aimait sa statue de façon narcissique, elle était son bien, il ne l'aimait pas pour l'image d'une altérité. Aphrodite la lui soustrait comme telle, et la rend vivante : elle en fait une femme réelle, substitut perturbant mais novateur. Il n'est pas certain que cette transformation ait été du goût de Pygamalion. La déesse a pu vouloir le récompenser comme lui jouer un tour et le punir de se désintéresser des autres femmes qu'il ignorait. On peut y voir une allégorie de la finance actuelle fascinée par ses montages et ses bulles (statues narcissiques), et qui manque la vie réelle. Quelle déesse saura transformer ces simulacres stériles en des réalités agissantes, liées à des besoins se manifestant dans nos sociétés ? Amusant aussi de penser que le nom modifié d'une seule lettre de Pygmalion a justement pu servir à une société écran pour une campagne électorale. Puissance du mythe en nos époques.

D'autres réflexions parcourent ce livre atypique. Nous en retirons le jugement qu'il s'appuie sur des données non ressassées, sur un corpus de faits qui attendent des analyses encore à faire, ce dont l'auteur semble convaincu.

L. T.

Guy-R Vincent, Des Substitutions comme principe de la pensée - Etude de récits mythiques grecs et sanscrits L'Harmattan 2011, coll. Ouvertures philosophiques, 33 €.

jeudi, 26 novembre 2015

Réflexions sur la géopolitique et l’histoire du bassin oriental de la Méditerranée

Mediterranean_Sea_political_map.jpg

Robert Steuckers :
Réflexions sur la géopolitique et l’histoire du bassin oriental de la Méditerranée

Dérives multiples en marge de la crise grecque

La crise grecque est majoritairement perçue comme une crise économique et monétaire, détachée de tout contexte historique et géopolitique. Les technocrates et les économistes, généralement des bricoleurs sans vision ni jugeote, englués dans un présentisme infécond, n’ont nullement réfléchi à la nécessité, pour l’Europe, de se maintenir solidement dans cet espace est-méditerranéen, dont la maîtrise lui assure la paix. Sans présence forte dans cet espace, l’Europe est déforcée. Ce raisonnement historique est pourtant établi : les croisades, l’intervention aragonaise en Grèce au 14ème siècle (avec la caste guerrière des Almogavares), etc. montrent clairement que ce fut toujours une nécessité vitale d’ancrer une présence européenne dans cet archipel hellénique, menacé par les faits turc et musulman. L’absence de mémoire historique,entretenue par les tenants de nos technocraties banquières et économistes, a fait oublier cette vérité incontournable de notre histoire : la gestion désastreuse de la crise grecque le montre à l’envi.

Erdogan, Toynbee et la dynamique turque

La puissance régionale majeure dans cet espace est aujourd’hui la Turquie d’Erdogan, même si toute puissance véritable, de nos jours, est tributaire, là-bas, de la volonté américaine, dont l’instrument est la flotte qui croise dans les eaux de la Grande Bleue. Trop peu nombreux sont les décideurs européens qui comprennent les ressorts anciens de la dynamique turque dans cette région, qui donne accès à la Mer Noire, aux terres noires d’Ukraine, au Danube, au Caucase, au Nil (et donc au cœur de l’Afrique orientale), à la Mer Rouge et au commerce avec les Indes. Comprendre la géopolitique à l’œuvre depuis toujours, dans ce point névralgique du globe, même avant toute présence turque, est un impératif de lucidité politique. Nous avons derrière nous sept siècles de confrontation avec le fait turc-ottoman mais c’est plutôt dans l’histoire antique qu’il convient de découvrir comment, dans la région, le territoire en lui-même confère un pouvoir, réel ou potentiel, à qui l’occupe. C’est le byzantinologue Arnold J. Toynbee, directeur et fondateur du « Royal Institute of International Affairs » (RIIA), et par là même inspirateur de bon nombre de stratégies britanniques (puis américaines), qui a explicité de la manière la plus claire cette dynamique que pas un responsable européen à haut niveau ne devrait perdre de vue : la domination de l’antique Bithynie, petit territoire situé juste au-delà du Bosphore en terre anatolienne, permet, s’il y a impulsion adéquate, s’il y a « response » correcte au « challenge » de la territorialité bithynienne (pour reprendre le vocabulaire de Toynbee), la double maîtrise de l’Egée et de la Mer Noire. Rome devient maîtresse de ces deux espaces maritimes après s’être assurée du contrôle de la Bithynie (au prix des vertus de César, insinuaient les méchantes langues romaines…). Plus tard, cette Bithynie deviendra le territoire initial du clan d’Osman (ou Othman) qui nous lèguera le terme d’« ottoman ».

GRANTCARTE001.jpg

Une Grèce antique pontique et méditerranéenne

On parle souvent de manière figée de la civilisation grecque antique, en faisant du classicisme non dynamique à la manière des cuistres, en imaginant une Grèce limitée tantôt à l’aréopage d’Athènes tantôt au gymnase de Sparte, tantôt aux syllogismes de ses philosophes ou à la géométrie de ses mathématiciens, une Grèce comme un îlot isolé de son environnement méditerranéen et pontique. Le point névralgique de cette civilisation, bien plus complexe et bien plus riche que les petits professeurs classicistes ne l’imaginaient, était le Bosphore, clef de l’ensemble maritime Egée/Pont Euxin. Le Bosphore liait la Grèce égéenne à la Mer Noire, la Crimée et l’Ukraine, d’où lui venait son blé et, pour une bonne part, son bois et ses gardes scythes, qui assuraient la police à Athènes. La civilisation hellénique est donc un ensemble méditerranéen et pontique, mêlant divers peuples, de souches européennes et non européennes, en une synthèse vivante, où les arrière-pays balkaniques, les Thraces et les Scythes, branchés sur l’Europe du Nord finno-ougrienne via les fleuves russes, ne sont nullement absents. L’espace hellénique, la future Romania d’Orient hellénophone, l’univers byzantin possèdent donc une dimension pontique et l’archipel proprement hellénique est la pointe avancée de ce complexe balkano-pontique, situé au sud du cours du Danube. En ce sens, l’espace grec d’aujourd’hui, où s’étaient concentrées la plupart des Cités-Etats de la Grèce classique, est le prolongement de l’Europe danubienne et balkanique en direction du Levant, de l’Egypte et de l’Afrique. S’il n’est pas ce prolongement, si cet espace est coupé de son « hinterland » européen, il devient ipso facto le tremplin du Levant et, éventuellement, de l’Egypte, si d’aventure elle redevenait une puissance qui compte, comme au temps de Mehmet Ali, en direction du cœur danubien de l’Europe.

Bosporan_Kingdom_growth_map-fr.svg.png

bithynia.gifToynbee, avec sa thèse bithynienne, a démontré, lui, que si l’hellénité (romaine ou byzantine) perd la Bithynie proche du Bosphore et disposant d’une façade pontique, la puissance qui s’en empareraitpourrait aiséments’étendre dans toutes les directions : vers les Balkans et le Danube, vers la Crimée, la Mer Noire et le cours des grands fleuves russes, vers le Caucase (la Colchide), tremplin vers l’Orient perse, vers l’Egypte en longeant les côtes syrienne, libanaise, palestinienne et sinaïque, vers le Nil, artère menant droit au cœur de l’Afrique orientale, vers la Mer Rouge qui donne accès au commerce avec l’Inde et la Chine, vers la Mésopotamie et le Golfe Persique. L’aventure ottomane, depuis la base initiale des territoires bithynien et péri-bithynien d’Osman, prouve largement la pertinence de cette thèse. L’expansion ottomane a créé un verrou d’enclavement contre lequel l’Europe a buté pendant de longs siècles. La Turquie kémaliste, en rejetant l’héritage ottoman, a toutefois conservé un pouvoir régional réel et un pouvoir global potentiel en maintenant le territoire bithynien sous sa souveraineté. Même si elle n’a plus les moyens techniques, donc militaires, de reprendre l’expansion ottomane, la Turquie actuelle, post-kémaliste, garde des atouts précieux, simplement par sa position géographique qui fait d’elle, même affaiblie, une puissance régionale incontournable.

Türkei Demographie1.jpg

Une Turquie ethniquement et religieusement fragmentée derrière un unanimisme apparent

Le fait turc consiste en un nationalisme particulier greffé sur une population, certes majoritairement turque et musulmane-sunnite, mais hétérogène si l’on tient compte du fait que ces citoyens turcs ne sont pas nécessairement les descendants d’immigrants guerriers venus d’Asie centrale, berceau des peuples turcophones : beaucoup sont des Grecs ou des Arméniens convertis en surface, professant un islam édulcoré ou un laïcisme antireligieux ; d’autres sont des Kurdes indo-européens sunnites ou des Arabes sémitiques également sunnites ; d’autres encore descendent d’immigrants balkaniques islamisés ou de peuples venus de la rive septentrionale de la Mer Noire ; à ces fractures ethniques, il convient d’ajouter les clivages religieux: combien de zoroastriens en apparence sunnites ou alévites, combien de derviches à la religiosité riche et séduisante, combien de Bosniaquesslaves dont les ancêtres professaient le manichéisme bogomile, combien de chiites masqués chez les Kurdes ou les Kurdes turcisés, toutes options religieuses anciennes et bien ancrées que l’Européen moyen et les pitres politiciens, qu’il élit, sont incapables de comprendre ?


Le nationalisme turc de facture kémaliste voulait camper sur une base géographique anatolienne qu’il espérait homogénéiser et surtout laïciser, au nom d’un tropisme européen. Le nationalisme nouveau, porté par Erdogan, l’homme qui a inauguré l’ère post-kémaliste, conjugue une option géopolitique particulière, celle qui combine l’ancienne dynamique ottomane avec l’idéal du califat sunnite. Les Kurdes, jadis ennemis emblématiques du pouvoir kémaliste et militaire, sont devenus parfois, dans le discours d’Erdogan, des alliés potentiels dans la lutte planétaire amorcée par les sunnites contre le chiisme ou ses dérivés. Mais tous les Kurdes, face à l’acteur récent qu’est l’Etat islamique en Irak et en Syrie, ne se sentent pas proches de ce fondamentalisme virulent et ne souhaitent pas, face à un sunnisme militant et violent, céder des éléments d’émancipation traditionnels, légués par leurs traditions gentilices indo-européennes, par un zoroastrisme diffus se profilant derrière un sunnisme de façade et de convention, etc.

Ethnic Groups in Turkey.png

Erdogan toutefois, avec son complice l’ancien président turc Gül, avait avancé l’hypothèse d’un néo-ottomanisme affable, promettant, avec le géopolitologue avisé Davoutoglu, « zéro conflits aux frontières ». Cette géopolitique de Davoutoglu se présentait, avant les dérapages plus ou moins pro-fondamentalistes d’Erdogan et le soutien à l’Etat islamique contre les Alaouites pro-chiites du pouvoir syrien, comme une ouverture bienveillante des accès qu’offre le territoire turc, union des atouts géographiques bithynien et anatolien.

religionenturkei.png

Echec du néo-ottomanisme

L’Europe, si elle avait été souveraine et non pas gouvernée par des canules et des ignorants, aurait parfaitement pu admettre la géopolitique de Davoutoglu, comme une sorte d’interface entre le bloc européen (de préférence libéré de l’anachronisme « otanien ») et le puzzle complexe et explosif du Levant et du Moyen-Orient, que le néo-ottomanisme déclaré aurait pu apaiser et, par la même, il aurait annihilé certains projets américains de balkaniser durablement cette région en y attisant la lutte de tous contre tous, selon la théorie de Donald M. Snow (l’intensification maximale du désordre par les uncivilwars).

Cependant l’Europe, entre la parution des premiers écrits géopolitiques et néo-ottomanistes de Davoutoglu et les succès de l’Etat islamique en Syrie et en Irak, a connu un ressac supplémentaire, qui se traduit par une forme nouvelle d’enclavement : elle n’a plus aucune entrée au Levant, au Moyen-Orient ou même en Afrique du Nord, suite à l’implosion de la Libye. La disparition du contrôle des flux migratoires par l’Etat libyen fait que l’Europe se trouve assiégée comme avant le 16ème siècle : elle devient le réceptacle d’un trop-plein de population (essentiellement subsaharienne) et cesse d’être la base de départ d’un trop-plein de population vers les Nouveaux Mondes des Amériques et de l’Océanie. Elle n’est plus une civilisation qui rayonne, mais une civilisation que l’on hait et que l’on méprise (aussi parce que les représentants officiels de cette civilisation prônent les dérives du festivisme post-soixante-huitard qui révulsent Turcs, Africains et Arabo-Musulmans).

Dimensions adriatiques

Si cette civilisation battue en brèche perd tous ses atouts en Méditerranée orientale et si la Grèce devient un maillon faible dans le dispositif européen, ce déclin irrémédiable ne pourra plus prendre fin. Raison majeure, pour tous les esprits qui résistent aux dévoiements imposés, de relire l’histoire européenne à la lumière des événements qui ont jalonné l’histoire du bassin oriental de la Méditerranée, de l’Adriatique et de la République de Venise (et des autres Cités-Etats commerçantes et thalassocratiques de la péninsule italienne). L’Adriatique est la portion de la Méditerranée qui s’enfonce le plus profondément vers l’intérieur des terres et, notamment, vers les terres, non littorales, où l’allemand est parlé, langue la plus spécifiquement européenne, exprimant le plus profondément l’esprit européen. La Styrie et la Carinthie sont des provinces autrichiennes germanophones en prise sur les réalités adriatiques et donc méditerranéennes, liées territorialement à la Vénétie. L’Istrie, aujourd’hui croate, était la base navale de la marine austro-hongroise jusqu’au Traité de Versailles. L’Adriatique donne accès au bassin oriental de la Méditerranée et c’est la maîtrise ininterrompue de ses eaux qui a fait la puissance de Venise, adversaire tenace de l’Empire ottoman. Venise était présente en Méditerranée orientale, Gênes en Crimée, presqu’île branchée sur les routes de la soie, laissées ouvertes par les Tatars avant qu’ils ne se soumettent à la Sublime Porte. Cette géopolitique vénitienne, trop peu arcboutée sur une masse territoriale assez vaste et substantielle, n’est peut-être plus articulable telle quelle aujourd’hui : aucun micro-Etat, de dimension urbaine ou ne disposant pas d’une masse de plusieurs dizaines de millions d’habitants, ne pourrait fonctionner aujourd’hui de manière optimale ni restituer une géopolitique et une thalassopolitique de grande ampleur, suffisante pour sortir justement toute la civilisation européenne de l’impasse et de l’enclavement dans lesquels elle chavire de nos jours.

Repubblica_di_Venezia.png

Double atout d’une géostratégie néo-vénitienne

Le concert européen pourrait déployer unenouvelle géopolitique vénitienne, qui serait une perspective parmi bien d’autres tout aussi fécondes et potentielles, pour sortir de l’impasse actuelle ; cette géopolitique vénitienne devrait dès lors être articulée par un ensemble cohérent, animé par une vision nécessairement convergente et non plus conflictuelle. Cette vision pourrait s’avérer très utile pour une projection européenne efficace vers le bassin oriental de la Méditerranée et vers l’espace pontique. Venise, et Gênes, se projetaient vers le bassin oriental de la Méditerranée et vers la Mer Noire, au-delà du Bosphore tant que Byzance demeurait indépendante. Cette double projection donnait accès aux routes de la soie, au départ de la Crimée vers la Chine et aussi, mais plus difficilement au fil des vicissitudes qui ont affecté l’histoire du Levant, au départ d’Antioche et des ports syriens et libanais vers les routes terrestres qui passaient par la Mésopotamie et la Perse pour amener les caravanes vers l’Inde ou le Cathay.

La présence des villes marchandes italiennes à Alexandrie d’Egypte donnait aussi accès au Nil, à cette artère nilotique qui plongeait, au-delà des cataractes vers les mystères de l’Afrique subsaharienne et vers le royaume chrétien d’Ethiopie. Les constats que nous induisent à poser une observation des faits géopolitiques et géostratégiques de l’histoire vénitienne et génoise devraient tout naturellement amener un concert européen sérieux, mener par des leaders lucides, à refuser tout conflit inutile sur le territoire de l’Ukraine actuelle car ce territoire donne accès aux nouvelles routes qui mènent de l’Europe occidentale à la Chine, que celles-ci soient ferroviaires (les projets allemands, russes et chinois de développement des trains à grande vitesse et à grande capacité) ou offre le transit à un réseau d’oléoducs et de gazoducs. Aucune coupure ne devrait entraver le développement de ces voies et réseaux. De même, les territoires libanais, syriens et irakiens actuels, dans l’intérêt d’un concert européen bien conçu, devraient ne connaître que paix et harmonie, afin de restaurer dans leur plénitude les voies d’accès aux ex-empires persans, indiens et chinois. Le regard vénitien ou génois que l’on pourrait jeter sur les espaces méditerranéen oriental et pontique permettrait de générer des stratégies de désenclavement.

L’Europe est ré-enclavée !

Aujourd’hui, nous vivons une période peu glorieuse de l’histoire européenne, celle qui est marquée par son ré-enclavement, ce qui implique que l’Europe a perdu tous les atouts qu’elle avait rudement acquis depuis la reconquista ibérique, la lutte pluriséculaire contre le fait ottoman, etc. Ce ré-enclavement est le résultat de la politique du nouvel hegemon occidental, les Etats-Unis d’Amérique. Ceux-ci étaient les débiteurs de l’Europe avant 1914. Après le désastre de la première guerre mondiale, ils en deviennent les créanciers. Pour eux, il s’agit avant tout de maintenir le vieux continent en état de faiblesse perpétuelle afin qu’il ne reprenne jamais plus du poil de la bête, ne redevienne jamais leur créancier. Pour y parvenir, il faut ré-enclaver cette Europe pour que, plus jamais, elle ne puisse rayonner comme elle l’a fait depuis la découverte de l’Amérique et depuis les explorations portugaises et espagnoles du 16ème siècle. Cette stratégie qui consiste à travailler à ré-enclaver l’Europe est la principale de toutes les stratégies déployées par le nouvel hegemon d’après 1918.

versailles.pngMême s’ils ne signent pas le Traité de Versailles, les Etats-Unis tenteront, dès la moitié des années 20, de mettre l’Europe (et tout particulièrement l’Allemagne) sous tutelle via une politique de crédits. Parallèlement à cette politique financière, les Etats-Unis imposent dans les années 20 des principes wilsoniens de droit international, faussement pacifistes, visant à priver les Etats du droit à faire la guerre, surtout les Etats européens, leurs principaux rivaux, et le Japon, dont ils veulent s’emparer des nouvelles conquêtes dans le Pacifique. On peut évidemment considérer, à première vue mais à première vue seulement, que cette volonté de pacifier le monde est positive, portée par un beau projet philanthropique. L’objectif réel n’est pourtant pas de pacifier le monde, comme on le perçoit parfaitement aujourd’hui au Levant et en Mésopotamie, où les Etats-Unis, via leur golem qu’est Daech, favorisent « l’intensification maximale du désordre ». L’objectif réel est de dépouiller tout Etat, quel qu’il soit, quelle que soient ses traditions ou les idéologies qu’il prône, de sa souveraineté. Aucun Etat, fût-il assiégé et étouffé par ses voisins, fût-il placé par ses antécédents historiques dans une situation d’in-viabilité à long terme à cause d’une précédente mutilation de son territoire national, n’a plus le droit de rectifier des situations dramatiques qui condamnent sa population à la misère, à l’émigration ou au ressac démographique. Or la souveraineté, c’était, remarquait Carl Schmitt face au déploiement de ce wilsonisme pernicieux, la capacité de décider de faire la guerre ou de ne pas la faire, pour se soustraire à des situations injustes ou ingérables. Notamment, faire la guerre pour rompre un encerclement fatidique ou un enclavement qui barrait la route à la mer et au commerce maritime, était considéré comme légitime. Le meilleur exemple, à ce titre, est celui de la Bolivie enclavée au centre du continent sud-américain, suite à une guerre du 19ème siècle, où le Pérou et le Chili lui avaient coupé l’accès au Pacifique : le problème n’est toujours pas résolu malgré l’ONU. De même, l’Autriche, vaincue par Napoléon, est privée de son accès à l’Adriatique par l’instauration des « départements illyriens » ; en 1919, Clémenceau lui applique la même politique : la naissance du royaume de Yougoslavie lui ôte ses bases navales d’Istrie (Pola), enlevant par là le dernier accès des puissances centrales germaniques à la Méditerranée. L’Autriche implose, plonge dans la misère et accepte finalement l’Anschluss en 1938, dont la paternité réelle revient à Clémenceau.

Versailles et le wilsonisme bétonnent le morcellement intra-européen

Ensuite, pour l’hegemon, il faut conserver autant que possible le morcellement territorial de l’Europe. Déjà, les restrictions au droit souverain de faire la guerre gèle le tracé des frontières, souvent aberrant en Europe, devenu complètement absurde après les traités de la banlieue parisienne de 1919-1920, lesquels rendaient impossible tout regroupement impérial et, plus précisément, toute reconstitution, même pacifique, de l’ensemble danubien austro-hongrois, création toute naturelle de la raison vitale et historique. Ces traités signés dans la banlieue parisienne morcellent le territoire européen entre un bloc allemand aux nouvelles frontières militairement indéfendables, « démembrées » pour reprendre le vocabulaire de Richelieu et de Haushofer, et une Russie soviétique qui a perdu les glacis de l’Empire tsariste (Pays Baltes, Finlande, Bessarabie, Volhynie, etc.). Le double système de Versailles (de Trianon, Sèvres, Saint-Germain, etc.) et des principes wilsoniens, soi-disant pacifistes, entend bétonner définitivement le morcellement de la « Zwischeneuropa » entre l’Allemagne vaincue et l’URSS affaiblie par une guerre civile atroce.

La situation actuelle en découle : les créations des traités iniques de la banlieue parisienne, encore davantage morcelées depuis l’éclatement de l’ex-Yougoslavie et de l’ex-Tchécoslovaquie, sans oublier le démantèlement des franges ouest de la défunte Union Soviétique, permet aujourd’hui aux Etats-Unis de soutenir les revendications centrifuges tantôt de l’une petite puissance résiduaire tantôt de l’autre, flattées de recevoir, de toute la clique néoconservatrice et belliciste américaine, le titre louangeur de « Nouvelle Europe » audacieuse face à une « Vieille Europe » froussarde (centrée autour du binôme gaullien/adenauerien de la Françallemagne ou de l’Europe carolingienne), exactement comme l’Angleterre jouait certaines de ces petites puissances contre l’Allemagne et la Russie, selon les dispositifs diplomatiques de Lord Curzon, ou comme la France qui fabriquait des alliances abracadabrantes pour « prendre l’Allemagne en tenaille », obligeant le contribuable français à financer des budgets militaires pharaoniques, notamment en Pologne, principale puissance de la « Zwischeneuropa », censée remplacer, dans la stratégie française ce qu’était l’Empire ottoman contre l’Autriche des Habsbourg ou ce qu’était la Russie lors de la politique de revanche de la Troisième République, soit un « rouleau compresseur, allié de revers », selon la funeste habitude léguée par François I au 16ème siècle. La Pologne était donc ce « nouvel allié de revers », moins lourd que l’Empire ottoman ou que la Russie de Nicolas II mais suffisamment armé pour rendre plus difficile une guerre sur deux fronts.

Depuis les années 90, l’OTAN a réduit les effectifs de la Bundeswehr allemande, les a mis à égalité avec ceux de l’armée polonaise qui joue le jeu antirusse que l’Allemagne ne souhaitait plus faire depuis le début des années 80. La « Zwischeneuropa » est mobilisée pour une stratégie contraire aux intérêts généraux de l’Europe.

Des séparatismes qui arrangent l’hegemon

Dans la partie occidentale de l’Europe, des mouvements séparatistes sont médiatiquement entretenus, comme en Catalogne, par exemple, pour promouvoir des idéologies néo-libérales (face à d’anciens Etats jugés trop protectionnistes ou trop « rigides ») ou des gauchismes inconsistants, correspondant parfaitement aux stratégies déconstructivistes du festivisme ambiant, stratégies favorisées par l’hegemon, car elles permettent de consolider les effets du wilsonisme. Ce festivisme est pleinement favorisé car il se révèle l’instrument idéal pour couler les polities traditionnelles, pourtant déjà solidement battues en brèche par soixante ou septante ans de matraquage médiatique abrutissant, mais jugées encore trop « politiques » pour plaire à l’hegemon, qui, sans discontinuer, fabrique à la carte des cocktails affaiblissants, chaque fois adaptés à la dimension vernaculaire où pointent des dissensus exploitables. Cette adaptation du discours fait croire, dans une fraction importante des masses, à l’existence d’une « identité » solide et inébranlable, ce qui permet alors de diffuser un discours sournois où la population imagine qu’elle défend cette identité, parce qu’on lui fabrique toutes sortes de gadgets à coloration vernaculaire ; en réalité, derrière ce théâtre de marionnettes qui capte toutes les attentions des frivoles, on branche des provinces importantes des anciens Etats non pas sur une Europe des ethnies charnelles, ainsi que l’imaginent les naïfs, mais sur les réseaux mondiaux de dépolitisation générale que sont les dispositifs néo-libéraux et/ou festivistes, afin qu’in fine tous communient, affublé d’un T-shirt et d’un chapeau de paille catalan ou basque, flamand ou wallon, etc. dans la grande messe néo-libérale ou festiviste, sans jamais critiquer sérieusement l’inféodation à l’OTAN.

Rendre tous les Etats « a-démiques »

Ainsi, quelques pans entiers du vieil et tenace ennemi des réseaux calvinistes/puritains anglo-américains sont encore davantage balkanisés : l’ancien Empire de Charles-Quint se disloque encore pour rendre tous ses lambeaux totalement «invertébrés » (Ortega y Gasset !). Les Bretons et les Occitans, eux, ne méritent aucun appui, contrairement aux autres : s’ils réclament autonomie ou indépendance, ils commettent un péché impardonnable car ils visent la dislocation d’un Etat occidentiste, dont le fondamentalisme intrinsèque, pure fiction manipulatrice, ne se réclame pas d’un Dieu biblique comme en Amérique mais d’un athéisme éradicateur. Les Bretons ne revendiquent pas la dissolution d’une ancienne terre impériale et européenne mais d’un Etat déjà « adémique », de « a-demos », de « sans peuple » (« a » privatif + démos, peuple en grec, ce néologisme ayant été forgé par le philosophe italien Giorgio Agamben). Il faut donc les combattre et les traiter de ploucs voire de pire encore. La stratégie du morcellement permanent du territoire vise, de fait, à empêcher toute reconstitution d’une réalité impériale en Europe, héritière de l’Empire de Charles-Quint ou de la « Grande Alliance », mise en exergue par l’historien wallon Luc Hommel, spécialiste de l’histoire du fait bourguignon. La différence entre les indépendantismes anti-impériaux, néfastes, et les indépendantismes positifs parce qu’hostiles aux Etats rénégats, qui, par veulerie intrinsèque, ont apostasié l’idéal d’une civilisation européenne unifiée et combattive, ne doit pas empêcher la nécessaire valorisation de la variété européenne, selon les principes mis en exergue par le théoricien breton Yann Fouéré qui nous parlait de « lois de la variété requise ».

Des tissus de contradictions

En Flandre, il faut combattre toutes les forces, y compris celles qui se disent « identitaires », qui ne revendiquent pas un rejet absolu de l’OTAN et des alliances nous liant aux puissances anglo-saxonnes qui articulent contre l’Europe le réseau ECHELON. Ces forces pseudo-identitaires sont prêtes à tomber, par stupidité crasse, dans tous les pièges du néo-libéralisme. En Wallonie, on doit rejeter la tutelle socialiste qui, elle, a été la première à noyer la Belgique dans le magma de l’OTAN, que les adversaires de cette politique atlantiste nommaient le « Spaakistan », rappelle le Professeur Coolsaet (RUG).

En Wallonie, les forces dites « régionales » ou « régionalistes » sont en faveur d’un développement endogène et d’un projet social non libéral mais sans redéfinir clairement la position de la Wallonie dans la grande région entre Rhin et Seine. La littérature wallonne, en la personne du regretté Gaston Compère, elle, resitue ces régions romanophones de l’ancien Saint-Empire dans le cadre bourguignon et les fait participer à un projet impérial et culturel, celui de Charles le Téméraire, tout en critiquant les forces urbaines (et donc non traditionnelles de Flandre et d’Alsace) pour avoir torpillé ce projet avec la complicité de l’« Universelle Aragne », Louis XI, créateur de l’Etat coercitif moderne qui viendra à bout de la belle France des Riches Heures du Duc de Berry, de Villon, Rutebeuf et Rabelais.

Compère inverse la vulgate colportée sur les divisions de la Belgique : il fait des villes flamandes les complices de la veulerie française et des campagnes wallonnes les protagonistes d’un projet glorieux, ambitieux et prestigieux, celui du Duc de Bourgogne, mort à Nancy en 1477. Certes Compère formule là, avec un magnifique brio, une utopie que la Wallonie actuelle, plongée dans les eaux glauques de la crapulerie politique de ses dirigeants indignes, est aujourd’hui incapable d’assumer, alors que la Flandre oublie sa propre histoire au profit d’une mythologie pseudo-nationaliste reposant sur un éventail de mythes contradictoires où se télescopent surtout une revendication catholique (le peuple pieux) contre les importations jacobines de la révolution française et une identification au protestantisme du 16ème siècle, dont les iconoclastes étaient l’équivalent de l’Etat islamiste d’aujourd’hui et qui ont ruiné la statuaire médiévale flamande, saccagée lors de l’été 1566 : il est dès lors plaisant de voir quelques têtes creuses se réclamer de ces iconoclastes, au nom d’un pannéerlandisme qui n’a existé que sous d’autres signes, plus traditionnels et toujours au sein de l’ensemble impérial, tout en rabâchant inlassablement une hostilité (juste) contre les dérives de Daech, toutefois erronément assimilées à toutes les formes culturelles nées en terres islamisées : si l’on se revendique des iconoclastes calvinistes d’hier, il n’y a nulle raison de ne pas applaudir aux faits et gestes des iconoclastes musulmans d’aujourd’hui, armés et soutenus par les héritiers puritains des vandales de 1566 ; si l’on n’applaudit pas, cela signifie que l’on est bête et surtout incohérent.

Les mythes de l’Etat belge sont eux aussi contradictoires car ils mêlent idée impériale, idée de Croisade (la figure de Godefroy de Bouillon et les visions traditionnelles de Marcel Lobet, etc.), pro- et anti-hollandisme confondus dans une formidable bouillabaisse, nationalisme étroit et étriqué, étranger à l’histoire réelle des régions aujourd’hui demeurées « belges ».

En Catalogne, la revue Nihil Obstat(n°22, I/2014), publiée près de Tarragone, rappelle fort opportunément que tout catalanisme n’a pas été anti-impérial : au contraire, il a revendiqué une identité aragonaise en l’assortissant d’un discours « charnel » que l’indépendantisme festiviste qui occupe l’avant-scène aujourd’hui ne revendique certainement pas car il préfère se vautrer dans la gadoue des modes panmixistes dictées par les officines d’Outre-Atlantique ou communier dans un gauchisme démagogique qui n’apportera évidemment aucune solution à aucun des maux qui affectent la société catalane actuelle, tout comme les dérives de la NVA flamande dans le gendérisme (made in USA avec la bénédiction d’Hillary Clinton) et même dans le panmixisme si prisé dans le Paris hollandouillé ne résoudront aucun des maux qui guettent la société flamande. Cette longue digression sur les forces centrifuges, positives et négatives, qui secouent les paysages politiques européens, nous conduit à conclure que l’hegemon appuie, de toutes les façons possibles et imaginables, ce qui disloque les polities, grandes et petites, d’Europe, d’Amérique latine et d’Asie et les forces centrifuges qui importent les éléments de dissolution néolibéraux, festivistes et panmixistes qui permettent les stratégies d’ahurissement visant à transformer les peuples en « populations », à métamorphoser tous les Etats-Nations classiques, riches d’une Realpolitik potentiellement féconde, en machines cafouillantes, marquées par ce que le très pertinent philosophe italien Giorgio Agamben appelait des polities « a-démiques », soit des polities qui ont évacué le peuple qu’elles sont pourtant censées représenter et défendre.

L’attaque monétaire contre la Grèce, qui a fragilisé la devise qu’est l’euro, afin qu’elle ne puisse plus être utilisée pour remplacer le dollar hégémonique, a ébranlé la volonté d’unité continentale : on voit réapparaître tous les souverainismes anti-civilisationnels, toutes les illusions d’isolation splendide, surtout en France et en Grande-Bretagne, tous les petits nationalismes de la « Zwischeneuropa », toutes les formes de germanophobie qui dressent les périphéries contre le centre géographique du continent et nient, par effet de suite, toute unité continentale et civilisationnelle. A cette dérive centrifuge générale, s’ajoutent évidemment les néo-wilsonismes, qui ne perçoivent pas le cynisme réel qui se profile derrière cet angélisme apparent, que percevait parfaitement un Carl Schmitt : on lutte parait-il, pour la « démocratie » en Ukraine ou en Syrie, pour le compte de forces sur le terrain qui s’avèrent très peu démocratiques. Les festivismes continuent d’oblitérer les volontés et ruinent à l’avance toute reprise d’une conscience politique. Les séparatismes utiles à l’hegemon gagnent en influence. Les séparatismes qui pourrait œuvrer à ruiner les machines étatiques devenues « a-démiques » sont, eux, freiner dans leurs élans. L’Europe est un continent devenu « invertébré » comme l’Espagne que décrivait Ortega y Gasset. L’affaire grecque est le signal premier d’une phase de dissolution de grande ampleur : la Grèce fragilisée, les flots de faux réfugiés, l’implosion de l’Allemagne, centre du continent, l’absence de jugement politique et géopolitique (notamment sur le bassin oriental de la Méditerranée, sur la Mer Noire et le Levant) en sont les suites logiques.

Robert Steuckers.

Madrid, Alicante, Hendaye, Forest-Flotzenberg, août-novembre 2015.

lundi, 09 novembre 2015

Une spiritualité de la Forme

apollo.jpg

Une spiritualité de la Forme

Pourquoi l’Antiquité gréco-romaine a-t-elle toujours exercé une attraction si forte sur l’homme européen ? L’attribuer tout entière à la fascination que procure l’art antique serait superficiel, car l’art grec tire précisément son prestige du fait qu’il rend visible la nostalgie métaphysique pour un modèle tout à la fois corporel et spirituel. L’art grec, en somme, est lui-même une partie de la religiosité grecque, comme le comprirent déjà Goethe et Winckelmann, puis, à notre époque, un Schefold [archéologue allemand] et un Walter F. Otto. Mais même quand on met l’accent sur la “rationalité” de la Grèce antique — en l’opposant, le cas échéant, à “l’irrationalité” du Moyen Âge —, on ne fait qu’interpréter banalement cette rationalité, on perd de vue sa dimension la plus profonde, où la clarté devient symbole, dans le credo apollinien et olympien, d’une très haute forme de maîtrise de soi.

Dans le monde grec, c’est la préhistoire indo-européenne qui se met à parler. Le premier “verbe” articulé de la civilisation grecque est la religion olympienne. Toutes les obscures luttes préhistoriques du principe diurne contre le principe nocturne, du principe paternel contre le principe maternel, s’y donnent à voir, mais sous une forme qui atteste la victoire de la claire lumière du jour. Apollon a déjà tué Python, Thésée est déjà venu à bout du Minotaure et, sur la colline sacrée d’Arès, Oreste a été acquitté de la faute d’avoir tué “la mère”. Il s’agit là d’une “sagesse poétique”, pour reprendre l’expression de Vico, où s’exprime une conscience nouvelle, une conscience qui fit dire à Plutarque : « Rien sans Thésée. »

Les Olympiens

Un jour nouveau se lève sur les cimes boisées du plus ancien paysage européen, répandant une clarté aurorale identique à la lumière de l’Olympe chantée par Homère :

« À ces mots, l’Athéna aux yeux pers disparut, regardant cet Olympe où l’on dit que les dieux, loin de toute secousse, ont leur siège éternel : ni les vents ne le battent, ni les pluies ne l’inondent ; là-haut, jamais de neige ; mais en tout temps l’éther, déployé sans nuages, couronne le sommet d’une blanche clarté […] ». [Odyssée, chant VI, trad. V. Bérard].

Le jour olympien est le jour de l’Ordre. Zeus incarne avec la spontanéité la plus puissante et la plus digne qui soit l’idée de l’ordre comme autorité. C’est une idée qui, à travers le Deus-pater (Iuppiter) romain, répand sa lumière bien au-delà des débuts du monde antique. Il suffit pour s’en convaincre de comparer la figure de Dieu le Père dans sa version la plus humble et patriarcale du paysan chrétien avec la notion, autrement abstraite et tyrannique, de Yahvé.

Apollon, lui, incarne un autre aspect de l’Ordre : l’Ordre comme lumière intellectuelle et formation artistique, mais aussi comme transparence solaire qui est santé et purification. Il se peut que le nom d’Apollon ne soit pas d’origine indo-européenne, même si la chose n’est pas établie, car l’illyrien Aplo, Aplus (cf. le vieil islandais afl, “force”), va à l’encontre de cette hypothèse, d’autant plus qu’Apollon est le dieu dorien par excellence et que la migration dorienne et la migration illyrienne ne font qu’un. Mais surtout, quand on traite d’histoire des religions, il ne faut jamais oublier que c’est le contenu qui importe, non le contenant.

artemisjm010.jpg

L’Artémis dorienne, représentée comme une jeune fille dure, sportive et nordique, n’est pas l’Artémis d’Éphèse aux cent mamelles. Sous un nom préexistant prend forme une figure religieuse profondément nordique et indo-européenne, qui exprime sa nature farouche, athlétique et septentrionale. Une même désignation recouvre donc deux “expériences” religieuses bien différentes. De même, Marie — entendue comme la “Grande Mère”, par ex. dans le cas de la Madone de Pompéi — est différente de la Vierge Marie de Bernard de Clairvaux et du catholicisme gothique. Ce n’est pas seulement la différence existant entre la jeune fille blonde des miniatures gothiques et la “Mère de Dieu” des terres du Sud. C’est la même diversité de vision que celle qui sépare l’Artémis d’Éphèse de l’Artémis Orthia spartiate apparue avec la migration dorienne.

Comme toujours, l’essence de la conception religieuse réside dans la spécificité de sa vision du divin. Une vision non pas subjective ou, mieux, une vision subjective en tant que l’absolu, en se manifestant, se particularise et se fait image pour le sujet. Apollon et Artémis, le Christ et la Vierge sont avant tout des “visions”, des présences saisies par l’intuition intellectuelle, là où “les dieux”, degrés se manifestant à partir de l’Être, sont vraiment. Goethe écrivait à Jacobi : « Tu parles de foi, moi, j’attache beaucoup d’importance à la contemplation » (Du sprichst von Glaube, ich halte viel auf Schauen).

Dans les divinités olympiennes, l’âme nordique de la race blanche a contemplé sa plus pure profondeur métaphysique. L’eusébeia, la vénération éclairée par la sagesse du jugement ; l’aidos, la retenue pudique face au divin ; la sophrosyné, la vertu faite d’équilibre et d’intrépidité : telles sont les attitudes à travers lesquelles la religion olympienne s’exprime comme un phénomène typiquement européen. Et le panthéon olympien est le miroir de cette mesure. De manière significative, même ses composantes féminines tendent à participer des valeurs viriles : comme Héra, en tant que symbole du coniugium, comme Artémis, en raison de sa juvénilité réservée et sportive, comme Athéna, la déesse de l’intelligence aguerrie et de la réflexion audacieuse, sortie tout armée de la tête de Zeus. C’est pourquoi Walter F. Otto a pu parler de la religion grecque comme de l’« idée religieuse de l’esprit européen » :

« Dans le culte des anciens Grecs se manifeste l’une des plus hautes idées religieuses de l’humanité. Disons-le : l’idée religieuse de l’esprit européen. Elle est très différente des idées religieuses des autres cultures, surtout de celles qui, pour notre histoire et notre philosophie des religions, passent pour fournir le modèle de toute religion. Mais elle est essentiellement apparentée à toutes les formes de la pensée et des créations authentiquement grecques, et recueillie dans le même esprit qu’elles. Parmi les autres œuvres éternelles des Grecs, elle se dresse, majeure et impérissable, devant l’humanité. […] Les figures dans lesquelles ce monde s’est divinement ouvert aux Grecs n’attestent-elles pas leur vérité par la vie qui est encore la leur aujourd’hui, par la permanence où nous pouvons encore les rencontrer, pourvu que nous nous arrachions aux emprises de la mesquinerie et que nous recouvrions un regard libre ? Zeus, Apollon, Athéna, Artémis, Dionysos, Aphrodite… là où l’on rend hommage aux idées de l’esprit grec, il n’est jamais permis d’oublier que c’en est le sommet et, d’une certaine manière, la substance même. Ces figures demeureront tant que l’esprit européen, qui a trouvé en elles son objectivation la plus riche, ne succombera pas totalement à l’esprit de l’Orient ou à celui du calcul pragmatique » [Les Dieux de la Grèce, Payot, 1981, p. 31]

Tempel-Hera-II-voor.jpg

Le monde grec

De même que le monde olympien est toujours resté vivant pour l’Européen cultivé, ainsi la civilisation grecque est demeurée exemplaire pour la civilisation européenne. Il importe cependant de comprendre correctement le sens de cette exemplarité. Si celle-ci devait valoir comme synonyme de scientificité, au sens banalement laïque du terme, alors il faudrait rappeler que l’attitude éminemment rationnelle de l’esprit hellénique n’a jamais été séparée de la foi dans le mythe comme archétype d’une raison plus haute. La rationalité de ce qui est naturel est étudiée et admirée précisément parce qu’elle renvoie à un équilibre supérieur. Chez Aristote, on trouve encore, au début de son traité de zoologie, cette citation d’Héraclite : « Entrez, ici aussi habitent les dieux » Quant à Goethe, il dira que « le beau est un phénomène originel » (Das Schöne ist ein Urphanomen). Mais c’est surtout Platon qui nous communique le sens le plus authentique de la “scientificité” de la pensée grecque, lorsqu’il compare la rationalité d’ici-bas (la “chose”) à la rationalité de là-haut (“l’idée”) et mesure la réalité empirique avec le mètre d’une réalité éternelle. Il est celui qui dans le mythe de la caverne (République, VII, 514-517) illustre la logique ultime de la connaissance : par-delà les ombres projetées par le feu, il y a la réalité supérieure de la lumière solaire. En effet, l’Être, qui est le fond obligatoire de la spéculation hellénique, est aussi ce qui l’empêche de tomber dans l’intellectualisme.

Cette myopie caractéristique qui a confondu le rationalisme des Grecs avec le rationalisme des modernes a également créé l’équivoque d’un hellénisme “adorateur du corps”. Ici aussi, la gymnastique et l’athlétisme grecs ont été saisis avec superficialité. En fait, les Grecs ont exalté l’éducation du corps comme une partie de l’éducation de l’esprit. C’est le sens hellénique de la forme qui exige que le corps également reçoive une discipline formatrice. Le kosmos est l’infiniment grand et l’infiniment petit, l’ordre de l’univers et celui du corps humain. L’instance ultime du monde des corps et de la société est l’Ordre, tout comme l’instance ultime de la connaissance est l’Être.

Mais il va de soi que l’aveuglement principal est celui qui concerne le caractère prétendument “démocratique” de l’esprit grec. Si l’on excepte une brève période de l’histoire d’Athènes, la liberté des cités grecques a toujours été la liberté pour les meilleurs. Les partis aristocratiques et les partis démocratiques ne se séparaient que sur le nombre, plus ou moins grand, de ces “meilleurs”. Mais la masse et les esclaves restèrent toujours en dehors de l’organisation politique de la cité. C’est pourquoi toute la civilisation grecque resplendit encore de cet idéal de la sélection — l’ekloghé — qui a exercé une si grande fascination sur les élites de l’Occident. Julius Evola a résumé comme suit les valeurs exprimées par la Grèce antique à son apogée :

« […] le culte apollinien, la conception de l’univers comme kosmos, c’est-à-dire comme une unité, comme un tout harmonieusement ordonné […] l’importance conférée à tout ce qui est limite, nombre, proportion et forme, l’éthique de l’unification harmonieuse des différentes puissances de l’âme, un style empreint d’une dignité calme et mesurée, le principe de l’eurythmie, l’appréciation du corps et la culture du corps […] la méthode expérimentale dans les applications scientifiques en tant qu’amour de la clarté par opposition aux nébulosités pseudo-métaphysiques et mystiques, la valeur accordée aussi à la beauté plastique, la conception aristocratique et dorienne du gouvernement politique et l’idée hiérarchique affirmée dans la conception de la vraie connaissance » [I Versi d’oro pitagorei, Atanor, Rome, 1959, p. 30].

Ce sont des valeurs qui suffisent à attribuer à l’expérience grecque une place de premier plan dans le cadre d’une tradition européenne.

* * *

La Question d’une tradition européenne, Akribeia, 2014. Tr. fr.: Philippe Baillet.

lundi, 24 août 2015

Iliad Book 23 - Read by Dr. Stanley Lombardo

The Iliad Book 23 (62-107)

Read by Dr. Stanley Lombardo

A reading of Iliad Book 23, Lines 62-107 in Greek, by Dr. Stanley Lombardo, University of Kansas. Achilles is visited in a dream by the dead Patroclus. This is a particularly beautiful reading by Dr. Lombardo of a beautiful and emotional passage. To read along in Greek: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/t...

Dr. Lombardo's translation of this passage:

When sleep finally took him, unknotting his heart
And enveloping his shining limbs—so fatigued
From chasing Hector to windy Ilion—
Patroclus' sad spirit came, with his same form
And with his beautiful eyes and his voice
And wearing the same clothes. He stood
Above Achilles' head, and said to him:
"You're asleep and have forgotten me, Achilles.
You never neglected me when I was alive,
But now, when I am dead! Bury me quickly
So I may pass through Hades' gates.
For the spirits keep me at a distance, the phantoms
Of men outworn, and will not yet allow me
To join them beyond the river. I wander
Aimlessly through Hades' wide-doored house.
And give me your hand, for never again
Will I come back from Hades, once you burn me
In my share of fire. Never more in life
Shall we sit apart from our companions and talk.
The fate I was born to has swallowed me,
And it is your destiny, though you are like the gods,
Achilles, to die beneath the wall of Troy.
And one more thing, Achilles. Do not lay my bones
Apart from yours, but let them be together,
Just as we were reared together in your house
After Menoetius brought me, still a boy,
From Opoeis to your land because I had killed
Amphidamas' son on that day we played dice
And I foolishly became angry. I didn't mean to,
Peleus took me into his house then and reared me
With kindness, and he named me your comrade.
So let one coffer enfold the bones of us both,
The two-handled gold one your mother gave you."
And Achilles answered him, saying:
"Why have you come to me here, dear heart,
With all these instructions? I promise you
I will do everything just as you ask.
But come closer. Let us give in to grief,
However briefly, in each other's arms."
Saying this, Achilles reached out with his hands
But could not touch him. His spirit vanished like smoke,
Gone under the earth, with a last, shrill cry.
Awestruck, Achilles leapt up, clapping
His palms together, and said lamenting:
"Ah, so there is something in Death's house,
A phantom spirit, although not in a body.
All night long poor Patroclus' spirit
Stood over me, weeping and wailing,
And giving me detailed instructions
About everything. He looked so like himself."
(Full book: http://www.amazon.com/Iliad-Homer/dp/...)

samedi, 16 mai 2015

Maintenir et transmettre l’esprit de la culture antique

zeus.jpg

L'ANTIQUITÉ ET LES MONOTHÉISMES
 
Maintenir et transmettre l’esprit de la culture antique

Danièle Sallenave, académicienne*
Ex: http://metamag.fr
Il est un argument décisif en faveur des langues et cultures de l’antiquité auquel nos gouvernants auraient du penser avant de proposer des programmes qui voient leur effacement progressif.

Il paraît même étonnant qu’on n’y ait pas songé, alors que, dans le même temps, on se dit préoccupé par le retour de la religion et des affrontements religieux ! On a en effet décidé, pour se prémunir contre leur violence, de mettre en place un enseignement du « fait religieux », portant sur l’origine commune et l’histoire des trois monothéismes. Donc, naturellement, de l’Islam.

Mais alors il faudrait, impérativement, dresser en face de ce bloc monothéiste, l’édifice considérable du monde antique. Non que celui-ci ait ignoré la dimension religieuse, mais dans l’univers polythéiste des Grecs et des Romains, la religion ne se présente pas comme une vérité unique, garantie par sa source divine, ni comme un dogme. Les religions antiques sont constituées de représentations à la fois cosmologiques, sociales et politiques, bien éloignées de ce que nous appelons aujourd’hui du nom de religion. Et bien moins promptes à s’imposer par la force : ce qui est réprimé chez les Chrétiens, c’est moins leur croyance que leur refus public d'adhérer à la cité et à son culte.

Mais ce n’est pas seulement les religions antiques dont il faudrait réveiller l’étude et la connaissance, et la relative tolérance qui les marque : c’est le monde de pensée, d’art, de philosophie, dont les Grecs et les Romains furent porteurs pendant plus d’un millénaire. En un mot : cet humanisme, qui trouve ses fondements dès le Vème siècle avant notre ère avec la formule du penseur grec Protagoras, « l’homme est la mesure de toutes choses ». Inventions, audaces inouïes de l’Antiquité ! Jusque dans la confrontation avec l’esprit des religions : pour la première fois dans l’histoire de la pensée, avec le De natura rerum, Lucrèce pose les bases d’une philosophie matérialiste qui s’en prend à tous les « crimes » que les religions ont pu dicter.

La conversion d’un empereur romain, Constantin, fera du christianisme une religion d’état à valeur universelle. À partir de ce moment, le monde antique recule, ses dieux refoulés ne sont plus que les personnages de mythes inoffensifs. La pensée antique est destituée, elle perd tout fondement légitime, et se voit progressivement remplacée par une pensée, une morale, une culture issues de la christianisation. Comme l’avait déjà dit au IIème siècle un père de l’église, Tertullien, qui jugeait dangereuse la lecture de Platon : « Quand nous croyons, disait-il, nous ne voulons rien croire au-delà. Nous croyons même qu’il n’y a plus rien à croire ». Son apologétique de nouveau converti est une vigoureuse attaque de toutes les formes de la philosophie antique, à laquelle il refuse même ce nom.

D’où la forme que prend, à la fin du Moyen Age, le grand mouvement qui va marquer toute l’Europe, et qu’on a nommé à juste titre Renaissance. Ce sont en effet des années où « l’humanité renaissait » écrit Anatole France dans son Rabelais (1928). Et cet élan vers l’avenir s’appuie, paradoxalement, sur un retour, le retour à l’Antiquité, c’est-à-dire au monde d’avant la Bible. Les auteurs de la Renaissance retrouvent l’inspiration de Protagoras. C’est Marcile Ficin écrivant que « Le pouvoir humain est presque égal à la nature divine ». Érasme : « On ne naît pas homme, on le devient », et confiant le soin de cet avènement de l’homme dans l’homme à la pratique des antiquités grecques et romaines. Rabelais, pratiquant un évangélisme hostile à tout dogmatisme, demande aux lettres érudites et à la science de former « cet autre monde, l’homme ». Montaigne, enfin, pourtant profondément, chrétien, prend pour modèle de sagesse humaine non pas le Christ, qu’il ne cite jamais, mais Socrate.

Socrate fut condamné à boire la cigüe et les espérances de la Renaissance sombrèrent finalement dans l’atrocité des guerres de religion : cela ne retire rien à leur leçon. Maintenir et transmettre l’esprit de la culture antique, c’est garder ouvertes les voies d’un humanisme réfractaire à tout dogmatisme. C’est maintenir une vision plurielle de l’histoire, c’est refuser de se soumettre au monopole d’une vérité unique, porté par un livre unique, et imposée au monde avec l’invention du monothéisme.

vendredi, 24 avril 2015

Jean Soler rend son sourire à Homère

jsolerob_48df05_img-0585-1-1.JPG

Bernard Revel:

Photo Bernard Revel

« Le Sourire d’Homère » de Jean Soler, Editions de Fallois, 236 pages, 18 euros.

jean-soler-couv.jpgAuteur d’ouvrages éclairants sur les origines du Dieu unique, le Roussillonnais Jean Soler avait consacré dans « La violence monothéiste » un chapitre au « modèle grec », véritable livre dans le livre et magistrale synthèse qu’il met en parallèle avec son exploration du « modèle hébraïque ». On devine sans peine sa préférence pour une civilisation que deux vers de Pindare résument admirablement : « N’aspire pas, chère âme, à la vie immortelle, mais épuise le champ du possible ». Aussi n’est-il pas étonnant qu’après avoir consacré tant d’années à démonter sans les œillères de la foi les « vérités » de la Bible, il se soit à nouveau tourné avec plaisir vers sa chère Grèce antique dont il enseigna jadis la langue injustement délaissée aujourd’hui. Avec une évidente jubilation, il s’est lancé dans la relecture des œuvres d’Homère qui, il y a 2.900 ans « ont inauguré la littérature occidentale ». Jean Soler a le rare talent de dépoussiérer les textes anciens pour en tirer la signification profonde. Si la Bible n’est pas sortie grandie de l’exercice, il n’en est pas de même de l’Iliade et l’Odyssée, ces deux épopées bien connues mais peu lues, auxquelles son livre donne une résonance actuelle qui rend tout son sens au mot de Charles Péguy : « Homère est nouveau ce matin ».

D’une œuvre comptant 28.000 vers, Jean Soler extrait une douzaine de thèmes qui illustrent la pensée grecque. Son point de départ est le bouclier d’Achille sur lequel le dieu forgeron Héphaïstos a ciselé des tableaux qui sont une représentation complète de l’univers grec. Un univers circonscrit dans la voûte céleste et le fleuve mythique Océanos. « La pensée grecque est une pensée des limites », relève Jean Soler. « L’aspiration à l’infini n’est pas grecque ». Dans les illustrations du bouclier apparaissent les valeurs essentielles de la Grèce : la démocratie en germe dans l’agora, le théâtre dans le chœur, le goût du travail dans des scènes montrant des ouvriers, des paysans, des artisans. Dans la Bible, au contraire, le travail est un châtiment infligé par le Créateur. Voilà qui ne viendrait pas à l’esprit des dieux grecs puisqu’ils travaillent eux aussi. Ils habitent l’Olympe situé dans le monde terrestre. Ils sont immortels mais ils ont les qualités et les défauts des humains. « Le monde réel des hommes prime sur le monde imaginaire des dieux », affirme Jean Soler constatant qu’Homère ne prend pas ceux-ci au sérieux. Ils ne sont qu’une divinisation, « plus poétique que religieuse », de phénomènes naturels. « Un dieu qui possède sur la terre une île où il élève du bétail : nous sommes là plus près d’un conte pour enfant que d’une doctrine religieuse. Et nous restons de grands enfants, comme le public d’Homère, quand nous aimons entendre des contes pareils ».

Les Grecs pourraient goûter sans souci le bonheur de vivre en Méditerranée s’il n’y avait la guerre. Elle est au cœur de l’Iliade. Homère montre les hommes tels qu’ils sont, cruels, violents, sanguinaires. Ceux qui l’écoutent sont avides de récits de batailles, de combats, et la guerre de Troie qui dure dix ans en fournit à profusion. Les scènes réalistes d’Homère évoquent pour Jean Soler « les désastres de la guerre » peints pas Goya. « Il n’y a pas de belle mort, de mort glorieuse dans l’Iliade », note-t-il. Ni Achille ni Ulysse ne rêvent de mourir en héros. Ils rêvent d’une vieillesse heureuse dans leur chère patrie. « Il ne faudrait pas me forcer beaucoup pour me faire dire, dans le langage d’aujourd’hui, qu’Homère est un auteur antimilitariste », commente-t-il malicieusement.

Car rien ne vaut le plaisir de la vie. C’est pourquoi les Grecs ont fait « le choix de la clairvoyance ». Et notamment vis-à-vis des dieux qui, bien que partout chez Homère, n’existent que dans l’imaginaire. Donc, pas de lois tombées du ciel (commandements, interdits sexuels ou alimentaires, paradis perdu, peuple élu, etc.). Mais cela n’empêche pas d’aimer le bien et le beau. Jean Soler met en avant, dans les œuvres homériques, les liens du sang et de la patrie, l’importance de la parole, du jeu, l’amitié, le sens de l’honneur, l’hospitalité. Et surtout, cela n’empêche pas d’être curieux, de vouloir comprendre. Les Grecs sont de grands penseurs, des découvreurs, des inventeurs, cherchant toujours, comme le préconisait Pindare, à épuiser le champ du possible. Aucun dieu ne leur a interdit l’arbre de la connaissance. Ce qui caractérise Homère et qu’exprime ce « sourire » dont l’éclaire Jean Soler, c’est « l’amour de la vie ». Il est donc urgent de le lire et de le relire en dépit de ses traducteurs français qui ont trop tendance à rendre pompeux son style « simple et naturel ». Jean Soler trouve le procédé inadmissible : « Quand Homère écrit bateau, pourquoi traduire par nef ? Pourquoi dire, au lieu d’épée, glaive ? au lieu de bronze, airain ? au lieu d’eau, onde ? au lieu de maison, manoir. Au lieu d’entendre ouïr ? etc. » Avis aux futurs traducteurs. En attendant, suivons la prescription du bon docteur Soler. Contre le fanatisme et l’extrémisme, pour l’amour de la vie et de l’intelligence, il nous souffle la recette : « Faire des cures d’Homère ».

Bernard Revel

mardi, 24 mars 2015

L'art du vin grec

dio4364771.jpg

L'ART DU VIN GREC: Quand il a conquis les Celtes

François Savatier*
Ex: http://metamag.fr
 
Les objets découverts dans l'extraordinaire tombe princière celte de Lavau nous renseignent sur la façon dont les Celtes ont commencé à boire du vin : à la grecque !

Qui eût cru cela encore possible ? La « tombe à char » celte fouillée par  Bastien Dubuis et son équipe de l’INRAP à Lavau, près de Troyes, s'avère d'une importance comparable à celle de la princesse de Vix ! Située à deux kilomètres de la Seine, la chambre mortuaire de 14 mètres carrés a déjà livré un char à deux roues, deux céramiques, un poignard et son fourreau ainsi que de très nombreuses traces de bois et de tissus. Toutefois, c’est l’extraordinaire service à boire qui lui confère son rang de découverte exceptionnelle et invite les archéologues à penser qu’elle date du début du Ve siècle avant notre ère.


La pièce maîtresse du dépôt funéraire est un chaudron en bronze de près d'un mètre de diamètre, ce qui rappelle la tombe de Vix, où se trouvait un énorme cratère en bronze. Le bord du chaudron est décoré par huit têtes de félins, tandis que ses quatre anses circulaires sont ornées de têtes d’Acheloos, l’esprit-dieu du fleuve grec Achéloos. Au centre du chaudron se trouve une ciste, c'est-à-dire un contenant à objets sacrés qui est l’un des éléments bien connus du culte de Dionysos, le dieu du vin et… de ses excès. La ciste de Lavau a la forme d'un seau cylindrique en bronze. Un vase de bronze – un contenant à liquide selon Bastien Dubuis – se trouve aujourd'hui dans cette ciste, mais la stratigraphie (l'ordre des strates archéologiques) indique qu'il se trouvait à l'origine dans, ou sur le chaudron. Finalement, une œnoché (œnochoe), c'est-à-dire une cruche utilisée dans le rite dionysiaque pour puiser le vin, se trouve au fond du chaudron, accompagnée d'une passoire en argent destinée filtrer le liquide.

 
L’intérêt intrinsèque du chaudron et des objets qu'il contient est dépassé par celui de la seule œnochoé. Une œnochoe, littéralement, une « puiseuse à vin », est une cruche à panse large, à une seule anse et à bec verseur trilobé. Généralement en céramique, les œnochoés peuvent aussi être en métal, et être décorées ou non. La décoration de celle de Lavau met en scène Dionysos couché sous une vigne (une grappe de raisin est visible, ainsi que ce qui semble être du lierre) et parlant à une femme. Pour Dominique Garcia, président de l'INRAP, cette femme pourrait être Ariane, une mortelle censée avoir épousé Dionysos. Pour Bastien Dubuis, en revanche, ce pourrait être Déméter, la déesse grecque de l'agriculture et des moissons, souvent représentée avec Dionysos sur les œnochoés. Les deux personnages sont représentés par des figures noires sur fond rouge, un type de céramique produit dans la région d’Athènes jusqu'à la moitié du Ve siècle avant notre ère.

Pour Dominique Garcia, il est vraisemblable que l’œnochoé de Lavau a été importé de Grèce en Italie, où un habile artisan a recouvert le bord verseur et le pied d’une couche d’or agrémentée de filigranes. Cet artisan se serait employé à «customiser» un objet de luxe fréquent, peut-être même produit en série, pour s'adapter aux goûts celtes. En faisant travailler cet artisan spécialisé, le marchand méditerranéen qui a vendu ou offert le service à boire de Lavau à un prince celte aura ainsi cherché à s'adapter aux goûts exotiques des Celtes, un peu comme les marques de luxe françaises adaptent aujourd'hui des produits bien français aux goûts orientaux ou asiatiques…

Pour Bastien Dubuis, cette hypothèse, qui correspond à ce que l'on sait de la circulation des biens de luxe entre les peuples antiques, est séduisante, mais les princes celtes, grands amateurs de joaillerie, ont aussi pu faire appel sur place un artisan étrusque ou ibère. Peut-être cet artisan a-t-il est-il aussi l'auteur du magnifique torque (collier en forme d'anneau) décoré de chevaux ailés et d'une sorte de filigrane retrouvé dans la tombe de la princesse de Vix ? La tombe de Vix et celle de Lavau sont en effet très proches dans le temps et l'espace, et les relations entre ces deux tombes devront être étudiées en détail.

Quoi qu’il en soit, au début du Ve siècle avant notre ère, c'est-à-dire de la fin du Hallsttatt ou premier Âge du fer (de 800 à 450 avant notre ère), un prince celte (Lavau) et une princesse celte (Vix) se sont fait enterrer avec un service à boire destiné à célébrer les rites grecs de l'orgie dionysiaque. Or selon les indices archéologiques, l'élite celte ne connaissait pas le vin avant sa rencontre avec les marchands méditerranéens. Le fait qu'elle semble avoir repris à son compte le rite dionysiaque suggère qu'elle était en voie d'acculturation en reprenant les usages grecs. À moins que les élites celtes aient possédé depuis longtemps leur propre version des célébrations orgiaques grecques, de sorte que sous l'impulsion de marchands héllénisés, la mode du luxe grec se serait imposée aux élites celtes à la fin du Hallstatt. Une seule chose est sûre, tranche Dominique Garcia, cet œnochoe ornementé d’or et de filigranes est unique au monde. Le kitsch du luxe, c'est sûr, est très ancien.

Pour en savoir plus :

Michael Dietler, L'art du vin chez les Gaulois, Dossier Pour la Science N°61, octobre-décembre 2008.
François Savatier, Le trésor du Keltenblock, actualité Pour la Science, en ligne le 4 avril 2012.
Stéphane Verger, La Dame de Vix : une défunte à personnalité multiple, dans J. Guilaine (dir.), Sépultures et sociétés. Du Néolithique à l’Histoire, Paris 2009, p. 285-309.

00:05 Publié dans archéologie | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0) | Tags : archéologie, gaule, grèce antique, oenologie, vin, vin gaulois | |  del.icio.us | | Digg! Digg |  Facebook

dimanche, 22 février 2015

Hellenismo

Rivista Hellenismo Trentesimo numero

 

Trentesimo numero della rivista online ‘Hellenismo’

Link documento pdf

Indice

Dalle scorse Lenaia ad Anthesterion …
Tre scritti sulla Giustizia: Dike, Nomos e Dikaiosyne
Hermes: cenni teologici e culto
Romano Ritu: Libagioni, I parte – Torte dolci e salate
Per un latino vivo e parlato – I parte
Il Dramma Sacro del mito di Horus dal Tempio di Behdet
Il regno di Baal. Alcune considerazione sui Ba’alin fenici nell’Africa punica

Appendice PDF
Proclo,Commento al Timeo

Appendice Iconografica
Per il mese dei Misteri Minori…

 

Calendario Religioso

Anthesterion

 

cal

Principali celebrazioni del mese

– II Δευτέρα Ἱσταμένου
Sacrificio a Dioniso (Erchia)

– III Τρίτη Ἱσταμένου
Incontro dei Thiasotai di Bendis a Salamina

– XI Ἑνδεκάτη
Anthesteria- Pithoigia, ‘apertura delle botti’

–  XII Δωδεκάτη
Anthesteria- Khoes, ‘boccali’
Sacrificio a Dioniso (Torico)

– XIII Τρίτη Μεσοῦντος
Anthesteria- Khytroi, ‘pentole'; Aiora/Aletis

– Dal XX Εἰκὰς a XXVI Πέμπτη Φθίνοντος
En Agrais Mysteria

– XXIII Ὀγδόη Φθίνοντος
Diasia

*** LINK DOCUMENTO ONLINE PDF ***

Ex: http://hellenismo.wordpress.com

00:05 Publié dans Revue | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0) | Tags : revue, hellénisme, antiquité grecque, grèce antique | |  del.icio.us | | Digg! Digg |  Facebook

vendredi, 26 décembre 2014

Le meilleur régime: une querelle millénaire

 

Parlement-europeen-930-620_scalewidth_630.jpg

Le meilleur régime: une querelle millénaire

Proposer ou imposer un chef à sa Nation ne se fait jamais sans conséquences. Mais alors, quel système politique doit-on mettre en œuvre pour assurer la pérennité de ce (nouveau) Régime ? Et quel est le plus préférable ?

Dans son « Enquête » au sein du livre 3, Hérodote rapporte un dialogue entre trois « mages » au lendemain de la mort du roi de Perse, Smerdis, pour trouver quel serait le meilleur régime afin de gouverner le territoire. En réalité, ces « mages » ou encore appelés « servants » selon les textes, représentent les trois principaux régimes politiques.

  • Otanes, faisant l’apogée de la démocratie, commence par attaquer la monarchie par ces mots : « Je crois que l’on ne doit plus désormais confier l’administration de l’État à un seul homme, le gouvernement monarchique n’étant ni agréable ni bon ». En réalité, Otanes s’insurge sur le fait que ce « monarque » n’agirait qu’à sa guise, selon l’impulsion donnée par son caractère capricieux, tout lui étant alors permis. Otanes préconise un gouvernement choisi par le peuple ce qui régirait le « principe d’isonomie ». Ce principe consiste en une soumission à une même loi pour tous. L’isonomie est concrétisée sur l’égalité des droits civiques avec l’idée de partage effectif du pouvoir.
  • Mégabyse, favorable au système aristocratique, témoigne de son accord avec Otanes sur les dérives de la monarchie, régime tyrannique selon lui. Mais la démocratie ne vaut pas mieux en y regardant de plus près ! Mégabyse dira même que le système démocratique est bien pire que son opposant monarchique pour la simple et bonne raison que le tyran monarque sait ce qu’il fait, alors que la masse populaire ne le sait pas ! Pour lui, seul un gouvernement composé des hommes de savoir et d’éducation, peut se maintenir ! « Pour nous, faisons le choix des hommes les plus vertueux ; mettons-leur la puissance entre les mains : nous serons nous-même de ce nombre ; et, suivant toutes les apparences, des hommes sages et éclairés et ne donneront que d’excellents conseils ».
  • Darius quant à lui se positionne pour la monarchie. Prenant la parole en dernier, et ayant soigneusement écouté ses comparses, il critique immédiatement Otanes et Mégabyse : Pour lui, le meilleur gouvernement ne peut être autre que celui du meilleur homme seul ! « Il est constant qu’il n’y a rien de meilleur que le gouvernement d’un seul homme, quand il est homme de bien ». L’oligarchie n’est pour lui que l’étape précédent la monarchie, d’où sa faiblesse : « Chacun veut primer, chacun veut que son opinion prévale » de sorte que les nobles se battraient pour gouverner. Cette situation ne déboucherait que sur le recours à un roi pour rétablir l’ordre social. Mais la démocratie ne vaut pas mieux selon le « mage » ! « Quand le peuple commande, il est impossible qu’il ne s’introduise beaucoup de désordre dans un État ». Cela ne conduirait qu’à une tyrannie – justement – pour rétablir brutalement l’ordre. Pour Darius, la monarchie apparait comme seul régime valable, ou du moins comme le moins mauvais.

Cette introduction nous permet d’enchaîner sur l’étude desdits systèmes politiques, non pas pour vanter les mérites de l’un sur les autres, mais pour en comprendre leurs fondements, leurs principes et leurs idéaux.

La démocratie

aristotelessdgh.jpgL’une des meilleurs définitions a été donné par Aristote : « La liberté – ou démocratie – consiste dans le fait d’être tour à tour gouverné et gouvernant… »
La démocratie est le gouvernement du peuple, par le peuple et pour le peuple. Idéalement, la démocratie instaure une identité entre les gouvernants et les gouvernés. Les conditions nécessaires sont les suivantes :

  • L’égalité : C’est l’idée que tous les citoyens, sans distinction d’origine, de race, de sexe ou de religion, sont égaux en droit. Les mêmes règles doivent s’appliquer aux citoyens qui sont placés dans une situation identique.
  • La légalité : C’est l’idée d’une obéissance aux règles de droit. Les rapports entre les citoyens doivent être régis par des règles de droit qui, adoptées par tous, s’appliquent à tous.
  • La liberté : C’est l’idée de la liberté de participation aux affaires publiques. Tous les citoyens sont libres de participer au gouvernement soit par la désignation des gouvernants – élection – soit par la prise directe de décision – référendum. C’est également l’idée d’une liberté d’opinion, ce qui induit le respect de plusieurs courants politiques.

Outre Otanès que nous avons évoqué en introduction, Périclès fait également l’éloge de la démocratie où l’égalité serait son fondement. Dans ce régime il ne doit y avoir aucune différence entre les citoyens ni dans leur vie publique ni dans leur vie privée. Aucune considération ne doit s’attacher à la naissance ou à la richesse, mais uniquement au mérite !

La démocratie est un régime de générosité et de fraternité, reposant sur la philanthropie (du grec ancien φίλος / phílos « amoureux » et ἄνθρωπος / ánthrôpos « homme », « genre humain ») est la philosophie ou doctrine de vie qui met l’humanité au premier plan de ses priorités. Un philanthrope cherche à améliorer le sort de ses semblables par de multiples moyens.

Cependant et après étude de ces éléments, nous sommes en droit de nous poser la question suivante : l’élection démocratique d’un dirigeant le force t-il nécessairement à être philanthrope ? À moins que la réponse ne soit déjà dans la question…

L’Oligarchie

L’oligarchie est le gouvernement d’un petit nombre de personnes, le pouvoir étant détenu par une minorité. L’oligarchie est également une catégorie générique qui recouvre plusieurs formes de gouvernement.

La forme oligarchique la plus répandue est l’aristocratie. C’est un gouvernement réservé à une classe sociale censée regrouper les meilleurs. L’aristocratie repose ainsi sur une conception élitiste du pouvoir.

Outre les institutions de la république romaine, rappelons que le système politique spartiate était bel et bien orienté vers l’oligarchie notamment avec la gérousie.
La gérousie est une assemblée composée de 28 hommes élus à vie et âgés de plus de 60 ans. Ces derniers sont choisis en fonction de leur vertu militaire mais force est de constater qu’ils appartiennent pour la plupart aux grandes familles de Sparte.

Il est intéressant de noter que dans cet exemple que seuls les membres de cette assemblée possèdent l’initiative des lois. Dans un système oligarchique on ne laisse que peu de place à l’aléatoire puisque seuls les « meilleurs » accèdent aux fonctions législatives, encore faut-il convenablement définir ce que sont « les meilleurs » dans un régime politique.

La monarchie

La monarchie est la forme de gouvernement dans laquelle le pouvoir est exercé par un seul homme (roi, empereur, dictateur).
La monarchie absolue est un courant de la monarchie qui, elle-même est un courant de la monocratie. La monarchie absolue donc, est le gouvernement d’un seul homme fondée sur l’hérédité et détenant en sa personne tous les pouvoirs (législatif, exécutif et judiciaire). La souveraineté du monarque est très souvent de droit divin.

Outre Darius, Isocrate défend cette idée de monarchie comme forme d’organisation du pouvoir. Il pense trouver le chef dans Philippe de Macédoine (père d’Alexandre le Grand), car il y voit le règne de l’efficacité et l’avènement de la modernité.

xenophon05.jpgXénophon a réellement été l’initiateur du régime monarchique. « Ce qui fait les rois ou les chefs (…) c’est la science du commandement ». Le roi est comparable au pilote qui guide le navire. Xénophon décrit un homme qui détient une supériorité sur tous les autres, car il « sait ». On ne naît pas roi, on ne l’est pas non plus par le fait, ni encore par l’élection : on le devient ! La monarchie est un art qui, comme tous les autres arts, suppose un apprentissage, la connaissance des lois et des maîtres pour les enseigner.

L’éducation fait acquérir au roi un ensemble de talents et de qualités qui le rendront véritablement apte à exercer ses fonctions. Il ne doit pas imposer son pouvoir par la force, sinon il ne serait qu’un tyran, ce que Xénophon réprouve. Le roi devra être capable de susciter le consentement du peuple en se fondant sur la justice et la raison. Le chef est donc au service de ceux qu’il commande. « Un bon chef ne diffère en rien d’un bon père de famille ». Héritage grec oblige, Xénophon n’oublie pas de mentionner que le roi ne fera régner la justice qu’en respectant la primauté de la loi.

***

À l’étude de ces différents régimes proposant une gouvernance différente du territoire, sommes-nous en capacité de répondre à l’intitulé de cet article à savoir « Quel est le meilleur Régime politique ? » Chacun se fera son avis, chacun se fera son opinion ! Tout réside naturellement dans la capacité du « chef » à gouverner, mais aussi et surtout dans sa conception du pouvoir.

Napoléon Bonaparte a été très certainement l’un des empereurs les plus prestigieux de l’Histoire. Cependant était-il d’avantage un démocrate qu’un monarque ? Ou a-t-il réussi à faire ressortir une nouvelle façon d’exercer le pouvoir ? Pour approfondir le sujet, je vous invite à lire les articles de Christopher Lings et David Saforcada aux adresses suivantes :

Christopher Destailleurs

Nous avons besoin de votre soutien pour vivre et nous développer :