Ok

En poursuivant votre navigation sur ce site, vous acceptez l'utilisation de cookies. Ces derniers assurent le bon fonctionnement de nos services. En savoir plus.

mardi, 09 février 2016

Iran Completes Eurasian Golden Triangle

Ex: http://journal-neo.org
 
Iran Completes Eurasian Golden Triangle

Sometimes profound tectonic shifts in the global politics arise from least noticed events. Such is the situation with Iran and the recent visit to Teheran of China’s President Xi Jinping. What emerged from the talks confirms that the vital third leg of what will become a genuine Eurasian Golden Triangle, of nations committed to peaceful economic development, is now in place. Now Iran, Russia and China have all indicated a will to cooperate that has the potential to change the current Western course of wars and destruction in favor of peace and cooperation. Consider some aspects of recent events since lifting of economic sanctions on Teheran only days ago.

What emerges in the public announcements following talks between China’s President and all top Iranian leaders from Prime Minister Rouhani to Iranian Parliament Speaker Ali Larijani and Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, merely hints at what is clearly a profound shift in the relations between China and Iran. On January 23, an official Chinese Xinhua news agency statement on Xi’s Iran trip, the first by any Chinese leader in fourteen years, declared the visit will, “lift their ties to a comprehensive strategic partnership.” In Teheran the Chinese President noted, “China stands ready to work with Iran to seize the momentum and further elevate our relationship and practical cooperation, so as to usher in a new chapter for our ties featuring comprehensive, long-term and stable development.”

Developing the economic fibers

The content of that cooperation is of a major geopolitical and geo-economical importance for not merely Eurasia, but for the world. Iran has just formally requested to join the world’s most important infrastructure project, China’s One Belt, One Road initiative, often called the New Silk Road Economic Initiative. The New Silk Road initiative was first proposed during a September 2013 meeting in Astana between Xi and Nursultan Nazarbayev, the President of Kazakhstan. Kazakhstan today is also a member with Russia of the Eurasian Economic Union and also of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization. Keep these various threads of an evolving economic fiber in mind as we proceed.

Since that initial 2013 discussion in Astana, the One Belt, One Road has begun to transform the political and economic map of all Eurasia. Last year in talks in Moscow just prior to the May 9 Russian Victory Day celebrations, where Xi was a specially honored guest, Vladimir Putin announced that the Eurasian Economic Union–Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Armenia and Kyrgyzstan–will formally integrate its own infrastructure development with China’s New Economic Silk Road.

Now the formal addition of Iran to the expanding Eurasian Silk Road is a giant positive step. It will allow Iran to break years of economic isolation and Western sanctions, and to do so over land where NATO color revolutions and other shenanigans are rendered largely impotent. It will open for the rest of Eurasia, especially China, but also Russia, vast new economic potentials.

Iran’s extraordinary resources

Iran has a young, educated population of more than 80 million, more than half under 35 years old, and a strategic land expanse twice the size of the state of Texas. It has the ninth highest literacy rate in the world–82% of the adult population, and 97% among young adults between 15 and 24 without gender discrepancy. Iran has 92 universities, 512 online University branches, and 56 research and technology institutes around the country with almost four million university students, one million of them medical students. One third or 31% are studying in Engineering and construction programs, one of the highest rates in the world. Iran today is not the primitive backwater many American policymakers imagine it to be. I’ve witnessed that first hand.

The country has also been blessed with vast undeveloped economic resources, not only its huge reserves of oil and natural gas. It is situated adjacent to Armenia and Azerbaijan on the north, Afghanistan and Pakistan on the east, and Iraq and Turkey on the west. The Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman lie south, and the Caspian Sea—the largest inland body of water in the world—lies to the north, giving Iran most of the water needed for its agriculture.

In terms of other natural resources it has one of the world’s largest copper reserves, as well as bauxite, coal, iron ore, lead, and zinc. Iran also has valuable deposits of aluminum, chromite, gold, manganese, silver, tin, and tungsten, as well as various gemstones, such as amber, agate, lapis lazuli, and turquoise. It’s a beautiful, rich country, as I can personally attest.

Now, by connecting the country to the expanding network of high-speed rail infrastructure in Eurasia’s One Belt, One Road, Iran’s future will become firmly tied to the most vibrant economic space on the planet–Eurasia–from the Pacific to India to Russia and, whenever the EU decides to stop being suicidal vassals to a Washington gone mad, also to Europe.

Notably, the peaceful economic relations between Iran and China go back some 2,000 years, when Persia was a key part of the ancient Silk Road trade route from China to the west. That fact was underscored by President XI. For the past six years, China has been Iran’s largest trading partner, which, despite western sanctions, reached $52 billion in 2014. That is now set to vastly increase, as Western sanctions are gone.

yazd-ville-d-iran.jpg

Iran as NATO pawn?

There are some who have speculated in recent months that, with US sanctions now lifted, Iran will become a pawn of Washington geopolitical games. While the Obama Administration clearly would relish the prospect, it will not happen. A recent event that has been covered up in Western, especially USA media coverage, illustrates Iran’s clear intent to defend its autonomy and sovereignty, much as her allies China and Russia do, all to the chagrin of NATO and the Pentagon.

In early January Iran seized two US Navy small ships that had violated its territorial waters in the Persian Gulf. They were captured and boarded and the 10 sailors on board taken into custody before being released, unharmed, allowed to continue their journey in their own boats. Their boats had “wandered” into Iranian territorial waters around Farsi Island.

US Defense Secretary Ash Carter claimed it was “apparently” because of mechanical and navigational failure. Farsi is the home base for the naval wing of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps, in the center of the Gulf. Rear Admiral Ali Fadavi, the commander of the naval branch of the Revolutionary Guard, publicly agreed with Carter, stating to press, “They were positioned in that area due to the failure of their navigation systems and they were not aware of being close to Farsi Island.”

Admiral Ali Fadavi was being diplomatic and more than a bit coy. Farsi Island is one of the most strategic bases in Iran, home to Iran’s maritime unconventional warfare force. The US claims that their two boats “lost” their GPS satellite abilities at precisely the same time, and the Secretary of Defense claims that he isn’t sure what happened? That the two boats also lost radio communication and all other communication during the incident, is a huge embarrassment for the US Navy, who only recently described Iran as an “ox-cart technology culture.”

The loss of all communication equipment and GPS systems on two US Navy boats at the same time means one thing: Iran has developed highly sophisticated electronic means to blind the GPS guidance systems essential to all operations of the world’s most powerful navy. Iran is no ox cart technology culture. In cooperation with Russia and Syria in the war to defeat ISIS, Iran has demonstrated it is no push-over as was Saddam Hussein’s Iraq in 2003. And, despite years of US sanctions, Iran today in military terms is not comparable to Iran during the US-instigated Iran-Iraq war in the 1980’s.

The recent incident recalls the event on December 4, 2011 when a US a Lockheed Martin RQ-170 Sentinel spy drone, the premier spy drone in the US fleet, crashed into the Iranian countryside. Iran claimed its electronic warfare unit brought the plane down. Washington laughed. Iran was right. They didn’t just down the aircraft, they took control of it mid-flight: “Using its knowledge of the frequency Iran initiated its ‘electronic ambush’ by jamming the bird’s communications frequencies, forcing it into auto-pilot. By putting noise [jamming] on the communications, you force the bird into autopilot. This is where the bird loses its brain.’” Iran managed to guide the drone to a peaceful landing inside Iran with the drone “believing” it was Afghanistan. This most recent Iranian capture of two US Navy boats well in Iranian waters by sophisticated electronic jamming says that Iran is hardly bowing before the temple of Washington power. She has become a very formidable military force. This ability for self-defense is very important in today’s hostile world.

SCO membership

Now, with Iran a formal partner in the Eurasian New Silk Road infrastructure development, and with US sanctions finally lifted, Iran will certainly be formally admitted as a full member of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization at their next annual meeting this summer. Iran currently has SCO Observer status.

Presently SCO members include China, Russia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and most recently, India and Pakistan.

In coming months the SCO, if present dynamics continue, will form the seed crystal of an emerging unified Eurasia, cooperating economically, politically, and importantly, militarily, as well as in counter-terrorism. It will tend to become the forum where vital issues among all SCO member nations will be worked out, as the Chinese are fond of saying, on a “win-win” manner.

We’re seeing the emergence of a true Eurasian Golden Triangle with China, Russia and Iran as the three key points. With the stated plan to route the Silk Road rail infrastructure to assist the mining of new gold for currency backing of the Eurasian member states, including now Iran with its significant own unexploited gold, the hyper-inflated, debt-bloated dollar system is gaining a formidable positive alternative, one committed to peace and development. Isn’t that a nice prospect?

F. William Engdahl is strategic risk consultant and lecturer, he holds a degree in politics from Princeton University and is a best-selling author on oil and geopolitics, exclusively for the online magazine “New Eastern Outlook”.
http://journal-neo.org/2016/02/03/iran-completes-eurasian...

dimanche, 03 janvier 2016

L'Amérique ne recherche-t-elle pas une guerre avec l'Iran?

iranarsenal_280909-source-khaleejtimes.com.jpg

L'Amérique ne recherche-t-elle pas une guerre avec l'Iran?

par Jean-Paul Baquiast

Ex: http://www.europesolidaire.eu

L'Iran, compte tenu de ses liens stratégiques avec la Russie, compte tenu aussi du rôle stratégique que lui permet sa position géographique en bordure des détroits, restera plus que jamais une ennemie potentielle de l'Amérique.
 
Un accord de long terme avait été obtenu concernant l'abandon par l'Iran de son programme d'armement nucléaire. Cet accord doit en principe entraîner une levée rapide des sanctions décrétées par Washington à l'égard des entreprises et des personnes impliquées dans des relations commerciales avec l'Iran. Ces sanctions gênent d'ailleurs tout autant les Européens que les Iraniens. Leur levée est donc attendue avec impatience.

Mais tout se passe comme si les Etats-Unis voulaient continuer à traiter l'Iran comme présentant pour eux une menace militaire imminente. Le Wall Street Journal vient d'indiquer que Washington prépare dorénavant des sanctions à l'égard des firmes et personnes supposées collaborer au programme iranien de missiles balistiques.

Deux réseaux de telles entreprises et personnes ont été identifiés. Les firmes américaines ou étrangères se verront interdire de mener des relations commerciales avec les entités mentionnées par ces réseaux. Les banques américaines gèleront leurs dépôts.

L'abus de droit est manifeste, compte-tenu du fait qu'un grand nombre de pays développent de tels missiles, militaires ou civiles, sans vouloir leur confier de charges nucléaires. Pour les autorités américaines, l'Iran serait susceptible d'utiliser ces vecteurs, même sans têtes nucléaires, dans le cadre d'attaques contre les Etats voisins ou en soutien au terrorisme.

Pour Téhéran au contraire, de tels missiles, dont deux exemplaires ont déjà expérimentés, n'ont que des objectifs défensifs. Il en sera de même des matériels livrés par la Russie. Faut-il rappeler que l'Arabie Saoudite, Israël et quelques autres continuent à menacer l'Iran de raids dévastateurs. Doit-on aller jusqu'à interdire l'Iran la fabrication de valises de voyage, sous prétexte que celles-ci peuvent être utilisées par des terroristes pour transporter des bombes?

L'Iran n'a pas encore réagit à l'annonce de telles nouvelles sanctions. Mais précédemment l'Ayatollah Ali Khamanei avait indiqué que le maintien de celles-ci serait considérées comme une violation de l'accord sur le nucléaire.


vendredi, 01 janvier 2016

La fortuna di Heidegger in Oriente

La fortuna di Heidegger in Oriente

Ex: http://4pt.su

“Un tempo l’Asiatico portò tra i Greci un oscuro fuoco ed essi, con la loro poesia e il loro pensiero, ne composero la natura fiammeggiante disponendola in una forma dotata dichiarezza e di misura”.     
                       

M. Heidegger, Aufenthalte

La fortuna di Heidegger in Iran

Nel 1977 Hans Georg Gadamer notava come Was ist Metaphysik?, la prolusione tenuta da Heidegger a Friburgo in Brisgovia nel 1929, avesse avuto una vasta risonanza fuori dalla Germania e come il pensiero heideggeriano fosse rapidamente penetrato in aree culturali ascrivibili all’Oriente. “È assai rivelativo – scriveva Gadamer – che siano state tanto immediate le traduzioni in giapponese e persino in turco, in lingue cioè che non rientrano nell’area linguistica dell’Europa cristiana. Sembra pertanto che il tentativo heideggeriano di pensare oltre la metafisica abbia riscontrato una precipua disponibilità alla sua ricezione proprio dove la metafisica greco-cristiana non orientava tutto il pensiero come suo sfondo naturale”1.

Tre anni più tardi un ex allievo persiano di Heidegger, Ahmed Fardid (1909-1994), diventava l’elemento di spicco di un organismo fondato dall’Imam Khomeyni, il Consiglio Supremo per la Rivoluzione Culturale Islamica, e costituiva il punto di riferimento di un gruppo di intellettuali che si richiamava esplicitamente al pensiero heideggeriano e si contrapponeva al gruppo dei “popperiani”.

“Gli ‘heideggeriani’ – si legge nell’articolo di un loro avversario – si erano proposti un obiettivo essenziale: la denuncia della democrazia in ogni sua forma, in quanto del tutto incompatibile con l’Islam e con la filosofia. Cercavano di dimostrare che Socrate era stato giustiziato perché avversario della democrazia e sostenevano che l’ordinamento politico difeso dal suo discepolo Platone era antesignano del governo islamico. (…) Fino al 1989 gli ‘heideggeriani’ furono la forza filosofica dominante nel sistema creato da Khomeini. Il primo ministro di allora, Mir Hussein Musavi, e il giudice supremo Abdul Kerim Erdebili (…) appartenevano entrambi al gruppo degli ‘heideggeriani’. Per un breve periodo i ‘popperiani’ furono in grado di invertire parzialmente la rotta del potere, ma la loro sorte fu segnata quando la presidenza della Repubblica Islamica venne conquistata da Mahmud Ahmadinejad. Il nuovo presidente era infatti un attivo seguace di Fardid e di Heidegger”2.

La fortuna di Heidegger nella Repubblica Islamica dell’Iran venne ufficializzata dal convegno internazionale organizzato nel 2005 a Teheran dall’Istituto Iraniano di Filosofia e dall’Ambasciata della Confederazione Elvetica sul tema “Heidegger e il futuro della filosofia in Oriente e in Occidente”. Il prof. Reza Davari-Ardakani, un ex allievo di Ahmed Fardid diventato presidente dell’Accademia delle Scienze, espose i risultati dei suoi studi sul pensiero di Heidegger. Il prof. Shahram Pazouki, che oltre ad aver tenuto due corsi su Heidegger aveva assegnato tesi di dottorato su “Dio nel pensiero di Heidegger” e sulla “Filosofia dell’arte di Heidegger”, stabilì un confronto fra Sohrawardi e il filosofo tedesco, indicando la gnosi islamica e la filosofia di Heidegger come i mezzi ideali per la comunicazione spirituale tra l’Asia e l’Europa. Benché attestato su posizioni distanti da quelle degli relatori precedenti, il prof. Bijan Karimi riconobbe l’importanza fondamentale del pensiero heideggeriano dell’essere nel mantener viva la dimensione del sacro3.

Dell’attuale situazione degli studi filosofici in Iran si è occupato anche Jürgen Habermas, che l’ha riassunta in questi termini: “Davari-Ardakani è oggi presidente dell’Accademia delle Scienze e passa per essere uno dei ‘postmoderni’. Questi hanno assunto innanzitutto l’analisi heideggeriana dell’ ‘essenza della tecnica’ e la utilizzano come la critica più coerente della modernità. Suo contraltare è Abdul Kerim Sorus, che difende – in quanto ‘popperiano’ – una divisione cognitiva tra religione e scienza, anche se personalmente tende a identificarsi con una certa corrente mistica islamica. Davari è un difensore filosofico dell’ortodossia sciita, mentre Sorus, come critico, ha già perso molta della sua pur scarsa influenza”4.

L’interesse manifestato dall’intellettualità iraniana nei confronti di Heidegger può trovare una spiegazione in ciò che dice Henry Corbin, studioso di Sohravardi e traduttore francese di Was ist Metaphysik?5, circa le corrispondenze esistenti fra la teosofia islamica e l’analitica heideggeriana. “Quello che cercavo in Heidegger, quello che ho compreso grazie a Heidegger, è la stessa cosa che ho cercata e trovata nella metafisica islamico-iraniana, in alcuni grandi nomi (…) Non molto tempo fa Denis de Rougemont ricordava, con un certo umorismo, che all’epoca della nostra gioventù aveva constatato che la mia copia di Essere e tempo recava sul margine numerose glosse in arabo. Credo che per me sarebbe stato molto più arduo tradurre il lessico di un Sohravardi, di un Ibn ‘Arabi, di un Molla Sadra Shirazi, se prima non mi fossi impegnato nella traduzione dell’inaudito lessico tedesco di Heidegger. Kashf al-mahjûb significa esattamente ‘disvelamento di ciò che è occulto’. Pensiamo a tutto quello che Heidegger ha detto circa il concetto di aletheia6.

heidegger2.jpgMa questa analogia non è la sola che possa essere citata. Lo stesso Corbin ne sottintende un’altra dello stesso genere allorché, avvalendosi di una terminologia heideggeriana, ci ricorda che “il passaggio dall’essere (esse) all’ente (ens), i teosofi islamici lo concepiscono come il porre l’essere all’imperativo (KNEsto). È in forza dell’imperativo Esto che l’ente è investito dell’atto di essere7.

Osiamo allora abbozzare altre corrispondenze: per esempio, quella che si può intravedere fra l’Andenken, la “rimemorazione” finalizzata a mantener vivo il problema dell’essere, e il dhikr, la “rimemorazione” rituale cui il sufismo assegna il compito di attualizzare la presenza divina nell’individuo.

Così l’Ereignis, l’”evento” che si configura come l’Essere stesso in quanto tempo originario e costituisce perciò lo spazio di un nuovo apparire divino, viene ad assumere le dimensioni di una realtà ierostorica, individuabile nel momento della Rivelazione o in corrispondenza della parusia del Mahdi o comunque su uno sfondo escatologico.

O ancora: l’essere-per-la-morte, la decisione anticipatrice in cui viviamo la morte come la possibilità più incondizionata e insuperabile, non trova un parallelo islamico nel hadîth profetico riportato da As-Samnânî  “morite prima di morire” (mûtû qabla an tamûtu)?

Heidegger e l’Estremo Oriente

L’Oriente islamico non è la sola area culturale dell’Asia in cui il pensiero di Heidegger ha suscitato interesse. Non è un caso che Unterwegs zur Sprache8 cominci con un colloquio tra l’Autore e un Giapponese buddhista, Tomio Tezuka: in Giappone, dove Heidegger è il filosofo europeo più tradotto e dove sono stati affrontati temi quali “le religioni nel pensiero di Heidegger”9 o “Heidegger e il buddhismo”10, le prime pubblicazioni sul suo pensiero risalgono agli anni Venti del secolo scorso11, ossia al periodo in cui i corsi del filosofo a Friburgo e a Marburgo cominciarono ad essere frequentati da studiosi buddhisti giapponesi. Tra questi, a suscitare l’interesse di Heidegger per il Giappone pare sia stato il Barone Shûzô Kuki (1888-1941), “un pensatore che riveste nel panorama filosofico giapponese ed europeo di questo secolo una singolare importanza”12; tornato in patria, Kuki tenne corsi su Heidegger presso l’Università Imperiale di Kyôto.

I contatti di Heidegger col Giappone proseguirono dopo la guerra: nel 1953 egli conobbe personalmente Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki (1870-1966), il noto studioso e divulgatore del buddhismo zen, del quale aveva letto i pochi libri accessibili. “Se comprendo correttamente quest’uomo, – aveva detto di lui – questo è quanto io ho cercato di dire in tutti i miei scritti”13. Da parte sua, Suzuki rievocò così l’incontro avuto con Heidegger: “Il tema principale del nostro colloquio è stato il pensiero nel suo rapporto con l’essere. (…) ho detto che l’essere è là dove l’uomo, che medita l’essere, avverte se stesso, senza però separare sé dall’essere (…) ho aggiunto che nel Buddhismo Zen il luogo dell’essere è mostrato evitando parole o segni grafici, poiché il tentativo di parlarne finisce inevitabilmente in una contraddizione”14.

Nel 1954 ebbe luogo il colloquio con Tomio Tezuka (1903-1983), traduttore, oltre che di Goethe, Hölderlin, Rilke e Nietzsche, anche di alcuni testi di Heidegger. Dopo essere stato sollecitato a chiarire numerose questioni relative al vocabolario giapponese, Tezuka chiese a Heidegger quale fosse il suo parere circa il significato attuale del cristianesimo per l’Europa. Il filosofo definì il cristianesimo “imborghesito”, espressione di “religiosità convenzionale” e per lo più privo di una “fede viva”15.

Nel 1958 Heidegger tenne all’Università di Friburgo un seminario che vide la partecipazione di Hôseki Shin’ichi Hisamatsu (1889-1980), monaco zen di scuola rinzai e maestro di calligrafia16. Dopo che Heidegger ebbe chiesto a Hisamatsu di illustrare la nozione giapponese di arte e la relazione fra arte e buddhismo zen, ebbe luogo un dialogo sul carattere dell’opera d’arte e sulla sua origine, che Hisamatsu attribuì al libero movimento del non-ente (nicht-Seiende). Heidegger concluse il seminario riproponendo il celebre kôan del Maestro Hakuin Ekaku (1686-1769): “Ascolta il suono del battito di una sola mano!”17.

L’interesse di Heidegger per lo Zen e la consonanza esistente fra il suo pensiero e questa forma di buddhismo sono state riassunte da uno studioso nepalese nei termini seguenti: “Il disinteresse per ciò che è ‘rituale’ e l’attenzione data allo spirito da parte dello Zen potrebbero essere considerati equivalenti al rifiuto di Heidegger della struttura filosofica convenzionale delle nozioni, dei termini e delle categorie classiche in favore di un ‘filosofare vero’”18.

Nel 1963 ebbe luogo uno scambio di lettere tra Heidegger e Takehiko Kojima, direttore di un’istituzione filosofica giapponese. In una lettera aperta pubblicata su un giornale di Tokyo, Kojima si riferiva alla conferenza di Heidegger sull’era dell’atomo19 considerandola un discorso rivolto ai Giapponesi stessi. Con l’occidentalizzazione, proseguiva Kojima, è scesa sul Giappone quella notte che Kierkegaard e Nietzsche avevano già vista incombere sull’Europa. “L’unica cosa a cui possiamo credere – concludeva – è una parola tale che, precorrendo il mattino del mondo, del quale non possiamo sapere in che momento arriverà, sia in grado di scendere in questa lunga notte. Possa una tale parola sempre di nuovo giungerci vicino, richiamare il nostro passato e risuonare nel futuro”20. Nella sua risposta, prendendo atto del dominio mondiale che la scienza moderna assicura all’Occidente (“ovunque regna lostellen che provoca, assicura e calcola”), Heidegger affermava l’insufficienza del pensiero occidentale di fronte al problema posto dalla potenza dello stellen. Affermava poi che il pericolo più grande non consiste tanto nella “perdita di umanità” denunciata da Kojima, quanto nell’ostacolo che impedisce all’uomo di diventare ciò che ancora non ha potuto essere. Infine enunciava la necessità di un “passo indietro” che consentisse di meditare sulla potenza dello stellen; ma un tale meditare, concludeva, “non può più compiersi attraverso la filosofia occidental-europea finora esistente, ma neppure senza di essa, cioè senza che la sua tradizione, fatta propria in modo rinnovato, venga impiegata su una via appropriata”21.

Heidegger_green_crop.jpgNel 1964 avvenne l’incontro di Heidegger col monaco buddhista Bikkhu Maha Mani, docente di filosofia all’Università di Bangkok, che era venuto in Europa per conto della Radio tailandese. “Convinto sostenitore di un uso misurato della tecnologia e dei mass media come strumenti educativi, in Germania aveva voluto incontrare Heidegger proprio per confrontarsi sul problema della tecnica”22. Nel colloquio privato che ebbe luogo fra i due il giorno prima che venisse registrato un loro dialogo sul ruolo della religione, destinato ad essere trasmesso da un’emittente televisiva di Baden-Baden, Heidegger parlò di “abbandono” e di “apertura al mistero” e domandò al suo ospite che significato avesse, per l’Orientale, la meditazione. “Il monaco risponde del tutto semplicemente: ‘Raccogliersi’. E spiega: quanto più l’uomo, senza sforzo di volontà, si raccoglie, tanto più dis-fa [ent-werde] se stesso. L”io’ si estingue. Alla fine, vi è solo il niente. Il niente, tuttavia, non è ‘nulla’, ma proprio tutt’altro: la pienezza [die Fülle]. Nessuno può nominarlo. Ma è, niente e tutto, la piena realizzazione [Erfüllung]. Heidegger ha compreso e dice: ‘Questo è ciò che io, per tutta la mia vita, ho sempre detto’. Ancora una volta il monaco ripete: ‘Venga nella nostra terra. Noi La comprendiamo’”23.

Non diverse le parole del professor Tezuka: “Noi in Giappone siamo stati in grado di intendere subito la conferenza Was ist Metaphysik? (…) Noi ci meravigliamo ancor oggi come gli Europei siano potuti cadere nell’errore d’interpretare nihilisticamente il Nulla di cui si ragiona nella conferenza accennata. Per noi il Vuoto è il nome più alto per indicare quello che Ella vorrebbe dire con la parola ‘Essere’”24.

Infatti nella prolusione del 1929, subito tradotta in giapponese dal suo allievo Seinosuke Yuasa (1905-1970), Heidegger si era soffermato sul problema del Niente, argomentando che il Niente si identifica con lo sfondo originario tramite cui l’ente appare e che, siccome tale sfondo dell’ente coincide con l’Essere, fare esperienza del Niente equivale a fare esperienza dell’Essere.

Una tale convinzione non poteva non trovare ulteriore sostegno nella dottrina taoista, secondo la quale “tutte le cose vengono all’esistenza mediante l’essere (yu), e questo mediante il wu, termine che non traduciamo semplicemente come ‘non-essere’ (…), bensì come l”essere non-essere’, cioè l’atto che trascende e determina il porsi della realtà”25. Oltre a manifestare per il Chuang-tze un interesse che è attestato da varie parti26, nell’estate del 1946 Heidegger tradusse in tedesco i primi otto capitoli del Tao-tê-ching, avvalendosi della mediazione di uno studioso cinese, Paul Shih-yi Hsiao (1911-1986)27, che del testo di Lao-tze aveva già pubblicato una versione italiana28.

Frequenti riferimenti a Heidegger si trovano nel commento che accompagna la traduzione del Tao-tê-ching iniziata nel 1973 da Chung-yuan Chang, autore di diversi studi sul taoismo e sul buddhismo ch’an. Rievocando un suo colloquio dell’anno precedente con Heidegger, Chang si sofferma sull’affinità del pensiero di quest’ultimo col taoismo, in relazione sia alla poesia sia al problema del Niente; osserva che la nozione heideggeriana di Aufheiterung (“schiarita”) è presente nella tradizione cinese e designa “un modo per entrare nel Tao”29; ricorda che Heidegger e lui concordarono nell’identificare la nozione diLichtung (“radura”) con quella taoista di ming; ecc.

L’individuazione di tutte queste analogie, lungi dal costituire un banale gioco di parole e di concetti, ci rimanda alla vitale necessità del Dasein europeo di confrontarsi con quello asiatico. Lo ha detto d’altronde lo stesso Heidegger in Aufenthalte: “Il confronto con l’asiatico fu per l’esserci greco una profonda necessità. Esso oggi rappresenta per noi, in maniera assai diversa ed entro un orizzonte molto più ampio, la decisione sul destino dell’Europa”30.


NOTE:
 

1. H. G. Gadamer, Prefazione, in: M. Heidegger, Che cos’è metafisica?, Libreria Tullio Pironti, Napoli 1982, p. ix.

2. Amir Taheri, Mollarin Felsefe [La filosofia dei mullah], “Radikal” (Istanbul), 8 marzo 2005.

3. Dieter Thomä, Heidegger und der Iran, “Neue Zürcher Zeitung”, 10 dicembre 2005.

4. Jürgen Habermas trifft in Iran auf eine gesprächbereite Gesellschaft, “Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung”, 13 giugno 2007.

5. Martin Heidegger, Qu’est-ce que la Métaphysique?, trad. par H. Corbin, Gallimard, Paris 1938.

6. Philippe Némo, De Heidegger à Sohravardî, “France-culture”, 2 giugno 1976 (www.amiscorbin.com).

7. H. Corbin, Il paradosso del monoteismo, Marietti, Casale Monferrato 1986, p. 7.

8. Trad. it.: M. Heidegger, Da un colloquio nell’ascolto del Linguaggio, in: In cammino verso il Linguaggio, Mursia, Milano 1973, pp. 83-125.

9. M. Inaba, Heideggâ no Shii no Shûkyôsei, Tokyo 1970.

10. T. Umehura e M. Oku, Heideggâ to Bukkyô, Tokyo 1970.

11. Satô Keiji, Heideggâ Hihan-sono Riron-Keitai ni tsuite, Tokyo 1926; Yoneda Shôtaro, Heideggâ no Kanshinron, Keizaironso XXVI-1, Kyoto 1928.

12. C. Saviani, L’Oriente di Heidegger, Il Melangolo, Genova 1998, p. 54.

13. W. Barrett, Zen for the West, in: Zen Buddhism: Selected Writings of D. T. Suzuki, W. Barrett ed., Doubleday Anchor Books, Garden City 1956, xi.

14. D. T. Suzuki, Erinnerungen an einen Besuch bei Martin Heidegger, in: Japan und Heidegger (hrsg. H. Buchner), Sigmaringen 1989, p. 169.

15. T. Tezuka, Drei Antworten, in Japan und Heidegger, cit., p. 179.

16. H. Sh. Hisamatsu, La pienezza del nulla, Il Nuovo Melangolo, Genova 1985; Idem, Una religione senza dio, Il Nuovo Melangolo, Genova 1996.

17. M. Heidegger – Hôseki Shinichi Hisamatsu, L’arte e il pensiero, in: C. Saviani, L’Oriente di Heidegger, cit., pp. 97-104.

18. Kumar Dipak Raj Pant, Heidegger e il pensiero orientale, Il Cerchio, Rimini 1990, p. 66.

19. Trad. it. in: M. Heidegger, L’abbandono, Il Melangolo, Genova 1986, pp. 25-43.

20. M. Heidegger, Briefwechsel mit einem japanischen Kollegen, in: Japan und Heidegger, cit., p. 220.

21. M. Heidegger, Briefwechsel mit einem japanischen Kollegen, cit., p. 226.

22. C. Saviani, L’Oriente di Heidegger, cit., p. 77.

23. H. W. Petzet, Auf einen Stern zugehen. Begegnungen mit Martin Heidegger 1929 bis 1976, Societäts Verlag, Frankfurt a. M. 1983, p. 191.

24. M. Heidegger, Da un colloquio nell’ascolto del Linguaggio, cit., p. 97.

25. P. Filippani-Ronconi, Storia del pensiero cinese, Boringhieri, Torino 1964, p. 58.

26. C. Saviani, L’Oriente di Heidegger, cit., pp. 41-42.

27. P. Shih-yi Hsiao, Heidegger e la nostra traduzione del Tao Te Ching, in: C. Saviani, L’Oriente di Heidegger, cit., pp. 105-118.

28. P. Siao Sci-Yi, Il Tao-te-King di Laotse, Laterza, Bari 1941.

29. Ch.-y. Chang, Reflections, in: Erinnerung an Martin Heidegger (hersg. G. Neske), Pfullingen 1977, p. 66.

30. M. Heidegger, Soggiorni. Viaggio in Grecia, Guanda, Parma 1997, p. 31.

vendredi, 25 décembre 2015

The Hundred Years’ War

Maude_in_Baghdad.jpg

The Hundred Years’ War

By

Ex: http://www.lewrockwell.com

When the British armed forces occupied the Middle East at the end of the war, the region was passive.

From chapter 43: “The Troubles Begin: 1919 – 1921”; A Peace to End All Peace, David Fromkin

With this sentence, Fromkin begins his examination of the troubles for western imperialists throughout the Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia.  Of course, there were interventions before this time (Britain already had significant presence in Egypt and India, for example), yet – corresponding with the overall theme of Fromkin’s book – his examination centers on the aftermath of the fall of the Ottoman Empire.

Fromkin summarizes the situation and conflict in nine different regions (many of which were not “countries” as we understand the term).  He suggests that the British did not see a connection in these difficulties, one region to the other:

In retrospect, one sees Britain undergoing a time of troubles everywhere in the Middle East between 1919 and 1921; but it was not experienced that way, at least not in the beginning.

As I have found repeatedly throughout this book, while history might not repeat, it rhymes so obviously that one could suggest plagiarism.

This is a long post – 3500 words; for those who want the summary, I offer the following: Egypt, Afghanistan, Arabia, Turkey, Syria and Lebanon, Eastern Palestine (Transjordan), Palestine – Arabs and Jews, Mesopotamia (Iraq), Persia (Iran).

Promises made during war, promises broken during the peace; local factions at odds with each other; most factions at odds with the imperialists; intrigue and double-dealing; fear of the Bolshevik menace; costly wars and occupations; the best laid plans of mice….

There you have it – you can skip the details if you like.  Alternatively, just pick up a copy of today’s paper.

British_Army_Mespot.jpg

Egypt

…Britain had repeatedly promised Egypt her independence and it was not unreasonable for Egyptian politicians to have believed the pledges…

These were useful promises to make during the war; they became a source of conflict after:

Neither negotiations nor independence were what British officials had in mind at the time.

Britain allowed no delegation from Egypt to go to either London or Paris during 1918. When Egyptian officials protested their exclusion from the Paris peace conferences of 1919, the British deported the lead delegate, Saad Zaghlul, and three of his colleagues to Malta.

A wave of demonstrations and strikes swept the country.  The British authorities were taken by surprise.

Telegraph communications cut, attacks on British military personnel ensued – culminating, on March 18, with the murder of eight of them on a train from Aswan to Cairo.  Christian Copts demonstrated alongside Moslems; theological students alongside students from secular schools; women (only from the upper classes) alongside men. Most unnerving to the British: the peasantry in the countryside, the class upon whom British hopes rested.

Britain returned Zaghlul from Malta, and negotiated throughout the period 1920 – 1922. The process yielded little, and Zaghlul once again was deported.

The principal British fantasy about the Middle East – that it wanted to be governed by Britain, or with her assistance – ran up against a stone wall of reality.  The Sultan and Egypt’s other leaders refused to accept mere autonomy or even nominal independence; they demanded full and complete independence, which Britain – dependent on the Suez Canal – would not grant.

British (continuing with American) domination has been maintained more or less ever since.

Afghanistan

The concern was (and presumably remains) containing and surrounding Russia – the Pivot Area of Mackinder’s world island:

The issue was believed by British statesmen to have been resolved satisfactorily in 1907, when Russia agreed that the [Afghan] kingdom should become a British protectorate.

Apparently no one asked the locals: after the Emir of Afghanistan was assassinated on 19 February 1919, his third son – 26-year-old Amanullah Khan – wrote to the Governor-General of India…

…announcing his accession to the “free and independent Government of Afghanistan.”

What came next could be written of more recent times: Afghan attacks through the Khyber Pass, the beginning of the Third Afghan War.  Further:

For the British, the unreliability of their native contingents proved only one of several unsettling discoveries…

…the British Government of India was obliged to increase its budget by an enormous sum of 14,750,000 pounds to cover the cost of the one-month campaign.

…the British forces were inadequate to the task of invading, subduing, and occupying the Afghan kingdom.

What won the day for them was the use of airplanes…it was the bombing of Afghan cities by the Royal Air Force that unnerved Amanullah and led him to ask for peace.

In the ensuing treaty, Afghanistan secured its independence – including control of its foreign policy.  Amanullah made quick use of this authority by entering into a treaty with the Bolsheviks.  Britain attempted to persuade Amanullah to alter the terms of the treaty…

But years of British tutelage had fostered not friendship but resentment.

Arabcccccc.jpg

Arabia

Of all the Middle Eastern lands, Arabia seemed to be Britain’s most natural preserve.  Its long coastlines could be controlled easily by the Royal Navy.  Two of its principal lords, Hussein in the west and Saud in the center and east, were British protégés supported by regular subsidies from the British government.

No European rival to Britain came close to holding these advantages.

Yet, these two “protégés” were “at daggers drawn” – and Britain was financially supporting both sides in this fight.  A decision by the British government was required, yet none was forthcoming – different factions in the government had different opinions; each side in Arabia had its supporters in London; decisions were made in one department, and cancelled in another.

Ibn Saud was the hereditary champion of Muhammed ibn Abdul Wahhab; in the eighteenth century, Wahhab allied with the house of Saud, reinforced through regular intermarriage between members of the two families.

The Wahhabis (as their opponents called them) were severely puritanical reformers who were seen by their adversaries as fanatics.  It was Ibn Saud’s genius to discern how their energies could be harnessed for political ends.

Beginning in 1912, tribesmen began selling their possessions in order to settle into cooperative agricultural communities and live a strict Wahhabi religious life

The movement became known as the Ikhwan: the Brethren.  Ibn Saud immediately put himself at the head of it, which gave him an army of true Bedouins – the greatest warriors in Arabia.

It was the spread of this “uncompromising puritanical faith into the neighboring Hejaz” that threated Hussein’s authority.  The military conflict came to an end when a Brethren force of 1,100 camel riders – armed with swords, spears, and antique rifles – came upon the sleeping camp of Hussein’s army of 5,000 men – armed with modern British equipment – and destroyed it.

Britain intervened on Hussein’s behalf.  Ibn Saud, ever the diplomat, made a show of deferring to the British and “claimed to be trying his best to restrain the hotheaded Brethren.”  Meanwhile, Saud and his Wahhabi Brethren went on to further victories in Arabia.  Ultimately, Ibn Saud captured the Hejaz and drove Hussein into exile.

Yet the British could do nothing about it.  As in Afghanistan, the physical character of the country was forbidding.

There was nothing on the coast worth bombing; Britain’s Royal Navy – its only strength in this region – was helpless.

Turkey

Lloyd George changed his mind several times about what to do with Turkey.  Ultimately decisions were taken out of his hands via the work of Mustapha Kemal – the 38-year-old nationalist general and hero.  He began by moving the effective seat of government power inland and away from the might of the Royal Navy – to Angora (now Ankara).

In January 1920, the Turkish Chamber of Deputies convened in secret and adopted the National Pact, calling for creation of an independent Turkish Moslem nation-state.  In February, this was announced publicly.  While Britain and France were meeting in Europe to discuss the conditions they would impose on Turkey, the Chamber of Deputies – without being asked – defined the minimum terms they were willing to accept.

It was estimated that twenty-seven army divisions would need to be provided by the British and French to impose upon the terms which were acceptable in London and Paris.  This was well beyond any commitment that could be made.  Still, Lloyd George would not concede.

France attempted to come to terms with the Turks.  Britain would not, leading an army of occupation into Constantinople.  France and Italy made clear to the Turks that Britain was acting alone.

Britain’s occupation of Constantinople did not damage Kemal – 100 members of the Chamber of Deputies who remained free reconvened in Angora, and with 190 others elected from various resistance groups, formed a new Parliament.

Red-Cross-in-Iraq.jpg

Treaties with Russia ensued – misread by Britain as an alliance.  Instead, Kemal – an enemy of Russian Bolshevism – suppressed the Turkish Communist Party and killed its leaders.  Stalin, recognizing that Kemal could inflict damage to the British, put Russian nationalism ahead of Bolshevik ideology and therefore made peace.  Soviet money and supplies poured over the Russo-Turkish frontier to the anti-Bolshevik Nationalists for use against the British.

Britain – acting at least in part on their misreading of the Russo-Turkish actions – threw in with the Greeks, a willing party desiring to recover former Greek territory populated throughout by a Greek minority.

Kemal attacked British troops in Constantinople.  London recognized that the only troops available to assist were the Greeks.  Venizelos agreed to supply the troops as long as Britain would allow him to advance inland.  Lloyd George was more than willing to agree.

The Greeks found early success, advancing to the Anatolian plateau:

“Turkey is no more,” and exultant Lloyd George announced triumphantly.  On 10 August 1920 the Treaty of Sèvres was signed by representatives of the virtually captive Turkish Sultan and his helpless government.

Helpless because it was Mustapha Kemal in charge, not the Sultan.

The treaty granted to both Greece and London all that each was seeking.  Yet, how to keep the terms from being overthrown by the reality on the ground?  Without a continued Allied presence, Kemal might well descend from the Anatolian plateau and retake the coast.

Meanwhile, the pro-British Venizelos lost an election to the pro-German Constantine I (there is a deadly monkey bite involved in this intrigue).  This turnabout opened the possibility for those who desired to abandon this quagmire to do so.  Italy and France took advantage of this; Lloyd George did not.  Again, incorrectly viewing Kemal as a Bolshevist ally, Lloyd George could not compromise on his anti-Russian stand.

The Greeks went for total victory and lost, ending in Smyrna.  Mustafa Kemal Atatürk – “Father of the Turks” – is revered to this day for securing the ethnically- and religiously-cleansed Turkish portion of the former Ottoman Empire.

Syria

Feisal – who led the Arab strike force on the right flank of the Allied armies in the Palestine and Syria campaigns – was the nominal ruler of Syria.  Feisal – a foreigner in Damascus – spent much of 1919 in Europe negotiating with the Allies.  In the meantime, intrigue was the order of the day in Damascus.

The old-guard traditional ruling families in Syria were among those whose loyalty to the Ottoman Empire had remained unshaken throughout the war.  They had remained hostile to Feisal, the Allies, and the militant Arab nationalist clubs…

In mid-1919, the General Syrian Congress called for a completely independent Syria – to include all of the area today made up of Syria, Lebanon, Israel and Jordan.  Matters seemed to be passing out of Feisal’s control.  France was willing to grant some autonomy to Syria, but many Syrians saw no role for the French.

Intrigue followed intrigue; factions formed and dissolved.  Eventually France issued an ultimatum to Feisal – one considered too onerous for Feisal to accept, yet he did.  The mobs of Damascus rioted against him.  By this time, the French marched on Damascus – supported by French air power.

The French General Gouraud began to divide Greater Syria into sub-units – including the Great Lebanon and its cosmopolitan mix of Christians and Moslems – Sunni and Shi’ite.

wwhmvf101.jpg

Eastern Palestine (Transjordan)

France was opposed to a Zionist Palestine; Britain, of course, was a sponsor.  France opposed a Jewish Palestine more than it was opposed to a British Palestine.  France had commercial and clerical interests to protect, and felt these would be endangered by a British sponsored Zionism.

The dividing lines between places such as Syria-Lebanon, Palestine, and Jordan were vague at best.  Where lines were drawn would make or break French interests.  In British support for Zionism, France saw British desires to control ever-larger portions of this as-of-yet undefined region.

[France] also claimed to discern a Jewish world conspiracy behind both Zionism and Bolshevism “seeking by all means at its disposal the destruction of the Christian world.” …Thus the French saw their position in Syria and Lebanon as being threatened by a movement that they believed to be at once British, Jewish, Zionist, and Bolshevik….”It is inadmissible,” [Robert de Caix, who managed France’s political interests in Syria] said, “that the ‘County of Christ’ should become the prey of Jewry and of Anglo-Saxon heresy.  It must remain the inviolable inheritance of France and the Church.”

Britain was not in a position to militarily defend Transjordan from a French invasion; therefore it worked to avoid provoking France.  Yet, there was still the concern of the French propaganda campaign – designed to draw Arab support for a Greater Syria to include Transjordan and Palestine via an anti-Zionist platform.

Palestine – Arabs and Jews

Beginning in 1917-1918, when General Allenby took Palestine from the Turks, there was established a British military administration for the country:

Ever since then, throughout the military administration there had been a strong streak of resentment at having been burdened by London with an unpopular and difficult-to-achieve policy: the creation of a Jewish homeland in Palestine pursuant to the Balfour Declaration.

The Zionists emphasized their desire to cooperate with the local Arab communities; the Jewish immigrants would not be taking anything away but would buy, colonize and cultivate land that was not then being used.  This desire was made more difficult given the rivalries between great Arab urban families.

As an aside, during this time – the late 19th / early 20th century – there was a movement that took root in Britain known as British Israelism:

British Israelism (also called Anglo-Israelism) is a doctrine based on the hypothesis that people of Western European and Northern European descent, particularly those in Great Britain, are the direct lineal descendants of the Ten Lost Tribes of the ancient Israelites. The doctrine often includes the tenet that the British Royal Family is directly descended from the line of King David.

At the end of the 19th century Edward Hine, Edward Wheeler Bird and Herbert Aldersmith developed the British Israelite movement. The extent to which the clergy in Britain became aware of the movement may be gauged from the comment made by Cardinal John Henry Newman (1801-1890); when asked why in 1845 he had left the Church of England to join the Roman Catholic Church, he said that there was a very real danger that the movement “would take over the Church of England.” (emphasis added)

The extent to which this effort in Britain influenced British policies toward Palestine are beyond the scope of this post, yet clearly the connection cannot be ignored.

Returning to Fromkin, from a note written by Churchill to Lloyd George on 13 June 1920:

“Palestine is costing us 6 millions a year to hold.  The Zionist movement will cause continued friction with the Arabs.  The French…are opposed to the Zionist movement & will try to cushion the Arabs off on us as the real enemy.  The Palestine venture…will never yield any profit of a material kind.”

National-Army-Museum_-1027338_739.jpg

Mesopotamia (Iraq)

At the close of the war, the temporary administration of the provinces was in the hands of Captain (later Colonel) Arnold Wilson of British India, who became civil commissioner.

While he was prepared to administer the provinces of Basra and Baghdad, and also the province of Mosul…he did not believe that they formed a coherent entity.

Kurds of Mosul would likely not easily accept rule by Arabs of other provinces; the two million Shi’ite Moslems would not easily accept rule by the minority Sunni Moslem community, yet “no form of Government has yet been envisaged, which does not involved Sunni domination.”  There were also large Jewish and Christian communities to be considered.  Seventy-five percent of the population of Iraq was tribal.

Cautioned an American missionary to Gertrude Bell, an advocate of this new “Iraq”:

“You are flying in the face of four millenniums of history if you try to draw a line around Iraq and call it a political entity!  Assyria always looked to the west and east and north, and Babylonia to the south.  They have never been an independent unit.  You’ve got to take time to get them integrated, it must be done gradually.  They have no conception of nationhood yet.”

Arnold Wilson was concerned about an uprising:

In the summer of 1919 three young British captains were murdered in Kurdistan. The Government of India sent out an experienced official to take their place in October 1919; a month later he, too, was killed.

There were further murdered officers, hostage rescues, and the like.  According to Colonel Gerald Leachman, the only way to deal with the disaffected tribes was “wholesale slaughter.”

In June the tribes suddenly rose in full revolt – a revolt that seems to have been triggered by the government’s efforts to levy taxes.  By 14 June the formerly complacent Gertrude Bell, going from one extreme to another, claimed to be living through a nationalist reign of terror.

According to Arnold Wilson, the tribesmen were “out against all government as such…” yet this was not a satisfactory explanation, as every region of the British Middle East was in some state of chaos and revolt.

For one reason or another – the revolt had a number of causes and the various rebels pursued different goals – virtually the whole area rose against Britain, and revolt then spread to the Lower Euphrates as well.

On 11 August, Leachman, the advocate of “wholesale slaughter,” was murdered on order of his tribal host while attending a meeting with tribal allies – blowback of a most personal nature.  Before putting down the revolt, Britain suffered 2,000 casualties with 450 dead.

Persia (Iran)

“The integrity of Persia,” [Lord Curzon] had written two decades earlier, “must be registered as a cardinal precept of our Imperial creed.”

The principal object of his policy was to safeguard against future Russian encroachments.  Unfortunately, the means to secure this “integrity” were limited, and hindered further by mutinies and desertions in the native forces recruited by Britain.  The solution was thought to be a British-supervised regime in Persia:

Flabby young Ahmed Shah, last of the fading Kadjar dynasty to sit upon the throne of Persia, posed no problem; he was fearful for his life and, in any event, received a regular subsidy from the British government in return for maintaining a pro-British Prime Minister in office.

Under the supervision of Lord Curzon, the Persians signed a treaty.  The Persian Prime Minister and two colleagues demanded – and received – 130,000 pounds from the British in exchange.  What was worth this payment?  British railroads, reorganization of Persian finances along British lines, British loans, and British officials supervising customs duties to ensure repayment of the loans.

With the collapse of the Russian Empire, fear of the Russians faded in Persia; therefore Britain represented the only threat to the autonomy of various groups in Persia.  Public opinion weighed strongly against the Anglo-Persian agreement.

Meanwhile, the Bolsheviks were courting the Persians – forgiveness of debts, renouncing of prior political a military claims, cancelling all Russian concessions and surrendering all Russian property in Persia.  Of course, the Soviet government was too weak to enforce any of these claims anyway; still these gestures were seen in great contrast to the measures taken by Britain.

Nationalist opinion hardened; in the spring of 1920, events took a new turn.  The Bolsheviks launched a surprise naval attack on the British position on Enzeli; Soviet troops landed and cut off the British garrison at the tip of the peninsula.  The commanding general had little choice but to accept the Soviet surrender terms, surrendering its military supplies and a fleet of a formerly British flotilla – previously handed by the British to the White Russians and held by the Persians upon collapse of the Russian Empire.

Within weeks, a Persian Socialist Republic was proclaimed in the local province.  Britain, having entered into the Anglo-Persian Agreement in significant measure to contain Soviet expansion, was clearly failing at this task.  The War Office demanded that the remaining British forces in Persia should be withdrawn.

This was not yet to occur.  In February 1921, Reza Khan marched into Tehran at the head of 3,000 Cossacks, seizing power.  In a manner, this entire escapade was instigated by the British General Ironside, who had approached Reza Khan about ruling once Britain departed.  Reza Khan did not wait, it seems.

Within five days, the new Persian government repudiated the Anglo-Persian Agreement. On the same day, a treaty was signed with Moscow – now looking for Russian protection from Britain instead of the other way around.

Conclusion

I don’t know – it isn’t over yet.

Reprinted with permission from Bionic Mosquito.

vendredi, 04 décembre 2015

L’IRAN EST LA SEULE ARMÉE CAPABLE DE VAINCRE DAECH

iranarmy392_98223_235528.jpg

L’IRAN EST LA SEULE ARMÉE CAPABLE DE VAINCRE DAECH

Entretien avec Ardavan Amir-Aslani


Daoud Boughezala*
Ex: http://metamag.fr
Ardavan Amir-Aslani est un avocat et essayiste spécialiste du Moyen-Orient. Il a notamment publié Juifs et Perses. Iran et Israël (Nouveau monde), Iran-États-Unis, les amis de demain ou l’après-Ahmadinejad (Pierre-Guillaume de Roux) et L’âge d’or de la diplomatie algérienne (Editions du Moment).

Daoud Boughezala. Avant d’aborder les questions géopolitiques, commençons par vos activités professionnelles. Vous venez d’ouvrir le cabinet d’avocats d’affaires “Cohen-Amir-Aslani” à Téhéran. En vous permettant de vous installer en Iran sous ce nom à consonance juive, la République islamique entend-elle se laver des soupçons d’antisémitisme qui pèse sur elle? 
Ardavan Amir-Aslani. La République islamique n’a pas eu son mot à dire quant au lancement de notre cabinet, et aucun de ses représentants n’est venu nous interroger sur la question. La loi iranienne ne connaissant pas la notion de cabinet d’avocats en tant que telle, le barreau de Téhéran est exclusivement constitué d’avocats « individuels » à l’exercice libéral qui s’y inscrivent à titre personnel. Lorsque je distribue les cartes de visite de mon cabinet en Iran, j’ai droit à des sourires, parce que les gens reconnaissent le nom à consonance juive, mais sans aucune remarque désobligeante. D’ailleurs, les employés de mon cabinet sont issus de familles religieuses, pratiquent l’islam et ne trouvent rien à redire au fait de travailler pour nous.

Il n’est pourtant pas toujours très plaisant d’être Juif en Iran…
C’est une erreur de considérer le peuple iranien comme un peuple antisémite. Même la République islamique permet constitutionnellement aux minorités religieuses et ethniques d’être surreprésentées à l’Assemblée nationale iranienne. C’est à ce titre-là que les juifs, qui sont environ 30.000 en Iran, élisent un député. Ceci dit, je ne prétends pas qu’il n’y ait pas d’antisémites en Iran, l’ancien président Ahmadinejad en est un bon exemple.

La signature de l’accord de Vienne sur le nucléaire aiguise l’appétit des investisseurs européens. Proche de l’Arabie Saoudite et du Qatar, la France a-t-elle raté le coche avec les milieux d’affaires iraniens ?
Le retour de l’Iran dans le concert des nations à l’issue de la levée des sanctions va être l’équivalent, d’un point de vue économique, du retour de l’ensemble des pays de l’Est-européen dans le camp occidental après la chute du mur de Berlin. Il s’agit de la première réserve gazière, de la quatrième réserve d’hydrocarbures au monde. C’est un pays de 83 millions d’habitants, un marché domestique important qui occupe une place centrale au Moyen-Orient. Je crois que la France a un coup à jouer parce que les secteurs les plus porteurs de l’économie iranienne - secteurs pétrolier, aéroportuaire, aérien, du traitement de l’eau – trouveront naturellement comme partenaires les grands groupes français comme Total, Airbus, Suez environnement ou Véolia. Malgré le positionnement particulièrement dur de la diplomatie française tout au long des négociations sur le nucléaire iranien, la France a su revenir dans le cœur des Iraniens. Quelques jours après l’accord de Vienne, Laurent Fabius a été parmi les premiers politiques d’envergure à faire son chemin de Damas en se rendant à Téhéran. Aujourd’hui, les Iraniens n’ont qu’une seule envie : pouvoir de nouveau commercer avec la France, laquelle pourra redevenir un partenaire industriel et commercial majeur.

Le Président iranien Hassan Rohani a vivement condamné les derniers attentats de Paris, les qualifiant de “crimes contre l’humanité” et contestant le caractère islamique de Daech. Est-ce une manière de conjurer le choc des civilisations ?
La journée tragique du vendredi 13 novembre était hélas prévisible. On aurait pu voir venir les choses depuis l’attaque des tours jumelles à New York le 11 septembre 2001. Ce jour-là, dix-sept personnes dont une majorité de Saoudiens et de Qataris, se sont écrasés sur des cibles civiles. C’est alors qu’a commencé le conflit de civilisations qui oppose l’Occident – c’est-à-dire non pas les pays de l’Ouest mais ceux qui sont attachés à la volonté de vivre et de laisser vivre – à une certaine version de l’islam. Il s’agit de la lecture wahhabite sunnite de l’islam marquée par l’Arabie Saoudite. Or, il se trouve que cet islamo-fascisme djihadiste a également comme ennemi principal l’Iranien chiite. Ce dernier est le principal objet de leur haine, devant le Juif et le Chrétien.

Iranian-Army1.jpgPartant de ce constat, pensez-vous crédible une inflexion de la politique étrangère française en faveur de l’Iran et de la Russie afin de combattre l’État islamique ?
Au Moyen-Orient, la France a construit tout son système d’alliances sur l’appui aux pétromonarchies sunnites wahhabites. Elle devrait réfléchir à  changer de stratégie. Tandis que Daech sert de pôle d’attraction sanguinaire et médiéval à nos jeunes frustrés d’origine musulmane, le seul moyen d’avoir la paix dans la région, c’est d’éradiquer l’État islamique. Pour l’instant, les bombardements contre Daech qui contrôle un territoire grand comme l’Angleterre à cheval sur l’Irak et la Syrie, ne l’ont pas fait reculer d’un mètre. Par contre, lorsque la volonté est là et des troupes au sol engagées, des milices pro-chiites irakiennes encadrés par des Iraniens ont mis vingt-quatre heures pour reprendre Tikrit à l’Etat islamique. Quand on veut, on peut.

Justement, aucun pays occidental, États-Unis et France compris, n’est prêt à envoyer des hommes au sol lutter contre l’Etat islamique. Que faire ?
Aujourd’hui, l’Iran est la seule armée capable de vaincre Daech et se montre d’autant plus déterminée qu’elle constitue une des cibles prioritaires du groupe djihadiste. Il faut donc permettre à l’armée iranienne, aidée des milices chiites de la région, de combattre au sol. Téhéran ne demande que ça.

En êtes-vous bien sûr ? Tant que l’État islamique reste cantonné à plus de quarante kilomètres de la République islamique, les pasdarans et les forces iraniennes se gardent bien d’intervenir massivement…
Le seul pays qui a fait qu’Assad tient bon depuis cinq ans, c’est l’Iran. Sans les forces armées chiites venues prêter main forte à l’armée syrienne, il serait tombé. Idem en Irak, s’il n’y avait pas de troupes pro-iraniennes à Samarra ou aux abords du Kurdistan irakien, le pays serait tombé entre les mains de Daech. Certes, il n’y a pas de troupes iraniennes au sol déployées massivement dans ces pays mais des milices proches de Téhéran. 60% de la population irakienne étant chiite, cela représente suffisamment de combattants prêts à prendre les armes contre l’Etat islamique sans que l’Iran ait besoin d’y envoyer des soldats. En Syrie, où les chiites sont minoritaires, l’Iran a fait en sorte que des chiites irakiens, pakistanais et afghans constituent des brigades chiites internationales pour sauver le pouvoir de Damas.

Mais sur un plan plus politique, la relégation des sunnites dans l’Irak post-Saddam Hussein a fait le lit de l’État islamique. De ce point de vue, la proximité entre Téhéran et Bagdad, en confortant la mainmise des chiites sur l’Irak, n’a-t-elle pas fait le jeu de Daech ?
C’est une question décisive. Quand on regarde la carte, on voit que l’Iran contrôle les capitales historiques de la civilisation arabe comme Damas (ville des Omeyyades), Bagdad (ville des Abbassides), Beyrouth (avec le Hezbollah) et Sanaa (au Yémen). Il y a une survisibilité de la puissance iranienne dans la région. Par conséquent, il n’y aura pas de paix durable dans la région tant que les Iraniens et leurs alliés occidentaux – car l’Iran est de facto l’allié des Occidentaux – n’auront pas réussi à fédérer les tribus sunnites en Irak et en Syrie. L’immense majorité des sunnites n’est pas sur la ligne idéologique de Daech ; il suffit d’observer la colère des sunnites de Mossoul sous le joug de l’Etat islamique. Tant en Irak qu’en Syrie, avec l’aide des Américains, se constituent déjà des brigades sunnites anti-EI. Il faudrait y ajouter des brigades mixtes chiites-sunnites pour faire battre en retraite Daech.

Rappelons que les deux tiers des combattants de l’État islamique sont des étrangers, dont la moitié de Saoudiens et un tiers de Caucasiens (Tchetchènes, Ingouches, Daguestanais), indifférents au sort des populations locales qui leur sont étrangères. Tous ces djihadistes aspirent à revenir dans leur pays d’origine commettre des attentats comme ceux que l’on a connus à Paris.

*rédacteur en chef de Causeur

jeudi, 03 décembre 2015

Iran in context of Syrian conflict

dimanche, 29 novembre 2015

La menace terroriste qui plane sur l’Iran

iran-1xxxxx.jpg

La menace terroriste qui plane sur l’Iran

Auteur : Mahan Abedin pour  Middle East Eye
Ex: http://zejournal.mobi

Tandis que l’Iran s’implique de plus en plus en Syrie et en Irak, la République islamique se retrouve pour la première fois dans le viseur de réseaux djihadistes transnationaux

La semaine dernière, une flopée de hauts responsables de la sûreté et de l’armée en Iran ont prévenu de l’existence d’une menace d’attentats terroristes en provenance du groupe État islamique et des réseaux djihadistes affiliés.

La dernière annonce en date est celle de Mohammad Ali Jafari, le commandant du Corps des Gardiens de la révolution islamique, qui a averti ce dimanche que Daech cherchait depuis quelque temps à générer « de l’instabilité » en Iran.

L’avertissement de Mohammad Ali Jafari faisait suite à l’interview dimanche du ministre de l’Intérieur Abdolreza Rahmani Fazli par la chaîne nationale, au cours de laquelle il a affirmé que les forces de sécurités iraniennes avaient découvert plusieurs « bombes » rien que le jour de l’interview.

En plus de ces déclarations, les agences de sécurité ont révélé au cours des derniers jours des informations sur la découverte d’explosifs, des complots qui auraient été déjoués et des groupes terroristes qui auraient été démantelés. La plus récente de ces annonces nous vient du ministère du Renseignement, qui a précisé que les projets d’une équipe de terroristes qui prévoyaient de faire exploser des bombes sur des autoroutes stratégiques de la province orientale du Sistan-et-Balouchistan avaient été contrecarrés.

La succession rapide de ces avertissements et un flot continu d’informations sur des conspirations apparemment déjouées indiquent à n’en pas douter que les autorités iraniennes sont aux prises avec une imminente menace terroriste d’une ampleur et d’une étendue sans précédent.

Ce qui démarque cette menace terroriste, ce n’est pas seulement son association avec Daech, mais le fait qu’elle englobe un plus large spectre de réseaux djihadistes, dont al-Qaïda. De plus, la perte d’immunité de la République islamique face au terrorisme djihadiste international n’est pas seulement liée à son implication en Syrie, mais est également symptomatique d’un effondrement de ses relations à plus grande échelle avec les groupes islamistes sunnites.

Une menace imminente

La dégradation de l’environnement sécuritaire de la République islamique est en grande partie liée à l’évolution rapide du paysage géopolitique. L’escalade des combats en Syrie, amplifiée par les forces aériennes russes et l’intensification des opérations iraniennes au sol, a eu pour effet immédiat de renforcer la posture du président syrien Bachar al-Assad.

La transformation du champ de bataille syrien finira inévitablement par déclencher une réaction contre l’Iran. Les attentats-suicides qui ont eu lieu un peu plus tôt ce mois-ci à Bourj al-Brajneh (au sud de Beyrouth) et qui ont été revendiqués par Daech visaient manifestement le Hezbollah, allié de l’Iran, et représentaient un message clair envoyé à Téhéran.

Cependant, les évolutions géopolitiques et les menaces à l’ordre public qui les accompagnent vont bien au-delà de la guerre en Syrie et de son voisinage immédiat au Levant. Le responsable de l’armée iranienne, le brigadier général Ahmad Reza Pourdastan, a récemment lancé un avertissement au sujet d’une menace de Daech qui pèserait sur l’Iran depuis le nord de l’Afghanistan.

Pour les forces de l’armée et de la sûreté iranienne, le groupe qu’on appelle État islamique représente une menace dans la mesure où celui-ci, à l’inverse de ses compatriotes idéologiques d’al-Qaïda et des groupes djihadistes affiliés, voit les musulmans chiites, et par extension la République islamique, comme ses principaux ennemis.

Ce problème est aggravé par le fait que même al-Qaïda, qui a évité pendant des années de s’en prendre à l’Iran pour des raisons politiques et logistiques, adopte maintenant une attitude plus belliqueuse envers la République islamique. Ceci est presque entièrement dû à l’engagement sans réserve de l’Iran en faveur de la défense du gouvernement syrien.

Cette agressivité a été soulignée par des propos particulièrement impressionnants d’Abou Mohammed al-Joulani, le chef du Front al-Nosra (le groupe syrien affilié à al-Qaïda), qui, dans un entretien avec Al Jazeera au mois de juin, a menacé de transporter le conflit « à l’intérieur » de l’Iran.

Alors qu’il est indéniable que de telles menaces élèvent les enjeux pour l’Iran, leur mise a exécution est un tout autre problème. En Iran, les groupes comme le Front al-Nosra et le groupe autoproclamé État islamique sont confrontés à un environnement sécuritaire musclé qui prend la forme d’un grand nombre de services de sécurité et de renseignement très vigilants, qui bénéficient d’une grande expérience et de grandes ressources.

Pour les forces de sécurité iraniennes, l’un des défis urgents est de retrouver les groupes activistes qui se trouvent dans les régions frontalières sensibles et de les empêcher de soutenir Daech et le Front al-Nosra, en particulier dans les provinces du Sistan-et-Balouchistan et de l’Azerbaïdjan occidental.

Les groupes militants sunnites originaires de ces régions ont déjà officiellement à leur actif plusieurs attaques contre le gouvernement et la sûreté à l’échelle locale. L’une des inquiétudes principales concerne le fait qu’en récupérant les ressources de ces groupes et leur connaissance du terrain, Daech pourrait chercher à s’attaquer à des cibles faciles dans des centres urbains importants, et en particulier la capitale, Téhéran, sous la forme d’attentats terroristes tragiques perpétrés par des hommes en maraude, ce qui ne serait pas sans rappeler les récentes attaques qui ont frappé Paris.

Des relations de cause à effet

La dégradation de la sécurité dans la région, comme le montre l’ascension de Daech, est prise tellement au sérieux à Téhéran que même le Guide suprême, l’ayatollah Ali Khamenei, a jugé utile de parler du sujet de manière répétée et sans détour au cours des derniers mois.

Lors de sa dernière intervention de dimanche, à l’occasion d’une rencontre avec le président turkmène Gurbanguly Berdimuhamedow, Ali Khamenei a affirmé que pour s’en sortir face aux courants « terroristes », il fallait impliquer la population dans des activités islamiques « acceptables » en vue de renforcer les courants islamiques « modérés » et « rationnels ».

Le problème de la République islamique est qu’au cours des dernières années, elle a progressivement perdu sa capacité à influencer ou même à générer des activités islamiques « acceptables » dans le domaine de l’Islam sunnite. L’impressionnante diminution de cette capacité a eu un impact sur une grande partie de la politique étrangère iranienne, en plus d’avoir rendu l’Iran plus vulnérable au terrorisme international.

Contrairement à la méprise largement répandue dans les médias et la sphère universitaire, le problème principal n’est pas lié au sectarisme mais, avec ironie, à la rationalisation accentuée de la politique étrangère iranienne, qui met en avant l’intérêt national aux dépens de l’éthique islamique révolutionnaire.

Tandis que le processus de rationalisation est en route depuis des décennies, il s’est terriblement amplifié sous le gouvernement du président Hassan Rohani, dont la priorité sur la scène internationale est de complètement déradicaliser la politique étrangère.

L’un des symptômes notables de ce processus, qui est également en lien avec la guerre en Syrie, est la rupture des relations de l’Iran avec le Hamas. Une évolution bien plus profonde concerne l’érosion des liens entre la République islamique et les Frères musulmans, aussi bien dans leur mère patrie égyptienne que dans des régions plus éloignées.

Ces évolutions résultent en une perte d’influence sur les cercles politiques islamiques sunnites, et par conséquent en l’incapacité de mettre un terme par voie de négociations aux désaccords et aux méprises qui émergent à cause de l’implication de l’Iran dans les conflits de la région.

Vis-à-vis du terrorisme, la République islamique se trouve aujourd’hui dans la même position inconfortable que d’autres États, et souffre notamment de ne plus être à l’abri de la fureur du djihad à l’échelle mondiale. Désormais, ce n’est peut-être plus qu’une question de temps avant que des atrocités en lien avec Daech ou bien simplement inspirées par ce mouvement ne surviennent à Téhéran.

Mahan Abedin

Traduction par Mathieu Vigouroux


- Source : Middle East Eye

jeudi, 12 novembre 2015

Les seigneurs de l'anneau

Les seigneurs de l'anneau

Ex: http://www.chroniquesdugrandjeu.com 

Les seigneurs de l'anneau

En attendant l'Inde, qui mettra encore quelques années pour participer pleinement aux dynamiques du continent-monde (ce qui fera d'ailleurs l'objet d'un prochain article), un spectaculaire triangle eurasien se met en place, qui donne vertiges et sueurs froides aux stratèges américains. Les amoureux de la géométrie insisteront certes sur la forme circulaire du nouveau colosse qui émerge et ils n'auront pas tout à fait tort (nous y reviendrons en fin d'article).

Nous avons déjà montré à plusieurs reprises à quel point le rapprochement entre Moscou, Pékin et Téhéran s'est accéléré ces dernières années. Nous écrivions le 20 octobre :

"Tout ceci n'est cependant rien en comparaison de ce qui se prépare avec l'Iran, grande puissance régionale si l'en est, case cruciale de l'échiquier eurasiatique. Si Obama pensait amadouer les ayatollahs avec l'accord sur le nucléaire, il s'est planté en 3D. La marche de Téhéran vers l'alliance sino-russe est inarrêtable. Coopération militaire renforcée avec Pékin, navires iraniens invités en Russie, et bien sûr une position commune sur les grands dossiers internationaux dont la Syrie. L'entrée de l'Iran dans l'OCS n'est qu'une question de temps.

Les liens énergétiques entre Téhéran et Pékin sont déjà anciens mais se consolident chaque jour. Ceci en attendant l'oléoduc irano-pakistanais qui verra prochainement le jour, reliant la base chinoise de Gwadar avant, un jour, de remonter tout le Pakistan et rejoindre la Karakoram Highway dans les somptueux décors himalayens."

Et le 25 octobre :

"Quant à l'Iran, qui ne sert désormais plus de prétexte fallacieux au bouclier anti-missile, sa lune de miel avec Moscou est à la hauteur de la désillusion de l'administration Obama qui espérait sans doute, avec l'accord sur le nucléaire, intégrer Téhéran dans son giron et l'écarter du grand mouvement de rapprochement eurasien. Et bah c'est raté, et drôlement raté...

En l'espace de quelques jours : accords sur des projets d'infrastructure (dont une ligne ferroviaire. Eurasie, Eurasie) d'une valeur de 40 milliards, établissement d'une banque commune pour favoriser les échanges (qui se feront évidemment en monnaies locales. Dédollarisation, dédollarisation). Cerise sur le gâteau, l'Iran va participer la banque des BRICS.

Leur future victoire en Syrie rapprochera encore Moscou et Téhéran, qui entrera bientôt, sous les auspices chinoises, dans l'Organisation de Coopération de Shanghai."

En ce moment, ô temps géopolitiquement excitants, pas une semaine ne passe sans qu'un jalon supplémentaire ne soit posé. Il y a quatre jours, l'Iran a proposé à la Chine d'organiser des exercices militaires communs. Pékin devrait évidemment accepter. Avant-hier, le fameux contrat pour la livraison des S-300 russes à Téhéran a enfin été signé, qui mettra à peu près définitivement l'Iran à l'abri de toute intervention aérienne étrangère.

Résumons :

  • dans le domaine militaire : manoeuvres/coopération sino-russes + sino-iraniennes + russo-iraniennes.
  • sur le plan énergétique : contrats gaziers du siècle sino-russes en 2014 + achats massifs de pétrole iranien par Pékin + entente russo-iranienne vis-à-vis de l'Europe (blocage des pipelines qataris et saoudiens en Syrie, accord sur le statut de la Caspienne...)
  • dans le domaine politique, géopolitique et géo-économique : entente totale des trois sur le dossier syrien, opposition commune aux tentatives unilatérales américaines, marche à la dédollarisation. Future entrée de l'Iran dans l'OCS sino-russe et participation à la banque des BRICS.

Il paraît que Brzezinski en a renversé son bol de café...

En 2013 paraissait un intéressant essai géopolitique intitulé Chine, Iran, Russie : un nouvel empire mongol ? La présentation de l'éditeur mérite qu'on s'y attarde :

"Le 20 mars 2013, le Homeland Security Policy Institute désignait des hackers chinois, russes et iraniens comme auteurs des attaques déstabilisant les systèmes de sécurité américains. Non contents de multiplier les cyber-intrusions, la Chine, la Russie et l'Iran collaborent aujourd'hui de façon croissante dans le domaine des nouvelles technologies. Dans un contexte marqué par l'effacement des frontières, ces trois pays sont-ils en train de fonder un nouvel empire mongol ou à l'inverse tentent-ils désespérément de préserver leurs influences régionales respectives ? Contrairement à la construction politique de Gengis Khan, ayant unifié l'Eurasie à partir d'un centre turco mongol, ces alliés encerclent une aire de civilisation turque dont ils se sont détournés. Cette alliance pragmatique, fondée sur l'axe sino-iranien, se matérialise par des appuis géopolitiques réciproques, une coopération étroite avec l'arrière-pays énergétique russe et la diffusion d'une vision du monde allant à rebours de nos propres stéréotypes. Étrangers à la chimère du dépassement des cultures par l'abolition des frontières, la Chine, la Russie et l'Iran peuvent puiser dans leurs histoires respectives des raisons d'exister sous une autre forme que celle d'une citadelle continentale résistant à la mondialisation océanique. Au delà de ses carences maritimes, le nouvel empire souffre toutefois de nombreuses fragilités telles que son affaiblissement démographique ou les intérêts parfois divergents des pays qui le composent. Aussi pourrait-il bouleverser soudainement nos repères géopolitiques avant de connaître une recomposition."

Si certaines bases de la coopération Moscou-Pékin-Téhéran étaient déjà là, que de chemin parcouru en deux petites années... Les "intérêts parfois divergents" ont presque totalement disparu, balayés par la dangereuse hystérie états-unienne en Ukraine et en Syrie. C'est désormais un triangle, pardon, un anneau extrêmement solide qui émerge, uni par des liens énergétiques, militaires et géopolitiques irréversibles.

A noter l'intéressante référence historique au coeur turco-mongol, centre de l'empire de Gengis Khan mais naine blanche de la nébuleuse annulaire russo-sino-iranienne, tournée vers les extrémités de l'échiquier eurasien. Les pays turcophones d'Asie centrale, qui appartiennent déjà à l'OCS et/ou à l'Union eurasienne, ne feront que suivre le mouvement, se coupant sans doute encore un peu plus d'une Turquie d'ailleurs elle-même embarquée dans un voyage bien turbulent...

Les seigneurs de l'anneau

lundi, 14 septembre 2015

Zarathoestra beleeft revival in Noord-Irak

zoroastriens-perdur.jpg

Door: Dirk Rochtus - Ex: http://www.doorbraak.be

Zarathoestra beleeft revival in Noord-Irak

Koerden in Noord-Irak herontdekken de oude religie van Zarathoestra als een wapen in de strijd tegen het door IS belichaamde Kwaad.

Een golf van politiek, religieus en sektarisch geweld overspoelt het Midden-Oosten. In Syrië woedt de soennitische terreurorganisatie Islamitische Staat (IS) in alle hevigheid tegen andersdenkenden en aanhangers van andere geloofsstrekkingen. In Turkije escaleert de strijd tussen het Turkse leger en de milities van de Koerdische Arbeiderspartij PKK. Iran en Saoedi-Arabië wedijveren met elkaar om de macht in de regio. Sjiieten en soennieten bestrijden elkaar om de juiste uitlegging van de islam.

Ware cultuur

De chaos drijft niet alleen vele mensen op de vlucht, maar doet ook velen onder de thuisblijvers snakken naar zekerheid en geborgenheid. Zo komt het bijvoorbeeld dat meer en meer Koerden een oude religie herontdekken. In de provincie Suleiman, in de Koerdische deelstaat van Noord-Irak, vond in de maand mei een merkwaardige ceremonie plaats. Honderden Koerden deden er een gewijde gordel, de 'koeshti', om. Ze betoonden zo hun gehechtheid aan het zoroastrisme, de religie van de Perzische profeet Zarathoestra (ook Zarathustra of Zoroaster genaamd). Ook dienden ze bij de overheid van de Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) een aanvraag in voor de bouw van twaalf zoroastrische tempels en voor de erkenning van het zoroastrisme als officiële godsdienst. Volgens Luqman al Hadsch Karim van de zoroastrische organisatie Zand zouden met de revival van het zoroastrisme de 'ware cultuur en religie van de Koerden' weer in ere worden hersteld.

De 'betere Bijbel'

Over het leven van Zarathustra is niet veel geweten. Hij zou rond 1200 voor Christus geleefd hebben in Perzië, het huidige Iran. Hij predikte als eerste het geloof in 'één God' - Ahura Mazda, de 'Wijze Heer' of de god van het goede die strijdt tegen de duivel Ahriman -, het bestaan van engelen, van hemel en hel en het Laatste Oordeel. Al deze geloofsbeelden zouden via de Joden in ballingschap in Babylon binnengeslopen zijn in de latere monotheïstische religies. Voor de publicist Paul Moonen schreef Zarathustra daarom ook de 'betere Bijbel'. Maar juist omdat Zarathoestra als de 'vader' van het monotheïsme geldt, gebruikte de godloochenende Duitse filosoof Friedrich Nietzsche hem in een ironische omkering in zijn poëtisch meesterwerk 'Also sprach Zarathustra' om de 'dood van God' te verkondigen.

zor520-9-8df4d.jpgVuur

De zoroastriërs vereren in hun vuurtempels het eeuwig brandende vuur als afbeeld van Ahura Mazda. Het zoroastrisme groeide later uit tot de staatsgodsdienst van het Perzische Rijk. Toen de islam in de zevende eeuw Perzië veroverde, vluchtten vele zoroastriërs naar het naburige India. Vandaag de dag leven er vooral nog in Bombay een paar tienduizend 'parsi's' die vasthouden aan het zoroastrische geloof. In Iran zelf telt de zoroastrische gemeenschap een dertigduizend leden. Ze wordt in de Islamitische Republiek van Iran erkend als een minderheid. Net zoals de Armeense en de Joodse gemeenschap heeft ze recht op één zetel in de Majlis, het Iraanse parlement. Toch moet ze nog heel wat onderdrukking en discriminatie doorstaan. Ook de Jezidi's, de aanhangers van een door IS vervolgde Koerdische 'volksreligie', zouden door het zoroastrisme beïnvloed zijn. Zijzelf wijzen elke band met de leer van Zarathoestra af.

Strijdtoneel

Het zoroastrisme leek de laatste jaren op de terugweg. Het aantal gelovigen in Iran en India was aan het slinken ten gevolge van lagere geboortecijfers, vervolging en discriminatie. Merkwaardig is het dan ook dat Koerden in Noord-Irak de Oud-Perzische religie van Zarathoestra herontdekken. Sowieso zijn er culturele verbanden. De Koerden spreken een met het Farsi (Perzisch) verwante taal en in Newroz, hun nieuwjaarsfeest, speelt het vuur een grote rol. Volgens analisten zou de onzekerheid over wat nu de ware islam is nationalistische en liberaal denkende Koerden in de armen van een tolerante religie als het zoroastrisme drijven. Zarathoestra zag in de wereld het strijdtoneel van het Goede en het Kwade en riep de mensen op om de zijde van de goede god Ahura Mazda te kiezen. In zulk een wereldbeeld past voor vele Koerden ook de strijd tegen IS als de belichaming van het Kwade.

 

00:05 Publié dans Traditions | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0) | Tags : zoroastrisme, irak, iran, traditions, traditionalisme | |  del.icio.us | | Digg! Digg |  Facebook

lundi, 01 juin 2015

Iraqi Kurds revive ancient Kurdish Zoroastrianism religion

wallpaper.jpg

Thanks to Islamic extremism, Iraqi Kurds revive ancient Kurdish Zoroastrianism religion

by Alaa Latif

Ex: http://ekurd.net

The One, True Kurdish Prophet

SLEMANI, Kurdistan region ‘Iraq’,— The small, ancient religion of Zoroastrianism is being revived in Iraqi Kurdistan. Followers say locals should join because it’s a truly Kurdish belief. Others say the revival is a reaction to extremist Islam.

One of the smallest and oldest religions in the world is experiencing a revival in the semi-autonomous region of Iraqi Kurdistan. The religion has deep Kurdish roots – it was founded by Zoroaster, also known as Zarathustra, who was born in Iranian Kurdistan (the Kurdish part of Iran) and the religion’s sacred book, the Avesta, was written in an ancient language from which the Kurdish language derives. However this century it is estimated that there are only around 190,000 believers in the world – as Islam became the dominant religion in the region during the 7th century, Zoroastrianism more or less disappeared.

Until – quite possibly – now. For the first time in over a thousand years, locals in a rural part of Slemani (Sulaymaniyah) province conducted an ancient ceremony on May 1, whereby followers put on a special belt that signifies they are ready to serve the religion and observe its tenets. It would be akin to a baptism in the Christian faith.

The newly pledged Zoroastrians have said that they will organise similar ceremonies elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan and they have also asked permission to build up to 12 temples inside the region, which has its own borders, military and Parliament. Zoroastrians are also visiting government departments in Iraqi Kurdistan and they have asked that Zoroastrianism be acknowledged as a religion officially. They even have their own anthem and many locals are attending Zoroastrian events and responding to Zoroastrian organisations and pages on social media.

Although as yet there are no official numbers as to how many Kurdish locals are actually turning to this religion, there is certainly a lot of discussion about it. And those who are already Zoroastrians believe that as soon as locals learn more about the religion, their numbers will increase. They also seem to selling the idea of Zoroastrianism by saying that it is somehow “more Kurdish” then other religions – certainly an attractive idea in an area where many locals care more about their ethnic identity than religious divisions.

As one believer, Dara Aziz, told Niqash: “I really hope our temples will open soon so that we can return to our authentic religion”.

“This religion will restore the real culture and religion of the Kurdish people,” says Luqman al-Haj Karim, a senior representative of Zoroastrianism and head of the Zoroastrian organisation, Zand, who believes that his belief system is more “Kurdish” than most. “The revival is a part of a cultural revolution, that gives people new ways to explore peace of mind, harmony and love,” he insists.

In fact, Zoroastrians believe that the forces of good and evil are continually struggling in the world – this is why many locals also suspect that this religious revival has more to do with the security crisis caused by the extremist group known as the Islamic State, as well as deepening sectarian and ethnic divides in Iraq, than any needs expressed by locals for something to believe in.

“The people of Kurdistan no longer know which Islamic movement, which doctrine or which fatwa, they should be believing in,” Mariwan Naqshbandi, the spokesperson for Iraqi Kurdistan’s Ministry of Religious Affairs, told Niqash. He says that the interest in Zoroastrianism is a symptom of the disagreements within Islam and religious instability in the Iraqi Kurdish region, as well as in the country as a whole.

sadeh.jpg

“For many more liberal or more nationalist Kurds, the mottos used by the Zoroastrians seem moderate and realistic,” Naqshbandi explains. “There are many people here who are very angry with the Islamic State group and it’s inhumanity.”

Naqshbandi also confirmed that his Ministry would help the Zoroastrians achieve their goals. The right to freedom of religion and worship was enshrined in Kurdish law and Naqshbandi said that the Zoroastrians would be represented in his offices.

Zoroastrian leader al-Karim isn’t so sure whether it is the Islamic State, or IS, group’s extremism that is changing how locals think about religion. “The people of Kurdistan are suffering from a collapsing culture that actually hinders change,” he argues. “It’s illogical to connect Zoroastrianism with the IS group. We are simply encouraging a new way of thinking about how to live a better life, the way that Zoroaster told us to.”

On local social media there has been much discussion on this subject. One of the most prevalent questions is this: Will the Kurdish abandon Islam altogether in favour of other beliefs?

“We don’t want to be a substitute for any other religion,” al-Karim replies. “We simply want to respond to society’s needs.”

However, even if al-Karim doesn’t admit it, it is clear to everyone else. Committing to Zoroastrianism would mean abandoning Islam. But even those who want to take on the Zoroastrian “belt” are staying well away from denigrating any other belief system. This may be one reason why, so far, Islamic clergy and Islamic politicians haven’t criticised the Zoroastrians openly.

As one local politician, Haji Karwan, an MP for the Islamic Union in Iraqi Kurdistan, tells Niqash, he doesn’t think that so many people have actually converted to Zoroastrianism anyway. He also thinks that those promoting the religion are few and far between. “But of course, people are free to choose whatever religion they want to practise,” Karwan told Niqash. “Islam says there’s no compulsion in religion.”

On the other hand, Karwan disagrees with the idea that any religion – let alone Zoroastrianism – is specifically “Kurdish” in nature. Religion came to humanity as a whole, not to any one specific ethnic group, he argues.

By Alaa Latif
Regions and cities names in Kurdish may have been changed or added to the article by Ekurd.net.

dimanche, 24 mai 2015

Turkish-Iranian Competition in the Middle East

TKiran.jpg

Turkish-Iranian Competition in the Middle East

Publication: Eurasia Daily Monitor

By: Orhan Gafarli

The Jamestown Foundation & http://www.themoderntokyotimes.com

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan paid a formal visit to Iran on April 7, 2015. The trip was designed to try to repair bilateral relations after their severe breakdown linked to the crisis in Yemen. Indeed, the conservative wing of the ruling establishment in Tehran, including the head of Iran’s Parliamentary National Security and Foreign Policy Commission, Huseyn Nakavi, demanded that Erdogan’s Iran visit should be delayed (BBC–Turkish service, April 7). Some even warned the government that if Erdogan did not cancel the visit, the issue would be brought before Iran’s Guardian Council. Despite this negative pressure, the Turkish president did end up traveling to Tehran to clarify Ankara’s position (Radikal, April 7).

Four significant issues have contributed to this nadir in Turkish-Iranian relations: Iraq, Syria, Yemen and energy. Regarding Syria, the only area of agreement between Ankara and Tehran is their firm opposition to the Islamic State. However, Iran has continued to support the beleaguered Syrian regime of President Bashar al-Assad, while Turkey backs the united opposition. On Iraq, Turkey still sees Iran acting as a manipulator in bilateral Ankara-Baghdad relations. Although from time to time Tehran sends positive messages on this issue, in reality, these are tactical games on Iran’s part (Internet Haber, March 4). In recent months, as the war in Yemen continued to spiral out of control, Turkey has sided with Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and the United Arab Emirates and supported their international military action backing the embattled Yemeni regime. Iran, on the other hand, stands behind the Houthi rebels who are fighting on the other side of this conflict.

Over the past fifteen years, these regional issues have become increasingly contentious for Ankara and Tehran. The reason, as many experts contend, is related to the relative power of Iran in the region. For one thing, its power and ability to influence other regional actors has grown after the Arab Spring. Moreover, Iran has been strengthening regional Shia groups and building a crescent of influence in the Middle East. In addition, some have argued that Iran now feels more confident after reaching a framework agreement with the 5+1 Western countries on its nuclear program (Internet Haber, March 4; Radikal, March 18).

Another key point of contention between Turkey and Iran has become the issue of energy. “Turkey, as a country, is the largest consumer of [natural] gas from Iran, and yet it pays the highest price,” President Erdogan declared while in Tehran (BBC–Turkish service, April 7). Turkey expects a possible discount on the gas volumes it already imports from Iran; but Tehran has, so far, ignored these pleas. Speaking to journalists, on April 14, Iranian Fuel Minister Bijen Namdar Zengene said that Tehran’s proposal of lowering the gas purchase in exchange for Turkey buying double the volumes was rejected by Ankara. Annually, Turkey buys 10 billion cubic meters (bcm) of natural gas from Iran. Sources from the Turkish Ministry of Energy confirm that Iran proposed selling Turkey another 10 bcm of gas at a gradually decreasing price scheme, but without changing the price it charges Ankara for the first 10 bcm. Turkish Foreign ministry sources declared that this proposal was not acceptable to authorities in Ankara (Hurriyet, April 17).

In addition to the subject of energy sales, the website Iran.ru, controlled by the Iranian embassy to Moscow, earlier this year published an article criticizing Turkey’s developing role as a regional gas hub. “Turkey, as an ‘Energy Hub’ country, [will be] dangerous for Iran,” the article asserts, adding, “and Iran does not understand why Russia has been helping Turkey in this process. Russia supports Iran via strategic cooperation [but] assists Ankara on the energy issue—which is not preferable for these nations [Russia and Iran]. Russia must defend Iran’s interests” (Iran.ru, January 23).

Relations between Russia, Turkey and Iran are being influenced by a complicated set of cross-cutting and often contradictory interests. Ankara, expecting that its warm relations with Russia would bolster Turkey’s international role, has felt uncomfortable with growing Iranian strength in the Middle East as a result of improving relations between Tehran and the West (Iran.ru, February 27). For one thing, Turkey is concerned about the fact that Iran has not taken any firm action on helping to resolve the conflicts in Syria and Iraq. Furthermore, if the economic sanctions on Iran are terminated, the Islamic Republic could grow to become the preeminent power in the region. That is why Ankara is assisting Saudi Arabia, Egypt and the United Arab Emirates in their campaign over Yemen (Hurriyet, April 24). This support clearly has a tactical dimension, particularly against the background of Turkey’s own disagreements with Saudi Arabia on Yemen. Moreover, relations between Ankara and Cairo have been virtually frozen after Mohamed Morsi was overthrown in Egypt two years ago (Turkiye, April 25).

Meanwhile, Turkish media has been hinting that relations with Israel might again come up for debate following Turkey’s parliamentary elections, scheduled for June 7. The geopolitical struggles in the Middle East are encouraging Turkey and Israel to rebuild a new, cordial relationship. But some experts infer that, in exchange for re-normalizing relations, Turkey will expect help from Israel on Syria. Without any dedicated alliances in the Middle East, Turkey is pursuing a series of tactical policy steps wherever it can find areas of common interest with other regional players. In the absence of any other allies in the Middle East, Turkey has been relying on political support from the United States—a fellow North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) member. But the insufficient backing it has received from Washington on the Syria issue has left Ankara feeling uncomfortable (CNN–Turkish service, April 24).

Turkey’s Middle East policy is thus in a current state of flux. But in its quest for new regional partnerships, it is unlikely to seek out either Iran or Russia. Rather, Turkey may be expected to seek closer cooperation with Saudi Arabia or re-build its relations with Israel. Recently, Turkey appears to have swung its attention more toward Saudi Arabia—President Erdogan attended the funeral of Saudi King Abdullah (Today’s Zaman, January 23) and later paid a formal visit to the country in March (Al-Monitor, March 3). These exchanges may herald a coming breakthrough in bilateral Saudi-Turkish relations in the near future. Though Turkey’s ultimate decision between moving closer to Israel or Saudi Arabia will undoubtedly have to wait until after the June 7 elections.

The Jamestown Foundation kindly allows Modern Tokyo Times to publish their highly esteemed articles. Please follow and check The Jamestown Foundation website at http://www.jamestown.org/

https://twitter.com/JamestownTweets The Jamestown Foundation

http://www.jamestown.org/single/?tx_ttnews[tt_news]=43923&tx_ttnews[backPid]=7&cHash=a02db9eaae718d591f16cedb4c57ca67#.VVw1x2b6m1k

mercredi, 06 mai 2015

Une coalition sino-russo-iranienne opposée à l’Otan débute-t-elle à Moscou?

mosctehepek.jpg

Une coalition sino-russo-iranienne opposée à l’Otan débute-t-elle à Moscou?

La Conférence de Moscou sur la sécurité internationale, en avril, a été une occasion de faire savoir aux Etats-Unis et à l’OTAN que d’autres puissances mondiales ne les laisseront pas faire comme ils l’entendent.

Le thème portait sur les efforts communs de la Chine, de l’Inde, de la Russie et de l’Iran contre l’expansion de l’OTAN, renforcés par des projets de pourparlers militaires tripartites entre Pékin, Moscou et Téhéran.

Des ministres de la Défense et des responsables militaires venus du monde entier se sont réunis le 16 avril au Radisson Royal ou Hotel Ukraina, l’une des plus belles réalisations de l’architecture soviétique à Moscou, connue comme l’une des Sept sœurs construites à l’époque de Joseph Staline.

L’événement de deux jours, organisé par le ministère russe de la Défense était la quatrième édition de la Conférence annuelle de Moscou sur la sécurité internationale (CMSI/MCIS).

Des civils et des militaires de plus de soixante-dix pays, y compris des membres de l’OTAN, y ont assisté. A part la Grèce, toutefois, les ministres de la Défense des pays de l’OTAN n’ont pas participé à la conférence.

Contrairement à l’année dernière, les organisateurs de la CMSI n’ont pas transmis d’invitation à l’Ukraine pour la conférence de 2015. Selon le vice-ministre russe de la Défense Anatoly Antonov, «à ce niveau d’antagonisme brutal dans l’information par rapport à la crise dans le sud-est de l’Ukraine, nous avons décidé de ne pas envenimer la situation à la conférence et, à ce stade, nous avons pris la décision de ne pas inviter nos collègues ukrainiens à l’événement.»

A titre personnel, le sujet m’intéresse, j’ai suivi ce genre de conférences pendant des années, parce qu’il en émane souvent des déclarations importantes sur les politiques étrangères et de sécurité. Cette année, j’étais désireux d’assister à l’ouverture de cette conférence particulière sur la sécurité. A part le fait qu’elle avait lieu à un moment où le paysage géopolitique du globe est en train de changer rapidement, depuis que l’ambassade russe au Canada m’avait demandé en 2014 si j’étais intéressé à assister à la CMSI IV, j’étais curieux de voir ce que cette conférence produirait.

Le reste du monde parle: à l’écoute des problèmes de sécurité non euro-atlantiques

La Conférence de Moscou est l’équivalent russe de la Conférence de Munich sur la sécurité qui se tient à l’hôtel Bayerischer Hof en Allemagne. Il y a cependant des différences essentielles entre les deux événements.

Alors que la Conférence sur la sécurité de Munich est organisée autour de la sécurité euro-atlantique et considère la sécurité globale du point de vue atlantiste de l’OTAN, la CMSI représente une perspective mondiale beaucoup plus large et diversifiée. Elle représente les problèmes de sécurité du reste du monde non euro-atlantique, en particulier le Moyen-Orient et l’Asie-Pacifique. Mais qui vont de l’Argentine, de l’Inde et du Vietnam à l’Egypte et à l’Afrique du Sud.  La conférence a réuni à l’hôtel Ukraina tout un éventail de grands et petits joueurs à la table, dont les voix et les intérêts en matière de sécurité, d’une manière ou d’une autre, sont par ailleurs sapés et ignorés à Munich par les dirigeants de l’OTAN et des Etats-Unis.

Le ministre russe de la Défense Sergey Shoigu, qui a un rang d’officier équivalent à celui d’un général quatre étoiles dans la plupart des pays de l’OTAN, a ouvert la conférence. Assis près de Shoigu, le ministre des Affaires étrangères Sergey Lavrov a aussi pris la parole, et d’autres responsables de haut rang. Tous ont parlé du bellicisme tous azimuts de Washington, qui a recouru aux révolutions de couleur, comme l’Euro-Maïdan à Kiev et la Révolution des roses en Géorgie pour obtenir un changement de régime. Shoigu a cité le Venezuela et la région administrative spéciale chinoise de Hong Kong comme exemples de révolutions de couleur qui ont échoué.

Le ministre des Affaires étrangères Lavrov a rappelé que les possibilités d’un dangereux conflit mondial allaient croissant en raison de l’absence de préoccupation, de la part des Etats-Unis et de l’OTAN, pour la sécurité des autres et l’absence de dialogue constructif. Dans son argumentation, Lavrov a cité le président américain Franklin Roosevelt, qui a dit:

«Il n’y a pas de juste milieu ici. Nous aurons à prendre la responsabilité de la collaboration mondiale, ou nous aurons à porter la responsabilité d’un autre conflit mondial «Je crois qu’ils ont formulé l’une des principales leçons du conflit mondial le plus dévastateur de l’Histoire: il est seulement possible de relever les défis communs et de préserver la paix par des efforts collectifs, basés sur le respect des intérêts légitimes de tous les partenaires » , a-t-il expliqué à propos de ce que les dirigeants mondiaux avaient appris de la Seconde Guerre mondiale.

Shoigu a eu plus de dix réunions bilatérales avec les différents ministres et responsables de la Défense qui sont venus à Moscou pour la CMSI. Lors d’une réunion avec le ministre serbe de la Défense Bratislav Gasic, Shoigu a dit que Moscou considère Belgrade comme un partenaire fiable en termes de coopération militaire.

Russie

De g. à dr.: Sergei Lavrov, ministre des Affaires étrangères, Sergei Shoigu, ministre de la Défense, Nikolai Patrushev, secrétaire au Conseil de sécurité et Valery Gerasimov, chef de l’état-major général, participant à la 4e Conférence de Moscou sur la sécurité (RIA Novosti / Iliya Pitalev)

Une coalition sino-russo-iranienne: le cauchemar de Washington

Le mythe que la Russie est isolée sur le plan international a de nouveau été démoli pendant la conférence, qui a aussi débouché sur quelques annonces importantes.

Le ministre kazakh de la Défense Imangali Tasmagambetov et Shoigu ont annoncé que la mise en œuvre d’un système de défense aérienne commun entre le Kazakhstan et la Russie a commencé. Cela n’indique pas seulement l’intégration de l’espace aérien de l’Organisation du traité de sécurité collective, cela définit aussi une tendance. Cela a été le prélude à d’autres annonces contre le bouclier de défense antimissile de l’OTAN.

La déclaration la plus vigoureuse est venue du ministre iranien de la Défense Hossein Dehghan. Le brigadier-général Dehghan a dit que l’Iran voulait que la Chine, l’Inde et la Russie s’unissent pour s’opposer conjointement à l’expansion à l’est de l’OTAN et à la menace à leur sécurité collective que constitue le projet de bouclier antimissile de l’Alliance.

Lors d’une réunion avec le ministre chinois des Affaires étrangères Chang Wanquan, Shoigu a souligné que les liens militaires de Moscou avec Beijing étaient sa «priorité absolue». Dans une autre rencontre bilatérale, les gros bonnets de la défense iraniens et russes ont confirmé que leur coopération sera une des pierres angulaires d’un nouvel ordre multipolaire et que Moscou et Téhéran étaient en harmonie quant à leur approche stratégique des Etats-Unis.

Après la rencontre de Hossein Dehghan et la délégation iranienne avec leurs homologues russes, il a été annoncé qu’un sommet tripartite se tiendrait entre Beijing, Moscou et Téhéran. L’idée a été avalisée ensuite par la délégation chinoise.

Le contexte géopolitique change et il n’est pas favorable aux intérêts états-uniens. Non seulement l’Union économique eurasienne a été formée par l’Arménie, la Biélorussie, le Kazakhstan et la Russie au cœur post-soviétique de l’Eurasie, mais Pékin, Moscou et Téhéran – la Triple entente eurasienne – sont entrés dans un long processus de rapprochement politique, stratégique, économique, diplomatique et militaire.

L’harmonie et l’intégration eurasiennes contestent la position des Etats-Unis sur leur perchoir occidental et leur statut de tête de pont en Europe, et même incitent les alliés des Etats-Unis à agir de manière plus indépendante. C’est l’un des thèmes centraux examinés dans mon livre The Globalization of NATO [La mondialisation de l’OTAN].

L’ancien grand ponte états-unien de la sécurité Zbigniew Brzezinski a mis en garde les élites américaines contre la formation d’une coalition eurasienne «qui pourrait éventuellement chercher à contester la primauté de l’Amérique». Selon Brzezinski, une telle alliance eurasienne pourrait naître d’une «coalition sino-russo-iranienne» avec Beijing pour centre.

«Pour les stratèges chinois, face à la coalition trilatérale de l’Amérique, de l’Europe et du Japon, la riposte géopolitique la plus efficace pourrait bien être de tenter et de façonner une triple alliance qui leur soit propre, liant la Chine à l’Iran dans la région golfe Persique/Moyen-Orient et avec la Russie dans la région de l’ancienne Union soviétique», avertit Brzezinski.

«Dans l’évaluation des futures options de la Chine, il faut aussi considérer la possibilité qu’une Chine florissante économiquement et confiante en elle politiquement – mais qui se sent exclue du système mondial et qui décide de devenir à la fois l’avocat et le leader des Etats démunis dans le monde –  décide d’opposer non seulement une doctrine claire mais aussi un puissant défi géopolitique au monde trilatéral dominant», explique-t-il.

C’est plus ou moins la piste que les Chinois sont en train de suivre. Le ministre Wanquan a carrément dit à la CMSI qu’un ordre mondial équitable était nécessaire.

La menace pour les Etats-Unis est qu’une coalition sino-russo-iranienne puisse, selon les propres mots de Brzezinski, «être un aimant puissant pour les autres Etats mécontents du statu quo».

russie

Un soldat pendant un exercice impliquant les systèmes de missiles sol-air S-300/SA sur le terrain d’entraînement d’Ashuluk, dans la région  d’Astrakhan (RIA Novosti / Pavel Lisitsyn)

Contrer le bouclier anti-missile des Etats-Unis et de l’OTAN en Eurasie

Washington érige un nouveau Rideau de fer autour de la Chine, de l’Iran, de la Russie et de leurs alliés au moyen de l’infrastructure de missiles des Etats-Unis et de l’OTAN.

L’objectif du Pentagone est de neutraliser toutes les ripostes défensives de la Russie et des autres puissances eurasiennes à une attaque de missiles balistiques US, qui pourrait inclure une première frappe nucléaire. Washington ne veut pas permettre à la Russie ou à d’autres d’être capables d’une seconde frappe ou, en d’autres termes, ne veut pas permettre à la Russie ou à d’autres d’être en mesure de riposter à une attaque par le Pentagone.

En 2011, il a été rapporté que le vice-Premier ministre Dmitri Rogozine, qui était alors envoyé de Moscou auprès de l’OTAN, se rendrait à Téhéran pour parler du projet de bouclier antimissile de l’OTAN. Divers articles ont été publiés, y compris par le Tehran Times, affirmant que les gouvernements de Russie, d’Iran et de Chine projetaient de créer un bouclier antimissile commun pour contrer les Etats-Unis et l’OTAN. Rogozine, toutefois, a réfuté ces articles. Il a dit que cette défense antimissile était discutée entre le Kremlin et ses alliés militaires dans le cadre de l’Organisation du traité de sécurité collective (OTSC).

L’idée de coopération dans la défense entre la Chine, l’Iran et la Russie, contre le bouclier antimissile de l’OTAN est restée d’actualité depuis 2011. Dès lors, l’Iran s’est rapproché pour devenir un observateur dans l’OTSC, comme l’Afghanistan et la Serbie. Beijing, Moscou et Téhéran se sont rapprochés aussi en raison de problèmes comme la Syrie, l’Euro-Maïdan et le pivot vers l’Asie du Pentagone. L’appel de Hossein Dehghan à une approche collective par la Chine, l’Inde, l’Iran et la Russie contre le bouclier antimissile et l’expansion de l’OTAN, couplé aux annonces faites à la CMSI sur des pourparlers militaires tripartites entre la Chine, l’Iran et la Russie, vont aussi dans ce sens.

Les systèmes de défense aérienne russes S-300 et S-400 sont en cours de déploiement dans toute l’Eurasie, depuis l’Arménie et la Biélorussie jusqu’au Kamchatka, dans le cadre d’une contre-manœuvre au nouveau Rideau de fer.  Ces systèmes de défense aérienne rendent beaucoup plus difficiles les objectifs de Washington de neutraliser toute possibilité de réaction ou de seconde frappe.

Même les responsables de l’OTAN et le Pentagone, qui se sont référés aux S-300 comme le système SA-20, l’admettent. « Nous l’avons étudié nous sommes formés pour le contrer depuis des années. Nous n’en avons pas peur, mais nous respectons le S-300 pour ce qu’il est: un système de missiles très mobile, précis et mortel », a écrit le colonel de l’US Air Force Clint Hinote pour le Conseil des relations étrangères basé à Washington.

Bien qu’il y ait eu des spéculations sur le fait que la vente des systèmes S-300 à l’Iran serait le point de départ d’un pactole provenant de Téhéran dû aux ventes internationales d’armes, résultat des négociations de Lausanne, et que Moscou cherche à avoir un avantage concurrentiel dans la réouverture du marché iranien, en réalité la situation et les motivations sont très différentes. Même si Téhéran achète différentes quantités de matériel militaire à la Russie et à d’autres sources étrangères, il a une politique d’autosuffisance militaire et fabrique principalement ses propres armes. Toute une série de matériel militaire – allant des chars d’assaut, missiles, avions de combat, détecteurs de radar, fusils et drones, hélicoptères, torpilles, obus de mortier, navires de guerre et sous-marins – est fabriqué à l’intérieur de l’Iran. L’armée iranienne soutient même que leur système de défense aérienne Bavar-373 est plus ou moins l’équivalent du S-300.

La livraison par Moscou du paquet de S-300 à Téhéran est plus qu’une simple affaire commerciale. Elle est destinée à sceller la coopération militaire russo-iranienne et à renforcer la coopération eurasienne contre l’encerclement du bouclier anti-missiles de Washington. C’est un pas de plus dans la création d’un réseau de défense aérienne eurasienne contre la menace que font peser les missiles des Etats-Unis et de l’OTAN sur des pays qui osent ne pas s’agenouiller devant Washington.

Par Mahdi Darius Nazemroaya –  23 avril 2015

Mahdi Darius Nazemroaya est sociologue, un auteur primé et un analyste géopolitique.

Article original : http://rt.com/op-edge/252469-moscow-conference-international-security-nato/

Traduit de l’anglais par Diane Gilliard

URL de cet article : http://arretsurinfo.ch/une-coalition-sino-russo-iranienne-opposee-a-lotan-debute-t-elle-a-moscou/

mardi, 21 avril 2015

Keep That Iranian Genii Bottled Up!

united-against-nuclear-iran1200.jpg

Keep That Iranian Genii Bottled Up!

By

Ex: http://www.lewrockwell.com

The deal reached in Lausanne, Switzerland by Iran and five powers, led by the US, appears to be about nuclear capability.

In fact, the real issue was not nuclear weapons, which Iran does not now possess, but Iran’s potential geopolitical power.

Iran, a nation of 80.8 million, has been bottled up like the proverbial genii by US-led sanctions ever since the 1979 Islamic Revolution deposed Shah Pahlavi’s corrupt royalist regime. The Shah had been groomed to be the chief US enforcer in the Gulf.

More than a dozen American efforts to overthrow the Islamic government in Tehran have failed. Washington resorted to sabotage and economic warfare, sought to throttle Iran’s primary exports, oil and gas,  to derail its banking system, and prevent imports of everything from machinery to vitamins. 

The US and Israel have used the extremist group People’s Mujahidin to murder Iranian officials and scientists.

There is no doubt that this western economic siege drove Iran to make major concessions over its nuclear energy program, a source of great national pride and prestige that broke what Grand Ayatollah Ali Khamenei called the “backwardness” imposed by the western powers on the Muslim world to keep it weak and subservient.

Like Cuba, another state that long defied Washington, Iran eventually found the price of its independence and self-interest too high to bear. As with Saddam’s Iraq, US-led sanctions caused its military to rust away and its oil exports to fall painfully.

Israel’s anguished alarms over Iran’s supposed nuclear “threat” were not even believed by its own crack intelligence services or those of the United States, but the relentless drumbeat of hate Iran propaganda convinced many in North America and even better-informed Europe that Iran is a menace.

What Israel really feared was not Iran’s non-existent nuclear threat  but rather its ongoing support for the beleaguered Palestinians.

Iran became the last Mideast nation giving strong backing to creation of a Palestinian state. The Arab states opposing Israel have been silenced: Syria, Libya and Iraq crushed by war and torn asunder, Egypt and Jordan bought off with huge bribes. The Saudis have secretly allied themselves to Israel. So only Iran was left to champion Palestine.

That is why Israel made such a determined effort to push the US into war with Iran. With the feeble Arab states largely demolished or gelded, Israel’s hold on the Occupied West Bank and Golan would be unchallenged.

But for the United States, the geostrategic calculus is somewhat different. The Iranian revolution of 1979 profoundly challenged America’s Mideast imperium – what I call the American Raj after the manner in which  the British Empire ruled India.

Washington’s Mideast political-strategic architecture was built on feudal and brutal military regimes. Ever since 1945, the deal was that the feudal oil states supplied oil at bargain basement prices in exchange for US military and political protection. In addition, the Arab oil monarchies undertook to buy huge amounts of American arms from plants in key political states that none of them knew how to effectively use. The most recent deal amounts to $46 billion of US weapons for the Saudis.

Washington’s Mideast Raj  forms one of the enduring pillars of American global power. Though America consumes less and less Mideast oil each year, its control of  the flow of oil from Arabia to Europe, Japan, China and the other parts of the Asian economy gives it huge strategic leverage. Japan and Germany both vividly remember they lost WWII because of lack of oil.

The 1979 Iranian Revolution gravely threatened this sweetheart arrangement. Iran demanded that its Arab neighbors follow Islam’s calls to share wealth, avoid ostentation, live modestly, and care for the needy – in short, the very opposite of the flamboyant Saudis and Gulf Arabs.

Iran set the example by funding extensive social programs and education. Of course, Iran’s challenge to share the wealth was anathema to the oil monarchs and their American patrons. By 1980, an undeclared conflict was underway across the Muslim world between the Saudis and Iran – one that still rages today as we see most recently in the expanding Yemen war.

iran-fenced-in.gifUS policy has been to keep the infectious, troublesome Iranians isolated and contained, rather as Europe’s reactionary powers did with revolutionary France at the end of the 18th century. While the reason given by Washington was Iran’s alleged nuclear threat, the sanctions regime was really aimed at fatally weakening Iran’s economy and provoking the overthrow of the Islamic government and its replacement by tame Beverly Hills Iranian exiles.

Unfortunately for US imperial policymakers, the dangerous chaos they created  in Iraq and Syria, and the rise of ISIS, necessitated working with Iran to keep a lid on this boiling pot. That means easing sanctions on Tehran and allowing its economy to start coming back to life.

Hence the Lausanne deal. But Tehran does not trust Washington to adhere to the pact. Grand Ayatollah Khamenei asserted last week there would be no deal unless sanctions against Iran were lifted “immediately.” To many Iranians it seemed clear that Washington had no intention of lifting key sanctions, only slowly lessening relatively unimportant ones.

Washington faces a major dilemma over the isolation of Iran. If sanctions are substantially lifted, Iran will increase oil and gas exports and begin rebuilding its industrial base and obsolete military forces. Europe,  Russia, China and India are all eager to resume doing business with Iran.

But lifting sanctions will make Iran stronger and even more of a political threat to America’s Mideast satraps – who want the Persian genii bottled up. Claims that Mideast states like Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the UAE fear a nuclear arm race are spurious. Save Egypt and Jordan, all are next door to Iran.  Nuclear weapons have no use in such close quarters.  Egyptians lack food, never mind nuclear arms.

Israel and its partisans, who have successfully purchased much of the US Congress, remain determined to scupper the nuclear deal. There are so many potential slips between cup and lip that reaching an effective, lasting deal will be very difficult. Iran is not wrong to be skeptical.

lundi, 20 avril 2015

L'Iran, un clou dans la chaussure d'Obama?

ir201404.jpg

L'Iran, un clou dans la chaussure d'Obama?

par Jean Paul Baquiast

Ex: http://www.europesolidaire.eu

Il avait été dit, mais nous n'avons pas les moyens de vérifier l'information, que signer un accord nucléaire avec l'Iran, au terme duquel ce pays renoncerait à développer une arme atomique et verrait lever les sanctions économiques contre lui, a été considéré par Barack Obama comme un grand succès personnel.
 
Ainsi pouvait-il justifier le prix Nobel de la Paix qui lui avait été décerné dans un passé déjà lointain. Plus généralement, il pouvait inscrire à son actif, au terme d'une présidence constellée de guerres perdues, d'imbroglios diplomatiques et d'échecs sur le plan intérieur, au moins une promesse tenue.

Malheureusement pour Obama, les choses ne se présentent pas aussi favorablement, concernant l'accord sur le nucléaire. D'abord ledit accord, ou plus exactement le pré-accord dit de Lausanne, est considéré par le fidèle allié Israël comme une défaite majeur infligée par l'ami américain. Benjamin Netanyahu, après l'avoir exposé devant un Congrès américain compréhensif, ne cesse de le répéter. Ce message est relayé aux Etats-Unis comme dans le reste du monde par les différents lobbys juifs, dont l'AIPAC en Amérique. Ils considèrent, à tort ou à raison que l'Iran n'a pas renoncé à la promesse faite il y a quelques années, de « rayer Israël de la carte ». On pourrait cependant penser que l'Etat juif dispose de suffisamment de moyens militaires et de renseignement pour tuer dans l'oeuf un tel projet, si Téhéran faisait la folie d'essayer de le réaliser.

Cependant, en dehors des Israéliens et de leurs amis à Washington, il apparaît qu'une très grande majorité de parlementaires américains, à la Chambre comme au Sénat, se propose de ne pas ratifier le traité avec l'Iran. Leur principal motif n'est pas la sécurité d'Israël, mais le désir de torpiller Obama, qu'ils présentent comme le plus mauvais des présidents américains. Iront-ils jusqu'à refuser le traité, ce qui serait immédiatement considéré comme une sorte de déclaration de guerre par l'Iran? La chose est fort possible. Iront-ils ensuite à pousser le Pentagone à des frappes directes contre les sites nucléaires iraniens, ou plus vraisemblablement inciter Israël à le faire? On en parle, et pas seulement à Téhéran ou Tel-Aviv.

Par précaution, le ministre iranien de la défense envisagerait en conséquence ces temps-ci un possible accord militaire entre l'Iran, la Chine et la Russie, destiné dans un premier temps à contrer le réseau antimissile de l'Otan, mis en place en Europe sous le nom de BMDE, que nous avions abondamment commenté sur ce site. L'Inde pourrait éventuellement s'y joindre ultérieurement Le BMDE est officiellement présenté comme destiné à décourager des frappes balistiques iraniennes, totalement imaginaires à ce jour. En fait, il est destiné à rendre inopérantes, comme nul ne l'ignore, des frappes russes en retour d'une attaque de l'Otan dirigée contre la Russie. Or, en cas de conflit américano-iranien, le BMDE pourrait servir à réaliser des frappes, éventuellement nucléaires, contre l'Iran. Il était donc naturel que l'Iran se tourne vers la Russie pour acquérir des batteries anti-missiles dites S.300. Au delà de cette première défense, il est également naturel que l'Iran cherche à promouvoir une alliance militaire avec la Russie et la Chine, en vue de se défendre contre toute attaque américaine, aujourd'hui ou plus tard.

Il n'est pas possible aujourd'hui de pronostiquer les chances de réalisation d'un tel accord. Mais d'ores et delà, la perspective de celui-ci renforce considérablement le poids de l'Iran, comme grande puissance régionale au Moyen-Orient. Elle pourra ainsi faire avorter les intentions des puissances sunnites alliées des Etats-Unis, dont l'Arabie Saoudite est la plus irresponsable, visant à mener des guerres au Yémen contre les Houthis, alliés de principe de l'Iran, ou contre la Syrie de Bashar al Assad, allié aussi bien de l'Iran que de la Russie.

Concernant la Chine, elle ne pourra que s'intéresser à une alliance stratégique avec l'Iran, incluant la Russie. Ainsi se constituerait un axe favorisant ses grands projets économiques et politiques, par l'intermédiaire d' un pays aux ressources considérables et qui, en tant qu'héritier du grand Empire Perse, ne s'estime pas nécessairement devoir représenter les intérêts des monarchies pétrolières. 

L'Iran, nous demandions-nous, est-elle donc en passe de devenir un clou dans la chaussure d'Obama? C'est à lui en premier lieu qu'il faudrait poser la question.

 

Jean Paul Baquiast

jeudi, 19 mars 2015

Les sanctions unilatérales portent-elles atteinte aux droits de l’homme?

Sanctions-copie-1.jpg

Les sanctions unilatérales portent-elles atteinte aux droits de l’homme?

Le Conseil des droits de l’homme de l’ONU a demandé une étude auprès du Comité consultatif

par Thomas Kaiser

Ex: http://www.horizons-et-debats.ch

Le Comité consultatif du Conseil des droits de l’homme de l’ONU, également appelé «Advisory Board», s’est réuni à Genève entre le 23 et le 27 février. Ce comité consultatif est composé de 18 experts indépendants, élus par le Conseil en respectant la répartition géographique des 47 Etats membres. Le 3 mars, on y a discuté le rapport du groupe de travail ayant examiné la question des mesures coercitives unilatérales et les atteintes aux droits de l’homme. On aborde là une question importante préoccupant depuis longtemps le Conseil des droits de l’homme et les spécialistes du droit international: à quel point des sanctions unilatérales portent-elles atteinte aux droits de l’homme?


Le grand public y est déjà habitué. Lorsqu’un Etat mène une politique déplaisant aux puissants de ce monde, on crée les raisons pour pouvoir imposer – comme allant de soi – des sanctions contre cet Etat. Même au sein de l’UE, on a soumis, en l’an 2000, l’Etat souverain d’Autriche à un régime de sanctions en prétextant des soi-disant déficits démocratiques. Il s’agit souvent de sanctions économiques aux effets catastrophiques. En jetant un regard sur le passé, on constate que ce sont surtout les Etats-Unis et leurs alliés qui imposent des mesures coercitives ou des sanctions unilatérales. Ainsi, Cuba est jusqu’à nos jours victime de mesures coercitives occidentales ayant créé d’énormes dommages économiques. Le Venezuela souffre également de sanctions américaines car il ne se soumet toujours pas au diktat néolibéral des Etats-Unis. D’autres Etats sont aussi victimes de cette politique de force occidentale. Le dernier exemple de mesures coercitives unilatérales sont les sanctions économiques et politiques imposées à la Russie par les Etats-Unis et l’UE, en raison de son prétendu soutien militaire des séparatistes en Ukraine orientale. Aucune preuve concrète n’a été fournie, mais les sanctions ont été appliquées. On contraint les pays membres d’y participer bien que plusieurs des Etats membres, dont la Grèce et l’Autriche, se soient opposés à la prolongation des sanctions.


A la lecture du rapport remis par le groupe de travail demandé par le Comité consultatif, il apparaît clairement que ces sanctions unilatérales arbitraires sont très problématiques du point de vue des droits humains. Ce groupe a analysé la situation dans divers Etats soumis à un régime de sanctions: Cuba, Zimbabwe, Iran et la bande de Gaza. Les effets de ces sanctions sont catastrophiques et représentent clairement une atteinte aux droits de l’homme. Selon le rapport, les conséquences négatives dans les pays sanctionnés se font surtout remarquer au sein de la société civile, parce que ce sont «les plus faibles membres de la société, tels que les femmes, les enfants, les personnes âgées et handicapées et les pauvres» qui sont le plus touchés par les sanctions. Le groupe de travail recommande notamment de nommer un rapporteur spécial pour analyser et documenter les atteintes aux droits de l’homme suite à des mesures coercitives unilatérales.


En lisant ce rapport soigneusement, on peut s’imaginer les conséquences graves engendrées dans les pays concernés et leurs populations.

Cuba

Là, ce sont surtout les femmes et les enfants qui souffrent des sanctions. Le rapport révèle que «l’embargo a abouti à la malnutrition, notamment des enfants et des femmes, à un approvisionnement déficient en eau potable et à un manque de soins médicaux.» En outre, l’embargo «a limité l’accès de l’Etat à des produits chimiques et des pièces de rechange nécessaires à la fourniture d’eau potable» ce qui mène assurément à l’augmentation du taux de maladies et de décès. Etant donné que cet embargo dure depuis plus de 50 ans et n’a toujours pas été levé par le président Obama, on ne peut que deviner les souffrances endurées par le pays.

Zimbabwe

En 2002, l’UE a imposé des sanctions contre le gouvernement du pays. La raison de ces sanctions se trouve dans la réforme agraire effectuée sous la présidence de Robert Mugabe. Selon le rapport, les 13 millions d’habitants de ce pays souffrent des sanctions: «Les taux de pauvreté et de chômage sont très élevés, les infrastructures sont dans un état pitoyable. Des maladies telles que le SIDA, le typhus, le paludisme ont mené à une espérance de vie d’entre 53 et 55 ans […]. Selon une enquête de L’UNICEF, approximativement 35% des enfants en-dessous de 5 ans sont sous-développés, 2% ne grandissent pas normalement et 10% ont un poids insuffisant.» Le mauvais état au sein du pays mène, outre le taux de mortalité élevé, à une forte migration avec de gros risques.

Iran

Selon le rapport, la situation économique du pays et de la population est catastrophique. «Les sanctions ont mené à l’effondrement de l’industrie, à une inflation galopante et à un chômage massif.» Le système de santé publique est aussi gravement atteint en Iran. «Bien que les Etats-Unis et l’UE font valoir que les sanctions ne concernent pas les biens humanitaires, ils ont en réalité gravement entravé la disponibilité et la distribution de matériel médical et de médicaments […], chaque année, 85?000 Iraniens reçoivent le diagnostic d’un cancer. Le nombre d’établissements pouvant traiter ces malades par chimiothérapie ou par radiothérapie est largement insuffisant. Alors que les sanctions financières contre la République islamique d’Iran, ne concernent en principe pas le secteur des médicaments ou des instruments médicaux, elles empêchent en réalité les importateurs iraniens de financer l’importation de ces médicaments ou instruments.» Aucune banque occidentale n’a le droit de faire des affaires avec l’Iran. A travers l’impossibilité de payer les médicaments, produits uniquement en Occident mais nécessaires aux malades, les sanctions concernent donc indirectement aussi le secteur de la santé publique et la population.

Bande de Gaza

Selon le rapport, «le gouvernement israélien traite la bande de Gaza comme un territoire étranger et expose sa population à un grave blocus financier et économique. En juillet et août 2014, lors des combats de 52 jours, les bombes israéliennes ont détruit ou gravement endommagés plus de 53.000 bâtiments. Le blocus permanent viole les droits sociaux, économiques et culturels des habitants souffrant des mesures coercitives unilatérales. La malnutrition, notamment des enfants, n’arrête pas d’augmenter. Des dizaines de milliers de familles vivent dans les ruines de leurs maisons ou dans des containers sans chauffage, mis à disposition par l’administration locale. En décembre 2014, l’Office de secours et de travaux des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés de Palestine dans le Proche-Orient (UNRWA), a rapporté qu’un certain nombre d’enfants âgés de moins de 10 ans étaient morts de froid.» On apprend aussi que divers rapports de l’ONU et d’ONG mettent en garde contre la mauvaise qualité de l’eau potable, menaçant la santé d’un grand nombre de personnes.


Après la présentation du rapport du groupe de travail, les membres du Comité consultatif ont discuté entre eux. Puis le président du Comité a donné la parole aux ambassadeurs présents.
Le représentant diplomatique de Cuba a profité de l’occasion pour attirer l’attention sur le tort qu’exercent les sanctions américaines depuis 50 ans contre son pays. Il a fustigé ces sanctions en tant que violation des droits de l’homme. L’imposition de sanctions constitue un acte arbitraire représentant une ingérence dans les affaires intérieures d’un Etat étranger. Il a précisé qu’il ne voyait pas de changement dans l’attitude des Etats-Unis et a accusé celle-ci d’être une grave violation des droits de l’homme et à la Charte de l’ONU.


Le représentant diplomatique du Venezuela a renchéri en précisant que toute sanction est une ingérence inadmissible dans les affaires intérieures d’un Etat souverain. Le but de cette sanction est de provoquer un «changement de régime». L’ONU, c’est-à-dire le Conseil de sécurité, est la seule entité pouvant prendre des mesures contre un Etat; cela ne peut être en aucun cas un Etat puissant imposant son diktat de l’exercice du doit du plus fort à un certain pays refusant de s’y plier. A son avis, cela constitue clairement une violation des principes de la Charte de l’ONU.


Au cours de la 28e session du Conseil des droits de l’homme, du 2 au 27 mars, ce rapport, demandé en septembre 2013, sera présenté et voté. S’il est accepté, il n’y aura plus d’obstacle à la mise en place d’un rapporteur spécial et à l’établissement de normes internationales dans ce domaine.     •

Source: A/HRC/28/74 Research-based progress report oft the Human Rights Council Advisory Committee containing recommendations on mechanisms to assess the negative impact of unilateral coercive measures on the enjoyment of human rights and to promote accountability

mardi, 17 mars 2015

Une Alliance stratégique Iran/Russie/Egypte est-elle possible?

eg180736346.jpg

Une Alliance stratégique Iran/Russie/Egypte est-elle possible?

Ex: http://nationalemancipe.blogspot.com
 
Les crises régionales ont élargi la convergence politique Téhéran-Moscou, ce qui a amené un pays, comme l'Egypte, à être convergent avec l'Iran et la Russie, au sujet des dossiers régionaux. Le ministre russe de la Défense s'est rendu, du 19 au 21 janvier, à Téhéran, où il a rencontré ses pairs iraniens, et signé avec eux un accord, qui prévoit d'accroître la coopération militaire et défensive entre l'Iran et la Russie.
 
Dans un article, le Centre des études arabes et des recherches politiques a procédé à un décryptage de cette visite, première du genre, depuis 2002. Dans son analyse, ce Centre évoque la signature de cet accord de coopération entre l'Iran et la Russie, dans les domaines de la formation, de l'exécution des manœuvres, et écrit : les médias iraniens et russes ont qualifié cette visite de très importante, dans leurs estimations, et ont souligné que cette visite sera un point de départ, pour la constitution d'une alliance stratégique entre l'Iran et la Russie. Ces médias ont indiqué que Moscou avait signé avec l'Iran le contrat de la vente à Téhéran des missiles S-300, d'avions de combat de type "Soukhoï", "Mig-30", "Soukhoï 24", ainsi que des pièces détachées nécessaires. La récente visite, en Iran, du ministre russe de la Défense semble être considérée comme stratégique, car elle sert les intérêts des deux parties, les deux pays étant exposés aux pressions de l'Occident, l'Iran, pour son programme nucléaire, et la Russie, en raison de la crise d'Ukraine.

 Cependant, certains analystes ne sont pas aussi optimistes, quant à ces accords, et disent qu'ils ne sont pas le signe d'un changement stratégique, dans les relations Téhéran-Moscou, car la Russie n'a rien fait, pour empêcher l'adoption, par l'Occident, des sanctions contre l'Iran, et a, d'ailleurs voté, toutes les résolutions anti-iraniennes, adoptées par le Conseil de Sécurité de l'ONU. La Russie a exprimé son mécontentement des pourparlers Iran/Etats-Unis, à Oman, sans l'invitation faite à ce pays d'y assister. En plus, en 2010, la Russie a refusé d'honorer ses engagements, pour vendre le système de défense anti-aérienne S-300, dans le cadre d'un contrat, signé avec l'Iran, d'un montant de 800 millions de dollars. 
 
La Russie a achevé la centrale atomique de Boushehr, avec un retard de dix ans. De plus, les Russes ne voient pas d'un bon œil le programme nucléaire iranien, et c'est pour cela qu'ils se sont rapprochés, à cet égard, des Occidentaux. A cela, s'ajoute le fait que les Russes sont inquiets de l'accès à un accord entre l'Iran et l'Occident, car un tel accord permettra à l'Occident de s'approvisionner en énergie, auprès de l'Iran, et mettre, ainsi, fin à sa dépendance énergétique vis-à-vis de la Russie. 
 

ruiranic6408977_0.jpg

 
Cela étant dit, il y a de nombreux intérêts communs entre les deux pays, surtout, en ce qui concerne les dossiers régionaux, des intérêts communs, qui l'emportent sur les hésitations, les doutes et les divergences. A ce propos, le Directeur du Centre d'études et d'analyses stratégiques de Russie dit : «A l'instar de la Russie, l'Iran est opposé à la croissance et à la montée en puissance des groupes takfiris extrémistes, au Moyen-Orient. Affectés par la baisse du prix du pétrole, les deux pays réclament la hausse du prix du pétrole. 
En outre, les deux pays se trouvent, dans des positions similaires, dues aux sanctions, appliquées à leur encontre, par l'Occident. L'Iran et la Russie s'accordent, unanimement, à soutenir le gouvernement de Bachar al-Assad, en Syrie, et à freiner la montée en puissance et la croissance des groupes terroristes takfiris et extrémistes, comme «Daesh». Les deux pays sont d'avis que la montée en puissance d'un tel groupe et des groupes similaires, représente un défi important, pour leur politique régionale et internationale, ainsi que pour leurs intérêts nationaux.
 
 Mais cela ne s'arrête pas là. Les deux pays sont parvenus, récemment, à une autre convergence, sur le plan régional, qui est celle liée au dossier du Yémen, à telle enseigne, que Moscou, comme Téhéran, ont annoncé leur soutien au mouvement d'Ansarallah. Moscou est persuadée que le soutien au Mouvement d'Ansarallah fournira à ce pays la possibilité de reprendre ses chaleureuses et amicales relations avec le Yémen, qui marquaient les années de la guerre froide. Mais la raison la plus importante, qui conduit à cette convergence Téhéran/ Moscou, c'est leur position unie, face à l'Arabie Saoudite. Ils veulent mettre sous pression l'Arabie Saoudite, sur le plan régional, notamment, au Yémen. Depuis novembre, l'Arabie a abaissé le prix du pétrole, pour s'aligner sur les Etats-Unis, en vue d'exercer des pressions sur l'Iran et la Russie. En guise de réaction, la Russie a soutenu le Mouvement d'Ansarallah, qui fait partie de l'axe chiite, dans la région. Cet axe est considéré, actuellement, comme le plus important allié de Moscou, dans la région, pour faire face aux pays, tels que l'Arabie saoudite et aux groupes terroristes, comme «Al-Qaïda», en général, dans la région, et, en particulier, au Yémen.
 
 La Russie a tout fait, au Conseil de sécurité de l'ONU, pour l'empêcher de déclarer, comme étant illégaux, les développements, survenus au Yémen, pour justifier, ainsi, le recours à la force, afin de réprimer les révolutionnaires. Parallèlement à l'accroissement de la coordination et de la convergence politique entre l'Iran et la Russie envers des dossiers régionaux, dont le Yémen et la Syrie, le changement de position de l'Egypte envers la crise syrienne a suscité l'étonnement de beaucoup de gens. Cela a montré que le Caire s'inquiète, grandement, de la croissance et de la montée en puissance des groupes et courants salafistes et takfiris extrémistes. D'où sa position convergente avec celle de l'Iran et de la Russie sur la Syrie. Cette convergence politique du Caire avec Téhéran et Moscou ne se borne pas au dossier syrien, car elle s'est élargie aux évolutions yéménites, car l'Egypte ne voit pas dans la montée en puissance d'Ansarallah, au Yémen, une menace contre sa sécurité nationale.

mercredi, 11 mars 2015

Nieuwe Saudische koning probeert moslimcoalitie tegen Iran te vormen

iran_me1.jpg

Nieuwe Saudische koning probeert moslimcoalitie tegen Iran te vormen

Al 10.000 door Iran gecommandeerde troepen op 10 kilometer van grens Israël

Arabische media kiezen kant van Netanyahu tegen Obama

Breuk tussen Israël en VS brengt aanval op Iran dichterbij dan ooit

De sterk in opkomst zijnde Shia-islamitische halve maan zal zich tegen haar natuurlijke ‘berijder’ keren: Saudi Arabië, met in de ster op de kaart het centrum van de islam: Mekka.

De Saudische koning Salman, opvolger van de in januari overleden koning Abdullah, heeft de afgelopen 10 dagen gesprekken gevoerd met de leiders van alle vijf Arabische oliestaten, Jordanië, Egypte en Turkije, over de vorming van een Soenitische moslimcoalitie tegen het Shi’itische Iran. De Saudi’s hebben Iraanse bondgenoten de macht zien overnemen in Irak en Jemen, en weten dat zij zelf het uiteindelijke hoofddoel van de mullahs in Teheran zijn.

Grootste struikelblok voor de gewenste coalitie is de Moslim Broederschap, die gesteund wordt door Turkije en Qatar, maar in Egypte, Jordanië en Saudi Arabië juist als een terreurorganisatie wordt bestempeld. Koning Salman is dermate bevreesd voor een nucleair bewapend Iran, dat hij inmiddels bereid lijkt om ten aanzien van de Broederschap concessies te doen.

Saudi Arabië zal worden vernietigd

In zo’n 2500 jaar oude Bijbelse profetieën wordt voorzegd dat de Perzen (Elam = Iran) uiteindelijke (Saudi) Arabië zullen aanvallen (Jesaja 21). Jordanië (Edom en Moab) zal hoogstwaarschijnlijk ten prooi vallen aan Turkije (Daniël 11:41), dat eveneens Egypte zal aanvallen. Saudi Arabië komt dan alleen te staan en zal totaal worden vernietigd (Jeremia 49:21).

Het land waarin de islam is ontstaan voelt de bui al enige tijd hangen en probeert nu bijna wanhopig ‘het beest’ waar ze eeuwen op gereden heeft, gunstig te stemmen. Turkije zal echter nooit de alliantie met de Moslim Broederschap opgeven, net zoals Egypte nooit de Broederschap zal steunen.

Het beest dat de hoer haat

Enkele jaren geleden schreven we dat Turkije een geheim samenwerkingspact gesloten heeft met Iran. Beide landen hebben historische vendetta’s met de Saudi’s, die de Ottomaanse Turken verrieden met Lawrence van Arabië. Ook de vijandschap tussen het Wahabitische huis van Saud en de Iraanse Shi’iten bestaat al eeuwen.

Bizar: ISIS is oorspronkelijk een ‘uitvinding’ van de Wahabieten en niet de Shi’iten, maar streeft desondanks toch naar het einde van het Saudische koninkrijk. Hetzelfde geldt voor de Moslim Broederschap, Hezbollah en andere islamitische terreurgroepen. Dit is exact zoals de Bijbel het voorzegd heeft: de volken en landen van ‘het beest’ zullen ‘de hoer van Babylon’ haten, zich omkeren en haar verscheuren / met vuur verbranden.

Arabische media kiezen kant van Netanyahu tegen Obama

De Arabieren vallen zelf Israël echter (nog) niet aan omdat de Joodse staat een onverklaarde bondgenoot is tegen Iran. Onlangs zouden de Saudi’s zelfs hun luchtruim hebben opengesteld voor de Israëlische luchtmacht, nadat bekend werd dat de Amerikaanse president Obama vorig jaar dreigde Israëlische vliegtuigen boven Irak neer te schieten toen de regering Netanyahu op het punt stond Iran aan te vallen.

Diverse toonaangevende Arabische media kozen afgelopen week openlijk de kant van de Israëlische premier, nadat hij in diens toespraak voor het Amerikaanse Congres de toenadering van Obama tot Iran impliciet fel bekritiseerd had. Netanyahu’s woorden onderstreepten dat er de facto een breuk tussen Amerika en Israël is ontstaan, die zolang Obama president is niet meer zal worden geheeld. Dit brengt een Israëlische aanval op Iran dichterbij dan ooit tevoren (4).

Het is al jaren bekend dat Obama Netanyahu haat, en andersom is er eveneens sprake van groot wantrouwen en minachting. Net als in Jeruzalem ziet men ook in bijna alle Arabische Golfstaten, maar vooral in Saudi Arabië, Obama liever vandaag dan morgen verdwijnen.

In Iran wordt nog steeds ‘dood aan Amerika’ geschreeuwd

Wrang genoeg voor Washington geldt dat ook voor Iran. ‘Allahu Akbar! Khamenei is de leider. Dood aan de vijanden van de leider. Dood aan Amerika. Dood aan Engeland. Dood aan de hypocrieten. Dood aan Israël!’ schreeuwden Iraanse officieren begin februari toen Khamenei vol trots verklaarde dat Iran uranium tot 20% verrijkt had, terwijl hij Obama uitdrukkelijk had beloofd dit niet te doen.

Deze oorlogskreet wordt al sinds 1979 dagelijks gebezigd in Iran. In dat jaar liet de Amerikaanse president Jimmy Carter toe dat de hervormingsgezinde Shah van Iran werd afgezet door de extremistische Ayatollah Khomeini. Het onmiddellijke gevolg was een bloederige oorlog met Irak, waarbij meer dan één miljoen doden vielen.

Al 10.000 Iraanse troepen bij grens Israël

Zodra het door Turkije en Iran geleide rijk van ‘het beest’ Israël aanvalt, zullen Sheba en Dedan, de Saudi’s en de Golfstaten, enkel toekijken (Ezechiël 38:13). Dat we snel deze laatste fase van de eindtijd naderen blijkt uit het feit dat er op dit moment in Syrië al zo’n 10.000 door Iran gecommandeerde troepen – ‘vrijwilligers’ uit Iran, Irak en Afghanistan- op slechts 10 kilometer van de Israëlische grens staan. Dat zouden er in de toekomst 100.000 of zelfs meer kunnen worden (2)(3).

Het Vaticaan ‘de hoer’ en vervolger van christenen?

Terwijl de Bijbelse eindtijdprofetieën overduidelijk voor onze eigen ogen in vervulling gaan zijn veel Westerse christenen hier nog steeds blind voor, omdat hen geleerd is dat ‘de hoer’ het Vaticaan is, en de ‘valse profeet’ een toekomstige paus is die de grote wereldreligies met elkaar zal verenigen, daar het evangelie voor zal opofferen en katholieken en andere christenen (!) zal laten onthoofden omdat ze dit zullen weigeren.

Als ‘de hoer’ het Vaticaan is, dan zou dat echter betekenen dat de katholieke/ christelijke landen waar zij op ‘zit’ haar zullen aanvallen en verbranden. Denken mensen nog steeds serieus dat andere landen in Europa Rome zullen aanvallen, terwijl moslim terreurgroepen zoals ISIS regelmatig openlijk dreigen om in de nabije toekomst Italië binnen te vallen en het Vaticaan te vernietigen? Terwijl christenen in Irak, Egypte, Syrië, Nigeria en andere moslimlanden nu al worden vermoord en onthoofd vanwege hun geloof en omdat weigeren zich te bekeren tot de islam (= het beest te aanbidden)?

Moderne ‘Torens van Babel’ in Mekka

In eerdere artikelenstudies (zie hyperlinks onderaan) voerden we uitgebreid Bijbels bewijs aan –en geen giswerk theorieën- dat ‘de hoer van Babylon’, ‘dronken van het bloed der heiligen en van het bloed der getuigen van Jezus’ zich precies daar bevindt waar Johannes haar zag: in ‘de woestijn’ (Openbaring 17:3). Alleen al hierom kan het nooit om Rome, New York of Brussel gaan. De 7 gigantische torens bij het Ka’aba complex in Mekka –het grootste ter wereld- worden plaatselijk zelfs letterlijk ‘De berg Babel’ genoemd.

Eindtijd: Niet Europa of Amerika, maar Israël centraal

Niet Europa, niet Amerika en ook niet Rusland staan centraal in de Bijbelse eindtijdprofetieën van zowel het Oude als het Nieuwe Testament –al spelen zij natuurlijk wel een rol-, maar het Midden Oosten, Israël en de omringende moslimwereld. Pas als de coalitie van het (moslim)beest Israël aanvalt –bedenk dat de islam zichzelf omschrijft als ‘het beest uit de afgrond’!- met de bedoeling de Joodse staat weg te vagen en de laatste resten van het christendom in het Midden Oosten uit te roeien, zal de Messias, Jezus Christus, in eigen persoon neerdalen, tussenbeide komen en alle vijanden vernietigend verslaan.

Xander

(1) Reuters via Shoebat
(2) American Thinker
(3) The Christian Monitor
(4) KOPP

mercredi, 04 mars 2015

Today's news on http://www.atimes.com

news2.jpg

Today's news on http://www.atimes.com

To read full article, click on title


Tackling Tehran: Netanyahu vs Obama
As negotiations over Iran's nuclear program continued in Europe, Israeli Premier Netanyahu told US Congress he feared the White House was close to striking a "very bad" deal. The absence of dozens of Democrats and the cheers that greeted his warnings of a "nuclear tinderbox" demonstrated the divisive nature of the issue in Washington. - James Reinl (Mar 4, '15)

Obama's nuclear squeeze
Netanyahu's address to the US Congress will have no effect on the future modalities of US-Iran nuclear negotiations. But if he can nudge Congress not to relax sanctions on Iran, even after a nuclear deal, then Tehran might retaliate by reversing some agreed upon issues of those intricate negotiations. - Ehsan Ahrari (Mar 4, '15)

Iran squashes IS, US seeks cover
An operation by Iraqi government forces to recapture Tikrit, north of Baghdad, from Islamic State militants, has resulted in fierce fighting around the town, seen as the spiritual heartland of Saddam Hussein's Ba'athist regime. This hugely important development has three dimensions. - M K Bhadrakumar (Mar 4,'15)

Israeli ex-generals condemn Netanyahu
In an unprecedented move, 200 veterans of the Israeli security services have accused Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of being a “danger” to Israel, their protest coming on the even of his visit to address a joint meeting of the US Congress against the wishes of the White House. - Jonathan Cook (Mar 2, '15)


The Middle East and perpetual war
There is a popular idea in Washington, DC, that the United States ought to be doing more to quash the Islamic State: if we don't, they will send terrorists to plague our lives. Previously, the canard was that we had to intervene in the Middle East to protect the flow of oil to the West. So why in fact are we there? The only answer is: "Israel". - Leon Anderson (Mar 2, '15)



A Chechen role in Nemtsov murder?
For many in Russia and the West, the Kremlin is inevitably the prime suspect in the assassination of opposition leader Boris Nemtsov. But the possibility of a Chechen connection should not be dismissed out of hand, given Nemtsov's repeated criticism of Chechen Republic head Ramzan Kadyrov. (Mar 4, '15)

Obama, Shell, and the Arctic Ocean's fate
Despite the glut of new American oil on the market (and falling oil prices), not to mention a recent bow to preservation of the Arctic, the Obama administration stands at the edge of once again green-lighting a foray by oil giant Shell into Arctic waters. - Subhankar Banerjee (Mar 4, '15)


Germany's future lies East
Germany, sooner or later, must answer a categorical imperative - how to keep running massive trade surpluses while dumping its euro trade partners. The only possible answer is more trade with Russia, China and East Asia. It will take quite a while, but a Berlin-Moscow-Beijing commercial axis is all but inevitable. - Pepe Escobar (Mar 3, '15)

 

Sven Hedin's journeys in Iran

Sven-Hedinqqqza.jpg

Sven Hedin's journeys in Iran

Ex: http://svenhedin.com

Sven Hedin is Sweden’s greatest explorer and adventurer of all time. He was born in Stockholm 1865 and decided to follow this path in his early teens. The first step in his career came when he in 1885, as a 20-year-old, had the opportunity to travel to Baku, Azerbaijan, to work as a private tutor for the son of a Swedish engineer in the Nobel-owned oil industry. When Hedin had fulfilled his duties as a tutor, he set out on a three month journey through Persia – today’s Iran (Hedin 1887). This was the beginning of a lifelong love affair with Iran’s rich nature, history and culture and he was to return twice (Wahlquist 2007).

svenhedinuuuu.jpgHedin’s (1891) second visit to Iran was as a member of the Swedish King Oscar II’s diplomatic mission to the Persian king Nasr-ed-din Shah in 1890. After the formal assignment Hedin followed the Shah to the Elburz Mountains and made a successful attempt to ascend Mount Damāvand – a snow capped volcano reaching 5,671 meters above sea level and also the highest mountain in the Middle East. This achievement constituted the basis for Hedin’s (1892a) doctoral dissertation two years later. Before returning to Sweden Hedin set off on a reconnaissance trip from Tehran towards Central Asia that took him all the way to Kashgar in westernmost China. Along this route he got a first glimpse of Iran’s central salt desert, the Dasht-e Kavir (Hedin 1892b). The following decade Hedin conducted two extended scientific expeditions focusing on the deserts of Xinjiang and the high plateau of Tibet.

Hedin’s (1910) third expedition, 1905-1908, had like the previous two, the Tibetan plateau as primary goal, but he decided to take an approach route through the deserts of eastern Persia – overland to India. This resulted in a two volume scientific work with a detailed series of maps of Iran based on his 232 sheets of original map sketches (Hedin 1918). Hedin was interested in long term environmental changes and on the Tibetan plateau he had found how lakes dry up, lose their outlets and become salty. The vast deserts and drainage-less basins of Iran provided him with an area for comparative research (Wahlquist 2007). Hedin was a relentless field researcher and recorded all information he could get in the form of diaries, photographs, drawings and water colors. He developed a method of capturing the landscape by making panorama drawings at all his camps that were incredibly accurate (Dahlgren, Rosén, and W:son Ahlmann 1918).

The main objective for our expedition in April-May 2013 was to follow Hedin’s 1906 route through the deserts of eastern Persia and follow up on his geographic and ethnographic observations, with the purpose of revealing changes that have taken place during the last century. In particular this would be done by locating Hedin’s historical camera positions and make repeated photographs that exactly match the originals. A second objective was to repeat Hedin’s most spectacular adventures in Iran – the crossing of Iran’s central salt desert and his ascent of Mount Damāvand in 1890.

For anyone interested in further readings about Sven Hedin’s journey’s through Persia, the works referenced in this article and listed below are the most important sources.

References

Dahlgren, Erik W., Karl D. P. Rosén, and Hans W:son Ahlmann. 1918. “Sven Hedins Forskningar I Södra Tibet 1906-1908: En Granskande Öfversikt.” In Ymer, 38:101–186. Stockholm, Sweden: Svenska sällskapet för antropologi och geografi.

Hedin, Sven. 1887. Genom Persien, Mesopotamien Och Kaukasien: Reseminnen. Stockholm, Sweden: Albert Bonniers.
———. 1891. Konung Oscars Beskickning till Schahen Af Persien. Stockholm: Samson & Wallin.
———. 1892a. “Der Demavend, Nach Eigener Beobachtung”. Inaugural dissertation, Halle, Germany: University of Halle.
———. 1892b. Genom Khorasan Och Turkestan. 2 vols. Stockholm, Sweden: Samson & Wallin.
———. 1910. Öfver Land till Indien: Genom Persien, Seistan Och Belutjistan. 2 vols. Stockholm, Sweden: Albert Bonniers.
———. 1918. Eine Routenaufnahme durch Ostpersien. 2 vols. Stockholm, Sweden: Generalstabens litografiska anstalt.

Wahlquist, Håkan. 2007. From Damavand to Kevir: Sven Hedin and Iran 1886-1906. Tehran, Iran: Embassy of Sweden.

00:05 Publié dans Eurasisme | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0) | Tags : sven hedin, iran, explorateurs, asie, eurasie, eurasisme, suède | |  del.icio.us | | Digg! Digg |  Facebook

mardi, 03 février 2015

Iranian Intervention in Iraq against the Islamic State

Members-of-Irans-revoluti-012.jpg

Iranian Intervention in Iraq against the Islamic State: Strategy, Tactics and Impact

Publication: Terrorism Monitor

By: Nima Adelkhah

The Jamestown Foundation & http://www.moderntokyotimes.com

A deliberately gory June 2014 report on the Shi’a Ahl al-Bayt website, no doubt intended to arouse emotions, shows a photo of the bloodied face of Alireza Moshajari. It describes him as the first of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) to have become a “martyr” in defense of the sacred shrine of Karbala against the then Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, now the Islamic State. Karbala, one of the most important Shi’a holy sites, is the battlefield where Hussein, the grandson of the Prophet, fought and died a martyr’s death (Ahl al-Bayat, June 16, 2014). The site also shows other photos of Moshajari posing for a camera in a western Iranian province, apparently preparing to depart for Iraq.

A month later, in July 2014, reports of the death of another member of the IRGC, Kamal Shirkhani in Samarra, further indicated an Iranian troop presence deep inside in Iraq (Basijpress, July 8, 2014). More significant, however, was the December 2014 news of the death of Iranian Brigadier General Hamid Taqavi, while he was on an “advisory” mission in Iraq (Mehr News, December 29, 2014; Fars News, December 29, 2014). He was the highest-ranking Iranian officer to be killed in Iraq since the 1980-1988 war. Taqavi had reportedly been assassinated by the Islamic State in Samarra (Fars News, January 5).

While Iran has continuously and publicly denied having a formal troop presence in Iraq, with IRGC officials saying that Iran has no need to have an army in its neighboring country, the evidence suggests a growing trend of Iranian military activities in certain regions of Iraq deemed critical to Tehran and are related to Iran’s efforts to contain the Islamic State (Fars News, September 22, 2014). However, this trend, which apparently has been growing since summer 2014, is less about expanding Iran’s power and is more a defensive strategic attempt to prevent the Islamic State from undermining two of Iran’s two core interests in Iraq: the security of its borders and the protection of Shi’a shrines there. Unlike Iran’s strategy in Syria, which is primarily about preserving the Assad regime even at the expense of fostering sectarianism, Tehran is keen to prevent its Shi’a-dominated neighbor from developing a sectarian mindset that could potentially have wider negative implications for Iran in the region.

Iran’s Islamic State Problem

As a militant organization emerging from the Syrian civil war, but whose core originates in the earlier anti-U.S. insurgency in Iraq, the Islamic State has not only forcefully established a military presence in regions of Iraq and Syria, but has done so as an intensely sectarian force. Driven by its view that Shi’as are infidels, the Islamic State’s military expansion in Syria, which spilled over into Iraq in summer 2014, has exacerbated tit-for-tat sectarian conflicts in both countries which have increasingly worried the Islamic Republic, the world’s largest Shi’a state.

Iran’s concern over the Islamic State is fourfold:

  1. Firstly, the military onslaught by the forces of the self-declared Sunni caliphate has, at times, posed an immediate threat to Iran’s west central provinces bordering Iraq, such as Ilam and Kermanshah. Though Iranian officials publically claim that the Islamic State does not have the capacity to attack Iran, there has been clear concern about the militants’ takeover of relatively nearby Iraqi cities such as Hawija and Mosul (Tabnak, July 2, 2014). The Islamic State’s further rapid take-over of Khanaqin, eastern Diyala and areas near the Iranian border in early summer 2014 underlined the threat to Iran’s borders (Shafaq, October 8, 2014). Such developments have triggered an outbreak of conspiracy theories in Iran. For instance, one cleric argued that the Islamic State originally wanted to attack Iran instead of Syria, as part of a larger Western conspiracy against the Islamic Republic (Sepaheqom, December 31, 2014). Such conspiratorial views echo a belief by many Iranian officials that the Islamic State is a U.S. creation and that its aim is to sow discord and conflict in a region where Iran claims dominance.
  2. The second Iranian concern is also connected with border security, this time in the form of Iranian fears of a refugee crisis arising from Islamic State attacks (Khabar Online, June 15, 2014). The refugee wave from Islamic State-affected areas of Iraq, similar to that which Iran saw from Afghanistan in the 1980s, is seen by Iran as posing significant security threat to the region and an economic burden to its economy, which is already struggling under U.S.-led sanctions (al-Arabiya, October 28, 2014).
  3. Iran’s third concern is over growing sympathies among Iran’s Sunni minority for Sunni sectarian groups such as the Islamic State. Fears of Islamic State influence in southeastern regions and northwestern Kurdistan, which have large Sunni populations, continue to pose a major problem for the Islamic Republic (Terrorism Monitor, December 13, 2013). In particular, there are fears that political-military movements such as Ahle Sunnat-e Iran (a.k.a. Jaysh al-Adl, Army of Justice), an offshoot of the Jundallah (Soldiers of God) militant group, may be inspired by the Islamic State or even that such groups may collaborate with the group to conduct insurgency operations inside Iran (Mehr News, August 15, 2014).
  4. The fourth reason for Iran’s concern is the religious dimension, perhaps the most significant to many Iranian government and military operatives. Iraq is home to a number of key Shi’a shrines, and Samarra – home to one of the most important such shrines – is on the frontline of the ongoing struggle against the Islamic State. Located 80 miles away from Baghdad and a short distance south of Tikrit, a Sunni Iraqi stronghold where there is some sympathy for the Islamic State, Samarra is where Iranian forces have mostly concentrated, due to the religious importance of the shrine and its vulnerability to Sunni militants. Apparently working under the assumption that United States’s objectives against the Islamic State are only to protect the Kurds, a primary mission of Iranian forces is to protect Samarra’s al-Askar shrine, whose dome had been previously destroyed by Salafist militants in February 2006.

It is, therefore, no coincidence that most announcements of Iranian deaths in Iraq have related to Samarra and that such announcements also deliberately emphasize the religious angle. For example, public announcements of the death of Mehdi Noruzi, a member of Iran’s Basij militia who was apparently nicknamed “Lion of Samarra” and was killed by the Islamic State in that city, highlighted the religious dimension of the conflict in order to arouse religious fervor and, hence, public support (Fars News, January 12; al-Arabiya, January 12). A further example is that all the 29 Iranian deaths reported in December 2014 most likely took place in and around Samarra, as with the death of an Iranian military pilot, Colonel Shoja’at Alamdari Mourjani, who likely died on the ground in the vicinity of the city (al-Jazeera, July 5, 2014). Underlining the importance of Samarra and other shrines to Iran, a June 2014 statement by Qom-based Grand Ayatollah Naser Makarem Shirazi called for jihad against the takfiri (apostate) Islamic State in defense of Iraq and Shi’a shrines. This was partly meant as a religious decree intended to swiftly mobilize support for countering the Islamic State onslaught. His fatwa can also be seen as a move, most likely backed by Tehran, intended to help the government recruit volunteers to fight in Iraq.

Military Intervention

While the U.S.-led air-campaign has curtailed the Islamic State’s progress since August, Iranian forces on the ground have also played a critical role in limiting its advance into northeast and southcentral Iraq. Iran’s support for Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga forces, as well as for Iraq’s army and militia forces, has also played a key role.

As illustrated by the recent death of Brigadier General Hamid Taqavi, the Iranian military mission includes high-ranking members, including General Qasem Soleimani, the commander of Iran’s special operations Quds Force. Iranian military activities in Iraq appear to largely concentrate along the Iraq-Iran border and in key Shi’a shrine cities, most importantly Samarra, for the reasons stated above. Meanwhile, ten divisions of Iran’s regular army are reportedly stationed along the Iraqi borders, ready for military confrontation (Gulf News, June 26, 2014).

In the conflict against the Islamic State, the Quds Force paramilitary operatives play an integral role, notably in training and commanding Iraqi forces, especially Sadrist and other militia groups such as Kataib al-Imam Ali (al-Arabiya, January 9). Typically, this has involved recruiting and training Shi’a Iraqi volunteers in camps in various Iraqi provinces, including Baghdad (ABNA 24, June 16, 2014). Quds officers have also reportedly been directly active in key hubs of the conflict, such as the siege of Amerli in northern Iraq, where Kurdish and Shi’a militia forces eventually defeated the Islamic State, with the input of Soleimani, in September 2014 (al-Jazeera, September 1, 2014; Gulf News, October 6, 2014).

The Lebanese Hezbollah group also plays a role in both training volunteers and conducting military operations in key battles against the Islamic State, as in the October 2014 attack on Islamic State positions in Jurf al-Sakhr, southwest of Baghdad, which reportedly involved 7,000 Iraqi troops, including militiamen (Al-Monitor, November 6, 2014; al-Arabiya, November 5, 2014). Meanwhile, the role of established Shi’a Iraqi militias such as the Badr Organization, led by Hadi al-Amiri, appears to be to support Iran’s training of volunteers, though the Badr force has also participated directly in joint military operations against the Islamic State (Al-Monitor, November 28, 2014). In an unprecedented way, therefore, Iran is currently uniting Shi’a militias to fight a common, perhaps existential enemy of Shi’as: Sunni radicalism.

Iranian deployment of ground troops, however, has been only one part of its broader military operation in Iraq. Alongside military operations, Iran has also shared intelligence with Kurdish and Iraqi forces, and allegedly installed intelligence units at various airfields to intercept the Islamic State communications (al-Jazeera, January 3). There are also reports of Iran sending domestically-built Adabil drones to Iraq to help the government against the Islamic State, highlighting Iran’s growing unmanned aerial surveillance capability (Gulf News, June 26, 2014). Such intelligence sharing and military coordination against the Islamic State is likely to be most significant in eastern Iraq, in areas closest to Iran (al-Jazeera, December 3, 2014; al-Arabiya, January 16). Thanks to agreements signed between Iran and Iraq in late November 2013, the dispatch of weapons to Iraq has likely considerably increased since summer 2014 (al-Jazeera, February 24, 2014; Press TV, June 26, 2014).

 

politique internationale,géopolitique,iran,eiil,hezbollah,isis,levant,syrie,irak,chiites,chiisme

 

A Strategic Outline: National and Regional Impact

In an October 12 interview, Brigadier Yadollah Javani, the head of the IRGC’s political bureau argued that the Islamic State had failed to capture Baghdad because of Iran’s military support for the Iraqi government (Iranian Students News Agency, October 12, 2014). This may be true on a tactical level, but in a longer-term strategic sense Tehran’s effort in Iraq may yet lead to unintended consequences that could yet threaten its wider interests in the region.

The most significant impact of Iran’s interference in Iraq is likely to be sectarian. Iran, of course, is aware of the potentially radicalizing impact of its operations among Sunnis and the main reason it keep its military operations low profile is to avoid inflaming such sectarian tensions (al-Jazeera, July 5, 2014). However, Tehran’s efforts have not been entirely effective. Anti-Iranian views in the (Sunni) Arab media are widespread, and these primarily describe Iran’s intervention in Iraq as part of a sinister, broader strategy (al-Sharq al-Awsat, January 13). Meanwhile, in Iraq itself, despite Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi’s efforts to bring Sunni Arabs into the government, not only in the provinces but also in Baghdad, the outcome of this process remains to be seen. For the most part, Sunni Arabs still feel marginalized and the potential for them to support the Islamic State remains high (al-Jazeera, January 3). Iran is likely to fear that such Sunni resentment may further encourage Saudi Arabia to involve itself in Iraq as a way to curtail Iran’s growing influence there.

Often overlooked, there is also the intra-Shi’a impact of Iran’s involvement, which Tehran appears understandably keen to downplay. Various Shi’a groups and figures continue to compete for influence in southern Iraq, with the interests of non-Iranian Shi’as being best represented by Najaf-based Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani. Sistani, the highest-ranking cleric in the Shi’a world and weary of repeated Iranian involvement in Iraq since 2003, has distanced himself from Soleimani and Iran’s military presence in Iraq. In fact, Sistani’s representative has argued that the cleric’s important summer 2014 fatwa calling for volunteers to resist the Islamic State was meant for Iraqis and not for Iranian Shi’as (Al-Monitor, December 2, 2014). How Sistani will respond to a continued Iranian presence in Iraq and in key shrine cities, especially after the Islamic State threat eventually wanes, remains to be seen. While it is likely that Sistani will continue to encourage some pragmatic cooperation with Tehran against the Islamic State, he will not accept a prolonged Iranian military presence in Iraq. This underlines that while the long-term implications of Iranian intervention in Iraq are unclear, for now at least Iran’s military intervention in Iraq has effectively united Shi’as against the Islamic State.

Nima Adelkhah is an independent analyst based in New York. His current research agenda includes the Middle East, military strategy and technology, and nuclear proliferation among other defense and security issues.

Files: TerrorismMonitorVol13Issue2_03.pdf

http://www.jamestown.org/single/?tx_ttnews%5Btt_news%5D=43442&tx_ttnews%5BbackPid%5D=7&cHash=1be59fb552739f9274873ae03b834d14#.VMkeGMb6nLU

The Jamestown Foundation kindly allows Modern Tokyo Times to publish their highly esteemed articles. Please follow and check The Jamestown Foundation website at http://www.jamestown.org/

https://twitter.com/JamestownTweets The Jamestown Foundation

mercredi, 31 décembre 2014

L’Iran, il y a cinquante ans

iran_shah.png

Erich Körner-Lakatos :

L’Iran, il y a cinquante ans

Le 5 octobre 1964, six chefs de tribu sont exécutés dans la ville iranienne de Shiraz parce qu’ils ont saboté la réforme agraire de l’Empereur Mohammed Reza Pahlevi qui, à partir du 15 septembre 1965 portera le titre d’Aryamehr, de « Soleil des Aryens ». Cette réforme agraire, appelée « révolution blanche », consiste à déposséder largement les latifundistes iraniens qui, dorénavant, ne pourront plus considérer comme leur plus d’un seul village. Les possessions féodales seront redistribuées aux paysans qui travaillent véritablement la terre. Le processus enclenché par la « révolution blanche » fait qu’à la fin de l’été 1964, 9570 villages ont été redistribués à 333.186 familles paysannes, ce qui équivaut à une population de 1.665.930 âmes. Le Shah a ainsi éliminé la caste entière des latifundistes. C’est là un événement qui laisse tous les penseurs marxistes perplexes qui véhiculent l’idée (fausse) que les grands propriétaires exploiteurs étaient le soutien de la monarchie iranienne. Le Shah de la dynastie Pahlevi était très populaire auprès du petit paysannat. Les mollahs chiites partisans de Khomeini, eux, haïssent le monarque, parce que leur influence est liée à celle des latifundistes évincés. Khomeini présentera la note au régime monarchique en 1979 et chassera le Shah et sa famille. Un an plus tard, le Roi des rois s’éteint en exil.

(article paru dans « zur Zeit », Vienne, n°45/2014 ; http://www.zurzeit.at ).

00:05 Publié dans Histoire | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0) | Tags : années 60, histoire, iran, shah d'iran, moyen orient | |  del.icio.us | | Digg! Digg |  Facebook

mercredi, 24 décembre 2014

Deutsche Geheimmission in Persien

image-778450-galleryV9-zule.jpg

Deutsche Geheimmission in Persien
 
Hauptmann Kleins Heiliger Krieg
  

Er hetzte zum Dschihad auf und ließ Ölpipelines sprengen: Hauptmann Fritz Klein führte im Orient einen Guerillakrieg gegen die Feinde des Kaiserreichs. Ein Historiker hat bislang unbekannte Dokumente des vergessenen Offiziers ausgewertet.

Von

Ex: http://www.spiegel.de

Die vier deutschen Soldaten waren verloren, Tausende Kilometer von der Heimat entfernt. Die Stadt Amara im heutigen Irak, umschlossen vom mächtigen Tigris und einem Überschwemmungsgebiet, wurde zur "Mausefalle", wie Anführer Hans Lührs es nannte. Die wichtigste Brücke war zerstört und aus der Ferne rückte schon der Feind an.

"Das Artilleriefeuer der Engländer kam immer näher", schreibt Lührs später. "Wir sahen in einer Flussbiegung bereits die Rauchfahnen der feindlichen Schiffe." Eine Granate schlug neben ihm ein, sein Hengst bäumte sich auf und galoppierte davon.

Fernab der Schlachtfelder in Europa lieferten sich die Kontrahenten des Ersten Weltkriegs auch im Orient einen unbarmherzigen Stellvertreterkrieg. Die Taktik auf beiden Seiten war ähnlich: neue Verbündete finden, Aufstände in gegnerischen Einflussgebieten anzetteln, feindliche Kräfte an der Kriegsperipherie binden.

Schulversager, Sitzenbleiber, Weltenbummler

Die Briten hatten für solche Aktionen Lawrence von Arabien. Der legendäre Archäologe und Geheimagent wiegelte die Araber gegen das wankende Osmanische Reich auf, den Bündnispartner des Kaiserreichs. Und die Deutschen? Nun, sie hatten - Hauptmann Fritz Klein aus dem westfälischen Siegerland.

"Klein von Arabien" hat den Mann glücklicherweise nie jemand genannt; es würde wohl auch lächerlich klingen. Aber: Kleins Männer haben ihre Aufgabe später zu Recht mit der von Lawrence von Arabien verglichen, und womöglich könnte ihre völlig unbekannte Mission nun etwas bekannter werden: Der Historiker Veit Veltzke hat eine Studie ("Unter Wüstensöhnen", Nicolai-Verlag) über die vergessene Orientmission geschrieben. Veltzke konnte dabei auf einen wahren Quellenschatz zurückgreifen: Der 95-jährige Sohn Fritz Kleins hatte dem Historiker den Nachlass seines Vaters übergeben - neben Aufzeichnungen auch rund 500 Fotos.

Veitzke spürte weitere Quellen auf, darunter das Kriegstagebuch der Expedition im Archiv des Auswärtigen Amtes. Am Ende stand für ihn fest: Fritz Kleins Mission war nicht nur die "vielseitigste" deutsche Orientexpedition - sondern auch die "mit dem greifbarsten Erfolg". Sie sei auch deshalb vergleichsweise erfolgreich gewesen, weil sich der eigensinnige Hauptmann nur bedingt an die Order seiner Vorgesetzten hielt.

"Schlag ins Herz der britischen Admiralität"

Klein träumte von einer engen deutsch-persischen Achse, die - und das war neu - möglichst unabhängig vom Einfluss des Osmanischen Reiches sein sollte. Konstantinopel verfolgte eigene imperialistische Ziele in der Region, die Klein ziemlich undiplomatisch als "geradezu blödsinnige Eroberungsgelüste" geißelte, weil sie jedes deutsch-persische Bündnis gefährden würden. Klein hingegen sah in Persien langfristig "ungeheure Kultur- und Wirtschaftsperspektiven" für das Kaiserreich.

Der Mann, der die Bevölkerung im heutigen Iran und Irak gegen die dort einflussreichen Briten und Russen aufwiegeln wollte, hatte schon als Kind seinen eigenen Kopf. Die Schulzeit war für ihn ein einziger "Bildungswahnsinn", angelerntes Wissen empfand er als "Ballast". Stattdessen habe er sich stets von seinem Menschenverstand und einem "unbezähmbaren Freiheitsdrang" treiben lassen - und fuhr damit erstaunlich gut: Klein reiste um die Welt, ging zur Armee und arbeitete ab 1911 für jeweils ein Jahr als Militärattaché in Rio de Janeiro, Kairo und Teheran.

Seine Erfahrungen dort halfen ihm, als das Auswärtige Amt nach dem Kriegsausbruch nach Personal für Geheimaufträge im Orient suchte. Klein brachte sich selbst ins Gespräch und wurde Ende 1914 zum Leiter eines verwegenen Kommandos: Die Deutschen sollten mithilfe arabischer Stämme die Ölpipelines der Briten am Persischen Golf sprengen - und damit die Treibstoff-Nachfuhr für die Marine kappen. Die Aktion sollte, so hoffte der Generalstab, "ein Schlag ins Herz der britischen Admiralität" werden.

So ungewöhnlich wie die Mission war auch ihre Zusammensetzung: Klein vertraute einer bunten Truppe von sprachgewandten Abenteurern, Archäologen, Kaufleuten und Ingenieuren. Zu seinem wichtigsten Mitarbeiter ernannte er Edgar Stern, den späteren Ullstein-Chefredakteur. 69 Männer machten den Kern seiner Expedition aus, zeitweise kamen noch 306 österreichisch-ungarische Soldaten hinzu, die aus russischer Gefangenschaft entflohen waren. Unterstellt waren sie der türkischen Armee, die damals von Bagdad aus Teile des heutigen Irak kontrollierte, allerdings schon von Briten und Russen bedrängt wurde.

Klein wollte in der Ferne mehr als nur Ölleitungen zerstören. Er improvisierte, sobald er ein Problem sah. Als der türkischen Flotte auf Euphrat und Tigris die Kohle ausging, fahndeten seine Männer nach neuen Kohlevorkommen. Geleitet wurde die hastig errichtete Mine von einem österreichischen Schlosser, die Logistik besorgte mit 1000 Kamelen ein deutscher Oberkellner. Kleins Ingenieure konstruierten auch lenkbare Flussminen und versuchten, wenig erfolgreich, ein Mittel gegen Heuschreckenplagen zu finden.

Vor allem aber hoffte Klein, "den Heiligen Krieg auch nach Persien hineinzutragen". Zwar hatte das sunnitische Osmanische Reich 1914 schon zum Dschihad gegen seine Feinde aufgerufen - aber was war mit den schiitischen Muslimen? Um auch sie für ein Bündnis mit dem Kaiserreich zu gewinnen, besuchte Klein 1915 - ohne Rücksprache mit der Botschaft in Konstantinopel - die schiitischen Glaubensführer in den heiligen Stätten von Nadschaf und Kerbela.

320 Millionen Liter Öl - verloren

"Unterwegs erkrankt [der Arzt] Dr. Schacht schwer, wird ohnmächtig, bekommt Darmblutungen", notierte Klein am 24. Januar 1915 über die beschwerliche Anreise nach Kerbala. "Eine Stunde vor K. empfangen uns zwei intelligent und vornehm aussehende Perser, um uns das Geleit zu geben. Der eine ist Sohn des Scheichs Mudschtahids Ali."

Scheich Ali bewirtete die Deutschen fürstlich mit "Hunderten von Schüsseln mit den verschiedensten orientalischen Sachen", wie der Hauptmann staunend festhielt. Nach zähen Verhandlungen sollte Klein schließlich sein Ziel erreichen: Im Februar 1915 riefen führende schiitische Geistliche, ermuntert auch durch 50.000 Reichsmark, zum Heiligen Krieg gegen die Feinde Deutschlands auf.

Obwohl sich der Hauptmann mit diesem Alleingang unbeliebt machte und zeitweise kaltgestellt wurde, gelang ihm wenige Wochen später sein größter Coup: Begleitet von türkischen Truppen sprengte ein Spezialkommando unter der Leitung von Hans Lührs am 22. März bei Ahvaz im heutigen Iran die britische Ölpipeline. Einem verbündeten arabischen Stamm gelangen in den folgenden Wochen weitere Anschläge auf die insgesamt 350 Kilometer lange Pipeline. Anhand des Jahresberichts der Anglo-Persian Oil Company schätzte der deutsche Generalstab den Gesamtverlust auf etwa 320 Millionen Liter Öl.

Eiternde Brandwunden

Ein Teil der Saboteure gerieten bald in die Defensive. Die Briten drängten die Türken aus der Region Ahvaz zurück, und ihre Kanonenboote eroberten Mitte 1915 die weiter westlich gelegene Stadt Amara, in die sich Lührs zurückgezogen hatte.

Auf der Flucht überquerte er mit seinen Kameraden Müller, Back und Schadow den reißenden Tigris. Eines ihrer Pferde ertrank. Verkleidet als Araber versuchten die Deutschen sich nun entlang des Flusses nach Norden durchzuschlagen. Die britischen Späher konnten sie täuschen, aber dann wurden sie von arabischen Banditen ausgeraubt. Einmal. Zweimal. Immer wieder. Erst verloren sie die Pferde, dann Uhren, Schuhe, Wäsche.

Nur mit Fetzen bekleidet taumelten die Männer barfuß über den heißen Lehmboden und bettelten um Brot, oft vergebens. Gegen die brüllende Hitze legten sie sich Tamariskenzweige auf den Kopf, die aber Unmengen von Moskitos und Sandmücken anzogen. "Auf unseren Schultern, Armen und Schenkeln bildeten sich große eiternde Brandwunden", erinnert sich Lührs. Sein Kamerad Schadow fiel immer wieder in Ohnmacht.

Ein "scheinheiliger Krieg"

Vielleicht ist es das größte Wunder der Mission Klein, dass Lührs und seine Männer ihre Odyssee überlebten. Nach mehr als hundert Kilometern Marsch erreichten sie bei Al-Gharbi mithilfe eines deutschfreundlichen Arabers eine türkische Einheit.

Klein selbst widmete sich nach dem Krieg der Philosophie. Den Heiligen Krieg, den er einst entflammen wollte, empfand er nun als "scheinheilig"; ebenso harsch kritisierte er jeglichen Imperialismus, den er früher mitgetragen hatte. In einem aber blieb er sich treu: Persien war zeitlebens das Land seiner Träume.

Anzeige
  • Veit Veltzke:
    Unter Wüstensöhnen

    Die deutsche Expedition Klein im Ersten Weltkrieg

    Nicolaische Verlagsbuchhandlung; 400 Seiten; 34,95 Euro.

lundi, 15 décembre 2014

Teología y geopolítica. La tentación de la serpiente

Ormuz-source-de-tension-entre-l-Iran-et-les-Etats-Unis_article_main.jpg

Teología y geopolítica.

La tentación de la serpiente.

por Francisco Javier Díaz de Otazú

Ex: http://www.arbil.org

Cuando se pergeña otro posible conflicto entre Israel e Irán es interesante conocer algo sobre las creencias persas que le diferencian de otros países musulmanes

El estrecho de Ormuz (en persa : تنگه هرمز, Tangeh-ye Hormoz; en árabe: مضيق هرمز, Maḍīq Hurmuz) es un estrecho angosto entre el golfo de Omán, localizado al sudeste, y el golfo Pérsico, al sudoeste. En la costa norte se localiza Irán y en la costa sur Omán. Fue guarida de piratas desde el siglo VII a. C. hasta el XIX. Comparte su nombre con una pequeña isla en la que están los restos de un castillo portugués, testigo ibero de otro tiempo en el que Occidente también penetró en el Oriente siempre misterioso y peligroso. Por aquel entonces, el petróleo eran las especias. Como sabrán los lectores, actualmente tiene gran importancia estratégica debido a que se encuentra en la salida del golfo Pérsico, que es rico en petróleo. Se estima que aproximadamente el 40% de la producción petrolífera mundial es exportada por este canal. Su anchura en el cabo es de 60 kilómetros. Se considera la clave para el control del petróleo mundial. Ahora, en vez de redundar en las crecientes informaciones sobre fragatas y navíos que suelen ser la actual versión de los viejos tambores de guerra, siempre más emocionantes que la CNN y Al-Yazira, por cierto esta cadena árabe puede traducirse y es otra evocación peligrosa en segundo escalón para España, como Algeciras. Significa “la isla” o “la península”, pues para los árabes del. S VII, eran lo mismo, y a la vez ambas cosas eran la península arábiga y la ibérica.  Pero antes de los árabes y el Islam, los que por allí mandaban eran los persas, de cuya religión quedan muy pocos residuos directos.

En Irán les llaman los “magos”, son tolerados por pocos e inofensivos, a modo de una reserva india,  y tienen como sagrados algunos fuegos donde el petróleo afloraba espontáneamente al suelo. Y no andaban muy despistados, pues, desde luego, el petróleo sigue siendo sagrado, al menos por el tiempo que le quede. Parece claro que el título de los “Reyes Magos”, procede de esa procedencia geográfica y de sus notables conocimientos astronómicos, comunes a todos los herederos de los caldeos. Otra pervivencia, más vigorosa, es el dualismo. El libro sagrado de los persas era el Avesta< , atribuido a Zoroastro, un filósofo medo que vivió en el siglo VI a. C. Nietzsche le llamó “Zaratustra”, y es cosa seria por que el desequilibrado filósofo era un gran filólogo y escribía muy bien. El asunto es que esa doctrina reconoce un Ser Supremo, que es eterno, infinito, fuente de toda belleza, generador de la equidad y de la justicia, sin iguales, existente por sí mismo o incausado y hacedor de todas las cosas. Hasta aquí bien, y nos entendemos todos.  Del núcleo de su persona salieron Ormuz y Arimán, principios de todo lo bueno y de todo lo malo, respectivamente.

Ambos produjeron una multitud de genios buenos y malos, en todo acordes con su naturaleza. Y así, el mundo quedó dividido bajo el influjo de estos dos grupos de espíritus divididos y bien diferenciados. Esto es lo que explica la lucha en el orden físico y moral, en el universo. El alma es inmortal y más allá de esta vida, le está reservada la obtención de un premio o de un castigo. La carne es pecaminosa e impura. La antropología de Platón está emparentada con esta línea, y ni el San Agustín ni Lutero se escapan a ella, influidos el primero por el maniqueismo, y el segundo por el contrapeso Gracia&pesimismo antropológico.

Lo que podemos simplificar como antropología católica nuclear está más bien en la línea unitiva, vinculada a Aristóteles y al principio de Encarnación. Pero sigamos con el dualismo. La inclinación hacia el mal tiene su origen en el pecado con el que se contaminó el primer hombre. Esta denodada lucha entre Ormuz y Arimán, tan equilibrada como la del día y la noche, ha de tener un desenlace final, y el triunfo debe ser de Ormuz, el principio del bien. El dualismo del bien y del mal es paralelo, aunque no coincidente, con el del espíritu y la carne. El maniqueísmo se ha presentado en diversas formas antiguas y modernas. No hay que confundir su acepción específica, los seguidores de Manes, otro persa, del s. III, que sumó al zoroastrismo elementos gnósticos, ocultistas, algo no tan demodé como pudiera pensarse, dado que eso que de hay unos elegidos, en el secreto de la Luz, y otros oyentes, enterados de lo que los primeros suministran, es invento suyo.

En un sentido amplio se utiliza como sinónimo de dualismo. Y este término en cuanto completa simetría o paridad, puesto que el Bien y el Mal es claro que se enfrentan sin necesidad de tanta palabrería, por ej. en cualquier western o cuento infantil. Pero si entramos en profundidad, reparando en el mensaje y no en que se trate o no de ficción, Saruman del Tolkien, Lucifer en el Génesis, o por descargar densidad el Caballero Negro, de una mesa artúrica, no rigen como principio propio, como Mal Absoluto autónomo del todo y en paridad con el Bien, si no que son originarios de ese mismo Bien que por algún misterio, asociado a que el bien moral exige libertad, la soberbia hace que algunos, así sean el ángel más bello, opten por el mal.  Retomemos el libro sagrado Avesta, donde se encuentran vestigios de diversas creencias primitivas: los dogmas de la unidad divina, de la creación, de la inmortalidad del alma, de premios y castigos en una vida futura.

Es de señalar que en esta lucha entre los genios malos y buenos, hay un paralelismo con la concepción bíblica, (mejor que decir judeocristiana, pues es concepto delicado, además que puede usarse para enfrentarlo al Islam, y, al menos en esto, no corresponde), de la lucha entre los ángeles sumisos al Creador y los que contra él se revelaron. Pero la diferencia grande está en que para Dios, dicho al modo “monista”, unitario, sea o no trino, Él es la fuente de todo. Descartando el pulso entre iguales, como no son parejas la luz y la oscuridad; la oscuridad no tiene otra definición que la falta de luz, o el frío, el de la falta de calor, por mucho que sepamos de dinámica de moléculas.  Pues lo mismo para con el mal, en cuanto ausencia de bien. No es tan absoluto. Como “la esperanza es lo último que se pierde”, ¿quién sabe si al final el diablo no se arrepiente?.

aaaOrm.jpg

Dejemos ese misterio para la magnanimidad del único Creador, y pasemos ya de tejas para abajo. Ya sabemos que Irán es una potencia regional, que está en vías de desarrollo nuclear, y que Israel sostiene una doctrina de la guerra preventiva que, justificada o no, explicaría un trato similar al recibido ya por el Irak de Sadam. EEUU suele hacer el papel de guardaespaldas de Israel, y de sus encuestas y elecciones presidenciales depende más que de la justicia de sus bombardeos su próxima actuación. Nosotros dependemos del petróleo totalmente, repartido a la sazón la mar de maniqueamente por Alá, y somos de la OTAN. Nunca mejor dicho, el asunto está “crudo”.

El mundo árabe-mediterráneo también está caliente, y Siria está al caer, con gran disgusto de Rusia. El gas nos llega mitad de Rusia, mitad de Argelia. En fin,  que quede claro que está crudo por una biológica lucha por la supervivencia entre poderes, intereses y estados, como mañana podrá ser por el agua dulce, y no por la del bien y del mal, viejo cuento donde el mal es el otro, siempre. El Bien es la Paz y la Justicia, entre nosotros, la posible dentro de lo posible, el Mal, la soberbia, la prepotencia. El querer hacer un gobierno mundial a partir del consenso de los poderosos, y no de una ley natural previa. Es la tentación de la serpiente.

·- ·-· -······-·
Francisco Javier Díaz de Otazú

dimanche, 07 décembre 2014

La stratégie des alliés contre l’Etat islamique : incohérente

f-4-phantom-iran.jpg

ALLIANCES : TÉHÉRAN OUI , DAMAS NON !
 
La stratégie des alliés contre l’Etat islamique : incohérente

par Jean Bonnevey
Ex: http://metamag.fr

L’Iran est devenu le meilleur ennemi des occidentaux et même sans doute leur meilleur allié contre les obscurantistes égorgeurs de l’Etat islamique sunnite du levant. Il est bien évident que l’Etat Chiite a tout intérêt à détruire Daesh pour sauver l’Irak et la Syrie et les garder sous son influence. On notera cependant que Téhéran devenu fréquentable brusquement, malgré l’échec des négociations sur le nucléaire, est le principal soutien de Damas. Or Damas reste infréquentable, alors que l’aide du régime serait un moyen de prendre en tenaille les extrémistes sunnites entre les chiites iraniens et les alaouites syriens.


Tout cela est inconséquent


Ghassem Soleimani, le chef de la force Al-Qods, la troupe d’élite iranienne chargée des opérations extérieures est aujourd’hui présenté, sans réserve, comme « le héros national » qui mène le combat de l’Iran contre l’Etat islamique en Irak (l’EI). Depuis cet été, cet officier dirige sur place les quelques centaines de miliciens chiites engagés au sol aux côtés de l’armée irakienne pour lutter contre les djihadistes.


Téhéran ne voit plus d’inconvénient à assumer et à reconnaître son implication militaire en Irak contre les forces sunnites de l’Etat islamique. Et même, il s’en vante. Le chef de la diplomatie iranienne s’est félicité que l’Iran « ait rempli ses engagements », contrairement aux « Occidentaux qui promettent des choses sans les faire ». C’est d’ailleurs pourquoi les Iraniens n’ont même pas nié ce que le porte-parole du Pentagone a qualifié, mardi 2 décembre depuis Washington, de « raids aériens avec des avions F-4 Phantom » en Irak. « Aujourd’hui, le peuple irakien se bat contre les terroristes et les étrangers aux côtés de son gouvernement et des forces volontaires », a expliqué  le vice-commandant en chef des forces armées iraniennes, Seyed Masoud Jazayeri, sans donner plus de détails sur les forces impliquées.


Pour la première fois, des avions F-4 Phantom iraniens ont lancé ces derniers jours des raids aériens en territoire irakien voisin. Les cibles visées dans la province frontalière de Diyala ne doivent rien au hasard. En investissant une partie de cette région dans la foulée de sa conquête de Mossoul et du «pays sunnite» à partir de juin, Daesh (l'État islamique ou EI) a porté la menace à la frontière de l'Iran. Les raids iraniens rappellent étrangement l'aide apportée par les avions américains pour permettre à l'armée irakienne de regagner du terrain sur Daesh plus à l'ouest, en «pays sunnite». Mais le Pentagone, qui a révélé les frappes iraniennes tandis que le secrétaire d'État John Kerry les qualifiait de «positives», dément cependant toute coordination avec son ennemi chiite. «Il s'agit plus vraisemblablement de deux actions parallèles», souligne l'institut de recherche Jane's à Londres «et pour l'instant cela fonctionne».


Bachar al-Assad a donné de son coté une interview au magazine Paris Match. Il estime que les frappes de la coalition contre les terroristes de l’Etat islamique sont inutiles. Ces interventions aériennes "nous auraient certainement aidés si elles étaient sérieuses et efficaces. C'est nous qui menons les combats terrestres contre Daesh, et nous n'avons constaté aucun changement, surtout que la Turquie apporte toujours un soutien direct dans ces régions", souligne-t-il. 


En réunion à Bruxelles, les ministres des Affaires étrangères de la coalition ont au contraire jugé que ces attaques en Irak et en Syrie commençaient "à montrer des résultats". Bachar al-Assad estime qu’on "ne peut pas mettre fin au terrorisme par des frappes aériennes. Des forces terrestres qui connaissent la géographie et agissent en même temps sont indispensables", a jugé le président syrien syrien.
Que ferait l’occident donc en cas d offensive terrestre conjuguée et sur deux fronts de la Syrie et de l’Iran ? Il faudra bien définir un jour l’ennemi principal et  considérer que ceux qui luttent contre lui sont sinon des amis au moins pour l’occasion des alliés de fait, de Téhéran à Damas.


Illustration en tête d'article : chasseurs iraniens en Irak

 

vendredi, 28 novembre 2014

Is Israel Losing the Battle to Wage War on Iran?

 

netanyahu-obama-aipac.gif

On the Long-Term Agreement Between Iran and the P5+1   

Is Israel Losing the Battle to Wage War on Iran?

by SASAN FAYAZMANESH
Ex: http://www.counterpunch.org

The world’s attention is focused once again on the negotiations between Iran and the five permanent members of the UN Security Council and Germany, commonly referred to as P5+1. Many are speculating about whether these negotiations will bear fruit by November 24, 2014, and reach a long-term agreement on curtailing Iran’s nuclear activities in exchange for removal of sanctions imposed on the country. Whatever the outcome, however, one thing is certain: the role of Israel in these negotiations has diminished considerably.

Last year’s short-term Joint Plan of Action (JPA), which was signed between Iran and the P5+1 on November 24, 2013, was a milestone in the US-Iran relations. As I analyzed it elsewhere, the JPA resulted in limiting some of Iran’s nuclear activities—which allegedly would enable her to make nuclear weapons—in return for a minimal reduction in certain kinds of sanctions. But this was not the real significance of the agreement. After all, and contrary to popular belief, the dispute between the US and Iran has never really been a technical dispute over nuclear issues. The dispute has always been a political clash; and the clash started in 1979, following the Iranian revolution. Since then the US has refused to accept the independence of Iran and has tried, using various excuses, to subdue a political system that would not fit the American vision of “world order.” These excuses, as I have shown elsewhere, have included, among others, issues such as Iran not accepting a ceasefire offered to it by Saddam Hussein in the 1980s Iran-Iraq war, Iran’s support for “terrorist” groups opposed to Israel and pursuit of weapons of mass destruction in general, Iran destabilizing Afghanistan, harboring Al-Qaeda, lacking democracy, being ruled by unelected individuals, violating human rights, not protecting the rights of women, and Iran not being forward-looking and modern. It has only been since 2002, when an Iranian exile group working hand in hand with the US and Israel made certain allegations against Iran, that the issue of Iran’s nuclear program was added to the list of accusations and became the cause célèbre and even casus belli. The JPA removed, at least for six months, the most major excuse for the US to wage a military attack on Iran.

In its clash with Iran, the US has always had a very close partner, Israel. The partnership started in 1979, but it took different routes. Up until the end of the Iran-Iraq war and the first US invasion of Iraq, Israel’s attention was primarily focused on Iraq, which was viewed by Israel as the most immediate obstacle to achieving its goal of annexing “Judea and Samaria.” Thereafter, Israel turned its attention to Iran, the other main obstacle in fulfilling the Zionist dream of Eretz Yisrael. Starting in the early 1990s Israel not only joined the US in its massive campaign against Iran, but it actually took over the sanctions policy of the US. With the help of its lobby groups, Israel pushed through the US Congress one set of sanctions after another, hoping that ultimately the US would attack Iran, as it had done in the case of Iraq.

Israel and its lobby groups also installed influential individuals in different US administrations to formulate US foreign policy toward Iran. This included the first Obama Administration. Various Israeli lobbyists shaped President Obama’s policy of “tough diplomacy,” a policy which, as I have analyzed elsewhere, meant nothing but sanctions upon sanctions until conditions would be ripe for military actions against Iran. Among these were Dennis Ross and Gary Samore. The first, Ross, well-known as “Israel’s lawyer,” was Obama’s closest advisor on Iran. He came from the Washington Institute for Near East Policy (WINEP), an offshoot of American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC), and when he retired in 2011 he returned to his lobbying activities through WINEP and JINSA (Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs). The second, Samore, who served as Obama’s advisor on “weapons of mass destruction,” was one of the founding members of the Israeli lobby group United Against Nuclear Iran (UANI), an establishment that has been lately in the news for receiving classified US government information on Iran and is being protected by the Obama Administration in a law suit. Samore left the Obama Administration in 2013 and returned to UANI to become its president. He also became the executive director of the Harvard University’s Belfer Center that is also linked to UANI, according to some investigative reports.

The policy of “tough diplomacy” pursued by the Israeli lobbyists did not produce the desired result. The harsh sanctions imposed did enormous damage to Iran’s economy. But, as Samore himself admitted in a talk at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London on March 11, 2014, there were no “riots on the streets” and no “threat to the survival of the regime.”

With the departure of the most influential Israeli lobbyists from the Obama Administration, the policy of “tough diplomacy” started to wither away. The disintegration of policy was also helped by John Kerry replacing Hillary Clinton, the most hawkish Secretary of State who often mimicked the belligerent language of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu when it came to Iran. Kerry—who, as the Chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, had once stated in an interview with The Financial Times that Iran has “a right to peaceful nuclear power and to enrichment in that purpose”—abandoned the policy of “tough diplomacy.” In the P5+1 meetings in February of 2013, Kerry offered the Iranian government a deal that it could live with. However, the Iranian government under President Ahmadinejad hesitated, haggled over the deal, and ran out of time as the Iranian presidential election approached. The new Iranian President, Rouhani, accepted the deal and ran away with it. The result was the JPA.

Israel, which had hoped that a military attack on Iran by the US would follow the tough sanctions imposed by the Obama Administration, was quite unhappy with the JPA. Even before an agreement was reached, Israeli leaders and their US allies led a massive campaign against it. For example, according to The Times of Israel, on November 10, 2013, Netanyahu sent an indirect message to French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, telling him that if France did not toughen its positions, he would attack Iran. Netanyahu also asked his supporters around the world to stop the deal. A news headline in Haaretz on November 10, 2013, read: “Netanyahu urges Jews: Rally behind me on halting Iran nuclear program.” Surrogates of Israel in the US Congress followed suit. The title of a news item on Reuters on November 10, 2013, read: “U.S. lawmakers seek tighter Iran sanctions before any deal.” Among the lawmakers were Senators Mark Kirk and Robert Menendez, as well as Representatives Eric Cantor, Ed Royce and Eliot Engel. Israeli lobbyists, too, went into action. This included former advisor to Obama Dennis Ross. “We must not let Tehran off the hook, says Dennis Ross at Jewish Agency for Israel’s 2013 Assembly,” was The Jerusalem Post headline on November 10, 2013. Yet, in the end, the short-term agreement between Iran and the P5+1 could not be stopped.

Failing to stop the JPA, Israel then tried to nullify it by passing a new and severe set of sanctions through the US Congress. The move was led by Kirk and Menendez, two senators who often appear on the list of the biggest recipients of campaign cash from pro-Israel public actions committees. The Kirk-Menendez bill, titled “Nuclear Weapons Free Iran Act,” was introduced on December 19, 2013, with the sole purpose of ending the agreement between Iran and the P5+1. The bill gained momentum as various Israeli lobby groups, particularly AIPAC, exerted pressure in the Senate. On January 4, 2014, AIPAC had a summary of Kirk-Menendez bill on its website and was instructing its members to “act now.”

The number of senators signing the Kirk-Menendez bill rose from 33 in early January to 59 in mid-January, 2014. This was despite the fact that some officials in the Obama Administration, including Secretary Kerry, referred to the bill as an attempt to push the US into a war with Iran. This was also in spite of Obama’s threats to veto the bill. On January 28, 2014, in his State of the Union Address, Obama reiterated his stance on any congressional bill intended to impose a new set of sanctions on Iran and stated that “if this Congress sends me a new sanctions bill now that threatens to derail these talks, I will veto it. ”

Israel, its lobby groups and its conduits in Congress, nevertheless, pushed for passing the resolution. However, they could not muster the strength to get the two-thirds majority in the Senate to make the bill veto-proof. They threw in the towel and AIPAC declared on February 6, 2014: “We agree with the Chairman [Menendez] that stopping the Iranian nuclear program should rest on bipartisan support . . . and that there should not be a vote at this time on the measure.” As many observed, this was the biggest loss for Israel, its lobby groups and its conduits in the US Congress, since Ronald Reagan agreed, contrary to Israel’s demand, to sell AWACS surveillance planes to Saudi Arabia. Subsequent attempts to nullify the JPA also failed. This included an attempt by some Senators, a few days before March 2014 AIPAC policy conference, to include elements of “Nuclear Weapons Free Iran Act” in a veterans’ bill.

In the end, Israeli lobby groups had to settle for a few letters written by US law makers to President Obama, telling him what the final deal must look like. The AIPAC-approved letter in the House of Representative on March 3, 2014, was circulated by Eric Cantor and Steny Hoyer. The Senate letter was posted on AIPAC website, dated March 18, 2014, and, as many Israeli affiliated news sources joyously reported, the letter gained 82 signatures. Finally, 23 Senators also signed the Cantor-Hoyer letter, as Senator Carl Levin’s website posted it on March 22, 2014. If some of the harsh measures proposed in these letters were to be adopted by the Obama Administrations, no final deal could be reached with Iran.

The JPA was supposed to lead to a final settlement in six months, and, consequently, there were many rounds of negotiations between Iran and the P5+1 before the deadline. The final and the most intense negotiations that took place behind closed doors in July 2014 lasted for more than two weeks. However, in the end there were “significant gaps on some core issues,” as a statement by EU Representative Catherine Ashton and Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif read on July 19, 2014. It was therefore decided to close the so-called gaps by November 24, 2014.

We are now approaching the 2nd deadline for reaching a long-term agreement between Iran and the P5+1. It is unclear whether the gaps can be bridged. It is also unclear how much of these gaps are due to the relentless Israeli pressure that is still being exerted even on the Obama Administration and its team of negotiators. We know that these negotiators, as they have readily admitted, consult Israel before and after every meeting with Iran. Indeed, even after the latest round of meetings between Iran and the US in Muscat, Oman, Kerry called Netanyahu to “update” him on the negotiations. Yet, we also know that Israel does not have the clout that it once had in the White House. The most influential Israeli lobbyists have left the Obama Administration and their policy of tough diplomacy is in tatters. Israel has also been unable to stop the short-term P5+1 agreement with Iran, it has failed to nullify the agreement after it passed, and it has not even been able to garner the two-thirds majority in the Senate to make veto-proof a Congressional bill designed to start a war with Iran. In other words, in the past two years Israel has been losing the battle to engage the US in another military adventure in the Middle East. But has Israel lost the war to wage war on Iran? The newly configured US Senate is already seeking a vote on another Israeli sponsored war bill called “Iran Nuclear Negotiations Act of 2014.”

Sasan Fayazmanesh is Professor Emeritus of Economics at California State University, Fresno, and is the author of Containing Iran: Obama’s Policy of “Tough Diplomacy.” He can be reached at: sasan.fayazmanesh@gmail.com.