Ok

En poursuivant votre navigation sur ce site, vous acceptez l'utilisation de cookies. Ces derniers assurent le bon fonctionnement de nos services. En savoir plus.

dimanche, 24 mai 2015

Turkish-Iranian Competition in the Middle East

TKiran.jpg

Turkish-Iranian Competition in the Middle East

Publication: Eurasia Daily Monitor

By: Orhan Gafarli

The Jamestown Foundation & http://www.themoderntokyotimes.com

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan paid a formal visit to Iran on April 7, 2015. The trip was designed to try to repair bilateral relations after their severe breakdown linked to the crisis in Yemen. Indeed, the conservative wing of the ruling establishment in Tehran, including the head of Iran’s Parliamentary National Security and Foreign Policy Commission, Huseyn Nakavi, demanded that Erdogan’s Iran visit should be delayed (BBC–Turkish service, April 7). Some even warned the government that if Erdogan did not cancel the visit, the issue would be brought before Iran’s Guardian Council. Despite this negative pressure, the Turkish president did end up traveling to Tehran to clarify Ankara’s position (Radikal, April 7).

Four significant issues have contributed to this nadir in Turkish-Iranian relations: Iraq, Syria, Yemen and energy. Regarding Syria, the only area of agreement between Ankara and Tehran is their firm opposition to the Islamic State. However, Iran has continued to support the beleaguered Syrian regime of President Bashar al-Assad, while Turkey backs the united opposition. On Iraq, Turkey still sees Iran acting as a manipulator in bilateral Ankara-Baghdad relations. Although from time to time Tehran sends positive messages on this issue, in reality, these are tactical games on Iran’s part (Internet Haber, March 4). In recent months, as the war in Yemen continued to spiral out of control, Turkey has sided with Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and the United Arab Emirates and supported their international military action backing the embattled Yemeni regime. Iran, on the other hand, stands behind the Houthi rebels who are fighting on the other side of this conflict.

Over the past fifteen years, these regional issues have become increasingly contentious for Ankara and Tehran. The reason, as many experts contend, is related to the relative power of Iran in the region. For one thing, its power and ability to influence other regional actors has grown after the Arab Spring. Moreover, Iran has been strengthening regional Shia groups and building a crescent of influence in the Middle East. In addition, some have argued that Iran now feels more confident after reaching a framework agreement with the 5+1 Western countries on its nuclear program (Internet Haber, March 4; Radikal, March 18).

Another key point of contention between Turkey and Iran has become the issue of energy. “Turkey, as a country, is the largest consumer of [natural] gas from Iran, and yet it pays the highest price,” President Erdogan declared while in Tehran (BBC–Turkish service, April 7). Turkey expects a possible discount on the gas volumes it already imports from Iran; but Tehran has, so far, ignored these pleas. Speaking to journalists, on April 14, Iranian Fuel Minister Bijen Namdar Zengene said that Tehran’s proposal of lowering the gas purchase in exchange for Turkey buying double the volumes was rejected by Ankara. Annually, Turkey buys 10 billion cubic meters (bcm) of natural gas from Iran. Sources from the Turkish Ministry of Energy confirm that Iran proposed selling Turkey another 10 bcm of gas at a gradually decreasing price scheme, but without changing the price it charges Ankara for the first 10 bcm. Turkish Foreign ministry sources declared that this proposal was not acceptable to authorities in Ankara (Hurriyet, April 17).

In addition to the subject of energy sales, the website Iran.ru, controlled by the Iranian embassy to Moscow, earlier this year published an article criticizing Turkey’s developing role as a regional gas hub. “Turkey, as an ‘Energy Hub’ country, [will be] dangerous for Iran,” the article asserts, adding, “and Iran does not understand why Russia has been helping Turkey in this process. Russia supports Iran via strategic cooperation [but] assists Ankara on the energy issue—which is not preferable for these nations [Russia and Iran]. Russia must defend Iran’s interests” (Iran.ru, January 23).

Relations between Russia, Turkey and Iran are being influenced by a complicated set of cross-cutting and often contradictory interests. Ankara, expecting that its warm relations with Russia would bolster Turkey’s international role, has felt uncomfortable with growing Iranian strength in the Middle East as a result of improving relations between Tehran and the West (Iran.ru, February 27). For one thing, Turkey is concerned about the fact that Iran has not taken any firm action on helping to resolve the conflicts in Syria and Iraq. Furthermore, if the economic sanctions on Iran are terminated, the Islamic Republic could grow to become the preeminent power in the region. That is why Ankara is assisting Saudi Arabia, Egypt and the United Arab Emirates in their campaign over Yemen (Hurriyet, April 24). This support clearly has a tactical dimension, particularly against the background of Turkey’s own disagreements with Saudi Arabia on Yemen. Moreover, relations between Ankara and Cairo have been virtually frozen after Mohamed Morsi was overthrown in Egypt two years ago (Turkiye, April 25).

Meanwhile, Turkish media has been hinting that relations with Israel might again come up for debate following Turkey’s parliamentary elections, scheduled for June 7. The geopolitical struggles in the Middle East are encouraging Turkey and Israel to rebuild a new, cordial relationship. But some experts infer that, in exchange for re-normalizing relations, Turkey will expect help from Israel on Syria. Without any dedicated alliances in the Middle East, Turkey is pursuing a series of tactical policy steps wherever it can find areas of common interest with other regional players. In the absence of any other allies in the Middle East, Turkey has been relying on political support from the United States—a fellow North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) member. But the insufficient backing it has received from Washington on the Syria issue has left Ankara feeling uncomfortable (CNN–Turkish service, April 24).

Turkey’s Middle East policy is thus in a current state of flux. But in its quest for new regional partnerships, it is unlikely to seek out either Iran or Russia. Rather, Turkey may be expected to seek closer cooperation with Saudi Arabia or re-build its relations with Israel. Recently, Turkey appears to have swung its attention more toward Saudi Arabia—President Erdogan attended the funeral of Saudi King Abdullah (Today’s Zaman, January 23) and later paid a formal visit to the country in March (Al-Monitor, March 3). These exchanges may herald a coming breakthrough in bilateral Saudi-Turkish relations in the near future. Though Turkey’s ultimate decision between moving closer to Israel or Saudi Arabia will undoubtedly have to wait until after the June 7 elections.

The Jamestown Foundation kindly allows Modern Tokyo Times to publish their highly esteemed articles. Please follow and check The Jamestown Foundation website at http://www.jamestown.org/

https://twitter.com/JamestownTweets The Jamestown Foundation

http://www.jamestown.org/single/?tx_ttnews[tt_news]=43923&tx_ttnews[backPid]=7&cHash=a02db9eaae718d591f16cedb4c57ca67#.VVw1x2b6m1k

mercredi, 06 mai 2015

Une coalition sino-russo-iranienne opposée à l’Otan débute-t-elle à Moscou?

mosctehepek.jpg

Une coalition sino-russo-iranienne opposée à l’Otan débute-t-elle à Moscou?

La Conférence de Moscou sur la sécurité internationale, en avril, a été une occasion de faire savoir aux Etats-Unis et à l’OTAN que d’autres puissances mondiales ne les laisseront pas faire comme ils l’entendent.

Le thème portait sur les efforts communs de la Chine, de l’Inde, de la Russie et de l’Iran contre l’expansion de l’OTAN, renforcés par des projets de pourparlers militaires tripartites entre Pékin, Moscou et Téhéran.

Des ministres de la Défense et des responsables militaires venus du monde entier se sont réunis le 16 avril au Radisson Royal ou Hotel Ukraina, l’une des plus belles réalisations de l’architecture soviétique à Moscou, connue comme l’une des Sept sœurs construites à l’époque de Joseph Staline.

L’événement de deux jours, organisé par le ministère russe de la Défense était la quatrième édition de la Conférence annuelle de Moscou sur la sécurité internationale (CMSI/MCIS).

Des civils et des militaires de plus de soixante-dix pays, y compris des membres de l’OTAN, y ont assisté. A part la Grèce, toutefois, les ministres de la Défense des pays de l’OTAN n’ont pas participé à la conférence.

Contrairement à l’année dernière, les organisateurs de la CMSI n’ont pas transmis d’invitation à l’Ukraine pour la conférence de 2015. Selon le vice-ministre russe de la Défense Anatoly Antonov, «à ce niveau d’antagonisme brutal dans l’information par rapport à la crise dans le sud-est de l’Ukraine, nous avons décidé de ne pas envenimer la situation à la conférence et, à ce stade, nous avons pris la décision de ne pas inviter nos collègues ukrainiens à l’événement.»

A titre personnel, le sujet m’intéresse, j’ai suivi ce genre de conférences pendant des années, parce qu’il en émane souvent des déclarations importantes sur les politiques étrangères et de sécurité. Cette année, j’étais désireux d’assister à l’ouverture de cette conférence particulière sur la sécurité. A part le fait qu’elle avait lieu à un moment où le paysage géopolitique du globe est en train de changer rapidement, depuis que l’ambassade russe au Canada m’avait demandé en 2014 si j’étais intéressé à assister à la CMSI IV, j’étais curieux de voir ce que cette conférence produirait.

Le reste du monde parle: à l’écoute des problèmes de sécurité non euro-atlantiques

La Conférence de Moscou est l’équivalent russe de la Conférence de Munich sur la sécurité qui se tient à l’hôtel Bayerischer Hof en Allemagne. Il y a cependant des différences essentielles entre les deux événements.

Alors que la Conférence sur la sécurité de Munich est organisée autour de la sécurité euro-atlantique et considère la sécurité globale du point de vue atlantiste de l’OTAN, la CMSI représente une perspective mondiale beaucoup plus large et diversifiée. Elle représente les problèmes de sécurité du reste du monde non euro-atlantique, en particulier le Moyen-Orient et l’Asie-Pacifique. Mais qui vont de l’Argentine, de l’Inde et du Vietnam à l’Egypte et à l’Afrique du Sud.  La conférence a réuni à l’hôtel Ukraina tout un éventail de grands et petits joueurs à la table, dont les voix et les intérêts en matière de sécurité, d’une manière ou d’une autre, sont par ailleurs sapés et ignorés à Munich par les dirigeants de l’OTAN et des Etats-Unis.

Le ministre russe de la Défense Sergey Shoigu, qui a un rang d’officier équivalent à celui d’un général quatre étoiles dans la plupart des pays de l’OTAN, a ouvert la conférence. Assis près de Shoigu, le ministre des Affaires étrangères Sergey Lavrov a aussi pris la parole, et d’autres responsables de haut rang. Tous ont parlé du bellicisme tous azimuts de Washington, qui a recouru aux révolutions de couleur, comme l’Euro-Maïdan à Kiev et la Révolution des roses en Géorgie pour obtenir un changement de régime. Shoigu a cité le Venezuela et la région administrative spéciale chinoise de Hong Kong comme exemples de révolutions de couleur qui ont échoué.

Le ministre des Affaires étrangères Lavrov a rappelé que les possibilités d’un dangereux conflit mondial allaient croissant en raison de l’absence de préoccupation, de la part des Etats-Unis et de l’OTAN, pour la sécurité des autres et l’absence de dialogue constructif. Dans son argumentation, Lavrov a cité le président américain Franklin Roosevelt, qui a dit:

«Il n’y a pas de juste milieu ici. Nous aurons à prendre la responsabilité de la collaboration mondiale, ou nous aurons à porter la responsabilité d’un autre conflit mondial «Je crois qu’ils ont formulé l’une des principales leçons du conflit mondial le plus dévastateur de l’Histoire: il est seulement possible de relever les défis communs et de préserver la paix par des efforts collectifs, basés sur le respect des intérêts légitimes de tous les partenaires » , a-t-il expliqué à propos de ce que les dirigeants mondiaux avaient appris de la Seconde Guerre mondiale.

Shoigu a eu plus de dix réunions bilatérales avec les différents ministres et responsables de la Défense qui sont venus à Moscou pour la CMSI. Lors d’une réunion avec le ministre serbe de la Défense Bratislav Gasic, Shoigu a dit que Moscou considère Belgrade comme un partenaire fiable en termes de coopération militaire.

Russie

De g. à dr.: Sergei Lavrov, ministre des Affaires étrangères, Sergei Shoigu, ministre de la Défense, Nikolai Patrushev, secrétaire au Conseil de sécurité et Valery Gerasimov, chef de l’état-major général, participant à la 4e Conférence de Moscou sur la sécurité (RIA Novosti / Iliya Pitalev)

Une coalition sino-russo-iranienne: le cauchemar de Washington

Le mythe que la Russie est isolée sur le plan international a de nouveau été démoli pendant la conférence, qui a aussi débouché sur quelques annonces importantes.

Le ministre kazakh de la Défense Imangali Tasmagambetov et Shoigu ont annoncé que la mise en œuvre d’un système de défense aérienne commun entre le Kazakhstan et la Russie a commencé. Cela n’indique pas seulement l’intégration de l’espace aérien de l’Organisation du traité de sécurité collective, cela définit aussi une tendance. Cela a été le prélude à d’autres annonces contre le bouclier de défense antimissile de l’OTAN.

La déclaration la plus vigoureuse est venue du ministre iranien de la Défense Hossein Dehghan. Le brigadier-général Dehghan a dit que l’Iran voulait que la Chine, l’Inde et la Russie s’unissent pour s’opposer conjointement à l’expansion à l’est de l’OTAN et à la menace à leur sécurité collective que constitue le projet de bouclier antimissile de l’Alliance.

Lors d’une réunion avec le ministre chinois des Affaires étrangères Chang Wanquan, Shoigu a souligné que les liens militaires de Moscou avec Beijing étaient sa «priorité absolue». Dans une autre rencontre bilatérale, les gros bonnets de la défense iraniens et russes ont confirmé que leur coopération sera une des pierres angulaires d’un nouvel ordre multipolaire et que Moscou et Téhéran étaient en harmonie quant à leur approche stratégique des Etats-Unis.

Après la rencontre de Hossein Dehghan et la délégation iranienne avec leurs homologues russes, il a été annoncé qu’un sommet tripartite se tiendrait entre Beijing, Moscou et Téhéran. L’idée a été avalisée ensuite par la délégation chinoise.

Le contexte géopolitique change et il n’est pas favorable aux intérêts états-uniens. Non seulement l’Union économique eurasienne a été formée par l’Arménie, la Biélorussie, le Kazakhstan et la Russie au cœur post-soviétique de l’Eurasie, mais Pékin, Moscou et Téhéran – la Triple entente eurasienne – sont entrés dans un long processus de rapprochement politique, stratégique, économique, diplomatique et militaire.

L’harmonie et l’intégration eurasiennes contestent la position des Etats-Unis sur leur perchoir occidental et leur statut de tête de pont en Europe, et même incitent les alliés des Etats-Unis à agir de manière plus indépendante. C’est l’un des thèmes centraux examinés dans mon livre The Globalization of NATO [La mondialisation de l’OTAN].

L’ancien grand ponte états-unien de la sécurité Zbigniew Brzezinski a mis en garde les élites américaines contre la formation d’une coalition eurasienne «qui pourrait éventuellement chercher à contester la primauté de l’Amérique». Selon Brzezinski, une telle alliance eurasienne pourrait naître d’une «coalition sino-russo-iranienne» avec Beijing pour centre.

«Pour les stratèges chinois, face à la coalition trilatérale de l’Amérique, de l’Europe et du Japon, la riposte géopolitique la plus efficace pourrait bien être de tenter et de façonner une triple alliance qui leur soit propre, liant la Chine à l’Iran dans la région golfe Persique/Moyen-Orient et avec la Russie dans la région de l’ancienne Union soviétique», avertit Brzezinski.

«Dans l’évaluation des futures options de la Chine, il faut aussi considérer la possibilité qu’une Chine florissante économiquement et confiante en elle politiquement – mais qui se sent exclue du système mondial et qui décide de devenir à la fois l’avocat et le leader des Etats démunis dans le monde –  décide d’opposer non seulement une doctrine claire mais aussi un puissant défi géopolitique au monde trilatéral dominant», explique-t-il.

C’est plus ou moins la piste que les Chinois sont en train de suivre. Le ministre Wanquan a carrément dit à la CMSI qu’un ordre mondial équitable était nécessaire.

La menace pour les Etats-Unis est qu’une coalition sino-russo-iranienne puisse, selon les propres mots de Brzezinski, «être un aimant puissant pour les autres Etats mécontents du statu quo».

russie

Un soldat pendant un exercice impliquant les systèmes de missiles sol-air S-300/SA sur le terrain d’entraînement d’Ashuluk, dans la région  d’Astrakhan (RIA Novosti / Pavel Lisitsyn)

Contrer le bouclier anti-missile des Etats-Unis et de l’OTAN en Eurasie

Washington érige un nouveau Rideau de fer autour de la Chine, de l’Iran, de la Russie et de leurs alliés au moyen de l’infrastructure de missiles des Etats-Unis et de l’OTAN.

L’objectif du Pentagone est de neutraliser toutes les ripostes défensives de la Russie et des autres puissances eurasiennes à une attaque de missiles balistiques US, qui pourrait inclure une première frappe nucléaire. Washington ne veut pas permettre à la Russie ou à d’autres d’être capables d’une seconde frappe ou, en d’autres termes, ne veut pas permettre à la Russie ou à d’autres d’être en mesure de riposter à une attaque par le Pentagone.

En 2011, il a été rapporté que le vice-Premier ministre Dmitri Rogozine, qui était alors envoyé de Moscou auprès de l’OTAN, se rendrait à Téhéran pour parler du projet de bouclier antimissile de l’OTAN. Divers articles ont été publiés, y compris par le Tehran Times, affirmant que les gouvernements de Russie, d’Iran et de Chine projetaient de créer un bouclier antimissile commun pour contrer les Etats-Unis et l’OTAN. Rogozine, toutefois, a réfuté ces articles. Il a dit que cette défense antimissile était discutée entre le Kremlin et ses alliés militaires dans le cadre de l’Organisation du traité de sécurité collective (OTSC).

L’idée de coopération dans la défense entre la Chine, l’Iran et la Russie, contre le bouclier antimissile de l’OTAN est restée d’actualité depuis 2011. Dès lors, l’Iran s’est rapproché pour devenir un observateur dans l’OTSC, comme l’Afghanistan et la Serbie. Beijing, Moscou et Téhéran se sont rapprochés aussi en raison de problèmes comme la Syrie, l’Euro-Maïdan et le pivot vers l’Asie du Pentagone. L’appel de Hossein Dehghan à une approche collective par la Chine, l’Inde, l’Iran et la Russie contre le bouclier antimissile et l’expansion de l’OTAN, couplé aux annonces faites à la CMSI sur des pourparlers militaires tripartites entre la Chine, l’Iran et la Russie, vont aussi dans ce sens.

Les systèmes de défense aérienne russes S-300 et S-400 sont en cours de déploiement dans toute l’Eurasie, depuis l’Arménie et la Biélorussie jusqu’au Kamchatka, dans le cadre d’une contre-manœuvre au nouveau Rideau de fer.  Ces systèmes de défense aérienne rendent beaucoup plus difficiles les objectifs de Washington de neutraliser toute possibilité de réaction ou de seconde frappe.

Même les responsables de l’OTAN et le Pentagone, qui se sont référés aux S-300 comme le système SA-20, l’admettent. « Nous l’avons étudié nous sommes formés pour le contrer depuis des années. Nous n’en avons pas peur, mais nous respectons le S-300 pour ce qu’il est: un système de missiles très mobile, précis et mortel », a écrit le colonel de l’US Air Force Clint Hinote pour le Conseil des relations étrangères basé à Washington.

Bien qu’il y ait eu des spéculations sur le fait que la vente des systèmes S-300 à l’Iran serait le point de départ d’un pactole provenant de Téhéran dû aux ventes internationales d’armes, résultat des négociations de Lausanne, et que Moscou cherche à avoir un avantage concurrentiel dans la réouverture du marché iranien, en réalité la situation et les motivations sont très différentes. Même si Téhéran achète différentes quantités de matériel militaire à la Russie et à d’autres sources étrangères, il a une politique d’autosuffisance militaire et fabrique principalement ses propres armes. Toute une série de matériel militaire – allant des chars d’assaut, missiles, avions de combat, détecteurs de radar, fusils et drones, hélicoptères, torpilles, obus de mortier, navires de guerre et sous-marins – est fabriqué à l’intérieur de l’Iran. L’armée iranienne soutient même que leur système de défense aérienne Bavar-373 est plus ou moins l’équivalent du S-300.

La livraison par Moscou du paquet de S-300 à Téhéran est plus qu’une simple affaire commerciale. Elle est destinée à sceller la coopération militaire russo-iranienne et à renforcer la coopération eurasienne contre l’encerclement du bouclier anti-missiles de Washington. C’est un pas de plus dans la création d’un réseau de défense aérienne eurasienne contre la menace que font peser les missiles des Etats-Unis et de l’OTAN sur des pays qui osent ne pas s’agenouiller devant Washington.

Par Mahdi Darius Nazemroaya –  23 avril 2015

Mahdi Darius Nazemroaya est sociologue, un auteur primé et un analyste géopolitique.

Article original : http://rt.com/op-edge/252469-moscow-conference-international-security-nato/

Traduit de l’anglais par Diane Gilliard

URL de cet article : http://arretsurinfo.ch/une-coalition-sino-russo-iranienne-opposee-a-lotan-debute-t-elle-a-moscou/

mardi, 21 avril 2015

Keep That Iranian Genii Bottled Up!

united-against-nuclear-iran1200.jpg

Keep That Iranian Genii Bottled Up!

By

Ex: http://www.lewrockwell.com

The deal reached in Lausanne, Switzerland by Iran and five powers, led by the US, appears to be about nuclear capability.

In fact, the real issue was not nuclear weapons, which Iran does not now possess, but Iran’s potential geopolitical power.

Iran, a nation of 80.8 million, has been bottled up like the proverbial genii by US-led sanctions ever since the 1979 Islamic Revolution deposed Shah Pahlavi’s corrupt royalist regime. The Shah had been groomed to be the chief US enforcer in the Gulf.

More than a dozen American efforts to overthrow the Islamic government in Tehran have failed. Washington resorted to sabotage and economic warfare, sought to throttle Iran’s primary exports, oil and gas,  to derail its banking system, and prevent imports of everything from machinery to vitamins. 

The US and Israel have used the extremist group People’s Mujahidin to murder Iranian officials and scientists.

There is no doubt that this western economic siege drove Iran to make major concessions over its nuclear energy program, a source of great national pride and prestige that broke what Grand Ayatollah Ali Khamenei called the “backwardness” imposed by the western powers on the Muslim world to keep it weak and subservient.

Like Cuba, another state that long defied Washington, Iran eventually found the price of its independence and self-interest too high to bear. As with Saddam’s Iraq, US-led sanctions caused its military to rust away and its oil exports to fall painfully.

Israel’s anguished alarms over Iran’s supposed nuclear “threat” were not even believed by its own crack intelligence services or those of the United States, but the relentless drumbeat of hate Iran propaganda convinced many in North America and even better-informed Europe that Iran is a menace.

What Israel really feared was not Iran’s non-existent nuclear threat  but rather its ongoing support for the beleaguered Palestinians.

Iran became the last Mideast nation giving strong backing to creation of a Palestinian state. The Arab states opposing Israel have been silenced: Syria, Libya and Iraq crushed by war and torn asunder, Egypt and Jordan bought off with huge bribes. The Saudis have secretly allied themselves to Israel. So only Iran was left to champion Palestine.

That is why Israel made such a determined effort to push the US into war with Iran. With the feeble Arab states largely demolished or gelded, Israel’s hold on the Occupied West Bank and Golan would be unchallenged.

But for the United States, the geostrategic calculus is somewhat different. The Iranian revolution of 1979 profoundly challenged America’s Mideast imperium – what I call the American Raj after the manner in which  the British Empire ruled India.

Washington’s Mideast political-strategic architecture was built on feudal and brutal military regimes. Ever since 1945, the deal was that the feudal oil states supplied oil at bargain basement prices in exchange for US military and political protection. In addition, the Arab oil monarchies undertook to buy huge amounts of American arms from plants in key political states that none of them knew how to effectively use. The most recent deal amounts to $46 billion of US weapons for the Saudis.

Washington’s Mideast Raj  forms one of the enduring pillars of American global power. Though America consumes less and less Mideast oil each year, its control of  the flow of oil from Arabia to Europe, Japan, China and the other parts of the Asian economy gives it huge strategic leverage. Japan and Germany both vividly remember they lost WWII because of lack of oil.

The 1979 Iranian Revolution gravely threatened this sweetheart arrangement. Iran demanded that its Arab neighbors follow Islam’s calls to share wealth, avoid ostentation, live modestly, and care for the needy – in short, the very opposite of the flamboyant Saudis and Gulf Arabs.

Iran set the example by funding extensive social programs and education. Of course, Iran’s challenge to share the wealth was anathema to the oil monarchs and their American patrons. By 1980, an undeclared conflict was underway across the Muslim world between the Saudis and Iran – one that still rages today as we see most recently in the expanding Yemen war.

iran-fenced-in.gifUS policy has been to keep the infectious, troublesome Iranians isolated and contained, rather as Europe’s reactionary powers did with revolutionary France at the end of the 18th century. While the reason given by Washington was Iran’s alleged nuclear threat, the sanctions regime was really aimed at fatally weakening Iran’s economy and provoking the overthrow of the Islamic government and its replacement by tame Beverly Hills Iranian exiles.

Unfortunately for US imperial policymakers, the dangerous chaos they created  in Iraq and Syria, and the rise of ISIS, necessitated working with Iran to keep a lid on this boiling pot. That means easing sanctions on Tehran and allowing its economy to start coming back to life.

Hence the Lausanne deal. But Tehran does not trust Washington to adhere to the pact. Grand Ayatollah Khamenei asserted last week there would be no deal unless sanctions against Iran were lifted “immediately.” To many Iranians it seemed clear that Washington had no intention of lifting key sanctions, only slowly lessening relatively unimportant ones.

Washington faces a major dilemma over the isolation of Iran. If sanctions are substantially lifted, Iran will increase oil and gas exports and begin rebuilding its industrial base and obsolete military forces. Europe,  Russia, China and India are all eager to resume doing business with Iran.

But lifting sanctions will make Iran stronger and even more of a political threat to America’s Mideast satraps – who want the Persian genii bottled up. Claims that Mideast states like Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the UAE fear a nuclear arm race are spurious. Save Egypt and Jordan, all are next door to Iran.  Nuclear weapons have no use in such close quarters.  Egyptians lack food, never mind nuclear arms.

Israel and its partisans, who have successfully purchased much of the US Congress, remain determined to scupper the nuclear deal. There are so many potential slips between cup and lip that reaching an effective, lasting deal will be very difficult. Iran is not wrong to be skeptical.

lundi, 20 avril 2015

L'Iran, un clou dans la chaussure d'Obama?

ir201404.jpg

L'Iran, un clou dans la chaussure d'Obama?

par Jean Paul Baquiast

Ex: http://www.europesolidaire.eu

Il avait été dit, mais nous n'avons pas les moyens de vérifier l'information, que signer un accord nucléaire avec l'Iran, au terme duquel ce pays renoncerait à développer une arme atomique et verrait lever les sanctions économiques contre lui, a été considéré par Barack Obama comme un grand succès personnel.
 
Ainsi pouvait-il justifier le prix Nobel de la Paix qui lui avait été décerné dans un passé déjà lointain. Plus généralement, il pouvait inscrire à son actif, au terme d'une présidence constellée de guerres perdues, d'imbroglios diplomatiques et d'échecs sur le plan intérieur, au moins une promesse tenue.

Malheureusement pour Obama, les choses ne se présentent pas aussi favorablement, concernant l'accord sur le nucléaire. D'abord ledit accord, ou plus exactement le pré-accord dit de Lausanne, est considéré par le fidèle allié Israël comme une défaite majeur infligée par l'ami américain. Benjamin Netanyahu, après l'avoir exposé devant un Congrès américain compréhensif, ne cesse de le répéter. Ce message est relayé aux Etats-Unis comme dans le reste du monde par les différents lobbys juifs, dont l'AIPAC en Amérique. Ils considèrent, à tort ou à raison que l'Iran n'a pas renoncé à la promesse faite il y a quelques années, de « rayer Israël de la carte ». On pourrait cependant penser que l'Etat juif dispose de suffisamment de moyens militaires et de renseignement pour tuer dans l'oeuf un tel projet, si Téhéran faisait la folie d'essayer de le réaliser.

Cependant, en dehors des Israéliens et de leurs amis à Washington, il apparaît qu'une très grande majorité de parlementaires américains, à la Chambre comme au Sénat, se propose de ne pas ratifier le traité avec l'Iran. Leur principal motif n'est pas la sécurité d'Israël, mais le désir de torpiller Obama, qu'ils présentent comme le plus mauvais des présidents américains. Iront-ils jusqu'à refuser le traité, ce qui serait immédiatement considéré comme une sorte de déclaration de guerre par l'Iran? La chose est fort possible. Iront-ils ensuite à pousser le Pentagone à des frappes directes contre les sites nucléaires iraniens, ou plus vraisemblablement inciter Israël à le faire? On en parle, et pas seulement à Téhéran ou Tel-Aviv.

Par précaution, le ministre iranien de la défense envisagerait en conséquence ces temps-ci un possible accord militaire entre l'Iran, la Chine et la Russie, destiné dans un premier temps à contrer le réseau antimissile de l'Otan, mis en place en Europe sous le nom de BMDE, que nous avions abondamment commenté sur ce site. L'Inde pourrait éventuellement s'y joindre ultérieurement Le BMDE est officiellement présenté comme destiné à décourager des frappes balistiques iraniennes, totalement imaginaires à ce jour. En fait, il est destiné à rendre inopérantes, comme nul ne l'ignore, des frappes russes en retour d'une attaque de l'Otan dirigée contre la Russie. Or, en cas de conflit américano-iranien, le BMDE pourrait servir à réaliser des frappes, éventuellement nucléaires, contre l'Iran. Il était donc naturel que l'Iran se tourne vers la Russie pour acquérir des batteries anti-missiles dites S.300. Au delà de cette première défense, il est également naturel que l'Iran cherche à promouvoir une alliance militaire avec la Russie et la Chine, en vue de se défendre contre toute attaque américaine, aujourd'hui ou plus tard.

Il n'est pas possible aujourd'hui de pronostiquer les chances de réalisation d'un tel accord. Mais d'ores et delà, la perspective de celui-ci renforce considérablement le poids de l'Iran, comme grande puissance régionale au Moyen-Orient. Elle pourra ainsi faire avorter les intentions des puissances sunnites alliées des Etats-Unis, dont l'Arabie Saoudite est la plus irresponsable, visant à mener des guerres au Yémen contre les Houthis, alliés de principe de l'Iran, ou contre la Syrie de Bashar al Assad, allié aussi bien de l'Iran que de la Russie.

Concernant la Chine, elle ne pourra que s'intéresser à une alliance stratégique avec l'Iran, incluant la Russie. Ainsi se constituerait un axe favorisant ses grands projets économiques et politiques, par l'intermédiaire d' un pays aux ressources considérables et qui, en tant qu'héritier du grand Empire Perse, ne s'estime pas nécessairement devoir représenter les intérêts des monarchies pétrolières. 

L'Iran, nous demandions-nous, est-elle donc en passe de devenir un clou dans la chaussure d'Obama? C'est à lui en premier lieu qu'il faudrait poser la question.

 

Jean Paul Baquiast

jeudi, 19 mars 2015

Les sanctions unilatérales portent-elles atteinte aux droits de l’homme?

Sanctions-copie-1.jpg

Les sanctions unilatérales portent-elles atteinte aux droits de l’homme?

Le Conseil des droits de l’homme de l’ONU a demandé une étude auprès du Comité consultatif

par Thomas Kaiser

Ex: http://www.horizons-et-debats.ch

Le Comité consultatif du Conseil des droits de l’homme de l’ONU, également appelé «Advisory Board», s’est réuni à Genève entre le 23 et le 27 février. Ce comité consultatif est composé de 18 experts indépendants, élus par le Conseil en respectant la répartition géographique des 47 Etats membres. Le 3 mars, on y a discuté le rapport du groupe de travail ayant examiné la question des mesures coercitives unilatérales et les atteintes aux droits de l’homme. On aborde là une question importante préoccupant depuis longtemps le Conseil des droits de l’homme et les spécialistes du droit international: à quel point des sanctions unilatérales portent-elles atteinte aux droits de l’homme?


Le grand public y est déjà habitué. Lorsqu’un Etat mène une politique déplaisant aux puissants de ce monde, on crée les raisons pour pouvoir imposer – comme allant de soi – des sanctions contre cet Etat. Même au sein de l’UE, on a soumis, en l’an 2000, l’Etat souverain d’Autriche à un régime de sanctions en prétextant des soi-disant déficits démocratiques. Il s’agit souvent de sanctions économiques aux effets catastrophiques. En jetant un regard sur le passé, on constate que ce sont surtout les Etats-Unis et leurs alliés qui imposent des mesures coercitives ou des sanctions unilatérales. Ainsi, Cuba est jusqu’à nos jours victime de mesures coercitives occidentales ayant créé d’énormes dommages économiques. Le Venezuela souffre également de sanctions américaines car il ne se soumet toujours pas au diktat néolibéral des Etats-Unis. D’autres Etats sont aussi victimes de cette politique de force occidentale. Le dernier exemple de mesures coercitives unilatérales sont les sanctions économiques et politiques imposées à la Russie par les Etats-Unis et l’UE, en raison de son prétendu soutien militaire des séparatistes en Ukraine orientale. Aucune preuve concrète n’a été fournie, mais les sanctions ont été appliquées. On contraint les pays membres d’y participer bien que plusieurs des Etats membres, dont la Grèce et l’Autriche, se soient opposés à la prolongation des sanctions.


A la lecture du rapport remis par le groupe de travail demandé par le Comité consultatif, il apparaît clairement que ces sanctions unilatérales arbitraires sont très problématiques du point de vue des droits humains. Ce groupe a analysé la situation dans divers Etats soumis à un régime de sanctions: Cuba, Zimbabwe, Iran et la bande de Gaza. Les effets de ces sanctions sont catastrophiques et représentent clairement une atteinte aux droits de l’homme. Selon le rapport, les conséquences négatives dans les pays sanctionnés se font surtout remarquer au sein de la société civile, parce que ce sont «les plus faibles membres de la société, tels que les femmes, les enfants, les personnes âgées et handicapées et les pauvres» qui sont le plus touchés par les sanctions. Le groupe de travail recommande notamment de nommer un rapporteur spécial pour analyser et documenter les atteintes aux droits de l’homme suite à des mesures coercitives unilatérales.


En lisant ce rapport soigneusement, on peut s’imaginer les conséquences graves engendrées dans les pays concernés et leurs populations.

Cuba

Là, ce sont surtout les femmes et les enfants qui souffrent des sanctions. Le rapport révèle que «l’embargo a abouti à la malnutrition, notamment des enfants et des femmes, à un approvisionnement déficient en eau potable et à un manque de soins médicaux.» En outre, l’embargo «a limité l’accès de l’Etat à des produits chimiques et des pièces de rechange nécessaires à la fourniture d’eau potable» ce qui mène assurément à l’augmentation du taux de maladies et de décès. Etant donné que cet embargo dure depuis plus de 50 ans et n’a toujours pas été levé par le président Obama, on ne peut que deviner les souffrances endurées par le pays.

Zimbabwe

En 2002, l’UE a imposé des sanctions contre le gouvernement du pays. La raison de ces sanctions se trouve dans la réforme agraire effectuée sous la présidence de Robert Mugabe. Selon le rapport, les 13 millions d’habitants de ce pays souffrent des sanctions: «Les taux de pauvreté et de chômage sont très élevés, les infrastructures sont dans un état pitoyable. Des maladies telles que le SIDA, le typhus, le paludisme ont mené à une espérance de vie d’entre 53 et 55 ans […]. Selon une enquête de L’UNICEF, approximativement 35% des enfants en-dessous de 5 ans sont sous-développés, 2% ne grandissent pas normalement et 10% ont un poids insuffisant.» Le mauvais état au sein du pays mène, outre le taux de mortalité élevé, à une forte migration avec de gros risques.

Iran

Selon le rapport, la situation économique du pays et de la population est catastrophique. «Les sanctions ont mené à l’effondrement de l’industrie, à une inflation galopante et à un chômage massif.» Le système de santé publique est aussi gravement atteint en Iran. «Bien que les Etats-Unis et l’UE font valoir que les sanctions ne concernent pas les biens humanitaires, ils ont en réalité gravement entravé la disponibilité et la distribution de matériel médical et de médicaments […], chaque année, 85?000 Iraniens reçoivent le diagnostic d’un cancer. Le nombre d’établissements pouvant traiter ces malades par chimiothérapie ou par radiothérapie est largement insuffisant. Alors que les sanctions financières contre la République islamique d’Iran, ne concernent en principe pas le secteur des médicaments ou des instruments médicaux, elles empêchent en réalité les importateurs iraniens de financer l’importation de ces médicaments ou instruments.» Aucune banque occidentale n’a le droit de faire des affaires avec l’Iran. A travers l’impossibilité de payer les médicaments, produits uniquement en Occident mais nécessaires aux malades, les sanctions concernent donc indirectement aussi le secteur de la santé publique et la population.

Bande de Gaza

Selon le rapport, «le gouvernement israélien traite la bande de Gaza comme un territoire étranger et expose sa population à un grave blocus financier et économique. En juillet et août 2014, lors des combats de 52 jours, les bombes israéliennes ont détruit ou gravement endommagés plus de 53.000 bâtiments. Le blocus permanent viole les droits sociaux, économiques et culturels des habitants souffrant des mesures coercitives unilatérales. La malnutrition, notamment des enfants, n’arrête pas d’augmenter. Des dizaines de milliers de familles vivent dans les ruines de leurs maisons ou dans des containers sans chauffage, mis à disposition par l’administration locale. En décembre 2014, l’Office de secours et de travaux des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés de Palestine dans le Proche-Orient (UNRWA), a rapporté qu’un certain nombre d’enfants âgés de moins de 10 ans étaient morts de froid.» On apprend aussi que divers rapports de l’ONU et d’ONG mettent en garde contre la mauvaise qualité de l’eau potable, menaçant la santé d’un grand nombre de personnes.


Après la présentation du rapport du groupe de travail, les membres du Comité consultatif ont discuté entre eux. Puis le président du Comité a donné la parole aux ambassadeurs présents.
Le représentant diplomatique de Cuba a profité de l’occasion pour attirer l’attention sur le tort qu’exercent les sanctions américaines depuis 50 ans contre son pays. Il a fustigé ces sanctions en tant que violation des droits de l’homme. L’imposition de sanctions constitue un acte arbitraire représentant une ingérence dans les affaires intérieures d’un Etat étranger. Il a précisé qu’il ne voyait pas de changement dans l’attitude des Etats-Unis et a accusé celle-ci d’être une grave violation des droits de l’homme et à la Charte de l’ONU.


Le représentant diplomatique du Venezuela a renchéri en précisant que toute sanction est une ingérence inadmissible dans les affaires intérieures d’un Etat souverain. Le but de cette sanction est de provoquer un «changement de régime». L’ONU, c’est-à-dire le Conseil de sécurité, est la seule entité pouvant prendre des mesures contre un Etat; cela ne peut être en aucun cas un Etat puissant imposant son diktat de l’exercice du doit du plus fort à un certain pays refusant de s’y plier. A son avis, cela constitue clairement une violation des principes de la Charte de l’ONU.


Au cours de la 28e session du Conseil des droits de l’homme, du 2 au 27 mars, ce rapport, demandé en septembre 2013, sera présenté et voté. S’il est accepté, il n’y aura plus d’obstacle à la mise en place d’un rapporteur spécial et à l’établissement de normes internationales dans ce domaine.     •

Source: A/HRC/28/74 Research-based progress report oft the Human Rights Council Advisory Committee containing recommendations on mechanisms to assess the negative impact of unilateral coercive measures on the enjoyment of human rights and to promote accountability

mardi, 17 mars 2015

Une Alliance stratégique Iran/Russie/Egypte est-elle possible?

eg180736346.jpg

Une Alliance stratégique Iran/Russie/Egypte est-elle possible?

Ex: http://nationalemancipe.blogspot.com
 
Les crises régionales ont élargi la convergence politique Téhéran-Moscou, ce qui a amené un pays, comme l'Egypte, à être convergent avec l'Iran et la Russie, au sujet des dossiers régionaux. Le ministre russe de la Défense s'est rendu, du 19 au 21 janvier, à Téhéran, où il a rencontré ses pairs iraniens, et signé avec eux un accord, qui prévoit d'accroître la coopération militaire et défensive entre l'Iran et la Russie.
 
Dans un article, le Centre des études arabes et des recherches politiques a procédé à un décryptage de cette visite, première du genre, depuis 2002. Dans son analyse, ce Centre évoque la signature de cet accord de coopération entre l'Iran et la Russie, dans les domaines de la formation, de l'exécution des manœuvres, et écrit : les médias iraniens et russes ont qualifié cette visite de très importante, dans leurs estimations, et ont souligné que cette visite sera un point de départ, pour la constitution d'une alliance stratégique entre l'Iran et la Russie. Ces médias ont indiqué que Moscou avait signé avec l'Iran le contrat de la vente à Téhéran des missiles S-300, d'avions de combat de type "Soukhoï", "Mig-30", "Soukhoï 24", ainsi que des pièces détachées nécessaires. La récente visite, en Iran, du ministre russe de la Défense semble être considérée comme stratégique, car elle sert les intérêts des deux parties, les deux pays étant exposés aux pressions de l'Occident, l'Iran, pour son programme nucléaire, et la Russie, en raison de la crise d'Ukraine.

 Cependant, certains analystes ne sont pas aussi optimistes, quant à ces accords, et disent qu'ils ne sont pas le signe d'un changement stratégique, dans les relations Téhéran-Moscou, car la Russie n'a rien fait, pour empêcher l'adoption, par l'Occident, des sanctions contre l'Iran, et a, d'ailleurs voté, toutes les résolutions anti-iraniennes, adoptées par le Conseil de Sécurité de l'ONU. La Russie a exprimé son mécontentement des pourparlers Iran/Etats-Unis, à Oman, sans l'invitation faite à ce pays d'y assister. En plus, en 2010, la Russie a refusé d'honorer ses engagements, pour vendre le système de défense anti-aérienne S-300, dans le cadre d'un contrat, signé avec l'Iran, d'un montant de 800 millions de dollars. 
 
La Russie a achevé la centrale atomique de Boushehr, avec un retard de dix ans. De plus, les Russes ne voient pas d'un bon œil le programme nucléaire iranien, et c'est pour cela qu'ils se sont rapprochés, à cet égard, des Occidentaux. A cela, s'ajoute le fait que les Russes sont inquiets de l'accès à un accord entre l'Iran et l'Occident, car un tel accord permettra à l'Occident de s'approvisionner en énergie, auprès de l'Iran, et mettre, ainsi, fin à sa dépendance énergétique vis-à-vis de la Russie. 
 

ruiranic6408977_0.jpg

 
Cela étant dit, il y a de nombreux intérêts communs entre les deux pays, surtout, en ce qui concerne les dossiers régionaux, des intérêts communs, qui l'emportent sur les hésitations, les doutes et les divergences. A ce propos, le Directeur du Centre d'études et d'analyses stratégiques de Russie dit : «A l'instar de la Russie, l'Iran est opposé à la croissance et à la montée en puissance des groupes takfiris extrémistes, au Moyen-Orient. Affectés par la baisse du prix du pétrole, les deux pays réclament la hausse du prix du pétrole. 
En outre, les deux pays se trouvent, dans des positions similaires, dues aux sanctions, appliquées à leur encontre, par l'Occident. L'Iran et la Russie s'accordent, unanimement, à soutenir le gouvernement de Bachar al-Assad, en Syrie, et à freiner la montée en puissance et la croissance des groupes terroristes takfiris et extrémistes, comme «Daesh». Les deux pays sont d'avis que la montée en puissance d'un tel groupe et des groupes similaires, représente un défi important, pour leur politique régionale et internationale, ainsi que pour leurs intérêts nationaux.
 
 Mais cela ne s'arrête pas là. Les deux pays sont parvenus, récemment, à une autre convergence, sur le plan régional, qui est celle liée au dossier du Yémen, à telle enseigne, que Moscou, comme Téhéran, ont annoncé leur soutien au mouvement d'Ansarallah. Moscou est persuadée que le soutien au Mouvement d'Ansarallah fournira à ce pays la possibilité de reprendre ses chaleureuses et amicales relations avec le Yémen, qui marquaient les années de la guerre froide. Mais la raison la plus importante, qui conduit à cette convergence Téhéran/ Moscou, c'est leur position unie, face à l'Arabie Saoudite. Ils veulent mettre sous pression l'Arabie Saoudite, sur le plan régional, notamment, au Yémen. Depuis novembre, l'Arabie a abaissé le prix du pétrole, pour s'aligner sur les Etats-Unis, en vue d'exercer des pressions sur l'Iran et la Russie. En guise de réaction, la Russie a soutenu le Mouvement d'Ansarallah, qui fait partie de l'axe chiite, dans la région. Cet axe est considéré, actuellement, comme le plus important allié de Moscou, dans la région, pour faire face aux pays, tels que l'Arabie saoudite et aux groupes terroristes, comme «Al-Qaïda», en général, dans la région, et, en particulier, au Yémen.
 
 La Russie a tout fait, au Conseil de sécurité de l'ONU, pour l'empêcher de déclarer, comme étant illégaux, les développements, survenus au Yémen, pour justifier, ainsi, le recours à la force, afin de réprimer les révolutionnaires. Parallèlement à l'accroissement de la coordination et de la convergence politique entre l'Iran et la Russie envers des dossiers régionaux, dont le Yémen et la Syrie, le changement de position de l'Egypte envers la crise syrienne a suscité l'étonnement de beaucoup de gens. Cela a montré que le Caire s'inquiète, grandement, de la croissance et de la montée en puissance des groupes et courants salafistes et takfiris extrémistes. D'où sa position convergente avec celle de l'Iran et de la Russie sur la Syrie. Cette convergence politique du Caire avec Téhéran et Moscou ne se borne pas au dossier syrien, car elle s'est élargie aux évolutions yéménites, car l'Egypte ne voit pas dans la montée en puissance d'Ansarallah, au Yémen, une menace contre sa sécurité nationale.

mercredi, 11 mars 2015

Nieuwe Saudische koning probeert moslimcoalitie tegen Iran te vormen

iran_me1.jpg

Nieuwe Saudische koning probeert moslimcoalitie tegen Iran te vormen

Al 10.000 door Iran gecommandeerde troepen op 10 kilometer van grens Israël

Arabische media kiezen kant van Netanyahu tegen Obama

Breuk tussen Israël en VS brengt aanval op Iran dichterbij dan ooit

De sterk in opkomst zijnde Shia-islamitische halve maan zal zich tegen haar natuurlijke ‘berijder’ keren: Saudi Arabië, met in de ster op de kaart het centrum van de islam: Mekka.

De Saudische koning Salman, opvolger van de in januari overleden koning Abdullah, heeft de afgelopen 10 dagen gesprekken gevoerd met de leiders van alle vijf Arabische oliestaten, Jordanië, Egypte en Turkije, over de vorming van een Soenitische moslimcoalitie tegen het Shi’itische Iran. De Saudi’s hebben Iraanse bondgenoten de macht zien overnemen in Irak en Jemen, en weten dat zij zelf het uiteindelijke hoofddoel van de mullahs in Teheran zijn.

Grootste struikelblok voor de gewenste coalitie is de Moslim Broederschap, die gesteund wordt door Turkije en Qatar, maar in Egypte, Jordanië en Saudi Arabië juist als een terreurorganisatie wordt bestempeld. Koning Salman is dermate bevreesd voor een nucleair bewapend Iran, dat hij inmiddels bereid lijkt om ten aanzien van de Broederschap concessies te doen.

Saudi Arabië zal worden vernietigd

In zo’n 2500 jaar oude Bijbelse profetieën wordt voorzegd dat de Perzen (Elam = Iran) uiteindelijke (Saudi) Arabië zullen aanvallen (Jesaja 21). Jordanië (Edom en Moab) zal hoogstwaarschijnlijk ten prooi vallen aan Turkije (Daniël 11:41), dat eveneens Egypte zal aanvallen. Saudi Arabië komt dan alleen te staan en zal totaal worden vernietigd (Jeremia 49:21).

Het land waarin de islam is ontstaan voelt de bui al enige tijd hangen en probeert nu bijna wanhopig ‘het beest’ waar ze eeuwen op gereden heeft, gunstig te stemmen. Turkije zal echter nooit de alliantie met de Moslim Broederschap opgeven, net zoals Egypte nooit de Broederschap zal steunen.

Het beest dat de hoer haat

Enkele jaren geleden schreven we dat Turkije een geheim samenwerkingspact gesloten heeft met Iran. Beide landen hebben historische vendetta’s met de Saudi’s, die de Ottomaanse Turken verrieden met Lawrence van Arabië. Ook de vijandschap tussen het Wahabitische huis van Saud en de Iraanse Shi’iten bestaat al eeuwen.

Bizar: ISIS is oorspronkelijk een ‘uitvinding’ van de Wahabieten en niet de Shi’iten, maar streeft desondanks toch naar het einde van het Saudische koninkrijk. Hetzelfde geldt voor de Moslim Broederschap, Hezbollah en andere islamitische terreurgroepen. Dit is exact zoals de Bijbel het voorzegd heeft: de volken en landen van ‘het beest’ zullen ‘de hoer van Babylon’ haten, zich omkeren en haar verscheuren / met vuur verbranden.

Arabische media kiezen kant van Netanyahu tegen Obama

De Arabieren vallen zelf Israël echter (nog) niet aan omdat de Joodse staat een onverklaarde bondgenoot is tegen Iran. Onlangs zouden de Saudi’s zelfs hun luchtruim hebben opengesteld voor de Israëlische luchtmacht, nadat bekend werd dat de Amerikaanse president Obama vorig jaar dreigde Israëlische vliegtuigen boven Irak neer te schieten toen de regering Netanyahu op het punt stond Iran aan te vallen.

Diverse toonaangevende Arabische media kozen afgelopen week openlijk de kant van de Israëlische premier, nadat hij in diens toespraak voor het Amerikaanse Congres de toenadering van Obama tot Iran impliciet fel bekritiseerd had. Netanyahu’s woorden onderstreepten dat er de facto een breuk tussen Amerika en Israël is ontstaan, die zolang Obama president is niet meer zal worden geheeld. Dit brengt een Israëlische aanval op Iran dichterbij dan ooit tevoren (4).

Het is al jaren bekend dat Obama Netanyahu haat, en andersom is er eveneens sprake van groot wantrouwen en minachting. Net als in Jeruzalem ziet men ook in bijna alle Arabische Golfstaten, maar vooral in Saudi Arabië, Obama liever vandaag dan morgen verdwijnen.

In Iran wordt nog steeds ‘dood aan Amerika’ geschreeuwd

Wrang genoeg voor Washington geldt dat ook voor Iran. ‘Allahu Akbar! Khamenei is de leider. Dood aan de vijanden van de leider. Dood aan Amerika. Dood aan Engeland. Dood aan de hypocrieten. Dood aan Israël!’ schreeuwden Iraanse officieren begin februari toen Khamenei vol trots verklaarde dat Iran uranium tot 20% verrijkt had, terwijl hij Obama uitdrukkelijk had beloofd dit niet te doen.

Deze oorlogskreet wordt al sinds 1979 dagelijks gebezigd in Iran. In dat jaar liet de Amerikaanse president Jimmy Carter toe dat de hervormingsgezinde Shah van Iran werd afgezet door de extremistische Ayatollah Khomeini. Het onmiddellijke gevolg was een bloederige oorlog met Irak, waarbij meer dan één miljoen doden vielen.

Al 10.000 Iraanse troepen bij grens Israël

Zodra het door Turkije en Iran geleide rijk van ‘het beest’ Israël aanvalt, zullen Sheba en Dedan, de Saudi’s en de Golfstaten, enkel toekijken (Ezechiël 38:13). Dat we snel deze laatste fase van de eindtijd naderen blijkt uit het feit dat er op dit moment in Syrië al zo’n 10.000 door Iran gecommandeerde troepen – ‘vrijwilligers’ uit Iran, Irak en Afghanistan- op slechts 10 kilometer van de Israëlische grens staan. Dat zouden er in de toekomst 100.000 of zelfs meer kunnen worden (2)(3).

Het Vaticaan ‘de hoer’ en vervolger van christenen?

Terwijl de Bijbelse eindtijdprofetieën overduidelijk voor onze eigen ogen in vervulling gaan zijn veel Westerse christenen hier nog steeds blind voor, omdat hen geleerd is dat ‘de hoer’ het Vaticaan is, en de ‘valse profeet’ een toekomstige paus is die de grote wereldreligies met elkaar zal verenigen, daar het evangelie voor zal opofferen en katholieken en andere christenen (!) zal laten onthoofden omdat ze dit zullen weigeren.

Als ‘de hoer’ het Vaticaan is, dan zou dat echter betekenen dat de katholieke/ christelijke landen waar zij op ‘zit’ haar zullen aanvallen en verbranden. Denken mensen nog steeds serieus dat andere landen in Europa Rome zullen aanvallen, terwijl moslim terreurgroepen zoals ISIS regelmatig openlijk dreigen om in de nabije toekomst Italië binnen te vallen en het Vaticaan te vernietigen? Terwijl christenen in Irak, Egypte, Syrië, Nigeria en andere moslimlanden nu al worden vermoord en onthoofd vanwege hun geloof en omdat weigeren zich te bekeren tot de islam (= het beest te aanbidden)?

Moderne ‘Torens van Babel’ in Mekka

In eerdere artikelenstudies (zie hyperlinks onderaan) voerden we uitgebreid Bijbels bewijs aan –en geen giswerk theorieën- dat ‘de hoer van Babylon’, ‘dronken van het bloed der heiligen en van het bloed der getuigen van Jezus’ zich precies daar bevindt waar Johannes haar zag: in ‘de woestijn’ (Openbaring 17:3). Alleen al hierom kan het nooit om Rome, New York of Brussel gaan. De 7 gigantische torens bij het Ka’aba complex in Mekka –het grootste ter wereld- worden plaatselijk zelfs letterlijk ‘De berg Babel’ genoemd.

Eindtijd: Niet Europa of Amerika, maar Israël centraal

Niet Europa, niet Amerika en ook niet Rusland staan centraal in de Bijbelse eindtijdprofetieën van zowel het Oude als het Nieuwe Testament –al spelen zij natuurlijk wel een rol-, maar het Midden Oosten, Israël en de omringende moslimwereld. Pas als de coalitie van het (moslim)beest Israël aanvalt –bedenk dat de islam zichzelf omschrijft als ‘het beest uit de afgrond’!- met de bedoeling de Joodse staat weg te vagen en de laatste resten van het christendom in het Midden Oosten uit te roeien, zal de Messias, Jezus Christus, in eigen persoon neerdalen, tussenbeide komen en alle vijanden vernietigend verslaan.

Xander

(1) Reuters via Shoebat
(2) American Thinker
(3) The Christian Monitor
(4) KOPP

mercredi, 04 mars 2015

Today's news on http://www.atimes.com

news2.jpg

Today's news on http://www.atimes.com

To read full article, click on title


Tackling Tehran: Netanyahu vs Obama
As negotiations over Iran's nuclear program continued in Europe, Israeli Premier Netanyahu told US Congress he feared the White House was close to striking a "very bad" deal. The absence of dozens of Democrats and the cheers that greeted his warnings of a "nuclear tinderbox" demonstrated the divisive nature of the issue in Washington. - James Reinl (Mar 4, '15)

Obama's nuclear squeeze
Netanyahu's address to the US Congress will have no effect on the future modalities of US-Iran nuclear negotiations. But if he can nudge Congress not to relax sanctions on Iran, even after a nuclear deal, then Tehran might retaliate by reversing some agreed upon issues of those intricate negotiations. - Ehsan Ahrari (Mar 4, '15)

Iran squashes IS, US seeks cover
An operation by Iraqi government forces to recapture Tikrit, north of Baghdad, from Islamic State militants, has resulted in fierce fighting around the town, seen as the spiritual heartland of Saddam Hussein's Ba'athist regime. This hugely important development has three dimensions. - M K Bhadrakumar (Mar 4,'15)

Israeli ex-generals condemn Netanyahu
In an unprecedented move, 200 veterans of the Israeli security services have accused Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of being a “danger” to Israel, their protest coming on the even of his visit to address a joint meeting of the US Congress against the wishes of the White House. - Jonathan Cook (Mar 2, '15)


The Middle East and perpetual war
There is a popular idea in Washington, DC, that the United States ought to be doing more to quash the Islamic State: if we don't, they will send terrorists to plague our lives. Previously, the canard was that we had to intervene in the Middle East to protect the flow of oil to the West. So why in fact are we there? The only answer is: "Israel". - Leon Anderson (Mar 2, '15)



A Chechen role in Nemtsov murder?
For many in Russia and the West, the Kremlin is inevitably the prime suspect in the assassination of opposition leader Boris Nemtsov. But the possibility of a Chechen connection should not be dismissed out of hand, given Nemtsov's repeated criticism of Chechen Republic head Ramzan Kadyrov. (Mar 4, '15)

Obama, Shell, and the Arctic Ocean's fate
Despite the glut of new American oil on the market (and falling oil prices), not to mention a recent bow to preservation of the Arctic, the Obama administration stands at the edge of once again green-lighting a foray by oil giant Shell into Arctic waters. - Subhankar Banerjee (Mar 4, '15)


Germany's future lies East
Germany, sooner or later, must answer a categorical imperative - how to keep running massive trade surpluses while dumping its euro trade partners. The only possible answer is more trade with Russia, China and East Asia. It will take quite a while, but a Berlin-Moscow-Beijing commercial axis is all but inevitable. - Pepe Escobar (Mar 3, '15)

 

Sven Hedin's journeys in Iran

Sven-Hedinqqqza.jpg

Sven Hedin's journeys in Iran

Ex: http://svenhedin.com

Sven Hedin is Sweden’s greatest explorer and adventurer of all time. He was born in Stockholm 1865 and decided to follow this path in his early teens. The first step in his career came when he in 1885, as a 20-year-old, had the opportunity to travel to Baku, Azerbaijan, to work as a private tutor for the son of a Swedish engineer in the Nobel-owned oil industry. When Hedin had fulfilled his duties as a tutor, he set out on a three month journey through Persia – today’s Iran (Hedin 1887). This was the beginning of a lifelong love affair with Iran’s rich nature, history and culture and he was to return twice (Wahlquist 2007).

svenhedinuuuu.jpgHedin’s (1891) second visit to Iran was as a member of the Swedish King Oscar II’s diplomatic mission to the Persian king Nasr-ed-din Shah in 1890. After the formal assignment Hedin followed the Shah to the Elburz Mountains and made a successful attempt to ascend Mount Damāvand – a snow capped volcano reaching 5,671 meters above sea level and also the highest mountain in the Middle East. This achievement constituted the basis for Hedin’s (1892a) doctoral dissertation two years later. Before returning to Sweden Hedin set off on a reconnaissance trip from Tehran towards Central Asia that took him all the way to Kashgar in westernmost China. Along this route he got a first glimpse of Iran’s central salt desert, the Dasht-e Kavir (Hedin 1892b). The following decade Hedin conducted two extended scientific expeditions focusing on the deserts of Xinjiang and the high plateau of Tibet.

Hedin’s (1910) third expedition, 1905-1908, had like the previous two, the Tibetan plateau as primary goal, but he decided to take an approach route through the deserts of eastern Persia – overland to India. This resulted in a two volume scientific work with a detailed series of maps of Iran based on his 232 sheets of original map sketches (Hedin 1918). Hedin was interested in long term environmental changes and on the Tibetan plateau he had found how lakes dry up, lose their outlets and become salty. The vast deserts and drainage-less basins of Iran provided him with an area for comparative research (Wahlquist 2007). Hedin was a relentless field researcher and recorded all information he could get in the form of diaries, photographs, drawings and water colors. He developed a method of capturing the landscape by making panorama drawings at all his camps that were incredibly accurate (Dahlgren, Rosén, and W:son Ahlmann 1918).

The main objective for our expedition in April-May 2013 was to follow Hedin’s 1906 route through the deserts of eastern Persia and follow up on his geographic and ethnographic observations, with the purpose of revealing changes that have taken place during the last century. In particular this would be done by locating Hedin’s historical camera positions and make repeated photographs that exactly match the originals. A second objective was to repeat Hedin’s most spectacular adventures in Iran – the crossing of Iran’s central salt desert and his ascent of Mount Damāvand in 1890.

For anyone interested in further readings about Sven Hedin’s journey’s through Persia, the works referenced in this article and listed below are the most important sources.

References

Dahlgren, Erik W., Karl D. P. Rosén, and Hans W:son Ahlmann. 1918. “Sven Hedins Forskningar I Södra Tibet 1906-1908: En Granskande Öfversikt.” In Ymer, 38:101–186. Stockholm, Sweden: Svenska sällskapet för antropologi och geografi.

Hedin, Sven. 1887. Genom Persien, Mesopotamien Och Kaukasien: Reseminnen. Stockholm, Sweden: Albert Bonniers.
———. 1891. Konung Oscars Beskickning till Schahen Af Persien. Stockholm: Samson & Wallin.
———. 1892a. “Der Demavend, Nach Eigener Beobachtung”. Inaugural dissertation, Halle, Germany: University of Halle.
———. 1892b. Genom Khorasan Och Turkestan. 2 vols. Stockholm, Sweden: Samson & Wallin.
———. 1910. Öfver Land till Indien: Genom Persien, Seistan Och Belutjistan. 2 vols. Stockholm, Sweden: Albert Bonniers.
———. 1918. Eine Routenaufnahme durch Ostpersien. 2 vols. Stockholm, Sweden: Generalstabens litografiska anstalt.

Wahlquist, Håkan. 2007. From Damavand to Kevir: Sven Hedin and Iran 1886-1906. Tehran, Iran: Embassy of Sweden.

00:05 Publié dans Eurasisme | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0) | Tags : sven hedin, iran, explorateurs, asie, eurasie, eurasisme, suède | |  del.icio.us | | Digg! Digg |  Facebook

mardi, 03 février 2015

Iranian Intervention in Iraq against the Islamic State

Members-of-Irans-revoluti-012.jpg

Iranian Intervention in Iraq against the Islamic State: Strategy, Tactics and Impact

Publication: Terrorism Monitor

By: Nima Adelkhah

The Jamestown Foundation & http://www.moderntokyotimes.com

A deliberately gory June 2014 report on the Shi’a Ahl al-Bayt website, no doubt intended to arouse emotions, shows a photo of the bloodied face of Alireza Moshajari. It describes him as the first of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) to have become a “martyr” in defense of the sacred shrine of Karbala against the then Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, now the Islamic State. Karbala, one of the most important Shi’a holy sites, is the battlefield where Hussein, the grandson of the Prophet, fought and died a martyr’s death (Ahl al-Bayat, June 16, 2014). The site also shows other photos of Moshajari posing for a camera in a western Iranian province, apparently preparing to depart for Iraq.

A month later, in July 2014, reports of the death of another member of the IRGC, Kamal Shirkhani in Samarra, further indicated an Iranian troop presence deep inside in Iraq (Basijpress, July 8, 2014). More significant, however, was the December 2014 news of the death of Iranian Brigadier General Hamid Taqavi, while he was on an “advisory” mission in Iraq (Mehr News, December 29, 2014; Fars News, December 29, 2014). He was the highest-ranking Iranian officer to be killed in Iraq since the 1980-1988 war. Taqavi had reportedly been assassinated by the Islamic State in Samarra (Fars News, January 5).

While Iran has continuously and publicly denied having a formal troop presence in Iraq, with IRGC officials saying that Iran has no need to have an army in its neighboring country, the evidence suggests a growing trend of Iranian military activities in certain regions of Iraq deemed critical to Tehran and are related to Iran’s efforts to contain the Islamic State (Fars News, September 22, 2014). However, this trend, which apparently has been growing since summer 2014, is less about expanding Iran’s power and is more a defensive strategic attempt to prevent the Islamic State from undermining two of Iran’s two core interests in Iraq: the security of its borders and the protection of Shi’a shrines there. Unlike Iran’s strategy in Syria, which is primarily about preserving the Assad regime even at the expense of fostering sectarianism, Tehran is keen to prevent its Shi’a-dominated neighbor from developing a sectarian mindset that could potentially have wider negative implications for Iran in the region.

Iran’s Islamic State Problem

As a militant organization emerging from the Syrian civil war, but whose core originates in the earlier anti-U.S. insurgency in Iraq, the Islamic State has not only forcefully established a military presence in regions of Iraq and Syria, but has done so as an intensely sectarian force. Driven by its view that Shi’as are infidels, the Islamic State’s military expansion in Syria, which spilled over into Iraq in summer 2014, has exacerbated tit-for-tat sectarian conflicts in both countries which have increasingly worried the Islamic Republic, the world’s largest Shi’a state.

Iran’s concern over the Islamic State is fourfold:

  1. Firstly, the military onslaught by the forces of the self-declared Sunni caliphate has, at times, posed an immediate threat to Iran’s west central provinces bordering Iraq, such as Ilam and Kermanshah. Though Iranian officials publically claim that the Islamic State does not have the capacity to attack Iran, there has been clear concern about the militants’ takeover of relatively nearby Iraqi cities such as Hawija and Mosul (Tabnak, July 2, 2014). The Islamic State’s further rapid take-over of Khanaqin, eastern Diyala and areas near the Iranian border in early summer 2014 underlined the threat to Iran’s borders (Shafaq, October 8, 2014). Such developments have triggered an outbreak of conspiracy theories in Iran. For instance, one cleric argued that the Islamic State originally wanted to attack Iran instead of Syria, as part of a larger Western conspiracy against the Islamic Republic (Sepaheqom, December 31, 2014). Such conspiratorial views echo a belief by many Iranian officials that the Islamic State is a U.S. creation and that its aim is to sow discord and conflict in a region where Iran claims dominance.
  2. The second Iranian concern is also connected with border security, this time in the form of Iranian fears of a refugee crisis arising from Islamic State attacks (Khabar Online, June 15, 2014). The refugee wave from Islamic State-affected areas of Iraq, similar to that which Iran saw from Afghanistan in the 1980s, is seen by Iran as posing significant security threat to the region and an economic burden to its economy, which is already struggling under U.S.-led sanctions (al-Arabiya, October 28, 2014).
  3. Iran’s third concern is over growing sympathies among Iran’s Sunni minority for Sunni sectarian groups such as the Islamic State. Fears of Islamic State influence in southeastern regions and northwestern Kurdistan, which have large Sunni populations, continue to pose a major problem for the Islamic Republic (Terrorism Monitor, December 13, 2013). In particular, there are fears that political-military movements such as Ahle Sunnat-e Iran (a.k.a. Jaysh al-Adl, Army of Justice), an offshoot of the Jundallah (Soldiers of God) militant group, may be inspired by the Islamic State or even that such groups may collaborate with the group to conduct insurgency operations inside Iran (Mehr News, August 15, 2014).
  4. The fourth reason for Iran’s concern is the religious dimension, perhaps the most significant to many Iranian government and military operatives. Iraq is home to a number of key Shi’a shrines, and Samarra – home to one of the most important such shrines – is on the frontline of the ongoing struggle against the Islamic State. Located 80 miles away from Baghdad and a short distance south of Tikrit, a Sunni Iraqi stronghold where there is some sympathy for the Islamic State, Samarra is where Iranian forces have mostly concentrated, due to the religious importance of the shrine and its vulnerability to Sunni militants. Apparently working under the assumption that United States’s objectives against the Islamic State are only to protect the Kurds, a primary mission of Iranian forces is to protect Samarra’s al-Askar shrine, whose dome had been previously destroyed by Salafist militants in February 2006.

It is, therefore, no coincidence that most announcements of Iranian deaths in Iraq have related to Samarra and that such announcements also deliberately emphasize the religious angle. For example, public announcements of the death of Mehdi Noruzi, a member of Iran’s Basij militia who was apparently nicknamed “Lion of Samarra” and was killed by the Islamic State in that city, highlighted the religious dimension of the conflict in order to arouse religious fervor and, hence, public support (Fars News, January 12; al-Arabiya, January 12). A further example is that all the 29 Iranian deaths reported in December 2014 most likely took place in and around Samarra, as with the death of an Iranian military pilot, Colonel Shoja’at Alamdari Mourjani, who likely died on the ground in the vicinity of the city (al-Jazeera, July 5, 2014). Underlining the importance of Samarra and other shrines to Iran, a June 2014 statement by Qom-based Grand Ayatollah Naser Makarem Shirazi called for jihad against the takfiri (apostate) Islamic State in defense of Iraq and Shi’a shrines. This was partly meant as a religious decree intended to swiftly mobilize support for countering the Islamic State onslaught. His fatwa can also be seen as a move, most likely backed by Tehran, intended to help the government recruit volunteers to fight in Iraq.

Military Intervention

While the U.S.-led air-campaign has curtailed the Islamic State’s progress since August, Iranian forces on the ground have also played a critical role in limiting its advance into northeast and southcentral Iraq. Iran’s support for Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga forces, as well as for Iraq’s army and militia forces, has also played a key role.

As illustrated by the recent death of Brigadier General Hamid Taqavi, the Iranian military mission includes high-ranking members, including General Qasem Soleimani, the commander of Iran’s special operations Quds Force. Iranian military activities in Iraq appear to largely concentrate along the Iraq-Iran border and in key Shi’a shrine cities, most importantly Samarra, for the reasons stated above. Meanwhile, ten divisions of Iran’s regular army are reportedly stationed along the Iraqi borders, ready for military confrontation (Gulf News, June 26, 2014).

In the conflict against the Islamic State, the Quds Force paramilitary operatives play an integral role, notably in training and commanding Iraqi forces, especially Sadrist and other militia groups such as Kataib al-Imam Ali (al-Arabiya, January 9). Typically, this has involved recruiting and training Shi’a Iraqi volunteers in camps in various Iraqi provinces, including Baghdad (ABNA 24, June 16, 2014). Quds officers have also reportedly been directly active in key hubs of the conflict, such as the siege of Amerli in northern Iraq, where Kurdish and Shi’a militia forces eventually defeated the Islamic State, with the input of Soleimani, in September 2014 (al-Jazeera, September 1, 2014; Gulf News, October 6, 2014).

The Lebanese Hezbollah group also plays a role in both training volunteers and conducting military operations in key battles against the Islamic State, as in the October 2014 attack on Islamic State positions in Jurf al-Sakhr, southwest of Baghdad, which reportedly involved 7,000 Iraqi troops, including militiamen (Al-Monitor, November 6, 2014; al-Arabiya, November 5, 2014). Meanwhile, the role of established Shi’a Iraqi militias such as the Badr Organization, led by Hadi al-Amiri, appears to be to support Iran’s training of volunteers, though the Badr force has also participated directly in joint military operations against the Islamic State (Al-Monitor, November 28, 2014). In an unprecedented way, therefore, Iran is currently uniting Shi’a militias to fight a common, perhaps existential enemy of Shi’as: Sunni radicalism.

Iranian deployment of ground troops, however, has been only one part of its broader military operation in Iraq. Alongside military operations, Iran has also shared intelligence with Kurdish and Iraqi forces, and allegedly installed intelligence units at various airfields to intercept the Islamic State communications (al-Jazeera, January 3). There are also reports of Iran sending domestically-built Adabil drones to Iraq to help the government against the Islamic State, highlighting Iran’s growing unmanned aerial surveillance capability (Gulf News, June 26, 2014). Such intelligence sharing and military coordination against the Islamic State is likely to be most significant in eastern Iraq, in areas closest to Iran (al-Jazeera, December 3, 2014; al-Arabiya, January 16). Thanks to agreements signed between Iran and Iraq in late November 2013, the dispatch of weapons to Iraq has likely considerably increased since summer 2014 (al-Jazeera, February 24, 2014; Press TV, June 26, 2014).

 

politique internationale,géopolitique,iran,eiil,hezbollah,isis,levant,syrie,irak,chiites,chiisme

 

A Strategic Outline: National and Regional Impact

In an October 12 interview, Brigadier Yadollah Javani, the head of the IRGC’s political bureau argued that the Islamic State had failed to capture Baghdad because of Iran’s military support for the Iraqi government (Iranian Students News Agency, October 12, 2014). This may be true on a tactical level, but in a longer-term strategic sense Tehran’s effort in Iraq may yet lead to unintended consequences that could yet threaten its wider interests in the region.

The most significant impact of Iran’s interference in Iraq is likely to be sectarian. Iran, of course, is aware of the potentially radicalizing impact of its operations among Sunnis and the main reason it keep its military operations low profile is to avoid inflaming such sectarian tensions (al-Jazeera, July 5, 2014). However, Tehran’s efforts have not been entirely effective. Anti-Iranian views in the (Sunni) Arab media are widespread, and these primarily describe Iran’s intervention in Iraq as part of a sinister, broader strategy (al-Sharq al-Awsat, January 13). Meanwhile, in Iraq itself, despite Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi’s efforts to bring Sunni Arabs into the government, not only in the provinces but also in Baghdad, the outcome of this process remains to be seen. For the most part, Sunni Arabs still feel marginalized and the potential for them to support the Islamic State remains high (al-Jazeera, January 3). Iran is likely to fear that such Sunni resentment may further encourage Saudi Arabia to involve itself in Iraq as a way to curtail Iran’s growing influence there.

Often overlooked, there is also the intra-Shi’a impact of Iran’s involvement, which Tehran appears understandably keen to downplay. Various Shi’a groups and figures continue to compete for influence in southern Iraq, with the interests of non-Iranian Shi’as being best represented by Najaf-based Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani. Sistani, the highest-ranking cleric in the Shi’a world and weary of repeated Iranian involvement in Iraq since 2003, has distanced himself from Soleimani and Iran’s military presence in Iraq. In fact, Sistani’s representative has argued that the cleric’s important summer 2014 fatwa calling for volunteers to resist the Islamic State was meant for Iraqis and not for Iranian Shi’as (Al-Monitor, December 2, 2014). How Sistani will respond to a continued Iranian presence in Iraq and in key shrine cities, especially after the Islamic State threat eventually wanes, remains to be seen. While it is likely that Sistani will continue to encourage some pragmatic cooperation with Tehran against the Islamic State, he will not accept a prolonged Iranian military presence in Iraq. This underlines that while the long-term implications of Iranian intervention in Iraq are unclear, for now at least Iran’s military intervention in Iraq has effectively united Shi’as against the Islamic State.

Nima Adelkhah is an independent analyst based in New York. His current research agenda includes the Middle East, military strategy and technology, and nuclear proliferation among other defense and security issues.

Files: TerrorismMonitorVol13Issue2_03.pdf

http://www.jamestown.org/single/?tx_ttnews%5Btt_news%5D=43442&tx_ttnews%5BbackPid%5D=7&cHash=1be59fb552739f9274873ae03b834d14#.VMkeGMb6nLU

The Jamestown Foundation kindly allows Modern Tokyo Times to publish their highly esteemed articles. Please follow and check The Jamestown Foundation website at http://www.jamestown.org/

https://twitter.com/JamestownTweets The Jamestown Foundation

mercredi, 31 décembre 2014

L’Iran, il y a cinquante ans

iran_shah.png

Erich Körner-Lakatos :

L’Iran, il y a cinquante ans

Le 5 octobre 1964, six chefs de tribu sont exécutés dans la ville iranienne de Shiraz parce qu’ils ont saboté la réforme agraire de l’Empereur Mohammed Reza Pahlevi qui, à partir du 15 septembre 1965 portera le titre d’Aryamehr, de « Soleil des Aryens ». Cette réforme agraire, appelée « révolution blanche », consiste à déposséder largement les latifundistes iraniens qui, dorénavant, ne pourront plus considérer comme leur plus d’un seul village. Les possessions féodales seront redistribuées aux paysans qui travaillent véritablement la terre. Le processus enclenché par la « révolution blanche » fait qu’à la fin de l’été 1964, 9570 villages ont été redistribués à 333.186 familles paysannes, ce qui équivaut à une population de 1.665.930 âmes. Le Shah a ainsi éliminé la caste entière des latifundistes. C’est là un événement qui laisse tous les penseurs marxistes perplexes qui véhiculent l’idée (fausse) que les grands propriétaires exploiteurs étaient le soutien de la monarchie iranienne. Le Shah de la dynastie Pahlevi était très populaire auprès du petit paysannat. Les mollahs chiites partisans de Khomeini, eux, haïssent le monarque, parce que leur influence est liée à celle des latifundistes évincés. Khomeini présentera la note au régime monarchique en 1979 et chassera le Shah et sa famille. Un an plus tard, le Roi des rois s’éteint en exil.

(article paru dans « zur Zeit », Vienne, n°45/2014 ; http://www.zurzeit.at ).

00:05 Publié dans Histoire | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0) | Tags : années 60, histoire, iran, shah d'iran, moyen orient | |  del.icio.us | | Digg! Digg |  Facebook

mercredi, 24 décembre 2014

Deutsche Geheimmission in Persien

image-778450-galleryV9-zule.jpg

Deutsche Geheimmission in Persien
 
Hauptmann Kleins Heiliger Krieg
  

Er hetzte zum Dschihad auf und ließ Ölpipelines sprengen: Hauptmann Fritz Klein führte im Orient einen Guerillakrieg gegen die Feinde des Kaiserreichs. Ein Historiker hat bislang unbekannte Dokumente des vergessenen Offiziers ausgewertet.

Von

Ex: http://www.spiegel.de

Die vier deutschen Soldaten waren verloren, Tausende Kilometer von der Heimat entfernt. Die Stadt Amara im heutigen Irak, umschlossen vom mächtigen Tigris und einem Überschwemmungsgebiet, wurde zur "Mausefalle", wie Anführer Hans Lührs es nannte. Die wichtigste Brücke war zerstört und aus der Ferne rückte schon der Feind an.

"Das Artilleriefeuer der Engländer kam immer näher", schreibt Lührs später. "Wir sahen in einer Flussbiegung bereits die Rauchfahnen der feindlichen Schiffe." Eine Granate schlug neben ihm ein, sein Hengst bäumte sich auf und galoppierte davon.

Fernab der Schlachtfelder in Europa lieferten sich die Kontrahenten des Ersten Weltkriegs auch im Orient einen unbarmherzigen Stellvertreterkrieg. Die Taktik auf beiden Seiten war ähnlich: neue Verbündete finden, Aufstände in gegnerischen Einflussgebieten anzetteln, feindliche Kräfte an der Kriegsperipherie binden.

Schulversager, Sitzenbleiber, Weltenbummler

Die Briten hatten für solche Aktionen Lawrence von Arabien. Der legendäre Archäologe und Geheimagent wiegelte die Araber gegen das wankende Osmanische Reich auf, den Bündnispartner des Kaiserreichs. Und die Deutschen? Nun, sie hatten - Hauptmann Fritz Klein aus dem westfälischen Siegerland.

"Klein von Arabien" hat den Mann glücklicherweise nie jemand genannt; es würde wohl auch lächerlich klingen. Aber: Kleins Männer haben ihre Aufgabe später zu Recht mit der von Lawrence von Arabien verglichen, und womöglich könnte ihre völlig unbekannte Mission nun etwas bekannter werden: Der Historiker Veit Veltzke hat eine Studie ("Unter Wüstensöhnen", Nicolai-Verlag) über die vergessene Orientmission geschrieben. Veltzke konnte dabei auf einen wahren Quellenschatz zurückgreifen: Der 95-jährige Sohn Fritz Kleins hatte dem Historiker den Nachlass seines Vaters übergeben - neben Aufzeichnungen auch rund 500 Fotos.

Veitzke spürte weitere Quellen auf, darunter das Kriegstagebuch der Expedition im Archiv des Auswärtigen Amtes. Am Ende stand für ihn fest: Fritz Kleins Mission war nicht nur die "vielseitigste" deutsche Orientexpedition - sondern auch die "mit dem greifbarsten Erfolg". Sie sei auch deshalb vergleichsweise erfolgreich gewesen, weil sich der eigensinnige Hauptmann nur bedingt an die Order seiner Vorgesetzten hielt.

"Schlag ins Herz der britischen Admiralität"

Klein träumte von einer engen deutsch-persischen Achse, die - und das war neu - möglichst unabhängig vom Einfluss des Osmanischen Reiches sein sollte. Konstantinopel verfolgte eigene imperialistische Ziele in der Region, die Klein ziemlich undiplomatisch als "geradezu blödsinnige Eroberungsgelüste" geißelte, weil sie jedes deutsch-persische Bündnis gefährden würden. Klein hingegen sah in Persien langfristig "ungeheure Kultur- und Wirtschaftsperspektiven" für das Kaiserreich.

Der Mann, der die Bevölkerung im heutigen Iran und Irak gegen die dort einflussreichen Briten und Russen aufwiegeln wollte, hatte schon als Kind seinen eigenen Kopf. Die Schulzeit war für ihn ein einziger "Bildungswahnsinn", angelerntes Wissen empfand er als "Ballast". Stattdessen habe er sich stets von seinem Menschenverstand und einem "unbezähmbaren Freiheitsdrang" treiben lassen - und fuhr damit erstaunlich gut: Klein reiste um die Welt, ging zur Armee und arbeitete ab 1911 für jeweils ein Jahr als Militärattaché in Rio de Janeiro, Kairo und Teheran.

Seine Erfahrungen dort halfen ihm, als das Auswärtige Amt nach dem Kriegsausbruch nach Personal für Geheimaufträge im Orient suchte. Klein brachte sich selbst ins Gespräch und wurde Ende 1914 zum Leiter eines verwegenen Kommandos: Die Deutschen sollten mithilfe arabischer Stämme die Ölpipelines der Briten am Persischen Golf sprengen - und damit die Treibstoff-Nachfuhr für die Marine kappen. Die Aktion sollte, so hoffte der Generalstab, "ein Schlag ins Herz der britischen Admiralität" werden.

So ungewöhnlich wie die Mission war auch ihre Zusammensetzung: Klein vertraute einer bunten Truppe von sprachgewandten Abenteurern, Archäologen, Kaufleuten und Ingenieuren. Zu seinem wichtigsten Mitarbeiter ernannte er Edgar Stern, den späteren Ullstein-Chefredakteur. 69 Männer machten den Kern seiner Expedition aus, zeitweise kamen noch 306 österreichisch-ungarische Soldaten hinzu, die aus russischer Gefangenschaft entflohen waren. Unterstellt waren sie der türkischen Armee, die damals von Bagdad aus Teile des heutigen Irak kontrollierte, allerdings schon von Briten und Russen bedrängt wurde.

Klein wollte in der Ferne mehr als nur Ölleitungen zerstören. Er improvisierte, sobald er ein Problem sah. Als der türkischen Flotte auf Euphrat und Tigris die Kohle ausging, fahndeten seine Männer nach neuen Kohlevorkommen. Geleitet wurde die hastig errichtete Mine von einem österreichischen Schlosser, die Logistik besorgte mit 1000 Kamelen ein deutscher Oberkellner. Kleins Ingenieure konstruierten auch lenkbare Flussminen und versuchten, wenig erfolgreich, ein Mittel gegen Heuschreckenplagen zu finden.

Vor allem aber hoffte Klein, "den Heiligen Krieg auch nach Persien hineinzutragen". Zwar hatte das sunnitische Osmanische Reich 1914 schon zum Dschihad gegen seine Feinde aufgerufen - aber was war mit den schiitischen Muslimen? Um auch sie für ein Bündnis mit dem Kaiserreich zu gewinnen, besuchte Klein 1915 - ohne Rücksprache mit der Botschaft in Konstantinopel - die schiitischen Glaubensführer in den heiligen Stätten von Nadschaf und Kerbela.

320 Millionen Liter Öl - verloren

"Unterwegs erkrankt [der Arzt] Dr. Schacht schwer, wird ohnmächtig, bekommt Darmblutungen", notierte Klein am 24. Januar 1915 über die beschwerliche Anreise nach Kerbala. "Eine Stunde vor K. empfangen uns zwei intelligent und vornehm aussehende Perser, um uns das Geleit zu geben. Der eine ist Sohn des Scheichs Mudschtahids Ali."

Scheich Ali bewirtete die Deutschen fürstlich mit "Hunderten von Schüsseln mit den verschiedensten orientalischen Sachen", wie der Hauptmann staunend festhielt. Nach zähen Verhandlungen sollte Klein schließlich sein Ziel erreichen: Im Februar 1915 riefen führende schiitische Geistliche, ermuntert auch durch 50.000 Reichsmark, zum Heiligen Krieg gegen die Feinde Deutschlands auf.

Obwohl sich der Hauptmann mit diesem Alleingang unbeliebt machte und zeitweise kaltgestellt wurde, gelang ihm wenige Wochen später sein größter Coup: Begleitet von türkischen Truppen sprengte ein Spezialkommando unter der Leitung von Hans Lührs am 22. März bei Ahvaz im heutigen Iran die britische Ölpipeline. Einem verbündeten arabischen Stamm gelangen in den folgenden Wochen weitere Anschläge auf die insgesamt 350 Kilometer lange Pipeline. Anhand des Jahresberichts der Anglo-Persian Oil Company schätzte der deutsche Generalstab den Gesamtverlust auf etwa 320 Millionen Liter Öl.

Eiternde Brandwunden

Ein Teil der Saboteure gerieten bald in die Defensive. Die Briten drängten die Türken aus der Region Ahvaz zurück, und ihre Kanonenboote eroberten Mitte 1915 die weiter westlich gelegene Stadt Amara, in die sich Lührs zurückgezogen hatte.

Auf der Flucht überquerte er mit seinen Kameraden Müller, Back und Schadow den reißenden Tigris. Eines ihrer Pferde ertrank. Verkleidet als Araber versuchten die Deutschen sich nun entlang des Flusses nach Norden durchzuschlagen. Die britischen Späher konnten sie täuschen, aber dann wurden sie von arabischen Banditen ausgeraubt. Einmal. Zweimal. Immer wieder. Erst verloren sie die Pferde, dann Uhren, Schuhe, Wäsche.

Nur mit Fetzen bekleidet taumelten die Männer barfuß über den heißen Lehmboden und bettelten um Brot, oft vergebens. Gegen die brüllende Hitze legten sie sich Tamariskenzweige auf den Kopf, die aber Unmengen von Moskitos und Sandmücken anzogen. "Auf unseren Schultern, Armen und Schenkeln bildeten sich große eiternde Brandwunden", erinnert sich Lührs. Sein Kamerad Schadow fiel immer wieder in Ohnmacht.

Ein "scheinheiliger Krieg"

Vielleicht ist es das größte Wunder der Mission Klein, dass Lührs und seine Männer ihre Odyssee überlebten. Nach mehr als hundert Kilometern Marsch erreichten sie bei Al-Gharbi mithilfe eines deutschfreundlichen Arabers eine türkische Einheit.

Klein selbst widmete sich nach dem Krieg der Philosophie. Den Heiligen Krieg, den er einst entflammen wollte, empfand er nun als "scheinheilig"; ebenso harsch kritisierte er jeglichen Imperialismus, den er früher mitgetragen hatte. In einem aber blieb er sich treu: Persien war zeitlebens das Land seiner Träume.

Anzeige
  • Veit Veltzke:
    Unter Wüstensöhnen

    Die deutsche Expedition Klein im Ersten Weltkrieg

    Nicolaische Verlagsbuchhandlung; 400 Seiten; 34,95 Euro.

lundi, 15 décembre 2014

Teología y geopolítica. La tentación de la serpiente

Ormuz-source-de-tension-entre-l-Iran-et-les-Etats-Unis_article_main.jpg

Teología y geopolítica.

La tentación de la serpiente.

por Francisco Javier Díaz de Otazú

Ex: http://www.arbil.org

Cuando se pergeña otro posible conflicto entre Israel e Irán es interesante conocer algo sobre las creencias persas que le diferencian de otros países musulmanes

El estrecho de Ormuz (en persa : تنگه هرمز, Tangeh-ye Hormoz; en árabe: مضيق هرمز, Maḍīq Hurmuz) es un estrecho angosto entre el golfo de Omán, localizado al sudeste, y el golfo Pérsico, al sudoeste. En la costa norte se localiza Irán y en la costa sur Omán. Fue guarida de piratas desde el siglo VII a. C. hasta el XIX. Comparte su nombre con una pequeña isla en la que están los restos de un castillo portugués, testigo ibero de otro tiempo en el que Occidente también penetró en el Oriente siempre misterioso y peligroso. Por aquel entonces, el petróleo eran las especias. Como sabrán los lectores, actualmente tiene gran importancia estratégica debido a que se encuentra en la salida del golfo Pérsico, que es rico en petróleo. Se estima que aproximadamente el 40% de la producción petrolífera mundial es exportada por este canal. Su anchura en el cabo es de 60 kilómetros. Se considera la clave para el control del petróleo mundial. Ahora, en vez de redundar en las crecientes informaciones sobre fragatas y navíos que suelen ser la actual versión de los viejos tambores de guerra, siempre más emocionantes que la CNN y Al-Yazira, por cierto esta cadena árabe puede traducirse y es otra evocación peligrosa en segundo escalón para España, como Algeciras. Significa “la isla” o “la península”, pues para los árabes del. S VII, eran lo mismo, y a la vez ambas cosas eran la península arábiga y la ibérica.  Pero antes de los árabes y el Islam, los que por allí mandaban eran los persas, de cuya religión quedan muy pocos residuos directos.

En Irán les llaman los “magos”, son tolerados por pocos e inofensivos, a modo de una reserva india,  y tienen como sagrados algunos fuegos donde el petróleo afloraba espontáneamente al suelo. Y no andaban muy despistados, pues, desde luego, el petróleo sigue siendo sagrado, al menos por el tiempo que le quede. Parece claro que el título de los “Reyes Magos”, procede de esa procedencia geográfica y de sus notables conocimientos astronómicos, comunes a todos los herederos de los caldeos. Otra pervivencia, más vigorosa, es el dualismo. El libro sagrado de los persas era el Avesta< , atribuido a Zoroastro, un filósofo medo que vivió en el siglo VI a. C. Nietzsche le llamó “Zaratustra”, y es cosa seria por que el desequilibrado filósofo era un gran filólogo y escribía muy bien. El asunto es que esa doctrina reconoce un Ser Supremo, que es eterno, infinito, fuente de toda belleza, generador de la equidad y de la justicia, sin iguales, existente por sí mismo o incausado y hacedor de todas las cosas. Hasta aquí bien, y nos entendemos todos.  Del núcleo de su persona salieron Ormuz y Arimán, principios de todo lo bueno y de todo lo malo, respectivamente.

Ambos produjeron una multitud de genios buenos y malos, en todo acordes con su naturaleza. Y así, el mundo quedó dividido bajo el influjo de estos dos grupos de espíritus divididos y bien diferenciados. Esto es lo que explica la lucha en el orden físico y moral, en el universo. El alma es inmortal y más allá de esta vida, le está reservada la obtención de un premio o de un castigo. La carne es pecaminosa e impura. La antropología de Platón está emparentada con esta línea, y ni el San Agustín ni Lutero se escapan a ella, influidos el primero por el maniqueismo, y el segundo por el contrapeso Gracia&pesimismo antropológico.

Lo que podemos simplificar como antropología católica nuclear está más bien en la línea unitiva, vinculada a Aristóteles y al principio de Encarnación. Pero sigamos con el dualismo. La inclinación hacia el mal tiene su origen en el pecado con el que se contaminó el primer hombre. Esta denodada lucha entre Ormuz y Arimán, tan equilibrada como la del día y la noche, ha de tener un desenlace final, y el triunfo debe ser de Ormuz, el principio del bien. El dualismo del bien y del mal es paralelo, aunque no coincidente, con el del espíritu y la carne. El maniqueísmo se ha presentado en diversas formas antiguas y modernas. No hay que confundir su acepción específica, los seguidores de Manes, otro persa, del s. III, que sumó al zoroastrismo elementos gnósticos, ocultistas, algo no tan demodé como pudiera pensarse, dado que eso que de hay unos elegidos, en el secreto de la Luz, y otros oyentes, enterados de lo que los primeros suministran, es invento suyo.

En un sentido amplio se utiliza como sinónimo de dualismo. Y este término en cuanto completa simetría o paridad, puesto que el Bien y el Mal es claro que se enfrentan sin necesidad de tanta palabrería, por ej. en cualquier western o cuento infantil. Pero si entramos en profundidad, reparando en el mensaje y no en que se trate o no de ficción, Saruman del Tolkien, Lucifer en el Génesis, o por descargar densidad el Caballero Negro, de una mesa artúrica, no rigen como principio propio, como Mal Absoluto autónomo del todo y en paridad con el Bien, si no que son originarios de ese mismo Bien que por algún misterio, asociado a que el bien moral exige libertad, la soberbia hace que algunos, así sean el ángel más bello, opten por el mal.  Retomemos el libro sagrado Avesta, donde se encuentran vestigios de diversas creencias primitivas: los dogmas de la unidad divina, de la creación, de la inmortalidad del alma, de premios y castigos en una vida futura.

Es de señalar que en esta lucha entre los genios malos y buenos, hay un paralelismo con la concepción bíblica, (mejor que decir judeocristiana, pues es concepto delicado, además que puede usarse para enfrentarlo al Islam, y, al menos en esto, no corresponde), de la lucha entre los ángeles sumisos al Creador y los que contra él se revelaron. Pero la diferencia grande está en que para Dios, dicho al modo “monista”, unitario, sea o no trino, Él es la fuente de todo. Descartando el pulso entre iguales, como no son parejas la luz y la oscuridad; la oscuridad no tiene otra definición que la falta de luz, o el frío, el de la falta de calor, por mucho que sepamos de dinámica de moléculas.  Pues lo mismo para con el mal, en cuanto ausencia de bien. No es tan absoluto. Como “la esperanza es lo último que se pierde”, ¿quién sabe si al final el diablo no se arrepiente?.

aaaOrm.jpg

Dejemos ese misterio para la magnanimidad del único Creador, y pasemos ya de tejas para abajo. Ya sabemos que Irán es una potencia regional, que está en vías de desarrollo nuclear, y que Israel sostiene una doctrina de la guerra preventiva que, justificada o no, explicaría un trato similar al recibido ya por el Irak de Sadam. EEUU suele hacer el papel de guardaespaldas de Israel, y de sus encuestas y elecciones presidenciales depende más que de la justicia de sus bombardeos su próxima actuación. Nosotros dependemos del petróleo totalmente, repartido a la sazón la mar de maniqueamente por Alá, y somos de la OTAN. Nunca mejor dicho, el asunto está “crudo”.

El mundo árabe-mediterráneo también está caliente, y Siria está al caer, con gran disgusto de Rusia. El gas nos llega mitad de Rusia, mitad de Argelia. En fin,  que quede claro que está crudo por una biológica lucha por la supervivencia entre poderes, intereses y estados, como mañana podrá ser por el agua dulce, y no por la del bien y del mal, viejo cuento donde el mal es el otro, siempre. El Bien es la Paz y la Justicia, entre nosotros, la posible dentro de lo posible, el Mal, la soberbia, la prepotencia. El querer hacer un gobierno mundial a partir del consenso de los poderosos, y no de una ley natural previa. Es la tentación de la serpiente.

·- ·-· -······-·
Francisco Javier Díaz de Otazú

dimanche, 07 décembre 2014

La stratégie des alliés contre l’Etat islamique : incohérente

f-4-phantom-iran.jpg

ALLIANCES : TÉHÉRAN OUI , DAMAS NON !
 
La stratégie des alliés contre l’Etat islamique : incohérente

par Jean Bonnevey
Ex: http://metamag.fr

L’Iran est devenu le meilleur ennemi des occidentaux et même sans doute leur meilleur allié contre les obscurantistes égorgeurs de l’Etat islamique sunnite du levant. Il est bien évident que l’Etat Chiite a tout intérêt à détruire Daesh pour sauver l’Irak et la Syrie et les garder sous son influence. On notera cependant que Téhéran devenu fréquentable brusquement, malgré l’échec des négociations sur le nucléaire, est le principal soutien de Damas. Or Damas reste infréquentable, alors que l’aide du régime serait un moyen de prendre en tenaille les extrémistes sunnites entre les chiites iraniens et les alaouites syriens.


Tout cela est inconséquent


Ghassem Soleimani, le chef de la force Al-Qods, la troupe d’élite iranienne chargée des opérations extérieures est aujourd’hui présenté, sans réserve, comme « le héros national » qui mène le combat de l’Iran contre l’Etat islamique en Irak (l’EI). Depuis cet été, cet officier dirige sur place les quelques centaines de miliciens chiites engagés au sol aux côtés de l’armée irakienne pour lutter contre les djihadistes.


Téhéran ne voit plus d’inconvénient à assumer et à reconnaître son implication militaire en Irak contre les forces sunnites de l’Etat islamique. Et même, il s’en vante. Le chef de la diplomatie iranienne s’est félicité que l’Iran « ait rempli ses engagements », contrairement aux « Occidentaux qui promettent des choses sans les faire ». C’est d’ailleurs pourquoi les Iraniens n’ont même pas nié ce que le porte-parole du Pentagone a qualifié, mardi 2 décembre depuis Washington, de « raids aériens avec des avions F-4 Phantom » en Irak. « Aujourd’hui, le peuple irakien se bat contre les terroristes et les étrangers aux côtés de son gouvernement et des forces volontaires », a expliqué  le vice-commandant en chef des forces armées iraniennes, Seyed Masoud Jazayeri, sans donner plus de détails sur les forces impliquées.


Pour la première fois, des avions F-4 Phantom iraniens ont lancé ces derniers jours des raids aériens en territoire irakien voisin. Les cibles visées dans la province frontalière de Diyala ne doivent rien au hasard. En investissant une partie de cette région dans la foulée de sa conquête de Mossoul et du «pays sunnite» à partir de juin, Daesh (l'État islamique ou EI) a porté la menace à la frontière de l'Iran. Les raids iraniens rappellent étrangement l'aide apportée par les avions américains pour permettre à l'armée irakienne de regagner du terrain sur Daesh plus à l'ouest, en «pays sunnite». Mais le Pentagone, qui a révélé les frappes iraniennes tandis que le secrétaire d'État John Kerry les qualifiait de «positives», dément cependant toute coordination avec son ennemi chiite. «Il s'agit plus vraisemblablement de deux actions parallèles», souligne l'institut de recherche Jane's à Londres «et pour l'instant cela fonctionne».


Bachar al-Assad a donné de son coté une interview au magazine Paris Match. Il estime que les frappes de la coalition contre les terroristes de l’Etat islamique sont inutiles. Ces interventions aériennes "nous auraient certainement aidés si elles étaient sérieuses et efficaces. C'est nous qui menons les combats terrestres contre Daesh, et nous n'avons constaté aucun changement, surtout que la Turquie apporte toujours un soutien direct dans ces régions", souligne-t-il. 


En réunion à Bruxelles, les ministres des Affaires étrangères de la coalition ont au contraire jugé que ces attaques en Irak et en Syrie commençaient "à montrer des résultats". Bachar al-Assad estime qu’on "ne peut pas mettre fin au terrorisme par des frappes aériennes. Des forces terrestres qui connaissent la géographie et agissent en même temps sont indispensables", a jugé le président syrien syrien.
Que ferait l’occident donc en cas d offensive terrestre conjuguée et sur deux fronts de la Syrie et de l’Iran ? Il faudra bien définir un jour l’ennemi principal et  considérer que ceux qui luttent contre lui sont sinon des amis au moins pour l’occasion des alliés de fait, de Téhéran à Damas.


Illustration en tête d'article : chasseurs iraniens en Irak

 

vendredi, 28 novembre 2014

Is Israel Losing the Battle to Wage War on Iran?

 

netanyahu-obama-aipac.gif

On the Long-Term Agreement Between Iran and the P5+1   

Is Israel Losing the Battle to Wage War on Iran?

by SASAN FAYAZMANESH
Ex: http://www.counterpunch.org

The world’s attention is focused once again on the negotiations between Iran and the five permanent members of the UN Security Council and Germany, commonly referred to as P5+1. Many are speculating about whether these negotiations will bear fruit by November 24, 2014, and reach a long-term agreement on curtailing Iran’s nuclear activities in exchange for removal of sanctions imposed on the country. Whatever the outcome, however, one thing is certain: the role of Israel in these negotiations has diminished considerably.

Last year’s short-term Joint Plan of Action (JPA), which was signed between Iran and the P5+1 on November 24, 2013, was a milestone in the US-Iran relations. As I analyzed it elsewhere, the JPA resulted in limiting some of Iran’s nuclear activities—which allegedly would enable her to make nuclear weapons—in return for a minimal reduction in certain kinds of sanctions. But this was not the real significance of the agreement. After all, and contrary to popular belief, the dispute between the US and Iran has never really been a technical dispute over nuclear issues. The dispute has always been a political clash; and the clash started in 1979, following the Iranian revolution. Since then the US has refused to accept the independence of Iran and has tried, using various excuses, to subdue a political system that would not fit the American vision of “world order.” These excuses, as I have shown elsewhere, have included, among others, issues such as Iran not accepting a ceasefire offered to it by Saddam Hussein in the 1980s Iran-Iraq war, Iran’s support for “terrorist” groups opposed to Israel and pursuit of weapons of mass destruction in general, Iran destabilizing Afghanistan, harboring Al-Qaeda, lacking democracy, being ruled by unelected individuals, violating human rights, not protecting the rights of women, and Iran not being forward-looking and modern. It has only been since 2002, when an Iranian exile group working hand in hand with the US and Israel made certain allegations against Iran, that the issue of Iran’s nuclear program was added to the list of accusations and became the cause célèbre and even casus belli. The JPA removed, at least for six months, the most major excuse for the US to wage a military attack on Iran.

In its clash with Iran, the US has always had a very close partner, Israel. The partnership started in 1979, but it took different routes. Up until the end of the Iran-Iraq war and the first US invasion of Iraq, Israel’s attention was primarily focused on Iraq, which was viewed by Israel as the most immediate obstacle to achieving its goal of annexing “Judea and Samaria.” Thereafter, Israel turned its attention to Iran, the other main obstacle in fulfilling the Zionist dream of Eretz Yisrael. Starting in the early 1990s Israel not only joined the US in its massive campaign against Iran, but it actually took over the sanctions policy of the US. With the help of its lobby groups, Israel pushed through the US Congress one set of sanctions after another, hoping that ultimately the US would attack Iran, as it had done in the case of Iraq.

Israel and its lobby groups also installed influential individuals in different US administrations to formulate US foreign policy toward Iran. This included the first Obama Administration. Various Israeli lobbyists shaped President Obama’s policy of “tough diplomacy,” a policy which, as I have analyzed elsewhere, meant nothing but sanctions upon sanctions until conditions would be ripe for military actions against Iran. Among these were Dennis Ross and Gary Samore. The first, Ross, well-known as “Israel’s lawyer,” was Obama’s closest advisor on Iran. He came from the Washington Institute for Near East Policy (WINEP), an offshoot of American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC), and when he retired in 2011 he returned to his lobbying activities through WINEP and JINSA (Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs). The second, Samore, who served as Obama’s advisor on “weapons of mass destruction,” was one of the founding members of the Israeli lobby group United Against Nuclear Iran (UANI), an establishment that has been lately in the news for receiving classified US government information on Iran and is being protected by the Obama Administration in a law suit. Samore left the Obama Administration in 2013 and returned to UANI to become its president. He also became the executive director of the Harvard University’s Belfer Center that is also linked to UANI, according to some investigative reports.

The policy of “tough diplomacy” pursued by the Israeli lobbyists did not produce the desired result. The harsh sanctions imposed did enormous damage to Iran’s economy. But, as Samore himself admitted in a talk at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London on March 11, 2014, there were no “riots on the streets” and no “threat to the survival of the regime.”

With the departure of the most influential Israeli lobbyists from the Obama Administration, the policy of “tough diplomacy” started to wither away. The disintegration of policy was also helped by John Kerry replacing Hillary Clinton, the most hawkish Secretary of State who often mimicked the belligerent language of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu when it came to Iran. Kerry—who, as the Chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, had once stated in an interview with The Financial Times that Iran has “a right to peaceful nuclear power and to enrichment in that purpose”—abandoned the policy of “tough diplomacy.” In the P5+1 meetings in February of 2013, Kerry offered the Iranian government a deal that it could live with. However, the Iranian government under President Ahmadinejad hesitated, haggled over the deal, and ran out of time as the Iranian presidential election approached. The new Iranian President, Rouhani, accepted the deal and ran away with it. The result was the JPA.

Israel, which had hoped that a military attack on Iran by the US would follow the tough sanctions imposed by the Obama Administration, was quite unhappy with the JPA. Even before an agreement was reached, Israeli leaders and their US allies led a massive campaign against it. For example, according to The Times of Israel, on November 10, 2013, Netanyahu sent an indirect message to French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, telling him that if France did not toughen its positions, he would attack Iran. Netanyahu also asked his supporters around the world to stop the deal. A news headline in Haaretz on November 10, 2013, read: “Netanyahu urges Jews: Rally behind me on halting Iran nuclear program.” Surrogates of Israel in the US Congress followed suit. The title of a news item on Reuters on November 10, 2013, read: “U.S. lawmakers seek tighter Iran sanctions before any deal.” Among the lawmakers were Senators Mark Kirk and Robert Menendez, as well as Representatives Eric Cantor, Ed Royce and Eliot Engel. Israeli lobbyists, too, went into action. This included former advisor to Obama Dennis Ross. “We must not let Tehran off the hook, says Dennis Ross at Jewish Agency for Israel’s 2013 Assembly,” was The Jerusalem Post headline on November 10, 2013. Yet, in the end, the short-term agreement between Iran and the P5+1 could not be stopped.

Failing to stop the JPA, Israel then tried to nullify it by passing a new and severe set of sanctions through the US Congress. The move was led by Kirk and Menendez, two senators who often appear on the list of the biggest recipients of campaign cash from pro-Israel public actions committees. The Kirk-Menendez bill, titled “Nuclear Weapons Free Iran Act,” was introduced on December 19, 2013, with the sole purpose of ending the agreement between Iran and the P5+1. The bill gained momentum as various Israeli lobby groups, particularly AIPAC, exerted pressure in the Senate. On January 4, 2014, AIPAC had a summary of Kirk-Menendez bill on its website and was instructing its members to “act now.”

The number of senators signing the Kirk-Menendez bill rose from 33 in early January to 59 in mid-January, 2014. This was despite the fact that some officials in the Obama Administration, including Secretary Kerry, referred to the bill as an attempt to push the US into a war with Iran. This was also in spite of Obama’s threats to veto the bill. On January 28, 2014, in his State of the Union Address, Obama reiterated his stance on any congressional bill intended to impose a new set of sanctions on Iran and stated that “if this Congress sends me a new sanctions bill now that threatens to derail these talks, I will veto it. ”

Israel, its lobby groups and its conduits in Congress, nevertheless, pushed for passing the resolution. However, they could not muster the strength to get the two-thirds majority in the Senate to make the bill veto-proof. They threw in the towel and AIPAC declared on February 6, 2014: “We agree with the Chairman [Menendez] that stopping the Iranian nuclear program should rest on bipartisan support . . . and that there should not be a vote at this time on the measure.” As many observed, this was the biggest loss for Israel, its lobby groups and its conduits in the US Congress, since Ronald Reagan agreed, contrary to Israel’s demand, to sell AWACS surveillance planes to Saudi Arabia. Subsequent attempts to nullify the JPA also failed. This included an attempt by some Senators, a few days before March 2014 AIPAC policy conference, to include elements of “Nuclear Weapons Free Iran Act” in a veterans’ bill.

In the end, Israeli lobby groups had to settle for a few letters written by US law makers to President Obama, telling him what the final deal must look like. The AIPAC-approved letter in the House of Representative on March 3, 2014, was circulated by Eric Cantor and Steny Hoyer. The Senate letter was posted on AIPAC website, dated March 18, 2014, and, as many Israeli affiliated news sources joyously reported, the letter gained 82 signatures. Finally, 23 Senators also signed the Cantor-Hoyer letter, as Senator Carl Levin’s website posted it on March 22, 2014. If some of the harsh measures proposed in these letters were to be adopted by the Obama Administrations, no final deal could be reached with Iran.

The JPA was supposed to lead to a final settlement in six months, and, consequently, there were many rounds of negotiations between Iran and the P5+1 before the deadline. The final and the most intense negotiations that took place behind closed doors in July 2014 lasted for more than two weeks. However, in the end there were “significant gaps on some core issues,” as a statement by EU Representative Catherine Ashton and Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif read on July 19, 2014. It was therefore decided to close the so-called gaps by November 24, 2014.

We are now approaching the 2nd deadline for reaching a long-term agreement between Iran and the P5+1. It is unclear whether the gaps can be bridged. It is also unclear how much of these gaps are due to the relentless Israeli pressure that is still being exerted even on the Obama Administration and its team of negotiators. We know that these negotiators, as they have readily admitted, consult Israel before and after every meeting with Iran. Indeed, even after the latest round of meetings between Iran and the US in Muscat, Oman, Kerry called Netanyahu to “update” him on the negotiations. Yet, we also know that Israel does not have the clout that it once had in the White House. The most influential Israeli lobbyists have left the Obama Administration and their policy of tough diplomacy is in tatters. Israel has also been unable to stop the short-term P5+1 agreement with Iran, it has failed to nullify the agreement after it passed, and it has not even been able to garner the two-thirds majority in the Senate to make veto-proof a Congressional bill designed to start a war with Iran. In other words, in the past two years Israel has been losing the battle to engage the US in another military adventure in the Middle East. But has Israel lost the war to wage war on Iran? The newly configured US Senate is already seeking a vote on another Israeli sponsored war bill called “Iran Nuclear Negotiations Act of 2014.”

Sasan Fayazmanesh is Professor Emeritus of Economics at California State University, Fresno, and is the author of Containing Iran: Obama’s Policy of “Tough Diplomacy.” He can be reached at: sasan.fayazmanesh@gmail.com.

lundi, 24 novembre 2014

Zwarte Piet….in Iran en whiteface in Afrika

Zwarte Piet….in Iran en whiteface in Afrika

door

Volgens extremisten die het nodig vinden om een robbertje te gaan vechten met de politie terwijl zij zich eerst strategisch opgesteld hebben tussen kinderen van leeftijden 2 tot 10 jaar is Zwarte Piet racistisch. We krijgen een slechte kopie van de burgerrechtenbeweging uit de VSA die ons wenst te vertellen dat Zwarte Piet racistisch is. Over krak dezelfde traditie in Iran, daar zwijgt men uiteraard zedelijk over.

Net als in Europa stamt het Iraanse feest Hadji Firoez uit een heidense traditie. Net als in Europa is zijn huid zwart gebrand door kool en roet. Niet van door de schoorsteen te kruipen, maar omdat hij de oude dingen van mensen verbrandt die ze niet meer nodig hebben. Dit om het nieuwe jaar te symboliseren. Is hij dan zoveel politiek correcter dan Zwarte Piet? Beoordeel zelf even:

haji firoz 2

haji firoz 3

haji firoz

Zwarte Piet zou racistisch zijn vanwege het “blackface” waarbij een blanke man zich zwart schminkt en veel lippenstift gebruikt . Kijken we echter naar de ceremonie van de Xhosa in Afrika wanneer zij de volwassen leeftijd bereiken. Zij worden hierbij besneden, waarna zij met modder wit worden geverfd. In het wit lopen zij dan rond als wilden (ze zijn immers volwassen mannen die naar niets meer moeten omzien). Moet dit ook onderzocht worden door de VN? Het beeldt immers uit dat een blanke huidskleur daar wordt bezien als iets wild.

whiteface

whiteface2

00:05 Publié dans Traditions | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0) | Tags : xhosa, traditions, zwarte piet, iran | |  del.icio.us | | Digg! Digg |  Facebook

dimanche, 23 novembre 2014

Niet VS, maar Iran stopte ISIS in Irak

Edward Azadi:

Niet VS, maar Iran stopte ISIS in Irak

Iraanse troepen in Irak, terug van nooit echt weggeweest

Ex: http://www.doorbraak.be

Juni 2014: ISIS neemt Mosul in: de 2de grootste stad van Irak. Het Iraaks leger slaat op de vlucht, en laat veel van haar wapens achter. September 2014: In Parijs komen vertegenwoordigers uit meer dan 30 landen samen om een coalitie te smeden in de strijd tegen ISIS. Iran is niet uitgenodigd. 

Volgens Franse diplomaten is Iran niet welkom op uitdrukkelijke vraag van een aantal Arabische landen. Maar ook de VS zijn duidelijk: er kan geen sprake zijn van samenwerking met Iran. November 2014: Volgens de krant Washington Post schrijft President Obama een brief naar Ayatollah Khamenei, waarin hij de deur opent voor een militaire samenwerking nadat er een akkoord wordt bereikt over Iraans nucleaire programma. Iran bevestigd de ontvangst van de brief, het Witte Huis wil in een reactie enkel kwijt dat hun standpunt ongewijzigd is: de VS werken niet militair samen met Iran. Maar intussen stapelen de bewijzen zich op dat Iran wel degelijk militair actief is in Irak. En dat is geen nieuws. Iran heeft al jaren 'boots on the ground' in haar buurland.

Tussen september 1980 en augustus 1988, vochten Irak en Iran een bloedige oorlog uit. Saddam Hoessein veronderstelde dat na Iran militair verzwakt uit de Islamitische Revolutie gekomen was, en probeerde een deel van het land te annexeren. Maar hij misrekende zich. Iran vocht vurig terug. Saddam Hoessein had op papier een sterker leger, en hij had de steun van het Westen. Maar Ayatollah Khomeini had meer kanonnenvlees in de strijd te werpen. Het conflict zou eindigen op een 'Status quo ante bellum'. Een uitkomst waarvoor honderdduizenden doden vielen, waaronder 95 000 Iraanse kindsoldaten.

Net zoals Irak tijdens de oorlog de steun krijgt van de Iraanse Volksmoedjahedien, gaat ook Iran op zoek naar Iraakse bondgenoten. Iran richt verschillende Sjiitische milities op in Irak, waaronder de Badr Brigades. Iraakse Sjiieten vechten met Iraanse wapens, en onder bevel van Iraanse officieren, tegen Saddam Hoessein, en blijven dat ook doen na 1988. De opstand van 1991, de Koerdische burgeroorlog of de Amerikaanse inval in 2003: telkens er in Irak een gewapend conflict losbarst, zijn de Badr Brigades en andere Sjiitische milities erbij betrokken.

Na de omverwerping van het regime van Saddam Hoessein, vormt de Badr Brigade zich om tot de 'Badr Organisatie': een politieke beweging. Officieel leggen ze de wapens neer. Leden van de voormalige brigades, sluiten zich bij het Iraakse leger aan. Maar in werkelijkheid behoudt de Badr Organisatie een militaire vleugel. Sinds de opmars van ISIS, komen ze daar ook opnieuw openlijk voor uit. Hadi Al-Amiri, leider van de Badr Organisatie en minister van Transport in de Iraakse regering, vertelt trots in interviews met Westerse media hoe zijn Badr milities de opmars van ISIS hebben gestopt. Omwille van de militaire successen van Badr (of misschien omwille van de militaire catastrofes van het Iraakse leger) plaatste Eerste Minister Nouri al-Maliki alle Iraakse troepen in de provincie Diyala onder het commando van Al-Amiri. Het ziet er niet naar uit dat de huidige Eerste Minister Haider al-Abadi die beslissing zal terugdraaien. Ook hij heeft de steun van de Badr Organisatie hard nodig. En met de steun van Badr, komt de steun van Iran. In de woorden van Al-Amiri: 'Zonder de hulp van Iran, was ISIS nu al in Bagdad'.

Maar Iran is ook rechtstreeks actief in buurland Irak. Qasem Soleimani stond tot augustus 2014 aan het hoofd van de Quds Eenheid: een speciale eenheid van de Iraanse Revolutionaire Garde. Hij was eerder al actief in Libanon en Syrië, en staat erom bekend de publiciteit te schuwen. Maar sinds augustus duikt hij geregeld op in foto's, genomen in Irak, en gepubliceerd in Iraanse media. De boodschap is duidelijk: de Quds Eenheid is in Irak, en Iran wil dat de wereld dat weet. De Quds trainen Iraakse soldaten, Sjiitische milities en Koerdische Peshmerga. Ze voorzien hen van wapens en munitie, en zouden ook deelnemen aan gevechten. Bronnen binnen de Iraakse regering bevestigden aan de BBC dat het niet zozeer de luchtbombardementen zijn die de ISIS opmars hebben gestopt, maar wel het snelle optreden van Iran.

Ook ISIS zelf bevestigt de aanwezigheid van Iran. De organisatie verspreidt foto's van een neergehaalde Iraanse verkennings-drone. En terwijl de VS officieel een samenwerking met Iran blijven uitsluiten, laat Australië weten dat ze 'gezien de aard van de dreiging', geen graten zien in een samenwerking met de Islamitische Republiek. Volgens het Australische ministerie van defensie is het algemeen geweten dat Irak de hulp gevraagd heeft van Iran in de strijd tegen ISIS. De Australische houding is niet onbelangrijk, aangezien het land met 200 speciale eenheden deelneemt aan de internationale coalitie tegen ISIS.

Maandag 24 november verloopt de deadline om tot een akkoord te komen in de onderhandelingen rond het Iraanse nucleaire programma. De VS lijken elke mogelijke samenwerking met Iran in de strijd tegen ISIS te laten afhangen van het bereiken van een akkoord. Maar intussen is de realiteit dat Iran al volop militair actief is in Irak. En eigenlijk is dat sinds de Iraans-Iraakse oorlog nooit anders geweest. Als het Westen iets wil bereiken in Irak, dan zal het met de factor Iran rekening moeten houden. Met of zonder nucleair akkoord.

Foto: Qasem Soleimani poseert met Peshmerga in Irak. Bron: tadbirkhabar.com

samedi, 22 novembre 2014

Le retour de l’Iran

yc301f0.jpeg

Le retour de l’Iran

par Aymeric Chauprade

La chute de Sanaa n’a été que peu commentée ; pourtant, la prise de contrôle de la capitale yéménite par les rebelles chiites Houthis a d’importantes répercussions et doit surtout être interprétée dans un contexte plus large : la stratégie régionale de Téhéran dont l’influence s’étend désormais sur tout le Golfe.

De l’encerclement à l’offensive…

Ce résultat était pourtant loin d’être acquis : au cours de la décennie précédente, l’influence perse avait été réduite sous les coups de butoir de la diplomatie néo-conservatrice américaine et l’Iran, pratiquement encerclée. Présentes en 2001 en Afghanistan, les forces armées américaines envahissaient deux ans plus tard l’Irak. Au Liban, Assad retirait progressivement son armée sous la pression de Washington (2005), et l’État hébreu commençait de s’entendre avec l’Azerbaïdjan dans un échange dont seul Israël a le secret : devenant conseiller militaire de Baku comme il l’est de Singapour et de New-Dehli, Tel-Aviv lui vendait des armes, lui achetait son pétrole (un tiers de son approvisionnement) et infiltrait ses agents de sabotage via cette base avancée de sa lutte féroce et clandestine contre le programme nucléaire iranien. Enfin, dernier trait, au moment même où Israël recevait enfin de Washington le feu vert pour la fourniture de bombes anti-bunkers (les massive ordnance penetrators), Moscou refusait de livrer à Téhéran le système S-300 de défense sol-air de moyenne portée, indispensable bouclier pourtant de son programme nucléaire…et entamait des négociations avec Ryad pour l’exportation du S-400, le nec plus ultra de la défense sol-air.

Encerclée, l’Iran apparaissait exsangue, au point que les soulèvements post-électoraux de 2009 apparaissaient comme le prologue de la chute annoncée de Téhéran et le couronnement, tardif certes, de la stratégie des faucons néo-conservateurs de Georges Bush junior…

C’était sans compter sans la patience et l’endurance de Téhéran d’une part et les inévitables conséquences des erreurs stratégiques américaines de l’autre. Si les manifestations de 2009 ont surpris le régime des Mollahs, elles ne l’ont pas entamé : la répression fut suffisamment féroce pour être comprise… et le cœur du régime a pu vérifier sa cohésion et sa solidité. Mais le vrai combustible de l’offensive iranienne se trouve dans les errements de la Maison Blanche, du département d’État et du Pentagone, tous unis dans un même aveuglement qui a également déteint sur les meilleurs analystes de la C.I.A, instrumentalisée à des fins idéologiques comme l’a été le S.I.S britannique.

Les néo-conservateurs, tout à leur revanche stérile contre Saddam Hussein, ont effet liquidé le mauvais régime et dispersé les cadres du parti Baas laïc, transformant l’Irak en une Mecque du terrorisme; les apprenti-sorciers de Washington (Richard Perle, Dick Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld, notamment) consolidaient aveuglément un axe sunnite formé des régimes fondamentalistes musulmans : Qatar, Arabie Saoudite, Émirats Arabes Unis. Cet axe sunnite, unis par le pétrole, les gros contrats d’armement et le terrorisme islamiste, cherchait partout à imposer sa volonté dans la région, notamment en Syrie. Une personne incarnait cette politique : le Prince Bandar bin Sultan, ancien ambassadeur saoudien à Washington et que l’on a souvent décrit comme un agent stipendié par la C.I.A. Sa réapparition au printemps dernier, après une brève éclipse de disgrâce, comme conseiller spécial du Roi Abdallah, en dit assez quant à l’influence américaine sur Ryad.

Le printemps arabe donnera bientôt à cet axe l’occasion d’accélérer leurs desseins géopolitiques. En 2009, la nouvelle administration américaine, tout aussi idéologique que la précédente, poursuivra son soutien aveugle à cet axe sunnite. La chute de la Libye de Khadafi en 2011 devait annoncer peu après celle du Caire de Moubarak en 2012 avec l’arrivée du Frère musulman Morsi.

Cette politique a provoqué le resserrement des liens entre Damas et Téhéran, tous deux soutenus par Moscou qui, après avoir perdu Le Caire, aux mains des Frères Musulmans, ne pouvait perdre ses deux derniers points d’appui régionaux. Préparant l’avenir, la Russie lançait un vaste programme de réarmement, dont le volet naval très ambitieux, prévoyait une flotte renforcée en Méditerranée et la consolidation de points d’appui : à Chypre (Limassol), à Alger (fourniture de deux Projet 636 armés de missiles de croisière Klub) et naturellement le port de Tartous (la Tortose des Templiers). La livraison de 72 missiles anti-navires Yakhont (P-800) à Damas, mais sous clé russe, l’agrandissement des quais flottants et la modernisation des ateliers de l’ancien port franc symbolisaient l’engagement solide de la Russie envers la Syrie. Dans le vocabulaire des amiraux russes, Tortose est ainsi passée en 2012 de base « d’appui technique » pour des navires en escale à celle de « point de déploiement » en 2013, permettant aux bâtiments de la Mer Noire de rejoindre Aden et l’Océan Indien en quatre jours à 20nd, soit moitié moins qu’au départ de Sébastopol…

Pendant ce temps, l’Iran poursuivait son programme nucléaire. Certes, de sporadiques explosions sur des sites sensibles, la paralysie des systèmes de contrôle des centrales par de mystérieux virus informatiques et l’assassinat ciblé d’ingénieurs en ralentissaient l’avancée. Mais, même fortement ralenti, Téhéran n’a jamais été sérieusement arrêté dans sa quête de la maîtrise du nucléaire civil et militaire.

Face à cet axe chiite renforcé, le camp sunnite se fissurait : le Qatar, grenouille pétrolière qui voulait devenir le bœuf régional, s’enhardissait au point de vouloir renverser les régimes saoudien et émirien, jugés trop occidentaux et décadents dans la foulée du Caire. Ce fut le pas de trop : Ryad et Abu Dhabi, dans un geste rare sommaient publiquement Doha en mars dernier de cesser toute ingérence sur leurs territoires, et pour bien être sûr d’être compris, entreprenaient des procès de « frères musulmans » à grand spectacle, aidaient le maréchal Abdel Fattah Saïd Hussein Khalil al-Sissi à renverser le président Morsi dans un coup d’État que Malaparte aurait certainement pris pour modèle s’il vivait encore….Washington, hésitant, laissait faire au Caire, tout en fournissant aides et armes aux rebelles « modérés » islamistes syriens depuis leur satellite régional, la Jordanie.

Le retour en force de l’Iran…

Résistance de l’axe chiite soutenu par les Russes, fissures de l’axe sunnite, hésitations américaines au Caire : telle était la situation à l’été 2014. La Blitzkrieg d’un nouvel acteur féroce, l’État islamique, fléau régional aux origines multiples, a radicalement rebattu les cartes du grand jeu régional en s’emparant progressivement de provinces entières irakiennes et surtout de ses gisements pétroliers.

Cette guerre-éclair islamiste, cruelle et médiatique, a soudainement ouvert les yeux de Washington. N’empruntant pas encore le chemin de Damas, l’Administration Obama a pris celui de Téhéran, ce qui vaut Canossa… Le marché conclu est simple : souplesse diplomatique dans les négociations sur le programme nucléaire iranien en échange d’un soutien militaire de Téhéran en Irak.

Marginalisé, sanctionné, l’Iran redevient courtisé par un de ces revirements soudains dont seule la diplomatie américaine a le secret, mais c’est oublier qu’entre-temps, Téhéran a avancé partout ses pions.

L’Iran a en effet consolidé son pouvoir sur quatre capitales : Damas où les pasdarans soutiennent le régime, à Beyrouth où le Hezbollah continue d’être l’arbitre discret de la scène politique, à Bagdad où les Chiites reprennent peu à peu les leviers du pouvoir et désormais Sanaa conquis par les Houthis, qui joueront le même rôle au Yémen que le parti de Dieu au Liban.

L’encerclement de l’Arabie

Ce vaste ensemble de manœuvres régionales vise deux objectifs : l’élimination de la dynastie des Saoud, jugés hérétiques, corrompus et décadents, et la destruction d’Israël.

Pour parachever son encerclement de l’Arabie, Téhéran s’attaque depuis quelque temps désormais à Bahreïn, majoritairement chiite. Cet objectif en vise d’ailleurs un autre par ricochet : la base de la Vème Flotte américaine. Pour une fois, le renseignement a été correctement analysé par l’U.S.Navy. Dans un rapport passé totalement inaperçu en juin 2013, « No plan B : U.S Strategic Access in the Middle East and the Question of Bahrain » publié par la prestigieuse Brookings Institution, l’auteur, Richard McDaniel un officier de l’U.S.Navy ayant stationné de nombreuses années dans le Golfe, expliquait en effet qu’il existait une possibilité non négligeable que le pouvoir des Al-Khalifa tombât un jour prochain sous la pression de la rue chiite, mettant ainsi en danger l’infrastructure la plus stratégique des États-Unis dans le Golfe, hub irremplaçable non seulement pour les opérations interarmées américaines mais également point focal des actions combinées avec les alliés britanniques. L’officier en appelait alors à « un plan B » (Oman en l’occurrence).

Combien de temps Bahreïn tiendra-t-il ? Sous contrôle saoudien, le sultanat n’en a pas moins passé commande cet été d’armes russes (des missiles anti-chars Kornet E) pour se concilier Moscou, un allié toujours précieux pour qui veut dialoguer avec Téhéran…

L’asphyxie de l’Arabie vise aussi la destruction de l’État hébreu, un des buts de guerre de Téhéran. Le double contrôle des détroits d’Ormuz et de Bal el-Mandeb est censé également déstabiliser le cas échéant l’économie israélienne.

Ainsi, sur tous les fronts, l’Iran sort vainqueur de l’affrontement dur avec le monde sunnite, en large partie grâce aux erreurs d’appréciation américaine. Avec la bombe nucléaire d’une part et le contrôle de deux détroits, Téhéran sera de facto en situation d’hégémonie. L’arsenal des pays du GCC ne servira en effet à rien car Washington en bloquera l’utilisation politiquement et technologiquement.

L’Arabie saoudite, au seuil d’une succession difficile, y survivra-t-elle ? Rien n’est moins sûr. Salman, le prince héritier et actuel ministre de la défense, est atteint de la maladie d’Alzheimer et prince Muqrin, n°2 dans la succession, respecté et sage, est cependant issu d’une Yéménite et non d’un clan royal saoud. La génération suivante est, quant à elle, pleine d’appétits, frustrée, à 55 ou 65 ans, de n’être toujours aux manettes du royaume…

L’observateur attentif aura remarqué un signe de la panique qui s’empare du régime et qui ne trompe pas : la transformation de la Garde Nationale (la SANG) en un armée (mai 2013) sous contrôle d’un ministre (le fils du Roi, Prince Mitaeb). La garde prétorienne remplace ainsi les légions jugées peu fiables. Prince Mitaeb a pris soin de doter la SANG d’armements modernes (avions d’armes F-15S, hélicoptères de transport et de combat, véhicules blindés et défense sol-air) venant de fournisseurs diversifiés (France, notamment) et surtout différents des forces armées traditionnelles (un cas répandu dans le Golfe pour éviter les embargos et préserver le secret).

Leçons pour la France

Face à ce tableau, quelle est la politique de la France ? Celle « du chien crevé au fil de l’eau ».

L’alignement français sur les positions américaines, nette depuis la réintégration française du commandement intégré de l’OTAN (mars 2009), a fait perdre à Paris toute marge de manœuvre pour jouer un rôle, pourtant taillé à sa mesure compte tenu de sa tradition diplomatique et de ses alliés régionaux. Apprentie sorcière en Libye (en février 2011), aveugle en Syrie (au point d’entraîner et d’armer les islamistes « modérés » et d’être à deux doigts d’envoyer des Rafale en août 2013 rééditer l’erreur libyenne), tournant le dos à l’Iran (en réclamant toujours plus de sanctions), elle a été prise de court par le revirement estival américain. Ce cocufiage de Paris par Washington ne serait que ridicule s’il n’emportait pas des conséquences tragiques sur le terrain et pour l’avenir.

Paris n’a ainsi plus une seule carte en mains : les routes de Moscou, de Téhéran et de Damas lui sont fermées et il n’est pas sûr que celles du palais saoudien d’Al Yamamah et de la Maison Blanche lui soient pour autant ouvertes. Délaissant sa tradition diplomatique, sourde aux réalités du terrain (l’armement de rebelles incontrôlables, le massacre des chrétiens, les effets terroristes sur son propre territoire), elle s’est fourvoyée dans cet Orient compliqué qu’elle connaissait pourtant si bien.

Pour jouer un rôle conforme à sa tradition et aux attentes de ses alliés régionaux, la France n’aura pas d’autre choix que de retrouver le chemin de Moscou, Téhéran et de Damas. Ce faisant, elle apportera un canal de discussions apprécié par les belligérants de la région et, même gageons-le, par la future Administration américaine. Participer à tout et n’être exclu de rien : tel est en effet le secret de la diplomatie.

Aymeric Chauprade
blog.realpolitik.tv

vendredi, 14 novembre 2014

The Disintegration of the Saudi Empire and the new Iranian axis

3449793502.jpg

Catherine Shakdam:

Ex: http://journal-neo.org

The Disintegration of the Saudi Empire and the new Iranian axis

If many have mocked Ali Reza Zakani’s comments on Saudi Arabia’s imminent fall and what he described as the “disintegration of Al Saud tribe” last September, branding his boasting of Iran’s political successes in the region as overblown and groundless, others would argue that the prominent Iranian political analyst actually hit the nail right on the head.

Looking back at recent developments in the Middle East over the past month alone – the rise of the Houthis in Yemen, Bahrain revolution, the sentencing to death of Sheikh Nimr Al Nimr, ISIS advances in Iraq and Syria, and it has become blaringly apparent that political, social and religious fractures have appeared across the Middle East, all pointing and adding to the erosion of Al Saud empire.

While Saudi Arabia has dominated the Arab and to an extent the Islamic world ever since the mighty fall of the Ottomans, aided and abated by both the British Empire and the United States on account of its royals’ willingness to remain pliable to western will, Al Saud’s political exclusionism as well as religious ostracism have created a situation today whereby the kingdom has become its worse own enemy.

Al Saud’s Petrodollars

Propelled into hegemonic prominence on the basis of its immense wealth alone, Saudi Arabia’s petrodollars are all which have sustained the kingdom’s intrinsic institutional, political and religious architecture. While it is Saudi Arabia’s billions of dollars which have allowed Al Saud to direct and control nations, governments and policies from afar, leaning and pulling, carving and crushing politicians and ideas as it went along implementing its vision for the Middle East; the kingdom has become enslaved to its ability to finance its alliances.

As it happens, Saudi Arabia could soon face a dramatic economic U-turn. As noted by Nick Butler in the Globalist, Saudi Arabia appears to have lost control of the Oil market, at a juncture when prices have experienced an unparalleled drop due to stock piling. “The Saudis may no longer be in a position to reverse the price fall,” wrote Butler, adding that negative political and economic outlooks within the OPEC would make any global output restriction policy impossible to implement, thus putting Saudi Arabia under a great deal of pressure.

“It’s hard to think of any OPEC state, except perhaps Kuwait, in a position to accept a sustained cut in production and revenue. The Saudis are on their own. “

Victims of its own political and economic miscalculations, Al Saud could have actually started the very fire which soon could threaten to lay waste its house and crumble Gulf monarchies to the ground.

Should Saudi Arabia prove unable to financially sustain its proxy states and finance its proxy wars in the region – Al Saud has opened up multiple fronts without being able to resolve any conflicts so far: Yemen, Syria, Iraq, Egypt, Libya, Bahrain – it is likely it will find itself cornered by the very powers which rose from the frictions it gave out and the vacuums it inadvertently helped created.

Unmistakably Turkey and Iran have both seen their prominence gain traction since 2011, their powers boosted by Saudi Arabia’s political stumbling.

Iranian_Military_parade_September_2007_005.jpg

Running out of time

As nations call for political emancipation while others have entered into a bitter fight against Islamic radicalism, the Middle East as we know it is undergoing a massive restructuration and power re-mapping.

As Zakani so eloquently put it, “Three Arab capitals have today ended up in the hands of Iran and belong to the Islamic Iranian revolution … and Sana’a has become the fourth Arab capital that is on its way to joining the Iranian revolution.”

While the Houthis of Yemen – faction organized under the leadership of Abdel-Malek Al Houthi – would argue that they are not under anyone’s control, but rather fiercely independent, the Zaidi faction – oldest branch of Shia Islam – is undeniably leaning on Tehran for support and guidance, just as the Hezbollah of Lebanon or more recently Baghdad have done.

But unlike Saudi Arabia which has ruled as would a monarch over its political vassals, it is Iran’s non-interference policy, its keenness to advise and not direct, to support while not dictate which has made the Islamic Republic so appealing and its ideological umbrella so inclusive.

Just as Saudi Arabia has ruled through fear, playing the hammer and the sword against all those it views as its subject-nations, Iran has in perfect polarity presented itself the alternative.

Now that so many have joined together to denounce Saudi Arabia’s hegemony and tyrannical rule, it appears Al Saud ‘s edifice has begun to show signs of erosion, its foundation strained by increasing political, economic, social and religious pressures.

All that made Saudi Arabia so formidable is slowly unravelling – Its standing as a religious guide has been tarnished by allegations it helped master-minded the evil which is ISIS, its economy stands on the verge of collapse, its society is imploding under the strain of sectarianism and social injustice and its position as the regional super-power has been challenged by Iran and Turkey.

Iran Grand Jihad

Following his tirade on Saudi Arabia’s pending dissolution unto nothingness, Zakani spoke before parliament of what he referred to as Iran’s phase of “Grand Jihad”, pointing to Iran’s intent to project and export its Islamic revolutionary model onto the greater region, in order to bring about what it understands as political, social and religious emancipation within the parameters of the Muslim faith.

Jihad here is not to be understood as a synonym for war, but rather an ideological campaign. Interestingly, religious scholars have often argue that the real Jihad, as the Scriptures intended has nothing to do with open war but rather “soft conversion”.

Zakani pointed out that this phase of Grand Jihad “requires a special policy and a cautious approach because it may lead to many repercussions,” underscoring the very lacking and lagging Saudi Arabia fell victim to in its race for control and blind belief money would ultimately speak louder.

A keen strategist, Zakani actually advised that Iran “supports movements that function within the Iranian revolution’s framework in order to end oppression and assist the oppressed in the Middle East.” In other words Iran will act a leader of nations not a despot or a dictator of policies.

Unlike Saudi Arabia, Iran wants to become the axis of change, the promoter of political transition.

Before the Islamic Revolution – 1979 – the Middle East was divided up in between two polarities within the American axis: Saudi Arabia absolute theocracy and secular republican Turkey. Came into the equation a manifestation of political Shia Islam framed under a republican system.

Three decades on and Turkey has but become a shadow of its former secular self and Saudi Arabia is facing dissent in the face. As for Iran, it has, despite foreign animosity and economic sanctions, seen its pull on the region expands exponentially, its impetus fed by the ever-increasing vacuum left by those powers who thought themselves too grand to ever fall.

“There are now two poles, the first is under the leadership of the United States and its Arab allies and the second is under the leadership of Iran and the states that joined the Iranian revolution’s project,” stressed Zakani.

Regardless of one might feel toward Iran or whatever prejudices one chooses to hold on to vis a vis the Islamic Republic, the Middle East of today is more Persian that it ever was.

Catherine Shakdam is the Associate Director of the Beirut Center for Middle Eastern Studies and a political analyst specializing in radical movements, exclusively for the online magazine “New Eastern Outlook”.
First appeared:
http://journal-neo.org/2014/11/12/the-disintegration-of-the-saudi-empire-and-the-new-iranian-axis/

dimanche, 26 octobre 2014

How Turan Invented Islam

How Turan Invented Islam

Much of the mythology of the pre-Islamic Persia involves the tension and conflict between Iran and Turan. In modern parlance “Turan” has become synonymous with Central Asia and the Turk, but in its original meaning it involved two groups of Iranian peoples who were distinctly geographically situated. The eruption of the Turkic tribes can be dated to approximately the middle of the first millennium A.D., so they post-date the mythological era of the Iranian peoples, though they coincide with the arrival of Islam to Central Asia. Lost Enlightenment: Central Asia’s Golden Age from the Arab Conquest to Tamerlane is really the chronicle of the last 500 years of the cultural efflorescence of classical Turan, the ancestors of the people we today term Tajik, as well as nearly extinct groups such as the Sodgians. Though there are numerous ‘call-backs’ to the pre-Islamic era, as well as the requisite scene setting chapters, the heart of the matter occurs during Islam’s Golden Age, in particular of the Abbasid Caliphate. The last few centuries, from the rise of more self-consciously Turkic political actors to the period of Timur, get’s short shrift, and the story is tidied up rather quickly.

k10064Lost Enlightenment is also unapologetically a history of intellectuals. Social, cultural, and diplomatic events serve as background furniture. They’re noted in passing and alluded to, but ultimately they are not the center of the story. They’re for intellectuals to be situated within. The key fact which serves as the cause for a book like this is many are not aware that an enormous disproportionate number of the intellectuals of the Golden Age of Islam were ethnically Iranian and from Central Asia. I say ethnically Iranian, because it is not quite accurate to state they were Persian, because the Iranian languages and ethnic groups differ considerably. Abū Rayḥān al-Bīrūnī was a native of Khwarezm, the Iranian language of which was close to Sogdian, and therefore closer to modern Ossetian. The author observes that because intellectuals from Islam’s Golden Age habitually wrote in Arabic most moderns assume they must be Arabs (perhaps more accurately, the names “look Arabic”, unless they are unrecognizable transliterations). But this is an error of the same class as presuming that because Western scholars utilized Latin as a lingua franca until recently they must have been Latins. A quick perusal of Wikipedia’s entry on the philosophy and science of the Islamic Golden Age will disabuse you of this notion. Though the central focus of Lost Enlightenment is on Iranians from Turan, it is important to remember that many individuals of note don’t quite fall into this exact category but exhibit affinities which might surprise. Though the figure behind the most widespread school of Islamic law, abu Hanifa, is well known to have had his ancestry among the Persians of what is today Afghanistan, ibn Hanbal, founder of the austere Hanbali school (arguably the ancestor of the Wahhabi and Salafi movements) was descended from Khorasani Arabs. In other words, even many of the Arabs had eastern affinities.

41OxoLpuNyL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_ To understand why, you need to realize that to a rough approximation the shift between the Umayyad Caliphate to the Abbasid involved a orientation of the Islamic world away from the Mediterranean world and toward Central Asia, Turan. This is summarized by the reality that the capital shifted from Damascus in Syria to Baghdad in Iraq, but this small distance does not do justice to the shift in mentality. The Abbasids were brought to power by armies and social movements with roots in Khorasan and further north and east. It was in a sense a revenge of the mawalis, non-Arab converts to Islam who were marginalized as second class citizens under the Umayyads. Traditional Muslims sometimes refer to the Umayyads as the “Arab Kingdom” because of the ethnic nature of their polity (evidenced by the fact that there were instances where Arab Christians were privileged over non-Arab Muslim converts). Though the Abbasids were an Arab Caliphate, their ruling culture was much more ethno-linguistically cosmopolitan. Over time the dynasty began to rely more and more upon Turks from Central Asia to man their armies, while the domain of culture and politics was heavily inflected by Iranians and Arabicized Iranians. For a period the caliph al-Ma’mun relocated the locus of the Caliphate to Merv, in modern day Turkmenistan. It is not surprise that al-Ma’mun’s mother was a Persian from Khorasan.

 

download The culturally Turanian color of the Abbasid world is critical because I think it is plausible to argue that Islam as we understand it emerged during the Abbasid period. On the face of it this sounds strange. Islam as a religion obviously dates to the time of Muhammad, in the early 7th century. Salafi purists would purge all that came after the mid-7th century, the period of the “Rightly Guided Caliphs” (i.e., the pre-dynastic period). But to say Islam was formed in this period is like saying Buddhism dates to the time of the Buddha, in the middle of the first millennium B.C., or that Christianity dates to the time of Jesus down to the writing of the Synoptic Gospels a few decades later. No matter what religionists may aver religions evolve organically through time, and some of their most seminal aspects develop considerably later. Among Christians this is acknowledged by the repeated attempts to recreate “Primitive Christianity,” that is, the Church before it became co-opted by Roman Imperial culture. But even before the conversion of Constantine Christianity had transformed into a gentile religion with Jewish roots, rather than a Jewish sect. The institutional superstructure of the Christian Church and its theological basis were totally transformed by the immersion of sectarian Judaism in the Greek and Roman world (one could say that this is true of both Christianity and modern Judaism!).

In modern Sunni Islam (~90 percent of Muslims) in comparison to Christianity theology plays a relatively minor role in relation to law, shariah. One of the primary bases of shariah are the hadith, the sayings of the prophet. It so happens that the two most respected collections of these sayings for Sunni Muslims were authored by Persians from Khorasan. The author of Lost Enlightenment chalks up the prominence of Turan in the compilation of hadith to the pre-Islamic cultural and religious norms, in particular on the prominent Buddhist tradition of translation and collection. Though never explicit the argument seems to be that this region so essential in the development of Islam as we know it remained religiously plural, with Buddhists, Zoroastrians, Christians, and pagans prominent for centuries, and this cultural background could not but help shape the beliefs and practices of local Muslims, many of them converts. But the connections are often not made concrete, but are more suggestive. For example the connection between Buddhist viharas and the later madrasas. Because the Buddhists of Turan have no modern day cultural descendants it can be quite difficult to comprehend just how prominent this religion was during this period, but it is well known that under the early Abbasids the influential Barmakid family were relativley recently converted Buddhist functionaries. Rather than the specifics though I think the fixation in Lost Enlightenment on the non-Muslim milieu that persisted in Turan down to ~1000 A.D. is to emphasize that during Sunni Islam’s formative period the religious culture looked east as much as it did to the west, that is, the world of India. The connections between the Near East, Central Asia, and India, are ancient, going back to records of Indian merchant communities settled in Sumeria. It does not take a leap of imagination to wonder if Sufi mysticism may have been influenced by Indian practices and beliefs (some early Sufi mystics do report Indian, or perhaps more accurately Turanian Buddhist, mentors). And there are curious currents in the other direction, “Greek medicine” as transmitted by Central Asians is still practiced in India.

Islamic civilization beginning with Muhammad is at its foundation “West” facing. Muhammad engaged the ideas and thoughts of Christians and Jews, and his foreign travels took him to the margins of Syria. The details of prayer positions among contemporary Muslims reportedly derive from the practice of Syrian monks. The eastern fringe of the Islamic world at its founding was that of the magians, the Zoroastrians, who were also clear influences. But if you accept the proposition that much, most, of Islamic civilization dates to the Abbasids, then your understanding of West and East must shift. Here the West is the world of Persia-verging-upon-Mesopotamia, Iran, and the East is India, and to a lesser extent China. The center is Turan. This is a somewhat tendentious position, but I do think it is defensible, should make us reconsider the genealogy of Islamic culture and civilization.

But one of aspects of Lost Enlightenment that I found irritating is prefigured by the title, and that is the Whiggish attempt to shoehorn Turanian civilization into the stream of ascending scientific and mechanical complexity of the West. I do think it is interesting that Turanians contributed overwhelmingly in the domains of medicine an the natural sciences, and far less to what we might term the humanities. The author argues rather aggressively that this is due to the fact that the environment of Central Asia requires city-scale hydraulic civilization, putting a premium upon the mechanical sciences. I am moderately skeptical of environmentally deterministic arguments, but they are reasonable. What is harder to excuse is harping upon the same thesis so often, as well as showing your own philosophical preferences so clearly. The author, like myself, is biased toward those scholars with a peripatetic method in regards to the natural sciences. Though making the case for Turan’s role in the formation of Islamic orthodoxy, he is not positively inclined toward the anti-scientific legalist orientation ascendant after ~1000 A.D. Neither am I, nor are most Western readers of this work. If al-Biruni is the hero, then al-Ghazali, a Persian from Khorasan, is the villain. This sort of normative typology is not befitting a scholarly work of this level.

Finally, we have to address the fact that today Turan is not what it once was. The prominence in intellectual endeavors indicates a demographic robustness which is hard to see in modern day Central Asia. The short answer seems to be the Mongols. The author argues that the Mongols were particularly destructive in Central Asia, both in the areas of straightforward genocide and destruction of the material basis of Turanian urban society in the form of hydraulic engineering. It seems clear that this period also saw the shift from a mostly Iranian speaking populace, to a Turkic one, as the Turks, long recently dominant politically, became handmaids to the Mongols. Though Lost Enlightenment gives some space to early Turkic attempts at ethnic assertion (apparently they were segregated in Baghdad in the early years), it is a very secondary aspect. But it may be that ultimately Turanian civilization always had a sell-by date, because the geographic parameters for dense civilization in Central Asia are fragile and marginal. Situated at the center of Eurasia, and forcing its populace to engage in ingenious engineering to simply survive, Turan was bound to be a creative force. But its explosion may inevitably have been ephemeral.

00:05 Publié dans Eurasisme, Islam | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0) | Tags : euraisme, histoire, islam, touran, espace touranien, iran | |  del.icio.us | | Digg! Digg |  Facebook

mercredi, 22 octobre 2014

Iran and the Proxy War in Kurdistan

667758-peshmergas-kurdes-iraq.jpg

Author: Eric Draitser

Iran and the Proxy War in Kurdistan

In the midst of the war against ISIS (Islamic State) now taking place in both Iraq and Syria, a possible shifting of alliances that could fundamentally alter the balance of power in the region is taking place, and no one seems to have noticed. Specifically, the burgeoning relationship between the Islamic Republic of Iran and the semi-autonomous Kurdistan region of Northern Iraq has the potential to remake the political landscape of the Middle East. Naturally, such a development is part of a broader geopolitical gambit by Iran, and it will have significant ramifications for all regional actors. However, it is Turkey, the gulf monarchies, and Israel that potentially have the most to lose from such a development.

While Iran has long-standing disputes with elements of its own Kurdish minority, it has demonstrably taken the lead in aiding Iraqi Kurds in their war against extremist fighters loyal to ISIS. As Kurdish President Massud Barzani explained in late August, “The Islamic Republic of Iran was the first state to help us…and it provided us with weapons and equipment.” This fact alone, coupled with the plausible, though unconfirmed, allegations of Iranian military involvement on the ground in Kurdish Iraq, demonstrates clearly the high priority Tehran has placed on cooperation with Barzani’s government and the Kurdish people in the fight against the Saudi and Qatari-backed militants of ISIS. The question is, why? What is it that Iran hopes to gain from its involvement in this fight? Who stands to lose? And how could this change the region?

The Iran Equation

While many eyebrows have been raised at Iranian involvement on the side of the Kurds in the fight against ISIS, perhaps it should not come as a much of a surprise. Tehran has steadily been shoring up its relations with Erbil, both out of a genuine desire to form an alliance, and as a counter-measure against the ouster of their close ally and partner, former Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki.

Since the US war on Iraq began in 2003, and especially after US troops left in 2011, Iran had positioned itself as a key, and in some ways dominant, actor in Iraq. Not only did it have significant influence with Maliki and his government, it also saw in Iraq an opportunity to break out of the isolation imposed upon it by the US, EU and Israel over its disputed nuclear program. For Iran, Iraq under Maliki was a bridge both physically (linking Iran with its allies in Syria and Southern Lebanon) and politically (serving as an intermediary with the West in negotiations). In addition, Maliki’s Iraq was to be the linchpin of a new economic strategy which included the proposed Iran-Iraq-Syria pipeline, a project which would have provided Iran overland access to the European energy market, thereby allowing the Islamic Republic to overtake Qatar as the region’s dominant gas exporter to Europe.

Additionally, Iraq was in many ways the front line in Iran’s continued struggle against western-backed terror groups, the most infamous of which is the Mujahideen-e-Khalq (MEK). It was Maliki’s government which closed down Camp Ashraf, the notorious base from which the MEK operated, conducting their continued terror war against Iran. It is of course no secret that MEK is the darling of the neocon establishment, lauded by nearly every architect, supporter, and enabler of Bush’s Iraq War.

Seen in this way, Iraq was both an economic and political necessity for Iran, one that could not simply be allowed to slip back into the orbit of Washington. And so, with the emergence of ISIS, and the subsequent toppling of the Maliki government through behind-the-scenes pressure and a comprehensive propaganda campaign that portrayed him as a brutal dictator on par with Saddam Hussein, Iran clearly needed to recalculate its strategy. Knowing that it could not trust the new government in Baghdad, which was more or less handpicked by the US, Tehran clearly saw a new opportunity in Kurdistan.

Why Kurdistan?

While the imperatives for Iran to engage in Iraq are clear, the question remains as to what specifically Kurdistan offers Tehran both in terms of strategic necessity and geopolitical power projection. To understand the Iranian motive, one must examine how Kurds and Kurdistan fit into Iran’s national and international relations.

First and foremost is the fact that Iran, like Iraq, Syria and Turkey, is home to a considerable Kurdish minority, one that has consistently been manipulated by the US and Israel, and used as a pawn in the geopolitical chess match with the Islamic Republic. With the chaos in Iraq and Syria, and the continued oppression and marginalization of the Kurdish minority in Turkey, it seems that an independent Kurdistan, one that could fundamentally alter the map of the region, is becoming an ever more viable possibility. So, in order to prevent any possible destabilization of Iran and its government from the Kurds, Tehran seems to have begun the process of allying with, as opposed to aligning against, Kurdish interests in Iraq. Likely, Iran sees in such an alliance a tacit, if not overt, agreement that any Kurdish independence will not be used as a weapon against Tehran.

Secondly, by siding with Barzani’s government and providing material and tactical support, Iran is clearly jockeying for position against its regional rivals. On the one hand, Iran recognizes the threat posed by NATO member Turkey whose government, led by Erdogan and Davutoglu, has been intimately involved in the war on Syria and the arming and financing of ISIS and the other terror groups inside the country. While Ankara has publicly proclaimed its refusal to participate in military action in Syria, its actions have shown otherwise. From hosting terrorists to providing space to CIA and other intelligence agencies involved in fomenting civil war in Syria, Turkey has shown itself to be integral to the US-NATO-GCC attempt to effect regime change.

It is, of course, not lost on the Kurds precisely what Turkey has done, and continues to do. Not only has Turkey waged a decades-long war against the Kurdish Workers Party (PKK), it has steadfastly refused to treat its Kurdish minority as anything other than second class citizens. And now, given the central role that Erdogan, Davutoglu & Co. have played in fomenting the war in Syria, they allow their terrorist proxies of ISIS to massacre still more Kurds. It should therefore come as no surprise that many Kurds view Turkey, not Syria or Iran, as the great threat and enemy of their people. And so, Iran steps into the vacuum, offering the Kurds not only material, but political and diplomatic support.

From Tehran’s perspective, Turkey continues to be the representative of the US-NATO-GCC agenda; Ankara has played a key role in blocking Iranian economic development, particularly in regard to energy exports. It should be remembered that Turkey is one of the principal players in the Caspian energy race, providing the requisite pipeline routes for both the TANAP (Trans-Anatolian Pipeline) and Nabucco West pipeline project, among a basket of others. These projects are supported by the US as competition to both Russia’s South Stream (a pipeline which would bring Russian gas to Southern Europe) and the proposed Iran-Iraq-Syria pipeline. Essentially then, Turkey should be understood as a powerful chess piece used to block Iranian moves toward economic independence and regional hegemony.

Iranian overtures toward the Kurds, and involvement in the fight against ISIS generally, must also be interpreted as a check against Iran’s other regional rivals in Saudi Arabia and Qatar. Both countries have been implicated in organizing and financing many of the terror groups and networks that now operate under the “ISIS” banner, using them as proxies to break the “Resistance Axis” that includes Hezbollah, Syria’s Baath Party, and Iran.

The economic and political interests of Saudi Arabia and Qatar, more specifically the families ruling those countries, are self-evident; maintaining their grip on power is only possible by maintaining dominance over the energy trade. In Iran, the gulf monarchies see a powerful, resource-rich nation that, given the opportunity to develop economically, would likely displace them as the regional leader. And so, naturally, they must activate their jihadi networks to deprive Iran of its two strategic allies in Iraq and Syria, thereby severing the link with Hezbollah and breaking the arc of Shia dominance. It is basic power politics, only it is now Kurds paying with their lives for the petty aspirations of gulf monarchs.

Finally, Iranian moves in Kurdistan represent a new phase of the long-standing proxy war between Iran and Israel. It is no secret that, as mentioned above, certain Kurdish factions and organizations have long been quite close with Tel Aviv. In fact, the decades-long relationship between the two is one of the primary reasons for Kurdish acquiescence to western designs against both Iraq and Iran. As pro-Israeli blogger and self-proclaimed “prodigious savant” Daniel Bart wrote:

There was very close cooperation between Israel and the KDP in the years 1965-75. During most of that time there were usually some 20 military specialists stationed in a secret location in southern Kurdistan. Rehavam Zeevi and Moshe Dayan were among Israeli generals who served in Kurdistan…The Israelis trained the large Kurdish army of Mustafa Barzani and even led Kurdish troops in battle…The “secret” cooperation between Kurdistan and Israel is mainly in two fields. The first is in intelligence cooperation and this is hardly remarkable as half the world including many Muslim states have such relationships with Israel. The second is influence in Washington. 

Bart, relying on the work of noted Israeli author and researcher Shlomo Nakdimon, is quite correct to point out that Israeli intelligence, including some of the most celebrated (or infamous, depending on one’s perspective) Israeli leaders, have had intimate ties with the Kurdish leadership for more than half a century. Though the documented evidence is scanty, those who follow the relationship closely generally believe that the level of cooperation between Tel Aviv and Erbil has increased dramatically, particularly since the US invasion of Iraq in 2003. Indeed, Israel likely has covert operatives and intelligence officers on the ground in Kurdistan, and has for some time. This is certainly no secret to the Iranians who are convinced (and are likely correct) that many of the assassinations, bombings, and other terrorist acts perpetrated by Israel have been planned and organized from Kurdish territory.

Such thinking is backed up by the investigative reporting of Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Seymour Hersh who noted in 2004:

“The Israelis have had long standing ties to the Talibani and Barzani clans [in] Kurdistan and there are many Kurdish Jews that emigrated to Israel and there are still a lot of connection. But at some time before the end of the year [2004], and I’m not clear exactly when, certainly I would say a good six, eight months ago, Israel began to work with some trained Kurdish commandoes, ostensibly the idea was the Israelis — some of the Israeli elite commander units, counter-terror or terror units, depending on your point of view, began training — getting the Kurds up to speed.”

Iran’s leaders have been keenly aware of the presence of Israeli Special Forces and intelligence on the ground in Kurdistan, knowing that ultimately it is Tehran in the crosshairs. And so, Iran has clearly taken this brief window as an opportunity to assert its own influence in Kurdistan, inserting itself into what had been, until now, the domain of the Israelis. It remains to be seen how Tel Aviv will respond.

While the world watches with horror the continued advance of ISIS in both Iraq and Syria, there is another story unfolding. It is the story of how Iran, long since demonized as the regional pariah, has turned the chaos meant to destroy it and its allies into a possible springboard for future cooperation. It is the story of how terrorism and proxy war has brought former enemies closer together, while exposing before the world the treachery of governments once seen as Iranian allies. It is the story of alliances shifting like desert sands. But in this story, the next chapter has yet to be written.

Eric Draitser is an independent geopolitical analyst based in New York City, he is the founder of StopImperialism.org and OP-ed columnist for RT, exclusively for the online magazine “New Eastern Outlook”.


First appeared: http://journal-neo.org/2014/10/16/iran-and-the-proxy-war-in-kurdistan/

vendredi, 17 octobre 2014

Renverser des gouvernements : une pratique étasunienne bien rodée

 

Renverser des gouvernements: une pratique étasunienne bien rodée

Auteur : Washington's Blog & http://zejournal.mobi 

Énoncer l’ensemble des pays victimes de la politique étasunienne serait difficile en un seul article, cela serait plutôt sujet à écrire un livre, mais un résumé est toujours possible quand à quelques événements ayant eut lieu, car dans le domaine, ils sont très prolifiques, en France avec De Gaulle en Mai 68, c’était eux, en Ukraine avec les néo-nazis qui ont accédé au pouvoir, idem, en Tunisie, pareil, etc… Les Etats-Unis ont l’entrainement, les moyens financiers et les outils, et vous en avez quelques exemples ici:

Les USA ont déjà renversé les gouvernements de Syrie (1949), d’Iran (1953), d’Irak (par deux fois), d’Afghanistan (par deux fois), de Turquie, de Lybie et de bien d’autres pays riches en pétrole.

Syrie

Chacun sait que les USA et leurs alliés ont fortement soutenu les terroristes islamiques de Syrie, dans leur tentative de renverser le régime en place dans le pays.

Mais saviez-vous que les USA ont déjà exécuté un changement de régime en Syrie par le passé ?

La CIA a soutenu un coup d’état d’extrême droite en Syrie en 1949. Douglas Little, professeur au Département d’Histoire de la Clark University a écrit :

« Déjà, en 1949, cette nouvelle république arabe indépendante fut un important champ d’expérimentation pour les premières tentatives d’actions clandestines de la CIA. La CIA y a encouragé en secret un coup d’état d’extrême droite en 1949. »

La raison pour laquelle les USA ont initié ce coup d’état ? Little explique :

« Fin 1945, la Arabian American Oil Company (ARAMCO) a présenté ses plans pour la construction du Trans-Arabian Pipe Line (TAPLINE) qui devait relier l’Arabie Saoudite à la Méditerranée. Grâce à l’aide US, ARAMCO put obtenir des permis de passage de la part du Liban, de la Jordanie, et de l’Arabie Saoudite. Mais le permis pour faire passer le pipeline par la Syrie fut refusé par le parlement [syrien]. »

En d’autres termes, la Syrie était le seul obstacle à la construction d’un pipeline lucratif. (En fait, la CIA a mis conduit des actions de ce type depuis sa création.)

En 1957, le président américain et le premier ministre britanniques se mirent d’accord pour déclencher à nouveau un changement de régime en Syrie. Little, en bon historien, indique que le complot en vue de la réalisation du coup d’état fut découvert et stoppé :

« Le 12 aout 1957, l’armée syrienne encercla l’ambassade des USA à Damas. Après avoir annoncé qu’il avait découvert un complot de la CIA pour renverser le président Shukri Quwatly, de tendance neutre, et installer un régime pro-occidental, le chef des services de contre-espionnage syriens Abdul Hamid Sarraj expulsa trois diplomates US du pays…

C’est ainsi que le chef des services de contre-espionnage syriens, Sarraj, réagit avec rapidité le 12 aout, en expulsant Stone et d’autres agents de la CIA, en arrêtant leurs complices, et en plaçant l’ambassade des USA sous surveillance. »

Les néoconservateurs établirent à nouveau des plans en vue d’un changement de régime en Syrie en 1991.

Et comme le note Nafeez Ahmed :

« D’après l’ancien ministre des affaires étrangères français Roland Dumas, la Grande-Bretagne avait préparé des actions clandestines en Syrie dès 2009 : « J’étais en Angleterre pour tout autre chose deux ans avant que les hostilités ne commencent en Syrie » a-t-il confié à la télévision française, « j’ai rencontré des responsables anglais de premier plan [...] qui m’ont avoué qu’ils préparaient quelque chose en Syrie. C’était en Angleterre, et pas en Amérique. L’Angleterre préparait une invasion de rebelles en Syrie. »

Des courriels de la société privée d’investigation Stratfor qui avaient fuité et qui comprenaient des notes d’un meeting avec des représentants du Pentagone ont confirmé que, dès 2011, l’entrainement des forces de l’opposition syriennes par des éléments des forces spéciales américaines et britanniques était en cours. Le but était de provoquer « l’effondrement » du régime d’Assad « de l’intérieur ».

Irak

Chacun sait que les USA ont renversé Saddam Hussein lors de la guerre d’Irak.

Mais saviez-vous que les USA avaient déjà réalisé un changement de régime en Irak par le passé ?

Plus spécifiquement, la CIA a tenté d’empoisonner le dirigeant irakien en 1960. En 1963, les USA ont soutenu le coup d’état qui est parvenu à assassiner le chef du gouvernement irakien.

Récemment, l’Irak a commencé à se fracturer en tant que nation. USA Today note que « l’Irak est déjà séparé en trois états ». De nombreuses personnes affirment que les événements ont été forcés… qu’en tout cas, c’est une forme de changement de régime.

Iran

Chacun sait qu’un changement de régime en Iran est l’un des objectifs à long terme des faucons de Washington.

Mais saviez-vous que les USA avaient déjà réalisé un changement de régime en Iran en 1953… qui est directement responsable de la radicalisation du pays ?

Pour être précis, la CIA a admis que les USA ont renversé le premier ministre iranien en 1953, un homme modéré, portant costume et cravate, et démocratiquement élu (il a été renversé car il avait nationalisé les compagnies pétrolières iraniennes, qui étaient auparavant contrôlées par BP et d’autres compagnies pétrolières occidentales. La CIA a admis que pour parvenir à ses fins, elle avait engagé des iraniens pour qu’ils jouent le rôle de communistes et préparent des attentats en Iran, dans le but de retourner le pays contre son premier ministre.

Si les USA n’avaient pas renversé le gouvernement iranien modéré, les mollahs fondamentalistes n’auraient jamais pris le pouvoir dans le pays. L’Iran était connu depuis des milliers d’années comme un pays tolérant envers ses chrétiens et ses autres minorités religieuses.

Les faucons du gouvernement des USA cherchent à entrainer un nouveau changement de régime en Iran depuis des dizaines d’années.

Turquie

La CIA a reconnu avoir organisé le coup d’état de 1980 en Turquie.

Afghanistan

Il est évident que les USA ont, par leurs bombardements, contraint les talibans à se soumettre, durant la guerre d’Afghanistan.

Mais le conseiller à la sécurité nationale d’Hillary Clinton et celui du président d’alors, Jimmy Carter,ont admis en public que les USA avaient auparavant conduit un changement de régime en Afghanistan durant les années 1970, en soutenant Ben Laden et les moudjahidines… les précurseurs d’Al Qaida.

Libye

Non seulement les USA ont engagé une intervention militaire directe contre Kadhafi, mais, d’après un groupe d’officiers de la CIA, les USA ont également armé des combattant d’Al Qaida, afin qu’ils aident à renverser Kadhafi.

En réalité, les USA ont organisé des coups d’états et des campagnes de déstabilisations dans le monde entier… ne créant partout que le chaos.


- Source : Washington's Blog

Alger se tourne vers le BRICS

Poutine-Bouteflika-1609.jpgAlger se tourne vers le BRICS, ...sans craindre l'Occident!

par Meziane Rabhi

Ex: http://french.irib.ir  

 
IRIB- “Dans un contexte de ralentissement de la demande d’exportations, en provenance des marchés européens,... l’Algérie multiplie ses relations commerciales avec un certain nombre d’économies émergentes, notamment le Brésil, la Russie, l’Inde et la Chine (Bric).” C’est du moins ce que relève Oxford Business Group (OBG) dans un papier intitulé “Algérie : diversification des relations économiques”. OBG note que l’Algérie, qui s’engage de plus en plus sur la voie d’une diversification de son économie, aussi bien en termes de production que de commerce, affiche des perspectives d’augmentation de ses recettes commerciales encourageantes, grâce à une demande — en particulier en matières premières — toujours forte de la part des marchés émergents malgré des prévisions de croissance revues à la baisse. Selon le cabinet londonien, citant le ministère des Finances, les exportations vers l’Asie ont atteint 2,03 milliards de dollars au premier trimestre 2012, un chiffre quasiment multiplié par deux par rapport à la même période l’année précédente. Début 2012, un dixième des exportations algériennes était à destination de l’Asie, faisant de la région le troisième marché d’exportation de l’Algérie. “Par exemple, le volume des échanges commerciaux de l’Algérie avec l’Inde, s’il ne représente toujours qu’un faible pourcentage de l’ensemble des échanges commerciaux du pays, a connu ces dernières années une rapide expansion”, indique OBG.

L’Inde est le 11e partenaire commercial de l’Algérie ; les deux pays se sont exprimés en faveur d’une augmentation du volume de ces échanges à l’avenir. “Dans un récent rapport de l’ambassade d’Inde en Algérie, on pouvait lire que le commerce bilatéral entre l’Algérie et l’Inde avait atteint un chiffre total de 2,7 milliards d’euros en 2011, contre 1,9 milliards d’euros en 2010, hausse qui s’explique en grande partie par la hausse du prix des produits pétroliers”, rapporte le cabinet londonien. Selon ce dernier, les exportations algériennes, qui se composent surtout de pétrole et de gaz, ont enregistré une hausse de près de 50% entre 2010 et 2011 et représentent les deux tiers de l’ensemble des échanges bilatéraux. Les exportations indiennes vers l’Algérie comportent des produits industriels variés, comme des véhicules à moteur et des tuyaux pour le transport de pétrole et de gaz, ainsi que de la viande et d’autres produits agricoles.

La Chine a connu la plus fulgurante ascension


Les relations commerciales entre l’Algérie et le Brésil ont également connu une croissance exponentielle au cours de ces dernières années. Mais comme partout ailleurs en Afrique, c’est la Chine qui a connu la plus fulgurante ascension.

Le géant asiatique a joué un rôle clé dans le soutien des exportations algériennes ces dernières années. Les statistiques du ministère des Finances concernant le commerce extérieur du pays en 2011 placent la Chine en deuxième position dans la liste des sources d’importation pour l’année 2011.
L’Algérie a également pris des mesures pour optimiser le potentiel de sa relation avec la Russie, elle aussi exportatrice d’hydrocarbures estime OBG. “Si les relations commerciales entre l’Algérie et la Russie sont limitées, les deux pays producteurs d’énergie se sont par le passé alliés dans le cadre de projets stratégiques communs afin de mettre en commun les bonnes pratiques établies dans les domaines de l’extraction et du transport des produits pétroliers”, rappelle le cabinet. Le dernier accord de partenariat entre Sonatrach et Gazprom, l’entreprise gazière monopolistique russe, a expiré en 2007 et n’a pas été renouvelé par la suite, faute de projets communs à l’horizon. “Il se pourrait bien que cette situation change, comme l’a montré l’annonce en juin 2012 d’un accord de principe entre Sonatrach et Gazprom pour procéder à des échanges de swap, un système d’échange de flux financiers qui permet à chaque pays d’optimiser ses ventes dans les marchés clés du pays partenaire”, prévoit OBG.

mercredi, 15 octobre 2014

L'Iran et la guerre très complexe contre l’organisation EI

Iran – Défilé de Gardiens de la Révolution

L'Iran et la guerre très complexe contre l’organisation EI

Ex: http://fortune.fdesouche.com

Les ennemis de mes ennemis ne sont pas nécessairement mes amis. C’est la raison pour laquelle la guerre contre le groupe Etat islamique s’annonce très complexe.

A cela plusieurs facteurs, notamment le fait que les pays de la coalition sont en même temps en conflit avec les Etats qui vont profiter de l’affaiblissement, voire de la disparition, du groupe djihadiste de l’EI qu’ils combattent.

Après de longues hésitations dont les causes restent toujours inexpliquées et à propos desquelles il vaut mieux, faute d’indices fiables, ne pas trop spéculer, les Occidentaux ont décidé non seulement d’endiguer immédiatement l’avancée du groupe Etat islamique (EI), mais aussi de l’éradiquer à terme.

Ce groupe djihadiste dont les crimes atroces contre les populations civiles ont révolté le monde entier, a pris le contrôle d’un immense territoire entre la Syrie et l’Irak. Il s’est sans doute épanoui sur les ruines de ces deux pays. Il contrôlait, jusqu’à ces derniers jours, des raffineries en Irak et en Syrie et réussissait à vendre du pétrole en contrebande, en tirant des bénéfices allant de 1 à 3 millions de dollars par jour, selon les experts.

Pour combattre ce mouvement djihadiste, une mobilisation internationale impliquant les Etats-Unis, plusieurs grands pays européens et asiatiques et certains Etats de la région dont l’Iran se sont mis en marche.


Mais l’Iran n’a pas été officiellement invité à rejoindre la coalition internationale bien qu’il ait été tenu au courant du début des opérations aériennes en Irak. Il a pour sa part prévenu qu’il n’hésiterait pas à combattre le mouvement EI sur le territoire irakien si celui-ci s’approchait d’aventure de ses frontières étant donné que les combattants de ce groupe contrôlent actuellement de larges secteurs de Diyala, une province frontalière avec l’Iran.

Bachar el-Assad est toujours indésirable

L’exclusion de toute participation de Damas à la coalition par les États-Unis et les pays européens comme la France et la Grande-Bretagne n’est pas difficile à comprendre. La guerre contre l’organisation EI ne doit surtout pas contribuer au maintien au pouvoir du président Bachar el-Assad contre lequel les Occidentaux soutiennent des factions rebelles syriennes considérées comme modérées.

Le premier objectif de la coalition est de tarir la source principale de financement du groupe Etat islamique. C’est pourquoi les frappes aériennes ont obstinément visé les raffineries contrôlées par l’EI. Ainsi, de nombreuses raffineries dans l’est de la Syrie ont été frappées le 24 septembre par les Etats-Unis, l’Arabie Saoudite et les Emirats arabes unis. Les raffineries modulaires sont des installations préfabriquées qui fournissent du carburant pour les opérations de l’EI et des fonds pour financer la poursuite de leurs attaques en Irak et en Syrie (Le Monde 26 sept).

La Russie, quant à elle, considère ces raids de la coalition illégaux puisque non effectués en coordination avec Damas, son allié dans la région. L’Iran, autre allié de Damas, a aussi dénoncé par la voix de son président, Hassan Rohani, « les ingérences inappropriées en Syrie » qui relèvent selon lui d’une « approche stratégique erronée » des Occidentaux au Moyen-Orient.

Qui vient grossir les rangs des djihadistes en Irak et en Syrie ?

La menace djihadiste ayant dominé les débats à la récente Assemblée générale de l’ONU à New York, le Conseil de sécurité réuni le mercredi 24 septembre a adopté à l’unanimité une résolution qui impose aux Etats, sous peine de sanction, d’empêcher leurs citoyens de s’enrôler dans des groupes extrémistes. Selon les renseignements américains, plus de 15.000 combattants étrangers venus de plus de 80 pays auraient rejoint ces dernières années les djihadistes en Irak et en Syrie.

Outre les pays européens comme les Pays-Bas et la Belgique qui ont annoncé une grande participation à la coalition, l’Australie et le Japon soutiennent d’une façon ou d’une autre ces opérations militaires.

Le revirement spectaculaire du pouvoir islamo-conservateur turc qui, outre à son inaction face aux extrémistes voulant rejoindre les rangs du groupe EI à travers les frontières turques, avait refusé jusqu’à ces derniers jours d’intégrer la coalition, est aussi un fait d’importance qui change la donne. Dès son retour de l’Assemblée générale de l’ONU, le président turc, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, a annoncé sa participation prochaine à des opérations militaires.

Il est même allé plus loin en jugeant les frappes aériennes insuffisantes. Dans un entretien accordé fin septembre au quotidien Hürriyet, il a déclaré que son pays pourrait envoyer des militaires en Syrie afin de mettre en place une zone de sécurité pour secourir les réfugiés fuyant les djihadistes de l’EI. D’après lui, des forces terrestres sont complémentaires. Les opérations aériennes sont logistiques, s’il n’y a pas de troupes terrestres, il n’y aura pas de règlement permanent (Hürriyet, 27 Eylül 2014 Cumartasi).

En Irak, les forces armées irakiennes continuent leur combat contre les djihadistes sur plusieurs fronts, surtout dans la province occidentale d’Al-Anbar. Ceux-ci assiégeaient sur le territoire syrien la ville d’Aïn al-Arab (Kobane en kurde) située à la frontière turque qu’ils tentaient de prendre après avoir conquis plus de 60 villages dans cette région du Nord syrien. Cette offensive a poussé plus de 160.000 civils kurdes à fuir en Turquie.

Près de 24 heures après les premières frappes lancées par la coalition, des avions venus de Turquie ont mené dans cette région plusieurs raids contre des positions et des routes d’approvisionnement du groupe EI. Selon une ONG, ces frappes étaient beaucoup plus puissantes que celles menées par le régime Bachar el-Assad dans cette zone.

A qui profitent ces opérations ?

Des dommages collatéraux des frappes pour les civils irakiens et syriens vont sûrement permettre aux Russes et aux Iraniens de hausser le ton contre la manière dont la coalition mène ses opérations. Il est pourtant difficile d’admettre qu’un accord tacite entre les Russes et la coalition sur la question du maintien au pouvoir de Bachar el-Assad n’ait pas été conclu.

Mais ce qui est intéressant est que la mise à l’écart de l’Iran a déjà irrité les responsables iraniens. Dans une interview exclusive avec Al-Alam, le général adjoint des Forces armées iraniennes, Massoud Jazayeri, a qualifié la coalition d’ « alliance de terroristes » et a affirmé que « nous assistons aujourd’hui à l’une des plus hypocrites et fausses alliances de l’histoire contemporaine de l’Asie de l’Ouest ».

Il a décrit l’alliance comme « une farce historique » mettant en garde contre le fait que « les Etats-Unis sous prétexte de la lutte contre le terrorisme tentent de former une coalition avec les perdants dans la région afin de justifier sa présence dans cette région ». Et il a poursuivi : « Nous avons des informations selon lesquelles les Américains et les sionistes ont affirmé qu’à travers cette coalition l’objectif est de frapper la Résistance [terme employé par le pouvoir iranien pour désigner le régime de Téhéran et ses alliés dans la région, ndlr] ».

Ces propos attestent l’amertume ressentie par la République islamique après sa mise à l’écart humiliante de la coalition.

Le général adjoint des Forces armées iraniennes ne veut évidemment pas évoquer la lourde responsabilité du gouvernement Nouri al-Maleki en Irak dans la naissance et le développement du groupe djihadiste EI. C’est avant tout en raison de la politique d’exclusion des sunnites de l’appareil d’Etat et des instances de décision par ce gouvernement chiite soutenu par l’Iran que ce groupe a pu s’épanouir sur le sol irakien.

Pourtant, les propos rancuniers de ce général iranien comportent une parcelle de vérité. Où doit-on la chercher ? Peut-être dans ce principe qu’aucun pays ne risque la vie de ses soldats pour rien !

La complexité de cette guerre est telle qu’il est aujourd’hui difficile de discerner avec précision les visées à long terme de la coalition. Endiguer l’avancée des djihadistes dont les crimes abominables contre les populations civiles ont heurté la conscience du monde est d’ores et déjà un objectif grandiose que l’on ne peut pas s’empêcher de saluer.

La Turquie a bien compris qu’une attitude complaisante envers ces djihadistes détruirait à long terme l’équilibre de la région et mettrait en danger sa propre sécurité.

Quant aux Kurdes, bien qu’ils aient subi, comme d’autres communautés, des pertes, ils ont pourtant réussi à tisser et à renforcer des liens avec la communauté internationale. Ils n’ont certes pas abandonné l’idée de l’indépendance du Kurdistan irakien en vue de créer avec leurs frères dans d’autres pays moyen-orientaux une entité politique indépendante, mais ils ont compris que le moment n’est pas propice pour ce genre d’aventure.

Pour ce qui est de l’Iran, tant que les pourparlers sur son programme nucléaire n’ont pas abouti, la voie pour son entrée dans le concert des nations restera nébuleuse pour ne pas dire fermée.

Après tout, dans l’état actuel des choses, quel que soit notre angle d’approche, il faut bien admettre que cette guerre arrange plutôt l’Iran et ses alliés dans la région et en premier lieu le pouvoir de Bachar el-Assad qui se débarrasse ainsi d’un ennemi redoutable.

RFI

mardi, 14 octobre 2014

L’Iran au-delà de l’islamisme, de Thomas Flichy

Flichy-e.png

Parution : L’Iran au-delà de l’islamisme, de Thomas Flichy

Publié par

 
Introduction (extrait) au nouvel ouvrage de Thomas Flichy
 
 
L’Iran au-delà de l’islamisme, qui vient de paraître aux Éditions de l’Aube. Reproduit avec l’aimable autorisation de l’auteur. Acheter sur Amazon : cliquez ici

L’Iran est aujourd’hui placé au centre de l’attention géopolitique mondiale pour trois raisons fondamentales. En premier lieu, ce pays constitue le coeur énergétique du monde, exploitant simultanément les réserves en hydrocarbures de la mer Caspienne et celles du golfe Persique. Les puissances du Moyen-Orient qui l’environnent constituent, à cet égard, des périphéries envieuses. Pour la Chine, un partenariat avec l’Iran permettrait l’indispensable sécurisation de ses approvisionnements énergétiques. Ceci explique la double poussée maritime et terrestre de l’Empire du Milieu vers l’Iran, sur les traces des routes de la soie de la dynastie Tang. En second lieu, le monde chiite représente le coeur historique de l’innovation musulmane. Ce foyer d’inventivité est confiné depuis très longtemps par le monde sunnite. Profitant aujourd’hui du basculement irakien et de l’instabilité syrienne, l’Iran pousse son avantage pour étendre son influence au coeur du Moyen-Orient. Mais sa créativité, décuplée par la puissance imaginative de la poésie persane, effraie. En troisième lieu, l’Iran, qui souffre d’un déficit énergétique malgré ses réserves prodigieuses de gaz, développe des activités atomiques de façon accélérée, suscitant les interrogations légitimes de ses voisins. Soucieux d’éviter l’affrontement, les États-Unis et leurs alliés ont exercé des pressions indirectes sur l’Iran afin que celui-ci renonce à l’enrichissement nucléaire. Ces actions ont été qualifiées, le 3 septembre 2001, de djang-e-naram, ou « guerre douce », par Hossein Mazaheri, professeur de droit à Ispahan. Cette nouvelle forme de guerre, intimement liée aux progrès technologiques de la dernière décennie, se présente en effet comme un conflit dans lequel chacun des adversaires, préservant le capital humain et matériel de ses forces armées, cherche à faire tomber l’ennemi par des actions masquées et déstabilisatrices telles que les sanctions financières, la manipulation médiatique, les cyber-attaques ou l’élimination ciblée des têtes de réseau adverses. Ce conflit dépasse de loin la simple réalité iranienne dans la mesure où les puissances asiatiques et continentales que constituent la Russie, la Chine et l’Iran ont connu, malgré des différends internes, un rapprochement spectaculaire au cours des dernières années. Face à cette conjonction, les États-Unis redoutent la formation d’un nouvel Empire mongol, capable de concurrencer leur puissance océanique.

(…)

Les incompréhensions entre Français et Iraniens s’enracinent en réalité dans une double fracture culturelle. Partageant un héritage indo-européen commun, la France et la Perse se sont brusquement éloignées à partir de la conquête islamique. Les grandes divergences s’expliquent en grande partie par la très longue période d’occupation qu’a connue l’Iran depuis lors. La culture aristocratique de la négociation menée par les hommes d’armes s’est effacée à cause du discrédit jeté sur les élites militaires persanes vaincues. La culture des marchands combinant ruse et sophistication s’est substituée aux modes antiques de négociation. Face aux envahisseurs, l’inertie s’est imposée comme la force des dominés. La déliquescence de l’État a favorisé la lenteur et la corruption de ses agents. Face à la suspension du droit commun, les courtiers se sont substitués aux gens de loi afin de dire le droit et régler les difficultés privées. Devant le despotisme des rois et la prodigieuse insécurité des personnes et des biens s’est développé un langage indirect et ambigu destiné à protéger les sujets de l’arbitraire du pouvoir. Incapables de maîtriser leur propre destin, les Iraniens ont attribué les malheurs du pays aux complots étrangers. Les longs siècles de domination ont par conséquent forgé une culture allant à rebours de la tradition française fondée sur le temps compté, la force de la loi, la bonne foi et le rayonnement. La seconde fracture est le fruit de la Révolution française. Les ambassadeurs français du XVIIème siècle avaient de nombreux atouts pour comprendre les ressorts secrets de la culture persane. Enracinés dans la transcendance et l’attente messianique d’un temps nouveau, ils servaient un État puissant. Conscients d’un héritage historique pleinement assumé et partie intégrante de leur identité, ils étaient non seulement capables de saisir les références faites à leur propre passé, mais également aptes à renvoyer leurs interlocuteurs à leurs propres contradictions historiques. Ils n’ignoraient ni l’art de la conversation, ni les références littéraires donnant tout son sens à leur culture. L’étiquette de la Cour avait façonné en eux une habitude de la courtoisie devenue une seconde nature. Aujourd’hui, la fracture révolutionnaire sépare ces improbables messagers de la culture persane. Si la fracture culturelle générée par les invasions de la Perse explique pour une large part notre inaptitude à comprendre l’Iran au-delà des mots, nous pouvons à l’évidence puiser dans notre culture classique les clefs d’un dialogue réinventé avec ce pays méconnu.

Professeur à l’Institut d’Études Politiques de Bordeaux, à l’École Navale puis à l’École Spéciale Militaire de Saint-Cyr, Thomas Flichy de La Neuville est spécialiste de la diplomatie au XVIIIème siècle. Ancien élève en persan de l’Institut National des Langues et Cultures Orientales, agrégé d’histoire et docteur en droit, ses derniers travaux portent sur les relations françaises avec la Perse et la Chine à l’âge des Lumières.