jeudi, 24 juillet 2014

Russian Nationalism and Eurasianism

demonstration.jpg

Russian Nationalism and Eurasianism

 
 

The recent flurry of writing on Russian politics, nationalism and Alexander Dugin shows the contemptible inability of western savants to apprehend any idea beyond the cliche's of stagnant neo-liberalism. Worse, “Russia specialists” in academia are now tripping over themselves trying to “analyze” Dugin and the Eurasianist idea. Bereft of the vocabulary to understand the concept, they merely apply fashionable labels from western political thought onto Russia in a pathetic and pretentious attempt to show how “dangerous” such ideas are to “European values.”

Reading A. Toynbee, especially Volumes IV-VI of his Study of History, lead one to question both the “civilizational” fundament and, later, his “higher religion.” The problems are not that, at such a level of analysis, he is inaccurate. Such an epic level of perspective cannot be held to the sharp standards of accuracy that a study of, say, the state of New Hampshire might be subject. The very nature of such a sweeping history means that, in the main, he might be seen as “more or less” on the right track. That is as far as one can go. However, that begs the question, since the very concept of such an epic orientation is open to doubt.
 
Equally sweeping is the general criticism of P. Sorokin and others, namely, that such a view of history is problematic because it isolates a few variables from the rest, making them extremely important. This means that others are minimized. This criticism gains force to the extent that one sees the knowledge required for any epic vista of history to work at all. One cannot know that much about global history to come to such conclusions. Those specializing in an element of a civilization (such as Hellenistic aesthetics) will easily annihilate sweeping generalizations. Hegel's desire to label entire epochs of history with one word means that such an approach cannot be true; unless one is willing to reduce epochs of civilization to slogans about them.
 
In the case of this present author, the concern has been to refuse such grand historical panoramas and focus instead on a single nation, or elements within a nation that lend themselves to detailed study. There, the actual living conditions of real people can be analyzed. The sweep of Toynbee, Hegel or Marx is interesting, but if the result is to then force all societies to follow that general model, then they should be left unread. Few deny the ability of Eric Voegelin, but again, outside of specialized studies on Plato or Marx, Voegelin's sweep is such as to make it interesting, but a fatal temptation to the study of actual historical life.
 
This preface is needed because the Eurasians fall into the same problem. They too, deal in civilizational norms, though their interest is very specific: defining the Atlantian civilization as against the Russian one. At the level of elite society, this is useful. Western elites, generally speaking, are of one mind in their commitment to science, secularism, individualism (in theory), capitalism, positivism and empire. There is nothing strange about this. Toynbee, in areas in which he is well schooled (such as Greek antiquity), becomes extremely important. When he generalizes this experience to medieval Hindustan, however, he becomes less tenable.
 
Identity and foreign policy go hand in hand. Domestic and foreign policies are closely linked. In Russia's case, her sense of corporate selfhood has changed radically since the fall of the Marxist empire in the early 1990s. Russia's foreign policy has changed as her global status has changed, and the debate among the different factions of Russian life has dominated her foreign policy. The purpose in this paper is to define, in specific terms, the nature of a Russian, Eurasianist foreign policy. Eurasianism is a popular foreign policy idea in elite Russian circles and therefore, must be taken very seriously by scholars (Shlapentokh, 2007).
 
Russia is a state and nation. It is also a broader based civilization taking in many ethnic groups to herself. This means that its values and virtues are far more than the result of specific historical conditions, but are, in some sense, eternal virtues that give life meaning. There are “civilizational” values that take what is crucial in those nations the civilization encompasses. These are not ethnic groups (which are much smaller) but refer to “imperial” ideologies that can rule many different groups and are formulated precisely to justify the rule of a large and diverse policy. Examples of such civilizations might be Chinese, Indian or African. These go beyond historical experience and are supposed to contain greater truths.
 
The concept of a “Russian civilization” undergirds the vision of the Russian Eurasianists. This is both a political theory and a source of foreign policy decisions. The “imperial mission” of a society is not about local values, but cosmic ideas. In politics, these “imperial ideologies” serve as the foundation of global rule.
 
Eurasianism as foreign policy refers to Russian geopolitical space. Russia is a “cosmos,” it takes smaller “solar systems” under its wing to create a loose federation of allied nations and states. In some instances, it rejects the very notion of “nation-statism” in that a true civilization can be only a federation, not a state. 
 
I. Ideological History of Eurasianism
 
Prior to the well known Alexander Dugin, Eurasianism has a rich ideological heritage unknown to those who cannot read Russian. PM Bitsilli (1953) took a broad look at global history. “Rhythm” is specific to a people. It is dialectical both in that it is becoming (rather than being) and takes the familiar trinity as undifferentiated unity – fragmentation – reflective unity. This also was essential to the metaphysics of Karsavin. Rhythms differ radically, but they still partake of the same formula.
 
Finally, inertia is the third element. Dialectic, rhythm and inertia govern the historical process. Tribal life is unreflective, yet, historical forces and local conditions force a chaotic mixing of tribes that are more or less compatible. Finally, in the construction of the ethnos, a reflective unity is created as conditions now exist for reason, thought and the development of the historical person.
 
In his “Tragedy of Russian Culture,” Bitsilli takes the common Eurasian position that “progress” and “history” are both loaded and ideological terms which contrast all existence with that of the west. That is to say, the lineal development of mechanized and commercial capitalism is the standard of global development. For Bitsilli, culture is the “self-disclosure” of the personality en masse. It is an overcoming of history in the sense that this self persists through time. 
 
PN Savitsky (1968) focused his research on the primordial argument for national, that is, ethnic development. Tribes mix together to form ethnicities. This mixing is not arbitrary, but can only take place among groups who share significant elements in common. This mixing, further, is also not arbitrary due to its context. As is common in this doctrine, climate, topography and local resources are extremely significant in the development of a decentralized tribal life into early forms of ethnic groups. Organizations of peoples, as they come out of their tribal background, take from local conditions. Thus, territory is significant and becomes a part of the development of the national unit. 
 
The soil literally is incorporated into the flesh of the people. Local resources, soil conditions and the general environment become a part of the physical makeup of ethnicities. Soil conditions are aspects of topography in that they are dependent on it. The ethnic group then becomes like its surroundings: an organic whole.
 
Ethnicities developing near the shoreline, all other things equal, develop into mercantile states. They think globally in terms of markets and resources.  Russia, on the other hand, is a land and forest based community and does not, as a result, develop the trading ethic to the extent that the Greeks or Phoenician have. This is not to argue that these conditions determine outcomes. They only provide dispositions.
 
Savitsky stresses that the Mongol occupation was not destructive for Russia, but quite the opposite. The Horde was a culturally advanced people who protected Russia from the inroads of western religious ideology. All occupied lands, so Savitsky and Most Eurasians would argue, did well under Mongol administration. 
 
In terms of politics, Savitsky argues that linear progress is a myth. Social organisms run in cycles, repeating some basic institutions but adding and subtracting others. The state, in the sense of its Cultural Constitution, requires a unity of religion and basic moral foundations in order to carry out even minimal tasks. The cultural and religious unity obviates the need for a strong state, administratively speaking.
 
Most importantly, Savitsky argued as early as 1928 that the future belongs to Asia. After World War I and storm clouds brewing over Europe, this was not a ludicrous idea. It is even more significant now. The simple idea that can be drawn from the prophetic words of Savitsky is that Europe destroyed itself in two world wars, went broke during the “Cold War” and, as of 2014, has little to offer the east. To reject “Europe” is to make a realistic judgment about the state of their finances, elites and economic foundations.
 
Of course, the most significant Eurasianist, and the most verbose, is Alexander Dugin. His work is generally more esoteric than the rest, arguing that the ancient symbolism of east and west points to two sorts of civilization: the sea based and the land based. What makes Dugin attractive to those who can read the language is his use of Plato to ground a new vision of the nation and its context, the civilization.
 
What the west lacks is the concept of higher meanings. Nominalism and positivism, the two official ideologies of western thought (in general) see objects per se. Nominalism argues that there are no necessary connections among things in society or nature, there are merely individual acts, people or institutions. Dugin, using Plato, argues that the “object” is merely phenomenal, not real. “Realism” is the view, assumed by positivism and nominalism, that there are two entities only: the observer and the observed. This is naive because there can be no way to prove the existence of actual objects solely based on perception.
 
The nominal has no purpose. They are random individual things that might form a system for “mutual advantage.” Its social applications are obvious. However, to oversimplify, objects and particulars exist only in a context, and that context soon becomes the All, or the single set of relations that make up the cosmos. Each is dependent on all. Dugin's critique of the west, given this simplistic model, is that western man has been trained to see objects as “facts,” brute givens that are only provided with meaning by man, and that usually refers to a political or scientific elite. All is reduced to the “practical,” and as a result, all meaning is lost.
 
The west replaced natural law with markets. Markets took science and make it an appendage of commercial dominance. The concept of pure mechanism, the product of the Renaissance, was to create a world, one imposed upon the real one, that reduced matter to a machine that can be taken apart and put back together in the form of man-made technology. This is the essence of capitalism (and has no relation to the market model). Capitalism is based on egocentricity, the denial of private property except for the few, and, perhaps most important, that morals and culture have no place in “rational” economics.
 
Socialism is quite similar. It is obsessed with technology, science and production as ends in themselves. Power may be reached by different means, but it all comes down to economics. Capitalism and socialism depend, not on intelligence, but on deviousness. The Marxist critique of capital is correct as far as it goes. Economics is inherently historical, egocentrism can never create stability and capital functions by using labor as a tool.
 
These are not the only options. Eurasianism, as economics, is based on the concept that economics is not a field in itself. It may not make its own rules, but is subordinated to the common good of the community. Competition always has a place, but so does cooperation. Production is culturally specific in nearly every way, only that globalization has gone very far in standardizing its methods.
 
Nations exist. They create states. However, with the possible exception of great states such as Russia and China, autarky is not rational. Regionalism is the response. For Dugin, several civilizational spaces exist: Eurasia, Africa, the Far East and Europe. These are now the actors in history. Nations retain their autonomy within their civilizational space, but the regionalism of Dugin seeks to retain the gains made by globalization while retaining local and regional sovereignty. The result is a multipolar world.
 
Globalization is western ideology and scientific culture masquerading as “reason” itself; as science per se. It is the rebirth of Atlantis, the necropolis, the world of Twilight, or unreality. Both Dostoevsky and Gogol used these metaphors to describe St. Petersburg. Atlantis lives on, deriving from the Phoenicians, and leading to the ruse of Venice in the High Middle Ages, then concluding with the English and institutionalized as a “global ideology” under the US. 
 
II. Basic Concepts of Eurasianism and the West
 
The discussion above does not even scratch the surface of the richness of Eurasian thought. It is a summary of some of the Russian-language literature. In a more understandable way, much of the Eurasian idea can be summarized in these points:
 
1.Communitarianism against nominalism. Identities are necessarily collective.
2.Non-alignment in global affairs.
3.Eurasianism holds that while nations exist, they are not self-contained. The political unit is the civilization, which is a federation of complimentary nations.
4.Culture is the essential tie among people in a nation or civilization. The quantifiable aspects of rule are highly limited and secondary. 
5.Russians are not Europeans, or at least not entirely European. Russians are mixtures of Slav, Mongol and Turkish blood that help inform their genetics. This means that Russians are genetically related to the Caucasian and some Central Asian peoples. In addition, this “third world” blood makes the Russians an ideal intermediary between Asia and Europe, or even Europe and the third world. (cf. Shlapentokh, 2007 for greater detail) 
6.The state (in its true sense as the cultural collective) should put its stamp on the economy. In general, public-private ownership mixes are essential for larger and strategic industry, while private ownership remains for small business. 
 
The Eurasian idea is one that both defines those within it as well as excludes those without. In this case, the “other” is the “West.” In the broadest of terms, the cardinal ideas of the West are these:
 
1.Egocentrism manifest as abstract rights rather than function, station or vocation. Rights are more rhetorical and strategic than real.
2.Democracy as necessarily proceeding from nominalism. This is not merely a “procedure” but a state of affairs. Democracy exists when liberalism does.
3.Materialism and secularism in public and economic life. In general, since rights have no discernible origin, utilitarianism becomes the official ideology by default. 
4.Liberal Messianism is crucial: liberalism needs to be imposed by force.
5.The west defines “state” as that which is bureaucratic and administrative.  
6.Liberal rhetoric sounds merely procedural. This is to mask the ideological core of liberalism which is essentially totalitarianism.
7.Politicians serve as window dressing for economic elites. When the economy fails, the politicians, who control nothing, are said to be at fault.
8.Evolution is part of the west's official ideology. It serves to a) secularize society, but more importantly, b) justify colonialism, industrial capitalism and “competition.”
9.“Rationality” is defined in purely economic terms.
10.“Science” and the “scientific establishment” are treated as identical. Science is defined as that which deals with formal and quantitative properties. This, in turn, is identical with the concept of “intelligibility.”
11.Liberalism rejects the “nation” as fiction, yet, holds formal quantity, the “international community,” and the isolated ego as palpable realities. 
 
These two views of the world are antithetical. The west views itself as the apex of human liberty while seeing the east as in need of western assistance.  Evolution is leading the world to the western idea, which was the purpose of the Darwinian system from the beginning. It is no accident that this view of the world arose from the height of English colonial rule and industrial development. Capitalism sees the world merely as a series of markets or resource bases to control. Peoples are treated in purely quantitative terms. 
 
Representative government, which is radically distinct from “democracy,”is an important factor in Eurasianist thought. The Eurasianist movement evaluates the “democracy” ethic as being a mask for economic power. Elections are competitive races among economic factions speaking for “the people,” a collective abstraction that does not exist.  A strong Russian executive can help filter the demands of the monied class and seek the common good. Putin's approach has mirrored this demand (Shlapentokh, 2007).
 
“Russian pluralism” is a vision that motivates Russian domestic policy (Tolz, 1998). Eurasianism as a political theory revolves around the concept of civilization over ethnos. A pluralist society would imitate the look of a federation, using the most significant elements of nationalism without its tribal negatives. A Russian Eurasianism stresses the fundamental autonomy of these ethnic groups within a broader state, and these different groups would maintain a large degree of independence.
 
Russia under Vladimir Putin has been a strong supporter of the non-aligned movement. This movement seeks to improve the condition of the third world and build a global society based on the independence of nation states. This idea is a direct attack on westernism. At the same time, larger states that are in various stages of development have taken the lead from one time to another, including Indonesia, Russia and India. This just means that these countries on the periphery of development have the size and potency to wring concessions from the central states such as England or Japan (Shulman, 2005). in Russian Eurasianism, the main foreign element is the “multipolar” world shared by the non-aligned movement and its dedication to alter global capitalism and westernism.
 
This “non-aligned” idea is central to Eurasianism in that the west, given their “New World Order” and “End of history” rhetoric, is implying that it and it alone has the right to shape the rules of the political game. It is not so much that these rules have been deduced from democratic elections and hence enforced, they are the rules that govern elections. Eurasianists make quite a bit of fuss about this distinction. Democracy is just as much a set of results as a set of processes (Nikitin, 2005). Russian Eurasianism and the non-aligned movement are closely related.
 
Russia cannot be considered as a “developed” or “developing” country since those terms imply an absolute standard.  The Soviet use of domestic force to rapidly develop heavy industry (that may or may not have been appropriate for the time) makes her a developed country, though one that did not develop according to the typical pattern of European states. In fact, Russia's industrialization drive in the 1960s and 1970s might (with some adjustments) be a model for the third would that wants to see a great state presence in the economy rather than just profit-seeking businessmen. Since Russia can be seen as the “periphery” of the European Union, she shares some elements in common with the third world.
 
In the (2010) work of Kazakh President Narsultan Nazarbayev, the above concepts are restated in a way more congenial to the development of Central Asia. His essential political theory can be summarized in five points:
1.A strong, independent state is required for both development and sovereignty over resources. “Self-regulated” development is part of the concept of independence, since anything else would give development priorities to others. The public good should always take precedence over private profit.
2.Within any Eurasian Union, a specific Central Asian bloc needs to be formed to focus on issues concerning this region. This is a part of Nazarbayev's emphasis on Eurasianism being practical and loose rather than federative (see below).
3.Free trade should focus on regions and culturally similar peoples. Central Asia is a good example. Free trade should be pursued with common policies on substantial economic issues. Its purpose is to keep foreign forces out of the area. In areas where Central Asia is impacted the most, even other members of the union, such as Russia, should stand aside.
4.Any decision made by the Central Asian Union, as well as, presumably, any Eurasian Union including Russia, will require a 4/5 vote. 
5.Slowly, regional groupings will consolidate basic laws on development policy. 
 
Nazarbayev's main concern is a practical one: the modernization of the Central Asian states with no reciprocal duties in any specific direction. His view is guarded and cautious due to his concern for Kazakh independence as well as its stress on modernization. In fact, convergence is not an issue here except as a matter of fiscal law, and he goes out of his way to stress that there is no single ideology nor any sense of unitarism. While this is consistent with Eurasianism, Nazarbayev's emphasis on practical economic programs aimed at modernization is not.
 
Even more, he stresses that, in terms of basic policy, each state within the union should retain the option to remove itself from any law it deems problematic. At best, The Kazakh program is based on a loose structure. Since there is no “doctrine” of Eurasianism on these matters, it remains an open question. In general, Eurasianists remain national in their focus.
 
The problem which Nazarbayev points out is that the states to be a part of this Union are far from homogeneous, and remain at different levels of development. Hindrances to any union he sees as primarily based on a lack of strategy. There is no method of dispute resolution, nor does there seem to be any connection among ministers dealing with these issues and their own governments. 
 
Relative to currency, the President argues that it needs to be based explicitly on production and the development needs of the societies involved. While it should be kept out of the hands of private bankers, no specific state should control it either. He advocates that all branches of government be involved in currency decisions, since these are so essential to economics and development. Keeping the currency out of the hands of speculators seems to imply that he wants the regional currency non-convertible.
 
III. Concepts in Eurasian Foreign Policy
 
In the work of Professor Vera Tolz, there are three basic concepts of Russian Eurasianism that can serve as the basis of foreign policy. In all cases, the idea of the USSR lies at the root. The USSR was an empire promising basic independence for each of its republics. In other words, the official position was that all ethnic organizations under the Soviet system were to be permitted autonomy within the broader society. This approach, thought honored only in the breach, is very close to Eurasianism. These views Tolz calls “revisionist” in that they seek to challenge the west and its increasing hegemony in various ways:
 
1.The USSR was a noble enterprise that went awry. This was because the Bolsheviks thought they could run the country from a central source. This was incorrect and led to tremendous distortions in the economy. The USSR needs to be reborn, but on a far more decentralized and humanitarian basis.
2.Russian civilization can develop along the lines of a limited federation of Russia, Ukraine and Belarus. 
3.The third concept is traditional ethno-nationalism, where the state develops to incorporate all Russian speakers contiguous to her borders. 
 
Dugin, in his essay on Nikolai Trubetskoy, argues that both the tsarist and liberal approaches to the USSR are incorrect. He argues that Bolshevism derives directly from the revolutionary state pioneered by Peter I, and the Petrograd bureaucracy that failed to connect with the broader population. They accepted Bolshevism because it was a “vague, unconscious, blind and desperate desire to return to Old Russia, prior to the 'Romano-German yoke.” At the same time, the Eurasian idea rejects this movement as secular and anti-traditionalist. It was the westernization of the Russian elite, rather than any alien imposition on society, that served as the model for the revolution. In other words, the alien regime existed from the early 18th century onward.
 
Trubetskoy saw the USSR as a basically positive phenomenon because it unified the Eurasian plain and maintained a multinational state dedicated to a unified economic end.  In addition, in doing battle with western imperialism, it served to weaken the west's stranglehold over most of the planet. Finally, in protecting Russians against the west, the USSR, despite itself, preserved much of Old Russia.
 
While often not mentioned in English, the Eurasian idea derives from the Old Belief. As this writer has also written, the Old Rite is representative of pre-Petrine Russia, and this state, given its limited resources, made war on the church no less systematically than the Bolsheviks. After Nikon, the close association of the church with the bureaucracy made the love of Orthodoxy dependent on the love of the state. 
 
While exaggerated, this is essentially true; the deposition of Nikon left Alexis in charge, only very soon after to permit Peter and the Germanic ruling class later to purge all national elements of the church. The followers of Alexis saw the Old Rite as ignorant fanatics and themselves, increasingly, as Enlightened westerners. The fact that the atheist and materialist Theophan Prokopovytch was placed in charge of reorganizing the Russian church under Peter shows just how far this process went.
 
These three visions are about recreating Russia as a powerful civilization on the ruins on both the USSR and the democratic capitalism of Yeltsin. These three concepts are different ways of making it legitimate. All three of these are anti-western in that they reject the liberal cosmopolitanism that serves to justify western expansion. None of these three are specifically economic, but use culture and political to situate economic development. Economics for the Eurasianist is but an aspect of the broader political idea (Tolz, 1998).
 
In a recent review of Empire (2000), by A. Negri and M. Hardt, Alexander Dugin remarks:
 
The essence of empire is corruption. Corruption, as destruction, is the antithesis of construction; it is a usurper. Empire is the perennial contagion in world history; it destroys life, but it does so through a highly complex and subtle system of control based on man's base desires, individuality and freedom. As intellectual work is today crucial, the nature of production has changed. If the mind is the main means of production, then the machine and the brain slowly merge. On the other hand, new technologies such as the computerization of technique, have become an indispensable aspect of the human body, and soon, these two will also merge. . . Empires are not imposed from without, but they slowly create mental dependencies that tie man into their networks. These gradually serve as our sources of information that integrate ourselves economically, legally and psychologically. This implies a total loss of identity. 
 
The connection between the physical world and the its mental analogue is common enough in western criticism, most famously in the early 20th century work of Bernard Bosanquet. Contrary to a naive realism, structures of social life and the means of their justification soon become organizing principles in the mind. This is the problem with recent work on Dugin and Eurasianism, these structures cannot manage the nature of the Eurasian critique of the western world.
 
IV. Eurasianism and Domestic Policy
 
Building a new Russian nation with its own specific interests in the world requires a strong civil society. This concept, which has become cliche over time, primarily deals with the institutions necessary for the functioning of a state, any state. Even a state that uses the most strict criterion of ethnicity must maintain a civil society that undergirds that idea. All states and governments must, in some way, provide the population with institutions that give regularity and law to social forces regardless of their origin.
 
The great issue in building the new Russia is membership. In Ukraine, for example, the proverbial distinction between east and west Ukraine has almost torn the country apart. Western Ukraine is seen as pro-western,. Eastern Ukraine seen as pro-Russian. In Russia's case, the Eurasianists do not normally use an ethnic criterion of membership, but would rebuild Russia as a federation of ethnic groups that can serve to check and balance each other (Sengupta, 2009).
 
Even if Russian foreign policy were to center around gathering all Russian speaking areas under Moscow, this would not free the state from the rule of law or basic representative institutions. There is no clear connection between liberalism and representation, that is, there is no reason to believe that a democratic government is necessarily a representative government. The Russian nationalist movement  in general, and Eurasianists in particular, normally holds that liberalism is about ideology and the interests of capital, not the protection of rights. A state can be highly representative without being a democracy, and a democracy can enshrine an oligarchy rather than “the people.” The Eurasianists are fairly cynical about western claims to tolerance and “universal values.”
 
Representation, at its root, is the “matching” of a constitution to domestic ideas of justice. A constitution is more than a scrap of paper. It is a living mode of thought that is meant to bind a community together in a world of shared ideas. Laws cannot come from mere self-interest or utility, but must be representative of the popular will. Popular wills are not necessarily manifest in elections, but show the broader contours of social life over time. The General Will is the public good, and its differs, as in the work of Rousseau, from the mere counting of votes and might even be opposed to it.
 
Even more, a strong, new Russia requires an educational system that creates a firm foundation to the constitutional order. Education in the Eurasianist case should be tilted towards that which is useful for the society as a whole, rather than the liberal arts as a broad category of “classics.” The idea is that education brings students into the constitutional order and both, taken together, form a strong sense of national identity; a linguistic and cultural bond that brings people together in shared responsibility rather than abstract rights.
 
This concept of constitution is central to foreign policy because when “Russia” acts on the world stage, there must be some important and significant entity that is called “Russia.” The Eurasianist looks askance at the United States acting on the world stage for democracy and human rights. These are abstractions. For the Russian Eurasianist in 2012, the U.S. acts for the interest of the corporate bodies who control her (Sengupta, 2009).
 
Dugin, in his article on National Bolshevism, reduces the Eurasian-socialist idea to three:
1.For development according to Russian tradition, socialism, ethnic roots and a adhesion to the constants in Russian history. These include the mir, sobornost', a rejection of utility, universalism and the imperial idea.
2.Towards the restoration of the values of Old Russia, traditional spiritual culture and the doctrine of “The Third Rome.”
3.To build a society without classes, toward brotherhood, equality, solidarity and justice. It is a combination of the social ideals of the populists, communists, socialists, and the national anarchist revolutionary tradition (Dugin, 2004).
 
V. Regionalism and Democracy
 
Regionalism is significant for Russia given her immense geographic distinctions. Eurasianism usually supports a strong sense of regional identity to balance centralized institutions. Regionalism for Russia has been an important problem since the Yeltsin administration because these were considered the more corrupt parts of the Russian polity. Regional governments were (and are) seen as the weak spots on the Russian body politic because of the older, clan-based models of both patronage and rent-seeking.
 
In the work of professors Phyllis Dininio and Robert Ortung, regional corruption has been the Achilles heel of Russia as a polity. In their 2005 article on the subject, there are two overpowering variables dealing with the regional idea: first, the size of the government and, second, the level of economic development. If Eurasianism is to enshrine regionalism as an essential part of its doctrine, then the problems of regional corruption need to be faced. While Putin has long promises to deal strongly with corruption, regional elites have been dug in through control over patronage and raw materials. In fact, the Dininio and Ortung thesis is that rent seeking increases in areas of great raw material production.
 
Corruption provides a great incentive to develop central institutions. The typical Eurasianist view is that internal moral virtues are just as important as external institutions. The “spiritual bonds” that the Eurasianist movement harps on continually is about the ability of local institutions to form virtuous citizens. A virtuous public would do well under even the worst form of government. In Russia's case, internal virtue is needed to rebuild institutions since the decay of the state in the early 1990s. 
 
Corrupt regions in Russia can be traced to large bureaucracies, tightly centralized, that can serve as rent protection for raw materials. The basic corrupt practice is that the bureaucrats use their access to the halls of power to charge a premium for those wishing to exploit or profit from it. This, in turn, strengthens the forces of disintegration and weakens the forces of the national will. While regionalism is important to the Eurasianist movement, it can never be the “cover” for an elite seeking to profit at the expense of the broader economy (Dininio and Ortung, 2005).
 
Regional corruption is an ideological issue for both the Eurasianists and the Putin government because both share the sense of a strong central authority that represents a well integrated regional identity. Regional identity and proper central representation are not opposites, but rather require each other to function. Putin's 2005 attempt to appoint certain regional leaders was seen as a way to correct this imbalance, yet, for the most part, American media treatment of the move was negative (Robertson, 2009)
 
Another reason why the regional idea is important is because it connects Russia to its “near abroad.” In a real sense, these can be called “regions” since—at least—they contain a certain proportion of Russian speakers. Ukraine is a powerful case in point. Ukraine was the center of the older Imperial state because her fertility fed the rest of Russia. To destabilize Ukraine and force it away from Russia is to wound Moscow tremendously. Ukraine is a region in the eyes of the Eurasianist, a region with legitimate cultural aspirations. Yet, there is no reason why she should remove herself from the Russian embrace and become the main agricultural supplier to the EU as a regional dependency (Shulman, 2005 and Bukkvoll, 1997).
 
Ukraine and other “regions” of the Russian near abroad show the significance of regionalism for Russian foreign policy. Eurasianism — and to a great extent the Putin presidency — wants to see a different sort of sovereignty. The Ukrainian national idea saw the world in black and while: either independence or empire. The Eurasianist sees it differently. As there is a “third way” in economics, there is also a third way in sovereignty, one that does not posit independence and empire as opposites, but rather as counterparts. In this case, a federative Russia sees Ukraine and Belarus retain basic control over internal cultural policy while serving a loose confederation of independent powers. Basic legislation is in the hands of regional elites, while foreign policy is maintained in Moscow. These federative concepts are a crucial element of Eurasian foreign policy, especially since both Ukraine and Russia have an active role in the Caucuses mountains. In both cases, the Slavic and Turkic connection is clear – the Slavs will be dealing with Asians as equal partners within a single “civilizational space” (Sangupta, 2009)
 
Ukrainian foreign policy as compared with the Russia shows many areas of overlap that display the significance of Eurasianism even for Kiev. Ukraine sees Russia the way the Eurasianists do – as a powerful empire and civilization more than a nation state. On the other hand, Kiev sees itself as a “central European” state using and manifesting certain parts of Russian Slavdom for its own purposes. Ukrainian foreign policy centers around making sense out of the competing demands of Moscow and the western powers, whether in Washington or Brussels. The seemingly unending recession and depression since 2007 is making the western option that much less appealing. 
 
The Eurasianist—naturally—sees southern and eastern Asia to be the future. If Ukraine s to “turn to the west,” she might be turning to a moribund body too indebted to help her development. Eurasianists can easily point to the apparently terminal stage of western capitalism and seek compensation in Asia (MacFarlane, 2006).
 
Ukraine and Russia both need to deal with regions. In Ukraine, the far Eastern coal and steel areas remain staunch Russian supporters and, to a great extent, neo-communists. These do not want a recreation of the Russian empire, but seek an independent Ukraine in fraternal union with Belarus and Russia, creating a Slavic colossus and trading empire the west must respect on the world stage. 
 
Ukraine and Belarus, in the Eurasian idea, are integral parts of a broader Russian federation. Such a federation is based on spiritual bonds and cultural history rather than economic self interest. Abstractions like rights and fraternity make no sense unless the spiritual bonds of the whole can be found in them. The concept of “home and hearth” is far more than a mere slogan of the bankrupt, but is crucial for any functional policy. Political debate implies a great level of commitment and consensus. Foundational issues must be settled before there can be any common ground to debate. 
 
VI. Conclusions
 
The Eurasian idea is central to Russian politics. While still only partially digested by western writers, Russians have been concerned with rebuilding. From the dust and ashes of an old empire a new identity is being forged, and, judging by the popularity of Vladimir Putin, the basic elements of Eurasianism seem to be significant (Kullberg and Zimmerman, 1999). The slavish imitation of the west is not an option, nor is going back to some kind of central control. The non-aligned movement, regionalism and the battles against corruption are but three pillars in a basic domestic and foreign policy that is to institutionalized many Eurasianist concepts. 
 
In conclusion, we can see several things developing:
 
1.Russia will not copy the west. The Yeltsin administration saw a huge proportion of the Russian economy shipped to foreign bank accounts and be taken over by those who had no hand in creating it. Democracy can be a dirty word in Russia since it is the system partially imposed by Boris Yeltsin. It just meant that the well connected were able to take advantage of the vacuum in both political and economic power.
2.Eurasianism is a popular and coherent option. Russia increasingly sees the west to be bankrupt, both literally and figuratively. The rebuilding process itself—similar to the 1960s decolonization movement in Africa—requires both a strong state and a significant sense of membership.
3.The state will continue to be an important part of the national economy. This is especially the case in areas such as oil and natural gas. The state will continue to own enterprises and can compete with cooperative and private ownership. Simple economic self-interest can never be the foundation of a national economy. The common good (represented y the state, albeit imperfectly) is equally as important as efficiency.
4.The west is in trouble, and is likely to continue in trouble. Her debt is massive, and her dependence on foreign oil equally so. Increasingly large trade deficits with China are the price she has paid for her retail prosperity. To think that the “western option” is an obvious or automatic one for Russia is absurd. The Eurasianists have a point when they stress the significance of the east in terms of economic potential. 
 
The shocking ignorance of American intellectuals trying to grapple with Eurasian concepts they do not understand underscores Dugin's main concerns. The US does not have the conceptual apparatus to properly understand the sweeping ontology of Eurasianiam. Western and westernized writers, such as Gene Veith, Doug Sanders, Anton Barbashin, Hannah Thoburn, and Anton Shekhovtsov display a disgraceful ignorance born of two things: first, their utter lack of intellectual preparation for the ontology and metaphysics of Dugin or anyone else outside of the western mainstream, and just as importantly, the fact that few of their readers know any better. This latter problem is everywhere, and gives the above a license to write as they please. This both frees them from actual understanding and insulates them from serious criticism. 
 
Since Eurasianism does not proceed from familiar journalistic cliches and pseudo-academic pretension, they do not have a framework to understand – let alone criticize – any of the views laid out. It shows the total collapse of serious thought in the pursuit of recognition as an “intellectual.” These are the residue of mass society and the collapse of intellectual honesty.

Bibliography:

Dininio, Phyllis and Robert Ortung. Explaining Patterns of Corruption in the Russian Regions. World Politics 57, 2005 500-529

Bukkvoll, Tor. Ukraine and European Security. Continuum Publishing 1997

Kullberg, Judity and William Zimmerman. Liberal Elites, Socialist masses and the Problem of Russian Democracy. World Politics 51 1999 323-358

MacFarlane, S. Niel. Is Russia an Emerging Power? International Affairs 82, 2006 41-57

Nikitin, Alexander. Russian Eurasianism and American Exceptionalism. Eurasia: A New Peace Agenda, Michael Intrilligator, et al (eds). Emerald Group Publishing, 2005, pps 157-170

Robertson, Graeme. Managing Society: Protest, Civil Society and Regime in Putin's Russia. Slavic Review 68, 2009 528-547

Sengupta, Anita. Heartlands of Eurasia: the Geopolitics of Political Space. Lexington Books, 2009

Shlapentokh, Dmitry. Russia between East and West: Scholarly Debates on Eurasianism. Brill, 2007

Shulman, Steven. National Identity and Public Support for Political and Economic Reform in Ukraine. Slavic Review 64, 2005 pps 59-87

Tolz, Vera. Conflicting Homeland Myths and Nation-State building in Postcommunist Russia. Slavic Review 57, 1998 267-294

Sorokin, P. A Survey of the Cyclical Conceptions of Social and Historical Process. Social Forces, 6(1), 1927: 28-40

Nazarbayev, Nursultan (2010). Eurasian Doctrine (Евразийская доктрина Нурсултана Назарбаева). Almaty: Institute for Philosophy

Dugin, A. Overcoming the West: An Essay on Nikolai Trubetskoy. эссе о Николае Сергеевиче Трубецком Arktogye, Eurasian Portal of A. Dugin, 2003

 The New National-Bolshevik Order. Arktugye, 2004

Eurasian Triumph: Essay on PN Savitsky.  Arktugye, 2000

Николай Алексеев: Теория евразийского государства. Eurasian Portal, 1999

http://evrazia.info/article/197

Ustrialov, N. Национал-большевизм. (Reprinted on the Site Russian Literature, first compied 1926)

http://www.rulit.net/books/nacional-bolshevizm-read-252152-136.html

About Trubetskoy. Eurasian Portal, 1997 (earlier version of the article above)

http://evrazia.org/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=109

Nikitch, E. «Классовая борьба» (Widerstand, Berlin, 1932)

Ernst Niekisch: Europäische Bilanz, Potsdam: Rütten & Loening 1951

Ustrialov Nikolai. Понятие государства. «Сменовехизм» («Новости Жизни», 1925)

Alexeev, N. (1935) Теория государства: Теоретическое государствоведение, государственное устройство, государственный идеал. (Prague, 1935)

Alexeev, N. (1934)Об идее философии и её общественной миссии. (Put', Путь, 1934, no 44)

Alexeyev, N (1935) The Spiritual Background of Eurasian Culture. Trans, M. Johnson, Young Eurasia (originally published in the Eurasian Chronicle, Berlin, 1935)

http://yeurasia.org/library/classical_eurasianism/николай-алексеев-духовные-предпосыл/

 

vendredi, 18 juillet 2014

A. Douguine: union économique eurasienne, alliance UE/Russie, hégémonisme américain

arton101426-480x320.jpg

Entretien avec Alexandre Douguine

Sur l'Union économique eurasienne, sur la nécessité d'une alliance UE/Russie, sur l'hégémonisme américain en Europe

 

Propos recueillis par Bernard Tomaschitz

 

Professeur Douguine, le 1 janvier 2015, l'Union Economique Eurasienne deviendra une réalité. Quel potentiel détient cette nouvelle organisation internationale?

 

AD: L'histoire nous enseigne que toute forme d'intégration économique précède une unification politique et surtout géopolitique. C'est là la thèse principale du théoricien de l'économie allemand, Friedrich List, impulseur du Zollverein (de l'Union douanière) allemand dans la première moitié du 19ème siècle. Le dépassement du "petit-étatisme" allemand et la création d'un espace économique unitaire, qui, plus tard, en vient à s'unifier, est toujours, aujourd'hui, un modèle efficace que cherchent à suivre bon nombre de pays. La création de l'Union Economique Eurasienne entraînera à son tour un processus de convergence politique. Si nous posons nos regards sur l'exemple allemand, nous pouvons dire que l'unification du pays a été un succès complet: l'Empire allemand s'est développé très rapidement et est devenu la principale puissance économique européenne. Si nous portons nos regards sur l'Union Economique Eurasienne, on peut s'attendre à un développement analogue. L'espace économique eurasien s'harmonisera et déploiera toute sa force. Les potentialités sont gigantesques.

 

Toutefois, après le putsch de Kiev, l'Ukraine n'y adhèrera pas. Que signifie cette non-adhésion pour l'Union Economique Eurasienne? Sera-t-elle dès lors incomplète?

 

AD: Sans l'Est et le Sud de l'Ukraine, cette union économique sera effectivement incomplète. Je suis d'accord avec vous.

 

Pourquoi l'Est et le Sud?

 

AD: Pour la constitution d'une Union Economique Eurasienne, les parties économiquement les plus importantes de l'Ukraine se situent effectivement dans l'Est et le Sud du pays. Il y a toutefois un fait dont il faut tenir compte: l'Ukraine, en tant qu'Etat, a cessé d'exister dans ses frontières anciennes.

 

Que voulez-vous dire?

 

AD: Nous avons aujourd'hui deux entités sur le territoire de l'Ukraine, dont les frontières passent exactement entre les grandes sphères d'influence géopolitique. L'Est et le Sud s'orientent vers la Russie, l'Ouest s'oriente nettement vers l'Europe. Ainsi, les choses sont dans l'ordre et personne ne conteste ces faits géopolitiques. Je pars personnellement du principe que nous n'attendrons pas longtemps, avant de voir ce Sud et cet Est ukrainiens, la "nouvelle Russie", faire définitivement sécession et s'intégrer dans l'espace économique eurasien. L'Ouest, lui, se tournera vers l'Union Européenne et s'intégrera au système de Bruxelles. L'Etat ukrainien, avec ses contradictions internes, cessera pratiquement d'exister. Dès ce moment, la situation politique s'apaisera.

 

Si, outre le Kazakhstan, d'autres Etats centrasiatiques adhèrent à l'Union Economique Eurasienne et que tous entretiennent de bonnes relations avec la Chine, un puissant bloc eurasien continental verra le jour: ce sera un défi géopolitique considérable pour les Etats-Unis, plus considérable encore que ne le fut jamais l'URSS…

 

AD: Non. Je ne crois pas que l'on puisse comparer les deux situations. Nous n'aurons plus affaire à deux blocs idéologiquement opposés comme dans l'après-guerre. L'idéologie ne joue aucun rôle dans la formation de cette Union Economique Eurasienne. Au contraire: pour l'Europe occidentale, cet immense espace économique sera un partenaire stratégique très attirant. L'Europe est en mesure d'offrir tout ce dont la Russie a besoin et, en échange, la Russie dispose de toutes les matières premières, dont l'Europe a besoin. Les deux partenaires se complètent parfaitement, profiteraient à merveille d'une alliance stratégique.

 

A Bruxelles, en revanche, on voit les choses de manière bien différente… On y voit Moscou et les efforts de convergence eurasiens comme une "menace". On utilise un vocabulaire qui rappelle furieusement la Guerre froide…

 

AD:  Pour que l'alliance stratégique, que je viens d'esquisser, puisse fonctionner, l'Europe doit d'abord s'auto-libérer.

 

Se libérer de quoi?

 

AD: De la domination américaine. L'UE actuelle est bel et bien dominée par Washington. D'un point de vue historique, c'est intéressant: les Européens ont commencé par coloniser le continent américain et, aujourd'hui, par une sorte de retour de manivelle, les Américains colonisent l'Europe. Pour que l'Europe puisse récupérer ses marges de manœuvre, elle doit se libérer de l'hégémonisme américain. Le continent européen doit retrouver un sens de l'identité européenne, de manière à ce qu'il puisse agir en toute autonomie, en faveur de ses propres intérêts. Si les Européens se libèrent de la tutelle américaine, ils reconnaîtront bien vite que la Russie est leur partenaire stratégique naturel.

 

La crise ukrainienne et les sanctions contre la Russie, auxquelles participent aussi l'UE, révèlent combien l'Europe est sous l'influence de Washington. Pensez-vous vraiment que l'UE est capable de s'émanciper des Etats-Unis sur le plan de la défense et de la sécurité?

 

AD: Absolument. Aujourd'hui, l'Europe se comporte comme si elle était une entreprise américaine en franchise. Les sanctions contre la Russie ne correspondent en aucune façon aux intérêts économiques et stratégiques de l'Europe. Les sphères économiques européennes le savent bien car elles ne cessent de protester contre cette politique des sanctions. Cependant, une grande partie de l'élite politique européenne est absolument inféodée aux Etats-Unis. Pour elle, la voix de Washington est plus importante à écouter que les plaintes de ses propres ressortissants. Il est intéressant de noter aussi que la grande majorité des Européens, au contraire de l'élite politique, est critique à l'égard des Etats-Unis et est, dans le fond, pro-européenne au meilleur sens du terme. Une confrontation politique adviendra en Europe, c'est quasi préprogrammé. Ce sera une sorte de révolution. Il suffit d'attendre.

 

En mai, le traité sur les livraisons de gaz entre la Russie et la Chine a été conclu: ce traité prévoit que les factures seront établies en roubles ou en renminbi. Peut-on dès lors prévoir la fin de l'hégémonie du dollar, si cet exemple est suivi par d'autres?

 

AD: Par cet accord, la Russie et la Chine cherchent de concert à imposer un ordre mondial multipolaire. Ce sera une multipolarité en tous domaines: économique, stratégique, militaire, politique et idéologique. En Occident, on croit toujours à la pérennité d'un modèle unipolaire, dominé par les Etats-Unis. L'accord sino-russe de mai dernier marque cependant la fin de ce modèle prisé à l'Ouest. Quelle en sera la conséquence? Les Etats-Unis deviendront une puissance régionale et ne seront plus une puissance globale. Mais la Russie et la Chine, elles aussi, demeureront des puissances régionales, de même que l'Europe qui se sera libérée. Le monde multipolaire de demain sera un monde de puissances régionales. L'architecture du monde en sera changée.

 

(Entretien paru dans zur Zeit, Vienne, n°27-28/2014; http://www.zurzeit.at ).

 

samedi, 28 juin 2014

Conférence à Marseille

PRSENT~1.JPG

jeudi, 26 juin 2014

Eurosibérie ou Eurasie ? Ou comment penser l’organisation du « Cœur de la Terre »…

 

Eurasia_and_eurasianism.png

Eurosibérie ou Eurasie ? Ou comment penser l’organisation du « Cœur de la Terre »…

par Georges FELTIN-TRACOL

Ex: http://www.europemaxima.com

 

Europe Maxima met en ligne la conférence de Georges Feltin-Tracol prononcée le 17 mai 2014 à Lyon dans le cadre du colloque « Réflexions à l’Est » à l’invitation de l’association Terre & Peuple.

 

Mesdames, Mesdemoiselles, Messieurs, Chers Amis,

 

Avec les développements inquiétants de la crise ukrainienne, la presse officielle de l’Hexagone insiste lourdement sur l’influence, réelle ou supposée, d’Alexandre Douguine, le théoricien russe du néo-eurasisme, sur les gouvernants russes. Ainsi, Bruno Tertrais l’évoque-t-il dans Le Figaro du 25 avril 2014. Puis c’est au tour du quotidien Libération du 28 avril d’y faire référence. Toujours dans Le Figaro, mais du 20 avril, c’est la philosophe catholique, libérale et néo-conservatrice Chantal Delsol de le citer… mal. Mieux, Le Nouvel Observateur du 1er mai lui consacre quatre pages sous la signature de Vincent Jauvert qui le qualifie de « Raspoutine de Poutine ». Même la livraison mensuelle de mai du Monde diplomatique en vient à traiter de l’eurasisme (1).

 

Cette notoriété médiatique tranche avec leur discrétion habituelle sur le sujet. Jusqu’à ces dernières semaines, et à part les périodiques de notre large mouvance rebelle, Alexandre Douguine était parfois évoqué par les correspondants permanents du journal Le Monde à Moscou (2). Certes, si ses œuvres complètes ne sont pas accessibles aux lecteurs francophones, ceux-ci disposent néanmoins de quelques ouvrages et textes essentiels traduits (3).

 

L’engouement des plumitifs du Système altantique-occidental pour le penseur polyglotte du néo-eurasisme témoigne en tout cas de l’intérêt qu’on porte à ses idées. Plus largement, la question de l’Eurasie suscite une réelle curiosité. Outre le n° 59 du magazine Terre et Peuple de ce printemps 2014, signalons que le dossier du nouveau trimestriel de géopolitique animé par Pascal Gauchon, Conflits, concerne « L’Eurasie. Le grand dessein de Poutine ».

 

Fins connaisseurs des thèses eurasistes, les rédacteurs du Terre et Peuple n° 59 préfèrent pour leur part se rallier à la thèse de l’Eurosibérie. De quoi s’agit-il donc ? C’est en 1998, soit plus d’une dizaine d’années après avoir quitté la métapolitique, que Guillaume Faye y revient avec un essai magistral, L’archéofuturisme. Cet ouvrage qui fit date dans nos milieux, bouscule maintes certitudes tenaces et balance quelques bombes idéologiques dont le fameux concept d’Eurosibérie. Guillaume Faye écrivait qu’« il faudra bien un jour intégrer la Russie et envisager l’avenir sous les traits de l’Eurosibérie. Les déboires actuels de la Russie ne sont que d’ordre transitoire et conjoncturel. Il s’agit simplement de contrer la (naturelle et explicable) volonté des États-Unis de contrôler l’Eurosibérie et de placer la Russie sous un protectorat et une assistance financière, prélude à sa vassalisation stratégique et économique (4) ».

 

Le concept d’Eurosibérie se réfère explicitement à la « Maison commune » du Soviétique Mikhaïl Gorbatchev exprimée en juillet 1989, et de la « Confédération européenne » esquissée le 31 décembre 1989 par François Mitterrand (5) avant que ces deux projets soient torpillés par les nouveaux agents de l’atlantisme en Europe centrale et orientale parmi lesquels le déplorable théâtreux tchèque Vaclav Havel.

 

L’Eurosibérie correspond à un espace géographique déterminé. « Notre frontière est sur l’Amour. Face à la Chine. Sur l’Atlantique et le Pacifique, face à la république impériale américaine, unique super-puissance mais dont le déclin géostratégique et culturel est déjà “ viralement ” programmé pour le premier quart du XXIe siècle – dixit Zbigniew Brzezinski, pourtant apologiste de la puissance américaine. Et, sur la Méditerranée et le Caucase, face au bloc musulman (moins divisé qu’on ne le pense) qui ne nous fera surtout jamais de cadeaux et peut constituer la première source de menaces mais aussi, si nous sommes forts, un excellent partenaire… (6) » Alors, éventuellement, « demain, poursuit Faye : de la rade de Brest à celle de Port-Arthur, de nos îles gelées de l’Arctique au soleil victorieux de la Crète, de la lande à la steppe et des fjords au maquis, cent nations libres et unies, regroupées en Empire, pourront peut-être s’octroyer ce que Tacite nommait le Règne de la Terre, Orbis Terræ Regnum (7) ».

 

En lisant L’archéofuturisme, on remarque que Guillaume Faye écarte la notion même d’Occident. Rappelons qu’il fut l’un des premiers en 1980 à dissocier et à opposer l’Occident – dominé par Washington -, de l’Europe dont nous sommes les paladins (8). Préoccupé par la montée démographique rapide des peuples du Sud, Faye imagine l’Eurosibérie intégrer une « solidarité globale – ethnique, fondamentalement – du Nord face à la menace du Sud. Quoi qu’il en soit, la notion d’Occident disparaît pour céder la place à celle du Monde du Nord, ou Septentrion (9) ». Après l’avoir combattu (10), il se rallie en fin de compte à l’avis de Jean Cau. Parce que « nous ne pouvons pas compter sur les États-Unis pour s’opposer à un mondialisme dont le monde-race blanc ferait seul les frais (11) », son célèbre Discours de la décadence n’excluait pas « ce qui me paraît essentiel pour notre salut : un nationalisme (et donc par là même un refus du mondialisme) qui, quelles que soient les rigueurs qu’il implique et les répugnances qu’il peut inspirer aux décadents que nous sommes (et qui ont lié les idées de liberté à la réalisation de ce mondialisme en lequel elles n’auront plus de contenu et de sens) est notre seul possible Destin (12) ». En effet, « par son action, continue Jean Cau, la Russie a plus le souci de défendre son empire que de “ libérer ” les peuples. C’est en vertu d’une vocation impériale, afin de rester intacte et non par idéalisme moralisant et mondialiste qu’elle agit (13) ». « Telle est, en ces années 70 – et bientôt 80 – ma “ vue de l’esprit ”, poursuit-il. Ô paradoxe n’est-ce pas, que de déclarer qu’une Russie nationale, de par sa résistance à l’Américanisme mondialiste, est peut-être la seule chance de nos nations et de notre monde-race blanc ? Paradoxe apparent, je le crains. Et vérité d’Histoire, je le crois (14). »

 

Dans Pourquoi nous combattons, publié en 2001, Guillaume Faye revient sur l’Eurosibérie qu’il définit comme un exemple d’« ethnosphère (15) ». Bloc continental à l’économie auto-centrée, c’« est l’espace destinal des peuples européens enfin regroupés, de l’Atlantique au Pacifique, scellant l’alliance historique de l’Europe péninsulaire, de l’Europe centrale et de la Russie (16) ». Il s’agit, dans son esprit, d’une « forteresse commune, la maison commune, l’extension maximale et l’expression naturelle de la notion d’« Empire européen ». Elle serait véritablement la “ Troisième Rome ”, ce que ne fut jamais la Russie (17) ».

 

Relevons en revanche l’absence dans ce manifeste du Septentrion. Est-ce parce qu’en 1989, on évoquait déjà une communauté euro-atlantique de Vancouver à Vladivostok ? Le 25 septembre 2001, Vladimir Poutine s’adressa en allemand au Bundestag. Il voyait alors la Russie comme un pays européen et occidental. C’était le temps où Moscou tentât d’adhérer à l’Alliance Atlantique. Aux États-Unis, certains cénacles de pensée stratégique proches des paléo-conservateurs, ces adversaires farouches du néo-conservatisme, approuvaient cette démarche destinée in fine à contrer l’ascension chinoise. L’auteur de thriller-fictions, Tom Clancy, en fit un roman, L’Ours et le Dragon (18). Une approche assez similaire se retrouve chez l’écrivain Maurice G. Dantec dans les trois volumes de son Journal métaphysique et polémique. Ainsi écrit-il dans Laboratoire de catastrophe générale que « l’O.T.A.N. doit donc non seulement intégrer au plus vite toutes les anciennes républiques populaires de l’Est européen, mais prévoir à moyen terme une organisation tripartite unifiant les trois grandes puissances boréales : Amérique du Nord, Europe Unie (quel que soit son état, malheureusement) et Russie, plus le Japon, au sein d’un nouveau traité Atlantique – Pacifique Nord, qui puisse faire contrepoids à l’abomination onuzie et aux menaces sino-wahhabites. […] La seule issue pour l’Occident est donc bien de définir un nouvel arc stratégique panocéanique, trinitaire, avec l’Amérique au centre, l’Europe du côté atlantique, et la Fédération de Russie, assistée du Japon, pour l’espace pacifique – sibérien (19) ».

 

Dénoncé par le national-républicain Régis Debray (20), l’option pan-occidentaliste a trouvé en Maurice G. Dantec son chantre décomplexé. Toutefois, à part l’implication du Japon, le cadre pan-occidental (ou Hyper-Occident) correspond déjà à l’O.C.D.E. (Organisation de coopération et de développement économique) et à l’O.S.C.E. (Organisation pour la sécurité et la coopération en Europe). « Issue en 1994 de la transformation de la Conférence sur la sécurité et la coopération en Europe d’Helsinki (1975), note Jean-Sylvestre Mongrenier, l’O.S.C.E. est une organisation régionale de sécurité juridiquement reliée à l’O.N.U. Ce forum regroupe les États d’Europe (Russie comprise), d’Asie centrale (les anciennes républiques musulmanes d’U.R.S.S.) et d’Amérique du Nord, soit 51 États membres. L’O.S.C.E. est tournée vers la maîtrise des armements et la diplomatie préventive (21). » Aujourd’hui, l’O.S.C.E. compte 57 membres ainsi que six partenaires méditerranéens pour la coopération (Algérie, Égypte, Israël, Jordanie, Maroc, Tunisie), et cinq partenaires asiatiques (Japon, Corée du Sud, Thaïlande, Afghanistan et Australie). Par ailleurs, l’orientation nord-hémisphérique que préfigure imparfaitement l’O.S.C.E., ne se confine pas au seul cénacle littéraire. « J’ai aussi été l’un des tout premiers, à l’époque de l’effondrement soviétique, à lancer l’idée de la construction politique d’un “ continent boréal ”, de Brest à Vladivostok, affirme Jean-Marie Le Pen (22). » En 2007, son programme présidentiel mentionnait de manière explicite une « sphère boréale » de Brest à Vladivostok.

 

Dans son dernier tome du Journal métaphysique et polémique, Maurice G. Dantec, converti, suite à ses lectures patristiques et philosophiques, au catholicisme traditionaliste, vomit l’Union européenne, l’O.N.U., le multiculturalisme, et en appelle à l’avènement d’« États continentaux – fédéraux, vagues souvenirs des empires d’autrefois (23) ». Exigeant une « Grande Politique » pour le pâle mécanisme européen qu’il surnomme « Zéropa-Land », il croit toutefois que « véritable fondation politique du continent, car seule capable historiquement de fonder quelque chose, l’O.T.A.N., ce vénérable Anneau de Pouvoir, est seule habilitée à le refondre. Elle va s’auto-organiser dans le développement tri-polaire de l’Occident futur : Russie/Europe de l’Est – Grande-Bretagne + Commonwealth – Amérique hémisphérique (24) ». Enthousiasmé par l’American way of life, l’auteur de Babylon Babies prétend que « les Américains, sous peu, auront encore plus besoin des Russes que ceux-ci des Américains; un peu comme avec la Deuxième Guerre mondiale, la Quatrième Guerre mondiale, qui est le régime international – pacifié de la guerre comme continuation du terrorisme par d’autres moyens, va fournir le décor pour un basculement d’alliance stratégique comme jamais il n’y eut dans l’histoire des hommes. Le dollar U.S. intronisé monnaie en Sibérie. Les ressources humaines et naturelles de la Russie, les ressources humaines et financières des États-Unis. À elles deux, ces deux nations l’ont montré, elles seraient capables de mettre en place un véritable condominium planétaire, basé sur les technologies de la conquête spatiale et un partage des responsabilités qui équivaudraient à une win-win situation, comme aiment le dire ces salauds de capitalistes yankees (25) ». Acquis à l’Occident génétiquement survitaminé, Dantec balaie sans aucune hésitation toute Eurosibérie possible. « Poutine devrait y réfléchir à deux fois avant de s’engager avec les Franco-boches, contre le Nouvel Occident, avertit Dantec. Malgré les délires de certains “ penseurs ” de la “ droite révolutionnaire ”, les Sibériens n’ont strictement rien à battre des pantins qui s’agitent à Strasbourg ou à Bruxelles, c’est-à-dire à leurs antipodes sur tous les plans. Quand je lis, de-ci de-là, de telles avanies sur une sorte de bloc euro-continental qui s’étendrait de Paris – Ville lumière jusqu’à Vladivostok, et sous le nom d’Europe, rien ne peut retenir mon rire d’éclater à la face de ces bidules prophétologiques dérisoires, et même pas vraiment criminels. Imaginent-ils donc qu’un marin russe qui pêche dans les eaux du Kamtchatka puisse se sentir en quelque façon “ européen ”, à quelques encablures du Japon? Anchorage sera toujours plus près d’Irkoutsk que n’importe laquelle des capitales de l’union franco-boche (26). »

 

Bien que réfractaire au concept eurosibérien, Dantec n’en demeure pas moins le défenseur d’un monde – race blanc, d’un Septentrion sous une forme déviante et identitairement inacceptable. D’autres font le même constat mais en lui donnant une formulation plus convaincante. Co-fondateur du site Europe Maxima, mon camarade et vieux complice Rodolphe Badinand promeut un Saint-Empire européen arctique. « La maîtrise du pôle Nord est une nécessité géopolitique et mythique, note-t-il. Outre qu’il est impératif que l’Empire s’assure du foyer originel de nos ancêtres hyperboréens, le contrôle du cercle polaire revêt une grande valeur stratégique. Si le réchauffement planétaire se poursuit et s’accentue, dans quelques centaines d’années, la banquise aura peut-être presque disparu, faisant de l’océan polaire, un domaine maritime de toute première importance. En s’étendant sur les littoraux des trois continents qui la bordent, le Saint-Empire européen arctique, dans sa superficie idéale qui comprendrait […] l’Eurosibérie et les territoires septentrionaux de l’Amérique du Nord (Alaska, Yukon, Territoire du Nord-Ouest, Nunavut, Québec, Labrador, Terre-Neuve, Acadie, Provinces maritimes de l’Atlantique), le Groenland et l’Islande, détiendrait un atout appréciable dans le jeu des puissances mondiales. C’est enfin la transposition tangible dans l’espace du symbole polaire. Comme l’Empereur est la référence de l’Empire, notre Empire redeviendra le pôle du monde, le référent des renaissances spirituelles et identitaires de tous les peuples, loin de tout universalisme et de tout mondialisme (27). »

 

Guillaume Faye, Jean Cau, Maurice G. Dantec, Rodolphe Badinand réfléchissent au fait politique à partir du critère géographique de grand espace. Ils poursuivent, consciemment ou non, les travaux du philosophe euro-américain Francis Parker Yockey (28), du géopoliticien allemand Karl Haushofer et du théoricien géopolitique belge Jean Thiriart (29). Dès la décennie 1960, ce dernier pense à un État-nation continental grand-européen qui s’étendrait de Brest à Vladivostok. Puis, au fil du temps et en fonction des soubresauts propres aux relations internationales, il en vient à soutenir dans les années 1980 un empire euro-soviétique. La fin de l’U.R.S.S. en 1991 ne l’empêche pas d’envisager une nouvelle orientation géopolitique paneuropéenne totale. Influencé, au soir de sa vie, par son compatriote Luc Michel, Jean Thiriart suggère « une République impériale allant de Dublin à Vladivostok dans les structures d’un État unitaire, centralisé (30) ». Le fondement juridique de cet État grand-européen reposerait sur l’« omnicitoyenneté ». « Né à Malaga, diplômé à Paris, médecin à Kiev, plus tard bourgmestre à Athènes le seul et même homme jouira de tous les droits politiques à n’importe quel endroit de la République unitaire (31). » Mais quelles frontières pour cet espace politique commun ? « Les limites territoriales vitales de l’Europe “ Grande Nation ”, écrit Thiriart, vont ou passent à l’Ouest de l’Islande jusqu’à Vladivostok, de Stockholm jusqu’au Sahara-Sud, des Canaries au Kamtchaka, de l’Écosse au Béloutchistan. […] L’Europe sans le contrôle des deux rives à Gibraltar et à Istanbul traduirait un concept aussi risible et dangereux que les États-Unis sans le contrôle de Panama et des Malouines. Il nous faut des rivages faciles à défendre : Océan glacial Arctique, Atlantique, Sahara (rivage terrestre), accès aux détroits indispensables, Gibraltar, Suez, Istanbul, Aden – Djibouti, Ormuz (32). » La Grande Europe selon Thiriart intègre non seulement l’Afrique du Nord, mais aussi la Turquie, le Proche-Orient et l’Asie Centrale, Pakistan inclus ! La capitale de cette Méga-Europe serait… Istanbul !

 

On doit reconnaître que les thèses exposées ici dépassent largement ce que François Thual et Aymeric Chauprade désignent comme des « panismes ». « On appelle panisme, ou pan-idée, une représentation géopolitique fondée sur une communauté d’ordre ethnique, religieuse, régionale ou continentale. Le “ ou ” ici n’étant pas exclusif. Le concept forgé dès les années 1930 par la géopolitique allemande de Karl Haushofer sous le vocable Pan-Idee, est repris et développé par François Thual dans les années 1990 (33). »

 

Nonobstant l’inclusion de l’Afrique du Nord dans l’aire politique grande-européenne, l’ultime vision de Jean Thiriart correspond imparfaitement à l’eurasisme dont Alexandre Douguine est l’une des figures les plus connues. Or la réflexion eurasiste ne se réduit pas à cette seule personnalité.

 

Pour faire simple et court, car il ne s’agit pas de retracer ici la généalogie et le développement tant historique qu’actuel de l’eurasisme (34), ce courant novateur résulte, d’une part, du panslavisme, et, d’autre part, du slavophilisme. Inventé à la Renaissance par un Croate, Vinko Pribojevitch, le panslavisme entend restaurer l’unité politique des peuples slaves à partir de leur héritage historique et linguistique commun retracé par des philologues et des poètes. Le panslavisme se politise vite. En 1823 – 1825 existe en Russie une Société des Slaves unis liée au mouvement libéral décabriste. Contrairement à ses prolongements ultérieurs, le premier panslavisme est plutôt libéral, voire révolutionnaire – l’anarchiste Michel Bakounine participe en 1848 au Ire Congrès panslave à Prague. Cette réunion internationale en plein « Printemps des Peuples » est un échec du fait de son éclatement en trois tendances antagonistes :

 

— un courant libéral et démocratique représenté par la Société démocratique polonaise, fondée en 1832, qui s’oppose surtout aux menées russes et veut rassembler les Slaves de l’Ouest catholiques romains ou réformés;

 

— une tendance plus attachée à la foi orthodoxe et donc plus alignée sur la Russie impériale, qui agite les Slaves du Sud (Monténégrins, Serbes, Macédoniens, Bulgares) vivant dans des Balkans soumis au joug ottoman et qui rêve d’une libération nationale grâce à l’intervention de Saint-Pétersbourg, le seul État slave-orthodoxe indépendant (c’est le « russo-slavisme »);

 

— une faction austro-slaviste prônée par des Tchèques, des Polonais de Galicie, des Slovaques et des Croates qui essaye de fédérer des Slaves de l’Ouest, des Balkans et de l’espace danubien sous l’autorité des Habsbourg.

 

La postérité du panslavisme dans la seconde moitié du XIXe siècle suit des prolongements inattendus. Le « russo-slavisme » vire en un « pan-orthodoxisme » impérialiste qui n’hésite pas à exclure Polonais et Tchèques jugés trop occidentaux et « romano-germains » quand il ne les russifie pas. Encouragé par de brillants publicistes dont le Russe Nicolas Danilevski, ces panslavistes pro-russes approuvent la guerre russo-turque de 1877 – 1878 dont la victoire militaire russe se solde au Congrès de Berlin en défaite diplomatique à l’initiative des puissances occidentales.

 

 

eurasia.jpg

Opposé à la présence russe, les panslavistes polonais évoluent vers des positions nationalistes plus ou moins affirmées. La Démocratie nationale de Dmovski œuvre avant 1914 pour un royaume de Pologne en union personnelle avec le tsar tandis que le militant socialiste et futur maréchal polonais, Joseph Pilsudski, récuse toute collaboration avec la Russie. Ayant en tête l’âge d’or de l’Union de Pologne – Lituanie entre les XIVe et XVIIIe siècles, ce Polonais natif de la ville lituanienne de Vilnius envisage un glacis anti-russe de la Baltique à la Mer Noire, soit la Pologne, la Lituanie, la Biélorussie et l’Ukraine : la Fédération Intermarum ou Fédération Entre Mers. Cette aspiration fédéraliste demeurera le cœur nucléaire du prométhéisme de Pilsudski. Ce projet de Fédération Entre Mers (avec les États baltes) vient de réapparaître dans le programme électoral présidentiel du mouvement ultra-nationaliste ukrainien Pravyï Sektor (Secteur droit) de Dmytro Yaroch (35).

 

Le conservatisme de la Double-Monarchie déçoit l’austro-slavisme qui laisse bientôt la place à des panismes partiels (ou panslavismes régionaux). En 1914, la Serbie encourage l’irrédentisme des Serbes de Bosnie au nom du yougoslavisme. Mais ce yougoslavisme, orthodoxe et russophile, à forte tonalité panserbe, diffère tant du yougoslavisme de l’archevêque croate Joseph Strossmayer qui souhaite rassembler autour des Habsbourg les peuples slaves du Sud que du yougoslavisme libertaire et socialiste favorable à une large fédération balkanique, concrétisé en août 1903 par l’éphémère république socialiste macédonienne de Kroutchevo. On sait que l’archiduc François-Ferdinand, époux d’une aristocrate tchèque, préconisait une Triple-Monarchie avec un pilier slave, ce que ne voulaient pas les Hongrois d’où peut-être une connivence objective entre certains services serbes et quelques milieux républicains magyars…

 

Faut-il pour autant parler du naufrage du panslavisme ? Sûrement pas quand on examine la politique étrangère de l’excellent président du Bélarus, Alexandre Loukachenko. Depuis 1994, date de l’arrivée au pouvoir de cet authentique homme d’État dont l’action contraste avec la nullité des Cameron, Merkel, l’« Écouté de Neuilly » ou notre Flamby hexagonal !, le président bélarussien a à plusieurs reprises encouragé le renouveau panslaviste. Permettez-moi par conséquent de m’inscrire ici en faux avec l’affirmation d’Alain Cagnat qui qualifie le Bélarus de « musée du stalinisme. [… Cet État] n’a aucune existence internationale. Quant au pseudo-particularisme linguistique ou culturel biélorusse, cela tient au folklore. On peut logiquement penser que, une fois refermée la parenthèse Loukachenko, les Biélorussiens se hâteront de rejoindre le giron russe (36) ». Que le russe soit depuis 1995 la langue co-officielle du Bélarus à côté du bélarussien n’implique pas nécessairement une intégration future dans la Russie sinon les Irlandais, tous anglophones, demanderaient à rejoindre non pas la Grande-Bretagne (ils ont largement donné), mais plutôt les États-Unis, ou bien les Jurassiens suisses la République française. La présidence d’Alexandre Loukachenko a consolidé l’identité nationale bélarussienne qui s’enracine à la fois dans les traditions polythéistes slaves et  l’héritage chrétien. Lors du solstice d’été, le Bélarus célèbre la fête de Yanka Koupali. Ce rite très ancien témoigne de l’attachement de la population à ses racines ainsi qu’à la nature. Il s’agit d’invoquer les éléments naturels pour que les récoltes soient bonnes. De nombreuses danses folkloriques sont alors exécutées par des jeunes femmes aux têtes couronnées de fleurs.

 

Par ailleurs, membre du Mouvement des non-alignés et allié du Venezuela de feu le Commandante Hugo Chavez, le Bélarus se trouve à l’avant-garde de la résistance au Nouveau désordre mondial propagé par l’Occident américanomorphe. Les projets d’union Russie – Bélarus sont pour l’heure gelés. Pour s’unir, il faut un consentement mutuel. Or le peuple bélarussien se sent autre par rapport à ses cousins russes. La revue en ligne, Le Courrier de la Russie, rapporte une certaine méfiance générale envers le grand voisin oriental. Une esthéticienne de Minsk déclare au journaliste russe : « Si la Russie et la Biélorussie se réunissent, ce sera du grand n’importe quoi. En Biélorussie, il y a de la discipline et de l’ordre, mais en Russie, il y a trop d’injustice, c’est le désordre (37). » Quelques peu dépités par les témoignages recueillis, les auteurs de l’article soulignent finalement que « pour les Biélorusses, la langue russe n’est pas associée directement avec la Russie », que « la Russie est perçue plutôt comme une force politique, du reste à l’esprit impérial assez désagréable » et quand « nous avons proposé à des étudiants de passer une sorte de test projectif – dessiner leur pays sur la carte du monde en s’orientant non sur les connaissances géographiques mais sur les associations personnelles, la majorité des Biélorusses ont fourni une image très semblable. Leur pays au centre et, autour, comme des pétales de marguerite et avec une importance équivalente, la Russie, la Pologne, la Lituanie, le Venezuela… (38) »

 

Sur la crise ukrainienne, le Président Loukachenko rejette toute fédéralisation du pays. Il a aussi reconnu et reçu le gouvernement provisoire de Kyiv et condamne les tentatives de sécession. Déjà en 2008, ce fidèle allié de Moscou n’a jamais reconnu l’indépendance de l’Abkhazie et de l’Ossétie du Sud. Mieux, il n’hésite pas à contrarier les intérêts russes. Le 26 août 2013, un proche de Poutine, Vladislav Baumgertner, directeur général d’Uralkali, une importante firme russe spécialisée dans la potasse, est arrêté à Minsk et incarcéré. « Quels que soient les sentiments qu’il inspire, le président biélorusse Alexandre Loukachenko entretient avec le Kremlin des relations qui sont plus d’égal à égal que celles des Grecs avec Merkel : imaginez ce qui se passerait si le patron d’une grosse entreprise allemande était arrêté en Grèce (39). » Minsk peut donc se montrer indocile envers Moscou qui respecte bien plus que les donneurs de leçons occidentaux la souveraineté étatique. En outre, contrairement encore à l’État-continent, le Bélarus n’appartient pas à l’O.M.C. et applique encore la peine de mort.

 

À la fin des années 1830 apparaissent en Russie les slavophiles (Alexis Khomiakov, Constantin Léontiev, Ivan Kireïevski, Constantin Aksakov, Fiodor Dostoïevski, etc.) dont la dénomination était à l’origine un sobriquet donné par leurs adversaires. Si ces romantiques particuliers ne sont pas toujours panslavistes, ils s’accordent volontiers sur l’exaltation des idiosyncrasies de leur civilisation, en particulier sa foi orthodoxe, sa paysannerie et son autocratie. Hostiles aux occidentalistes qui célèbrent un monde occidental romano-germanique hérétique en constante modification, les slavophiles s’associent trop au pouvoir tsariste et s’étiolent à l’orée de la Grande Guerre.

 

On a pu dire que leur dernier représentant fut Alexandre Soljénitsyne. Quand sombre l’Union Soviétique, l’ancien dissident envisage une « Union des peuples slaves » avec la Russie, l’Ukraine, le Bélarus et les marches septentrionales du Kazakhstan fortement russophones. Cependant, Soljénitsyne ne nie pas la réalité des langues, cultures et identités bélarussienne et ukrainienne. Il les admet et veut même les valoriser ! Il prévient néanmoins que « si le peuple ukrainien désirait effectivement se détacher de nous, nul n’aurait le droit de le retenir de force. Mais divers sont ces vastes espaces et seule la population locale peut déterminer le destin de son petit pays, le sort de sa région (40) ».

 

eura2148253926.jpgLa Première Guerre mondiale, les révolutions russes de 1917, le renversement du tsarisme et la guerre civile jusqu’en 1921  bouleversent les héritiers du slavophilisme. C’est au sein de l’émigration russe blanche qu’émerge alors l’eurasisme. Exilés à Prague et à Paris, les premiers eurasistes, Nicolas Troubetskoï, Pierre Savitsky, Georges Vernadsky, Pierre Suvchinskiy, redécouvrent le caractère asiatique de leur histoire et réhabilitent les deux cent cinquante ans d’occupation tataro-mongole. Saluant l’œuvre des khan de Karakorum, ils conçoivent l’espace russe comme un troisième monde particulier. S’ils proclament le caractère eurasien des régions actuellement ukrainiennes de la Galicie, de la Volhynie et de la Podolie, ils se désintéressent superbement des Balkans, du Caucase et de la Crimée. Parfois précurseurs d’une troisième voie, certains d’entre-eux approuvent le renouveau soviétique sous la férule de Staline si bien que quelques-uns retournent en U.R.S.S. pour se retrouver envoyés au Goulag ou exécutés.

 

Pensée « géographiste », voire géopolitiste, parce qu’elle prend en compte l’espace steppique, l’eurasisme ne dure qu’une dizaine d’années et semble disparu en 1945. Remarquons que le numéro-culte d’Éléments consacré à la Russie en 1986 ignore l’eurasisme pourtant présent en filigrane dans certains milieux restreints du P.C.U.S. (41). Cependant, la transmission entre le premier eurasisme et l’eurasisme actuel revient à Lev Goumilev qui sut élaborer un nouvel eurasisme à portée ethno-biologico-naturaliste. Le néo-eurasisme resurgit dans les années 1990 et prend rapidement un ascendant certain au sein du gouvernement. Dès 1996, un eurasiste connu, l’arabophone Evgueni Primakov, devient ministre des Affaires étrangères avant d’être nommé président du gouvernement russe entre 1998 et 1999.

 

Aujourd’hui, le néo-eurasisme russe se structure autour de trois principaux pôles. Activiste métapolitique de grand talent, Alexandre Douguine ajoute aux travaux des précurseurs et de Goumilev divers apports d’origine ouest-européenne comme l’école de la Tradition primordiale (Guénon et Evola), de la « Révolution conservatrice » allemande, des « Nouvelles Droites » françaises, thioises et italiennes, et des approches marxistes hétérodoxes d’ultra-gauche (42). Un autre « courant, autour de la revue Evrazija (Eurasie) d’Édouard Bagramov, est plus culturel et folkloriste, explique Marlène Laruelle. Son thème central est la mixité, l’alliance slavo-turcique, qu’il illustre par la réhabilitation de l’Empire mongol et des minorités turco-musulmanes dans l’histoire russe, par une comparaison entre religiosité orthodoxe et mysticisme soufi : la fidélité à la Russie serait ainsi le meilleur mode de protection de l’identité nationale des petits peuples eurasiens. Sur le plan politique, Evrazija appelle à la reconstitution d’une unité politique et économique de l’espace post-soviétique autour du projet du président Nazarbaev, qui finance en partie la revue. Le troisième et dernier grand courant eurasiste, celui d’Alexandre Panarine et de Boris Erassov, est le plus théorique puisqu’il tente de réhabiliter la notion d’« empire » : l’empire ne serait ni un nationalisme étroit ni un impérialisme agressif mais une nouvelle forme de citoyenneté, d’« étaticité » reposant sur des valeurs et des principes et non sur le culte d’une nation. Il incarnerait sur le plan politique la diversité nationale de l’Eurasie et annoncerait au plan international l’arrivée d’un monde dit “ post-moderne ” où les valeurs conservatrices, religieuses et ascétiques gagneraient sur les idéaux de progrès de l’Occident (43) ». Treize ans plus tard, en dépit du décès de Goumilev et de Panarine, cette répartition théorique persiste avec l’apparition d’« un courant néo-eurasiste sinophile, incarné par Mikhaïl Titarenko, le directeur de l’Institut d’Extrême-Orient de l’Académie des Sciences (44) ». Quoique balbutiante, cette orientation tend à s’affirmer progressivement. « Les cinq cents ans de domination de l’Occident sur le monde sont en train de s’achever, assurait en 2007 Anatoli Outkine, historien à l’Institut des États-Unis et du Canada de l’Académie des Sciences, et, in extremis, la Russie a réussi à prendre le train des nouveaux pays qui montent, aux côtés de la Chine, de l’Inde et du Brésil. […] L’Europe aurait pu être le centre du monde si seulement la Russie avait été acceptée dans l’O.T.A.N. et l’Union européenne. […] En 2025, c’est Shanghai qui sera le centre du monde, et la Russie sera dans le camp de l’Orient. Aujourd’hui, nous n’attendons plus rien de l’Occident (45). » « L’Extrême-Orient est systématiquement valorisé dans les discours officiels russes comme une région d’avenir, signale Marlène Laruelle. Son évocation participe en effet de l’idée que la Russie est une puissance asiatique ayant un accès direct à la région la plus dynamique du monde, l’Asie – Pacifique dont elle est partie intégrante. Si tel est le cas sur le plan géographique – bien que l’Asie du Nord soit marginale, économiquement, comparée à l’Asie du Sud, qui concentre le dynamisme actuel -, il n’en est rien au niveau économique. Le commerce transfrontalier avec la Chine est bel et bien en pleine expansion, et des projets de zone de libre-échange entre la Russie, la Chine et la Corée du Sud sont à l’ordre du jour. Mais, globalement, l’économie russe est encore peu tournée vers l’Asie et peu intégrée à ses mécanismes régionaux (46). »

 

ad1609207631.pngL’eurasisme n’est pas propre à la Russie. Le Kazakhstan de Nursultan Nazarbaïev assume, lui aussi, cette idéologie. Inquiet des revendications territoriales de Soljénitsyne, il a transféré la capitale d’Almaty à une ville créée ex-nihilo, Astana, dont l’université d’État s’appelle officiellement Lev-Goumilev… Dans le n° 1 de Conflits, Tancrède Josserand traite avec brio de l’eurasisme turc (47). L’eurasisme est aussi présent en Hongrie via le pantouranisme dont le Jobbik se veut le continuateur. Mais, dans ce dernier cas, l’idéocratie eurasiste exprimée en Mitteleuropa apparaît surtout comme un cheval de Troie pro-turc. Le Jobbik souhaiterait que l’Union européenne s’ouvre à Ankara. Avec lucidité, Jean-Sylvestre Mongrenier estime que « lorsque ce type de production n’est pas destiné à promouvoir la candidature turque à l’Union européenne, l’« eurasisme » européen accorde une place centrale à l’alliance russe, la mission historique de la “ Troisième Rome ” consistant faire de l’Asie du Nord le prolongement géopolitique de l’Europe. Aussi serait-il plus adéquat de parler d’« Eurosibérie »  (48) ».

 

Existe-t-il en Chine une pensée eurasiste ? Impossible en l’état de répondre à cette question. Ces derniers jours, les médiats ont rapporté que Pékin aimerait construire une ligne à grande vitesse de 13 000 km qui relierait le Nord-Ouest de la Chine aux États-Unis en deux jours par un train roulant à 350 km/h. Cette hypothétique L.G.V. traverserait la Sibérie, l’Alaska et le Canada et franchirait le détroit de Béring par un tunnel de 200 km (49). En revanche existe au Japon jusqu’en 1941 une mouvance eurasiste. Entre 1905 et 1940, les milieux cultivés de l’archipel débattent avec vigueur de deux orientations géopolitiques contradictoires : le Nanshin-ron ou « Doctrine d’expansion vers le Sud » (l’Asie du Sud-Est et les îles du Pacifique, ce qui implique d’affronter les puissances européennes et étasunienne) et le Hokushin-ron ou « Doctrine d’expansion vers le  Nord » (à savoir combattre l’U.R.S.S. – Russie afin de s’emparer de la partie Nord de Sakhaline, de la Mongolie, de Vladivostok, du lac Baïkal et de la Sibérie centrale). Adversaire de la Faction du contrôle (Toseiha) de Tojo, le Kodoha (ou Faction de la voie impériale) du général Sadao Araki a en partie défendu l’Hokushin-ron. La synthèse revient à Tokutomi Sohô qui se prononce en faveur d’une invasion simultanée du Nord et du Sud, d’où l’affirmation dans un second temps d’une visée pan-asiatique. On sait cependant que la poussée vers le Nord est brisée lors de la défaite nippone de Khalkin-Gol en 1939 (50). Cette digression extrême-orientale n’est pas superflue. Robert Steuckers rappelle que le Kontinentalblock de Karl Haushofer a été « très probablement repris des hommes d’État japonais du début du XXe siècle, tels le prince Ito, le comte Goto et le Premier ministre Katsura, avocats d’une alliance grande-continentale germano-russo-japonaise (51) ».

 

Éclectique au Japon, en Turquie, en Hongrie, l’eurasisme l’est aussi en Russie. « L’idéologie néo-eurasiste, précise Marlène Laruelle, peut ainsi se présenter comme une science naturelle (Goumilev), une géopolitique et un spiritisme (Douguine), une intégration économique (Nazarbaev, organes de la C.E.I.), un mode de gestion des problèmes internes de la Fédération (eurasisme turcique), une philosophie de l’histoire (Panarine), une “ culturologie ” (Bagramov), un nouveau terrain scientifique (Vestnik Evrazii) (52) », d’où une multiplicité de contentieux internes : Panarine et Bagramov ont par exemple critiqué les approches biologisantes, ethnicisantes et métapolitiques de Goumilev et de Douguine.

 

L’eurasisme reste un pragmatisme géopolitique qui, à rebours de l’idée eurosibérienne, prend en compte la diversité ethno-spirituelle des peuples autochtones de Sibérie. Quid en effet dans l’Eurosibérie ethnosphérique de leur existence ? Le territoire sibérien n’est pas un désert humain. Y vivent des peuples minoritaires autochtones tels les Samoyèdes, les Bouriates, les Yakoutes, etc. Il ne faut pas avoir à ce sujet une volonté assimilatrice comme l’appliquèrent les Russes tsaristes et les Soviétiques. La nature de la Russie est d’être multinationale. Entre ici les notions complémentaires d’ethnopolitique et de psychologie des peuples. « Il convient d’attacher la plus grande importance à l’étude de ces unités secondaires qu’en France on appelle régions et pays, déclare Abel Miroglio […]. Une bonne psychologie nationale ne peut se dispenser de s’appuyer sur la connaissance des diverses régions; bien sûr, elle la domine, elle ne s’y réduit pas; et pareillement la psychologie de la région exige, pour être bien conduite, l’étude de ses divers terroirs (53). » Par conséquent, si la société russe adopte une solution nationaliste telle que la défendent des « nationaux-démocrates » anti-Poutine à la mode Alexeï Navalny, elle perdra inévitablement les territoires sibériens. Or ce vaste espace participe pleinement à la civilisation russe. « La civilisation est un ensemble plus large qui peut contenir plusieurs cultures, juge Gaston Bouthoul. Car la civilisation est un complexe très général dont les dominantes sont les connaissances scientifiques et techniques et les principales doctrines philosophiques. Les cultures, tout en participant de la civilisation à laquelle elles appartiennent, présentent surtout des différences de traditions esthétiques, historiques et mythiques (54). » La civilisation russe est polyculturaliste qui est l’exact contraire radical du multiculturalisme marchand.

 

Voilà pourquoi Douguine assigne à l’Orthodoxie, au judaïsme, à l’islam et au chamanisme – animisme le rang de religions traditionnelles, ce que n’ont pas le catholicisme et les protestantismes représentés dans l’étranger proche par une multitude de sectes évangéliques d’origine étatsunienne. C’est ainsi qu’il faut comprendre son fameux propos : « Le rejet du chauvinisme, du racisme et de la xénophobie procède d’abord chez moi d’une fidélité à la philosophie des premiers Eurasistes, qui soulignaient de façon positive le mélange de races et d’ethnies dans la formation et le développement de l’identité russe et surtout grand-russe. Il est par ailleurs une conséquence logique des principes de la géopolitique, selon lesquels le territoire détermine en quelque sorte le destin de ceux qui y vivent (le Boden vaut plus que le Blut) (55) ». Rien de surprenant de la part d’Alexandre Douguine, traditionaliste de confession orthodoxe vieux-croyants. Il ajoute même que, pour lui, « le traditionalisme est la source de l’inspiration, le point de départ. Mais il faut le développer plus avant, le vivre, le penser et repenser (56) ».

 

Alexandre Douguine, en lecteur attentif de Carl Schmitt, systématise l’opposition entre la Terre et la Mer (57), entre les puissances telluriques et les puissances thalassocratiques. Alors que triomphe une « vie liquide » décrite par Zygmunt Bauman (58), sa démarche nettement tellurocratique est cohérente puisqu’elle s’appuie sur le Sol et non sur le Sang dont la nature constitue, en dernière analyse, un liquide. Et puis, en authentique homme de Tradition, Douguine insiste sur le fait, primordial à ses yeux, qu’ « un Eurasiste n’est donc nullement un “ habitant du continent eurasiatique ”. Il est bien plutôt l’homme qui assume volontairement la position d’une lutte existentielle, idéologique et métaphysique, contre l’américanisme, la globalisation et l’impérialisme des valeurs occidentales (la “ société ouverte ”, les “ droits de l’homme ”, la société de marché). Vous pouvez donc très bien être eurasiste en vivant en Amérique latine, au Canada, en Australie ou en Afrique (59) ». Marlène Laruelle considère néanmoins que « si l’eurasisme est bien un nationalisme, il se différencie des courants ethnonationalistes plus classiques par sa mise en valeur de l’État et non de l’ethnie, par son assimilation entre Russie et Eurasie, entre nation et Empire, et emprunte beaucoup au discours soviétique (60) ». Il est évident que les eurasistes pensent en terme d’empire et non en nation pourvue de « frontières naturelles » établies et reconnues. Guère suspect de cosmopolitisme, l’écrivain Vladimir Volkoff fait dire dans son roman uchronique, Alexandra, à Ivan Barsoff, l’un des personnages principaux qui emprunte pas mal des traits de l’auteur, qui est le Premier ministre de cette tsarine, que son empire russe « n’a pas de limites naturelles (à moins que ce soient les océans Arctique et Indien, Pacifique et Atlantique), il n’a pas d’unité linguistique, ni raciale, ni même religieuse : il est tissu autour d’une triple colonne torsadée constituée par l’orthodoxie, la monarchie et l’idéalisme du peuple russe servant de noyau aux autres (61) ». 

 

Par-delà les écrits de Guillaume Faye, de Jean Thiriart, de Maurice G. Dantec, des eurasistes ou des officiers nippons, tous veulent maîtriser le Heartland, ce « Cœur de la Terre ». Correspondant à l’ensemble Oural – Sibérie occidentale, cette notion revient au Britannique Halford Mackinder qui l’écrit en 1904 dans « Le pivot géographique de  l’Histoire ». Pour Mackinder, le Heartland est un espace inaccessible à la navigation depuis l’Océan. Pour Jean-Sylvestre Mongrenier, « le concept de Heartland et celui d’Eurasie […] se recoupent partiellement (62) ». Il entérine ce qu’avance Zbignew Brzezinski à propos de cette zone-pivot : « Passant de l’échelle régionale à l’approche planétaire, la géopolitique postule que la prééminence sur le continent eurasien sert de point d’ancrage à la domination globale (63) ». Le grand géopolitologue étatsunien se réfère implicitement à la thèse de Mackinder pour qui contrôler le Heartland revient à dominer l’Île mondiale formée de l’Europe, de l’Asie et de l’Afrique, et donc à maîtriser le monde entier. Cette célèbre formulation ne lui appartient pas. L’historien François Bluche rapporte qu’en novembre 1626, le chevalier de Razilly adresse à Richelieu un mémoire dans lequel est affirmé que « “ Quiconque est maître de la mer, a un grand pouvoir sur terre ”. [Cette trouvaille] poursuivra le Cardinal, l’obsédera, inspirera directement le Testament politique (64) ». « L’Eurasie demeure, en conséquence, l’échiquier sur lequel se déroule le combat pour la primauté globale (65). » Il faut toutefois se garder des leurres propres au « géopolitisme ». Ce dernier « est venu combler le vide provoqué par les basses pressions idéologiques. Il ne s’agit pas de recourir à la géographie fondamentale – comme savoir scientifique et méthode d’analyse – pour démêler l’écheveau des conflits et tenter d’apporter des réponses aux défis des temps présents, mais d’une vision idéologique qui se limite à quelques pauvres axiomes : la Russie est située au cœur du Heartland et elle est appelée à dominer (66) ».

 

Attention cependant à ne pas verser dans le manichéisme géopolitique ! Toute véritable puissance doit d’abord se penser amphibie, car, à la Terre et à la Mer, une stratégie complète s’assure maintenant de la projection des forces tout en couvrant les dimensions aérienne, sous-marine, spatiale ainsi que le cyberespace et la guerre de l’information. C’est ainsi qu’il faut saisir qu’à la suite de Robert Steuckers, « l’eurasisme, dans notre optique, relève bien plutôt d’un concept géographique et stratégique (67) ».

 

appel_eurasie_cov_500.jpgDe nouvelles études sur les écrits de Mackinder démontrent en fait qu’il attachait une importance cruciale au Centreland, la « Terre centrale arabe », qui coïncide avec le Moyen-Orient. Et puis, que se soit l’Eurosibérie ou l’Eurasie, l’autorité organisatrice de l’espace politique ainsi créé doit se préoccuper de la gestion des immenses frontières terrestres et maritimes. Actuellement, les États-Unis ont beau avoir fortifié leur mur en face du Mexique, ils n’arrivent pas à contenir les flux migratoires clandestins des Latinos. L’Union pseudo-européenne est incapable de ralentir la submersion migratoire à travers la Méditerranée. Même si toutes les frontières eurosibériennes étaient sous surveillance électronique permanente et si était appliquée une préférence européenne, à la rigueur nationale, voire ethno-régionale, il est probable que cela freinerait l’immigration, mais ne l’arrêterait pas, à moins d’accepter la décroissance pour soi, une économie de puissance pour la communauté géopolitique et la fin de la libre circulation pour tous en assignant à chacun un territoire de vie précis.

 

Vu leur superficie, l’Eurosibérie ou l’Eurasie n’incarnent-elles pas de véritables démesures géopolitiques ? Si oui, elles portent en leur sein des germes inévitables de schisme civilisationnel comme l’a bien vu en poète-visionnaire le romancier Jean-Claude Albert-Weill. Dans Sibéria, le troisième et dernier volume de L’Altermonde, magnifique fresque uchronique qui dépeint une Eurosibérie fière d’elle-même et rare roman vraiment néo-droitiste de langue française (68), on perçoit les premières divergences entre une vieille Europe, adepte du Chat, et une nouvelle, installée en Sibérie, qui vénère le Rat.

 

Le risque d’éclatement demeure sous-jacent en Russie,  particulièrement en Sibérie. Dès les années 1860 se manifestait un mouvement indépendantiste sibérien de Grigori Potanine, chantre de « La Sibérie aux Sibériens ! ». Libéral nationalitaire, ce mouvement fomenta vers 1865 une insurrection qui aurait bénéficié de l’appui de citoyens américains et d’exilés polonais. Quelques années plus tôt, vers 1856 – 1857, des entreprises étatsuniennes se proposaient de financer l’entière réalisation de voies ferrées entre Irkoutsk et Tchita. La Russie déclina bien sûr la proposition. Pendant la guerre civile russe, Potanine présida un gouvernement provisoire sibérien hostile à la fois aux « Rouges » et aux « Blancs ». Ce séparatisme continue encore. En octobre 1993, en pleine crise politique, Sverdlovsk adopta une constitution pour la « République ouralienne ». Plus récemment, en 2010, le F.S.B. s’inquiéta de l’activisme du groupuscule Solution nationale pour la Sibérie qui célèbre Potanine… Il est à parier que des officines occidentales couvent d’un grand intérêt d’éventuelles séditions sibériennes qui, si elles réussissaient, briseraient définitivement tout projet d’eurasisme ou d’Eurosibérie.

 

L’Eurosibérie « est un “ paradigme ”, c’est-à-dire un idéal, un modèle, un objectif qui comporte la dimension d’un mythe concret, agissant et mobilisateur, annonce Guillaume Faye (69) ». Il s’agit d’un mythe au sens sorélien du terme qui comporte le risque de remettre à plus tard l’action décisive. Pour y remédier, faisons nôtre le slogan du penseur écologiste Bernard Charbonneau : « Penser global, agir local ». Si le global est ici l’idéal eurosibérien, voire eurasiste, l’action locale suppose en amont un lent et patient travail fractionnaire d’édification d’une contre-société identitaire en sécession croissante de la présente société multiculturaliste marchande avariée. Par la constitution informelle mais tangibles de B.A.D. (bases autonomes durables), « il faut, en lisière du Système, construire un espace où incuber d’autres structures sociales et mentales. À l’intérieur de cet espace autonomisé, il sera possible de reconstituer les structures de l’enracinement (70) ».

 

Les zélotes du métissage planétaire se trompent. L’enracinement n’est ni l’enfermement ou le repli sur soi. Soutenir un enracinement multiple ou plus exactement un enracinement multiscalaire – à plusieurs échelles d’espace différencié – paraît le meilleur moyen de concilier l’amour de sa petite patrie, la fidélité envers sa patrie historique et l’ardent désir d’œuvrer en faveur de sa grande patrie continentale quelque que soit sa désignation, car « l’enracinement est peut-être le besoin le plus important et le plus méconnu de l’âme humaine. C’est un des plus difficiles à définir. Un être humain a une racine par sa participation réelle, active et naturelle à l’existence d’une collectivité qui conserve vivants certains trésors du passé et certains pressentiments d’avenir. Participation naturelle, c’est-à-dire amenée automatiquement par le lieu, la naissance, la profession, l’entourage. Chaque être humain a besoin d’avoir de multiples racines. Il a besoin de recevoir la presque totalité de sa vie morale, intellectuelle, spirituelle, par l’intermédiaire des milieux dont il fait naturellement partie (71) ». N’oublions jamais qu’au-delà des enjeux géopolitiques, notre combat essentiel demeure la persistance de notre intégrité d’Albo-Européen.

 

Je vous remercie.

 

Georges Feltin-Tracol

 

Notes

 

1 : Cf. la tribune délirante, summum de politiquement correct, de Thimothy Snyder, « La Russie contre Maïdan », in Le Monde, 23 et 24 février 2014; « Poutine doit écraser le virus de Maïdan… Entretien avec Lilia Chevtsova par Vincent Jauvert », in Le Nouvel Observateur, 27 février 2014; Bruno Tertrais, « La rupture ukrainienne », in Le Figaro, 25 avril 2014; Chantal Delsol, « Occident – Russie : modernité contre tradition ? », in Le Figaro, 30 avril 2014; Jean-Marie Chauvier, « Eurasie, le “ choc des civilisations ” version russe », in Le Monde diplomatique, mai 2014; Vincent Jauvert, « Le Raspoutine de Poutine », in Le Nouvel Observateur, 1er mai 2014; Isabelle Lasserre, « Grande serbie, Grande Russie, une idéologie commune », in Le Figaro, 6 mai 2014, etc.

 

2 : Ainsi, dans Le Monde du 18 janvier 2001, Marie Jégo évoquait-elle le projet poutinien de restauration d’un ensemble néo-soviétique en se référant aux Fondements de géopolitique (non traduit) de Douguine.

 

3 : Sur les œuvres de Douguine disponibles en français, se reporter à Georges Feltin-Tracol, « Rencontre avec Alexandre Douguine », in Réflexions à l’Est, Alexipharmaque, coll. « Les Réflexives », Billère, 2012, note 5 p. 220. On rajoutera depuis la parution de cet ouvrage : Alexandre Douguine, L’appel de l’Eurasie. Conversation avec Alain de Benoist, Avatar, coll. « Heartland », Étampes, 2013; Alexandre Douguine, La Quatrième théorie politique. La Russie et les idées politiques du XXIe siècle, Ars Magna Éditions, Nantes, 2012; Alexandre Douguine, Pour une théorie du monde multipolaire, Ars Magna Éditions, Nantes, 2013.

 

4 : Guillaume Faye, L’archéofuturisme, L’Æncre, Paris, 1998, p. 192.

 

5 : Sur ce projet mitterrandien méconnu, cf. Roland Dumas, « Un projet mort-né : la Confédération européenne », in Politique étrangère, volume 66, n° 3, 2001, pp. 687 – 703.

 

6 : Guillaume Faye, L’archéofuturisme, op. cit., p. 192.

 

7 : Idem, p. 194.

 

8 : cf. Guillaume Faye, « Pour en finir avec la civilisation occidentale », in Éléments, n° 34, avril – mai 1980, pp. 5 – 11.

 

9 : Guillaume Faye, L’archéofuturisme, op. cit., p. 75, souligné par l’auteur.

 

10 : cf. Guillaume Faye, « Il n’y a pas de “ monde blanc ” », in Éléments, n° 34, avril – mai 1980, p. 6.

 

11 : Jean Cau, Discours de la décadence, Copernic, coll. « Cartouche », Paris, 1978 pp. 164 – 165.

 

12 : Idem, p. 175, souligné par l’auteur.

 

13 : Id., p. 182, souligné par l’auteur.

 

14 : Id., p. 183, souligné par l’auteur.

 

15 : Guillaume Faye, Pourquoi nous combattons. Manifeste de la résistance européenne, L’Æncre, Paris, 2001, p. 119.

 

16 : Id., p. 123, souligné par l’auteur.

 

17 : Id., p. 124.

 

18 : Tom Clancy, L’Ours et le Dragon, Albin Michel, Paris, 2001 (1re édition originale en 2000), deux tomes.

 

19 : Maurice G. Dantec, Le théâtre des opérations 2000 – 2001. Laboratoire de catastrophe générale, Gallimard, Paris, 2001, pp. 594 – 595.

 

20 : L’Édit de Caracalla ou Plaidoyer pour des États-Unis d’Occident, par Xavier de C***, traduit de l’anglais (américain), et suivi d’une épitaphe par Régis Debray, Fayard, Paris, 2002.

 

21 : Jean-Sylvestre Mongrenier, Dictionnaire géopolitique de la défense européenne. Du traité de Bruxelles à la Constitution européenne, Éditions Unicomm, coll. « Abécédaire Société – Défense européenne », Paris, 2005, p. 235.

 

22 : « Contre le communisme ou l’islamisation, je me suis toujours battu pour préserver notre identité. Entretien avec Jean-Marie Le Pen », in Minute, 28 décembre 2011, p. 5.

 

23 : Maurice G. Dantec, American Black Box. Le théâtre des opérations 2002 – 2006, Albin Michel, Paris, 2007, p. 174.

 

24 : Idem, p. 119.

 

25 : Id., p. 66.

 

26 : Id., p. 122.

 

27 : Rodolphe Badinand, Requiem pour la Contre-Révolution. Et autres essais impérieux, Alexipharmaque, coll. « Les Réflexives », Billère, 2009, pp. 123 – 124.

 

28 : Cf. Francis Parker Yockey, Le prophète de l’Imperium, Avatar, coll. « Heartland », Paris -  Dun Carraig, 2004; Francis Parker Yockey, Imperium. La philosophie de l’histoire et de la politique, Avatar, coll. « Heartland », Paris -  Dun Carraig, 2008 (1re édition originale en 1948); Francis Parker Yockey, L’Ennemi de l’Europe, Ars Magna Éditions, Nantes, 2011 (1re édition originale en 1956).

 

29 : cf. Jean Thiriart, Un Empire de quatre cents millions d’hommes, l’Europe. La naissance d’une nation, au départ d’un parti historique, Avatar, coll. « Heartland », Paris -  Dublin, 2007 (1re édition originale en 1964).

 

30 : Jean Thiriart, « Europe : l’État-nation politique », in Nationalisme et République, n° 8, 1er juin 1992, p. 3.

 

31 : Jean Thiriart, art. cit., p. 5.

 

32 : Idem, p. 6, souligné par l’auteur.

 

33 : Aymeric Chauprade, Géopolitique. Constantes et changements dans l’histoire, Ellipses, Paris, 2003, p. 475.

 

34 : Sur l’histoire et les principales lignes de force de l’eurasisme, on  consultera avec un très grand profit de Marlène Laruelle, L’idéologie eurasiste russe. Ou comment penser l’empire, L’Harmattan, coll. « Essais historiques », Paris, 1999; Mythe aryen et rêve impérial dans la Russie du XXIe siècle, C.N.R.S. – Éditions, coll. « Mondes russes. États, sociétés, nations », Paris, 2005; La quête d’une identité impériale. Le néo-eurasisme dans la Russie contemporaine, Petra Éditions, 2007; Le nouveau nationalisme russe. Des repères pour comprendre, L’Œuvre Éditions, Paris, 2010; de Lorraine de Meaux, La Russie et la tentation de l’Orient, Fayard, Paris, 2010; de Georges Nivat, Vers la fin du mythe russe. Essais sur la culture russe de Gogol à nos jours, L’Âge d’Homme, coll. « Slavica », Lausanne, 1982, en particulier « Du “ panmongolisme ” au “ mouvement eurasien ” », pp. 138 – 155; Vivre en russe, L’Âge d’Homme, coll. « Slavica », Lausanne, 2007, en particulier « Les paradoxes de l’« affirmation eurasienne » », pp. 81 – 102.

 

35 : Cf. sur le blogue de Lionel Baland, « Secteur droit entre en   politique », mis en ligne le 6 mars 2014.

 

36 : Alain Cagnat, « Europe, Eurasie, Eurosibérie, l’éclairage géopolitique », in Terre et Peuple, n° 59, Équinoxe de Printemps 2014, p. 18.

 

37 : « La Russie vue par les Biélorusses », mis en ligne sur Le Courrier de la Russie, le 13 décembre 2013, cf. http://www.lecourrierderussie.com/2013/12/la-russie-vue-par-les-bielorusses/

 

38 : « La Russie vue par les Biélorusses. En coulisses… », mis en ligne sur Le Courrier de la Russie, le 13 décembre 2013, cf. http://www.lecourrierderussie.com/2013/12/la-russie-vue-par-les-bielorusses/2/

 

39 : Alexandre Baounov, « Entre Kiev et Moscou », in La Russie d’aujourd’hui, supplément du Figaro, le 18 décembre 2013.

 

40 : Alexandre Soljénitsyne, Comment réaménager notre Russie ? Réflexions dans la mesure de mes forces, Fayard, Paris, 1990, traduit par Geneviève et José Johannet, p. 23, souligné par l’auteur.

 

41 : cf. Éléments, « La Russie : le dernier empire ? », n° 57 – 58, printemps 1986, pp. 19 – 41.

 

42 : cf. Alexandre Douguine, « Evola entre la droite et la gauche », collectif, Evola envers et contre tous !, Avatar, coll. «Orientation», Étampes -  Dun Carraig, 2010.

 

43 : Marlène Laruelle, « Le renouveau des courants eurasistes en Russie : socle idéologique commun et diversité d’approches », in Slavica occitania, n° 11, 2000, p. 156.

 

44 : Marlène Laruelle, « De l’eurasisme au néo-eurasisme : à la recherche du Troisième Continent », in sous la direction de Hervé Coutau-Bégarie et Martin Motte, Approches de la géopolitique. De l’Antiquité au XXIe siècle, Économica, coll. « Bibliothèque Stratégique », Paris, 2013, p. 664.

 

45 : in Libération, 15 août 2007.

 

46 : Marlène Laruelle, « L’Extrême-Orient russe : la carte asiatique », in Questions Internationales, n° 57, septembre – octobre 2012, pp. 67 – 68.

 

47 : Tancrède Josserand, « L’eurasisme turc. La steppe comme ligne d’horizon », in Conflits, n° 1, avril – mai 2014, pp. 62 – 64.

 

48 : Jean-Sylvestre Mongrenier, Dictionnaire géopolitique de la défense européenne, op. cit., pp. 135 – 136.

 

49 : cf. Cécile de La Guérivière, « La Chine veut faire rouler un T.G.V. jusqu’aux États-Unis », in Le Figaro, 10 et 11 mai 2014.

 

50 : Jacques Sapir, La Mandchourie oubliée. Grandeur et démesure de l’art de la guerre soviétique, Éditions du Rocher, coll. « L’art de la guerre », Monaco, 1996.

 

51 : Robert Steuckers, La Révolution conservatrice allemande. Biographies de ses principaux acteurs et textes choisis, Les Éditions du Lore, Chevaigné, 2014, p. 131.

 

52 : Marlène Laruelle, « Le renouveau des courants eurasistes en Russie », art. cit., p. 159.

 

53 : Abel Miroglio, La psychologie des peuples, P.U.F., coll. « Que sais-je ? », n° 798, Paris, 1971, p. 7, souligné par l’auteur.

 

54 : Gaston Bouthoul, Les mentalités, P.U.F., coll. « Que sais-je ? », n° 545, Paris, 1952, p. 76, souligné par l’auteur.

 

55 : « Qu’est-ce que l’eurasisme ? Une conversation avec Alexandre Douguine », in Krisis, n° 32, juin 2009, p. 153.

 

56 : « La quatrième théorie politique d’Alexandre Douguine. Entretien », in Rébellion, n° 15, mars – avril 2012, p. 16.

 

57 : cf. Carl Schmitt, Terre et Mer. Un point de vue sur l’histoire mondiale, Le Labyrinthe, coll. « Les cahiers de la nouvelle droite », 1985, introduction et postface de Julien Freund, traduit par Jean-Louis Pesteil.

 

58 : cf. Zygmunt Bauman, La vie liquide, Éditions du Rouergue / Chambon, coll. « Les incorrects », Arles, 2006.

 

59 : « Qu’est-ce que l’eurasisme ? », art. cit., p. 127.

 

60 : Marlène Laruelle, « De l’eurasisme au néo-eurasisme : à la recherche du Troisième Continent », op. cit., p. 681.

 

61 : Jacqueline Dauxois et Vladimir Volkoff, Alexandra, Albin Michel, Paris, 1994, p. 444.

 

62 : Jean-Sylvestre Mongrenier, La Russie menace-t-elle l’Occident ?, Choiseul, Paris, 2009, p. 100.

 

63 : Zbignew Brzezinski, Le grand échiquier. L’Amérique et le reste du monde, Fayard, coll. « Pluriel », Paris, 2010 (1re édition originale en 1997), traduction de Michel Bessière et Michelle Herpe-Voslinsky, pp. 66 – 67.

 

64 : François Bluche, Richelieu, Perrin, Paris, 2003, p. 136.

 

65 : Zbignew Brzezinski, op. cit., pp. 59 et 61.

 

66 : Jean-Sylvestre Mongrenier, La Russie menace-t-elle l’Occident ?, op. cit., pp. 97 – 98.

 

67 : Robert Steuckers, « Eurasisme et atlantisme : quelques réflexions intemporelles et impertinentes », mis en ligne sur Euro-Synergies, le 20 mars 2009.

 

68 : Jean-Claude Albert-Weill, L’Altermonde, Éditions Gills Club La Panfoulia, Paris, 2004.

 

69 : Guillaume Faye, Pourquoi nous combattons, op. cit., p. 124, souligné par l’auteur.

 

70 : Serge Ayoub, Michel Drac, Marion Thibaud, G5G. Une déclaration de guerre, Les Éditions du Pont d’Arcole, Paris, 2012, p. 18.

 

71 : Simone Weil, L’enracinement, Gallimard, coll. « Folio – Essais », Paris, 1949, p. 61.


Article printed from Europe Maxima: http://www.europemaxima.com

URL to article: http://www.europemaxima.com/?p=3805

samedi, 31 mai 2014

LA NUEVA DERECHA RUSA EURASIÁTICA

ELEMENTOS Nº 70:

ALEXANDER DUGIN Y LA CUARTA TEORÍA POLÍTICA

LA NUEVA DERECHA RUSA EURASIÁTICA

 

 
Descargar con issuu.com

Descargar con scribd.com


Descargar con google.com


Sumario
 

Alexander Dugin: la Nueva Derecha rusa, entre el Neo-Eurasianismo y la Cuarta Teoría Política, por Jesús J. Sebastián
 
 
Más allá del liberalismo: hacia la Cuarta Teoría Política, por Alexander Dugin


Necesidad de la Cuarta Teoría Política, por Leonid Savin


La Cuarta Teoría Política y la “Otra Europa”, por Natella Speranskaya


El Liberalismo y la Guerra Rusia-Occidente, por Alexander Dugin


Alexander Dugin, o cuando la metafísica y la política se unen, por Sergio Fritz


La Cuarta Teoría Política, entrevista a Natella Speranskaya, por Claudio Mutti

 
El quinto estado: una réplica a Alexander Dugin, por Marcos Ghio


La Tercera Teoría Política. Una crítica a la Cuarta Teoría Política, por Michael O'Meara


La gran guerra de los continentes. Geopolítica y fuerzas ocultas de la historia, por Alexander Dugin


La globalización para bien de los pueblos. Perspectivas de la nueva teoría política, por Leonid Savin


Alianza Global Revolucionaria, entrevista a Natella Speranskaya


Contribución a la teoría actual de la protesta radical, por Geidar Dzhemal

 
El proyecto de la Gran Europa. Un esbozo geopolítico para un futuro mundo multipolar, por Alexander Dugin


Rusia, clave de bóveda del sistema multipolar, por Tiberio Graziani


La dinámica ideológica en Rusia y los cambios del curso de su política exterior, por Alexander Dugin


Un Estado étnico para Rusia. El fracaso del proyecto multicultural, por Vladimir Putin


Reportaje sobre Dugin (revista alemana Zuerst!), por Manuel Ochsenreiter

 
Dugin: de la Unión Nacional-Bolchevique al Partido Euroasiático, por Xavier Casals Meseguer

mercredi, 28 mai 2014

20 MAI 2014: Le jour où les USA ont perdu la maîtrise du monde...

ruschinegaz.jpg

20 MAI 2014: Le jour où les USA ont perdu la maîtrise du monde...

Michel Lhomme
Ex: http://metamag.fr

La Chine et la Russie ont conclu à Shanghai un méga-contrat d'approvisionnement gazier, fruit d'une décennie de négociations. La Russie fournira en gaz la deuxième économie mondiale à partir de 2018, et le volume livré à la Chine gonflera progressivement « pour atteindre à terme 38 milliards de mètres cube par an », a indiqué le groupe pétrolier public chinois CNPC dans son communiqué. Le prix total du contrat conclu pour 30 ans se chiffre à 400 milliards de dollars. Le gaz russe sera acheminé vers la Chine par une ramification orientale du gazoduc Iakoutie-Khabarovsk-Vladivostok baptisé Power of Siberia. Les livraisons doivent débuter en 2018. Prévus au départ à 38 milliards de mètres cubes par an, les volumes de gaz fournis à la Chine pourraient atteindre 60 milliards de mètres cubes. Le contenu en détail de l'accord reste secret. La signature de ce méga-contrat intervient, alors que les relations entre la Russie et les pays occidentaux connaissent une période de vives tensions sur fond de crise ukrainienne et syrienne.


Le président russe Vladimir Poutine et son homologue chinois Xi Jinping avaient tous deux assisté à la signature. Ils pouvaient ne pas le faire. Cette signature est donc un signe international adressé aux USA, à l'Otan et à l’Europe. Vladimir Poutine a ensuite participé à Shanghai à la quatrième édition de la Conférence pour l'interaction et les mesures de confiance en Asie ( Cica ), un nouveau forum de sécurité régionale. 


Après cette conférence, des exercices militaires conjoints russo-chinois ont été décidés et programmés pour 2015. Pourquoi ? Pour obliger l’Amérique à « jouer selon les règles des pays civilisés », a estimé mardi Igor Korottchenko, directeur du Centre d’analyse du commerce mondial des armes ( TSAMTO ). « Compte tenu de l’actuelle situation géopolitique dans le monde, la Russie et la Chine deviennent des partenaires stratégiques, et leur coopération ne sera plus uniquement économique, mais aussi militaire. Aussi, la tenue d’exercices militaires conjoints constitue un facteur extrêmement important attestant la similitude de nos approches des problèmes militaires et politiques », a déclaré l’expert militaire à RIA Novosti.


Ainsi, la participation de la Chine à ces exercices montre une fois de plus que Moscou et Pékin ont des objectifs communs et partagent les mêmes positions sur les événements en cours dans le monde. Il est, en effet, devenu nécessaire d’empêcher les Etats-Unis de décider seuls des destinées du monde, ont estimé ensemble la Russie et la Chine. Selon les deux puissances asiatiques, les Etats-Unis sont devenus une puissance dangereuse et en organisant des exercices conjoints, Moscou et Pékin montrent aux Etats-Unis qu’ils sont des pays capables de dresser une barrière sur la voie de l’expansion américaine. D’après le général Evgueni Boujinski, ex-responsable de la direction des accords internationaux auprès du ministère russe de la Défense, les exercices russo-chinois seront très vraisemblablement des exercices terrestres. Ces dernières années, la coopération militaire entre la Russie et la Chine est en plein essor. En 20 ans, Moscou a livré à Pékin un large éventail d’armements et de matériels de combat, dont des chasseurs Su-27, et des armes de défense antiaérienne, dont des missiles sol-air S-300, Bouk et Tor. La partie chinoise compte élargir la nomenclature des armements achetés à la Russie, notamment commander des systèmes S-400 et des avions Il-76 et Il-78.


Par ailleurs, l'accord énergétique russo-chinois qui vient d'être finalisé à Shangaï entérine la fin de la dollarisation. Pour la première fois depuis 40 ans, c'est-à-dire depuis Kissinger, un pays ne devra pas d’abord aller acheter du dollar sur les marchés pour acheter son énergie. Le dollar en effet se meurt doucement. Pour l'instant, il arrose l'Amérique mais ce n'est plus qu'une monnaie de papier de singe, fabriquée de toutes pièces par la FED. Tous les grands de la planète le savent. Certes, l'Amérique dispose de la haute technologie militaire. Elle croit être définitivement sauvée par ses drones ou ses avions furtifs, son B2 mais il faut aussi payer les heures de vol. L'Amérique est en réalité à genoux. Ses anciens combattants d'Irak ou d'Afghanistan croupissent dans les hôpitaux psychiatriques ou se suicident. Ses soldats souvent drogués, sauf peut-être ses mercenaires privés, n'ont même plus l'éthique du combat, la moralité virile de l'honneur pour se battre. L'Amérique est psychologiquement épuisée : ses vieillards travaillent maintenant dans les MacDo ! Détroit est en ruine, les villas de l'American Way of Life sont à vendre ou en saisie. Les prisons sont pleines, les homeless végètent dans les rues, même plus secourus par l'Armée du Salut. Neuf millions de ménages américains ont perdu leur foyer après la crise des subprimes. La population carcérale américaine a augmenté de 600 %, j'écris bien 600 %, ces quarante dernières années. L'Europe a choisi le destin américain. Elle a choisi le camp des perdants.


Y aura-t-il une réaction américaine à Shanghai : pour la première fois depuis des années, un avion Us provenant du Nigeria s'est posé le 18 mai sur l'aéroport de Téhéran. Que transportait-il  ? De l'uranium ? Que préparent donc les Américains en riposte du coté de l'Iran ? Avec quelles complicités ?... 

mardi, 27 mai 2014

Chine, Russie, UE et gaz

chrusgaz.jpg

Lettre de Charles Sannat

Chine, Russie, UE et gaz

"Mes chères contrariennes, mes chers contrariens !

Depuis plusieurs semaines, la rumeur courait et devenait de plus en plus insistante sur les négociations en cours entre la Russie et la Chine concernant la signature d’un contrat de fourniture de gaz d’ampleur historique digne de faire basculer les traditionnels rapports de forces géostratégiques.

En effet, la Chine et la Russie viennent d’annoncer officiellement, dans le cadre du voyage de Poutine dans l’empire du Milieu, la signature d’un contrat à… 400 milliards de dollars ! Colossal, surtout que ces ventes de gaz ne devraient pas forcément être libellées en dollars puisque derrière tout cela se joue une bataille féroce pour tenter de contrer la domination américaine du monde aussi bien politique qu’économique.

Souvenez-vous de l’épisode du relèvement du plafond de la dette américaine. La Chine furieuse avait indiqué qu’il était temps de désaméricaniser le monde… c’est véritablement en marche et la vitesse de changement est même assez incroyable.

La Russie menace sans ambiguïté l’Europe de couper le gaz

C’est un article des Échos qui revient sur la dernière sortie du Premier ministre russe Dmitri Medvedev alors que son patron Poutine est en Chine.

« Le Premier ministre russe Dmitri Medvedev a quant à lui mis la pression sur l’Occident mardi en évoquant la «possibilité théorique» d’une réorientation vers la Chine des exportations de gaz russe qui n’iraient plus vers l’Europe. «Nous avons suffisamment de réserves, suffisamment de gaz pour livrer du gaz et à l’est, et à l’ouest. Mais si l’on envisage le pire, de manière purement théorique le gaz qui se serait pas livré en Europe peut être envoyé (…) en Chine», a-t-il déclaré dans un entretien à Bloomberg. »

En clair, à compter d’aujourd’hui, la Russie ne dépend plus financièrement parlant de ses exportations de gaz vers les pays européens mais l’Europe dépend encore, elle, de ses importations de gaz russe.

Vous ne devez pas oublier qu’il n’existe pas de gazoduc traversant l’Atlantique et capable de nous livrer le gaz issu des gaz de schistes américains. Il faut donc liquéfier le gaz US dans d’immenses terminaux construits à cet effet (ce qui est en cours mais pas tout à fait encore achevé) puis remplir de tout ça d’immenses bateaux appelée « méthaniers » et capables de nous livrer… Remplacer le gaz russe par une flotte entière de bateaux prendra des années, et nous coûtera particulièrement cher.

En clair, désormais la Russie n’est plus dépendante de nos achats de gaz puisqu’elle peut vendre tout son gaz à la Chine, en revanche, nous sommes encore dépendants du gaz russe, puisque les Américains ne sont pas encore en mesure de nous livrer les quantités importantes dont nos pays ont besoin.

Victoire par KO de Poutine et évidemment l’Union européenne, grand nain devant l’éternel, qui se retrouve encore être le dindon de la farce de l’affrontement américano-russe pour le leadership mondial. C’était prévisible et je ne me suis pas gêné pour l’écrire et pour le dire.

Russie-Chine : élargir l’usage réciproque des monnaies nationales

Mais l’accord sino-russe ne va s’arrêter uniquement à la fourniture de gaz puisque tout cela s’accompagne également d’un accord monétaire comme nous l’apprend cette dépêche de l’Agence de presse RIA Novosti :

« La Russie et la Chine envisagent d’utiliser plus largement leurs monnaies nationales – le rouble et le yuan – dans leurs échanges commerciaux et leurs investissements réciproques, indique la déclaration conjointe signée mardi à l’issue de négociations entre les présidents russe et chinois Vladimir Poutine et Xi Jinping.
«Les parties envisagent d’entreprendre de nouvelles démarches pour élever le niveau et élargir les domaines de coopération pratique russo-chinoise. Il s’agit d’engager une interaction étroite dans le secteur financier, y compris d’augmenter le volume des règlements directs en monnaies nationales russe et chinoise dans le commerce, les investissements et l’octroi de crédits», lit-on dans la déclaration sur l’ouverture d’une nouvelle étape de partenariat et de coopération stratégique entre les deux pays.
La Russie et la Chine stimuleront également les investissements réciproques, notamment dans les infrastructures de transport, l’exploitation de gisements de minéraux utiles et la construction de logements bon marché en Russie. »

Il n’aura échappé à personne que le roi dollar n’est le roi que parce qu’il sert de devise de référence à l’ensemble des flux commerciaux à travers la planète et en particulier à l’achat des matières premières énergétiques comme le pétrole et le gaz d’où le nom justement de « pétro-dollars » !

Or, par cet accord, la Chine et la Russie viennent de mettre officiellement un terme à la suprématie du dollar dans les échanges internationaux. C’est une première et c’est une information d’une importance capitale.

Vous assistez ni plus ni moins à la désaméricanisation et à la dédollarisation du monde. Nous passons d’un monde unipolaire, où l’hégémonie américaine était totale depuis la chute du mur de Berlin, à un monde à nouveau multipolaire avec un immense bloc formé par la Chine et la Russie d’un côté et les USA qui, en l’absence d’un Traité transatlantique que l’on vous fera avaler de force tant il devient une question de survie pour l’Empire américain, se retrouveraient tout simplement isolés.

L’UE « supplie » Poutine de ne pas interrompre les livraisons de gaz à l’Europe

Alors notre Union européenne, qui est allée jouer aux apprentis sorciers en Ukraine et qui a provoqué sciemment « l’ogre » russe, se retrouve au milieu du gué, totalement à la merci des menaces de coupure de livraison du gaz russe.

Alors notre benêt béat de président de la Commission européenne, José Manuel Barroso, vient d’écrire une lettre à Vladimir en disant :

« Tant que se poursuivent les discussions à trois, entre la Russie, l’Ukraine et l’UE, les livraisons de gaz ne devraient pas être interrompues. Je compte sur la Fédération de Russie pour maintenir cet engagement. » Ou encore « il est impératif que toutes les parties continuent de s’engager de manière constructive dans ce processus, et se mettent d’accord également sur un prix qui reflète les conditions de marché », écrit Barroso pour qui cela « relève de la responsabilité de la compagnie russe Gazprom que d’assurer les livraisons des volumes requis comme prévu dans les contrats passés avec les compagnies européennes »…

Mais à tout cela il fallait y réfléchir avant d’aller allumer le feu en Ukraine, et il est évident que Vladimir Poutine, à défaut de déclencher la Troisième Guerre mondiale (car il n’est pas fou, contrairement à ce que la propagande de nos médias tente de nous faire avaler), nous fera payer au prix fort notre alignement stupide et sans recul sur des positions américaines absolument incompatibles avec les intérêts géostratégiques fondamentaux de l’Europe.

Une Europe au bout d’un mois de crise ukrainienne réduite à supplier Vladimir Poutine de ne pas couper le robinet de gaz.

Une Europe qui, encore une fois, et vous en avez une preuve une fois de plus qui risque de s’avérer douloureuse, qui est fondamentalement plus un problème que la solution".

Charles Sannat*, Le Contrarien matin du 22 mai 2014

*Directeur des études économiques chez AuCOFFRE.com

jeudi, 22 mai 2014

Acuerdo estratégico entre Rusia y China

Ex: http://www.elespiadigital.com

Rusia y China resistirán la injerencia extranjera en los asuntos internos de otros Estados y las sanciones unilaterales, dice un comunicado conjunto emitido este martes por los presidentes Vladímir Putin y Xi Jinping.

El mandatario ruso, Vladímir Putin, ha llegado en visita oficial a China, donde mantiene conversaciones con el presidente Xi Jinping y asistirá a la cumbre de la Conferencia sobre Interacción y Medidas de Construcción de Confianza en Asia. Asimismo, se reunirá con representantes de los círculos de negocios de China y Rusia.

"Las partes subrayan la necesidad de respetar el patrimonio histórico y cultural de los diferentes países, los sistemas políticos que han elegido, sus sistemas de valores y vías de desarrollo, resistir la injerencia extranjera en los asuntos internos de otros Estados, prescindir de las sanciones unilaterales y del apoyo dirigido a cambiar la estructura constitucional de otro Estado", puntualiza el documento acordado durante el encuentro de los mandatarios ruso y chino.

Al mismo tiempo, tanto Pekín como Moscú subrayan su preocupación por el perjuicio a la estabilidad y la seguridad internacional y el daño a las soberanías estatales que infligen las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación hoy en día. De esta manera, exhortan a la comunidad internacional a responder a estos desafíos y elaborar normas que regulen el comportamiento en el espacio informativo. Puntualizan, además, la necesidad de internacionalizar el sistema de gestión de Internet y seguir principios de transparencia y democracia.

El comunicado aborda además el tema del conflicto ucraniano e insta a todas las regiones y movimientos políticos del país a lanzar un diálogo y elaborar un concepto común de desarrollo constitucional.

Acuerdos militares

Moscú y Pekín se comprometen, además, a llevar a cabo la primera inspección conjunta de las fronteras comunes. Detallan que la medida estará destinada a combatir la delincuencia transfronteriza. Según ha destacado Putin, intensificar la colaboración militar "es un factor importante para la estabilidad y seguridad, tanto en la región como en todo el mundo". El presidente ruso ha acentuado que Moscú y Pekín tienen proyectos conjuntos de construcción de un avión de largo alcance y fuselaje ancho, y de un helicóptero civil pesado. El año que viene los dos países realizarán, además, maniobras militares conjuntas a gran escala con motivo del 70 aniversario de la victoria sobre el fascismo en la Segunda Guerra Mundial.

Acuerdos económicos

En cuanto a la cooperación económica entre los dos países, el presidente ruso detalló que en 2013 los volúmenes del comercio bilateral llegaron a un total de unos 90.000 millones de dólares y pronosticó que para el año 2015 alcanzará los 100.000 millones de dólares. Las partes acordaron profundizar, sobre todo, los lazos en el sector energético y aumentar los suministros del gas, petróleo, electricidad y carbón rusos a China.

En el marco de las reuniones entre delegaciones comerciales de los dos países, la compañía rusa Novatek y la china CNPC han firmado ya un contrato para la entrega de 3 millones de toneladas anuales de gas natural licuado ruso. Rosneft, por su parte, comunica que ha estipulado con sus socios chinos los plazos exactos de construcción de una planta de refinado de petróleo en la ciudad de Tianjín. Está previsto que la planta empiece a operar para finales de 2019 y que la parte rusa se encargue de suministrarle hasta 9,1 millones de toneladas de crudo. Además, se está negociando un contrato histórico con Gazprom: según detalla el secretario de prensa del presidente ruso, Dimitri Peskov, las partes ya han avanzado con la negociación de los precios y actualmente siguen trabajando sobre los detalles del acuerdo.

"Tenemos una larga historia de buenas relaciones. Ambos países se desarrollan muy rápidamente. Creo que China está muy interesada en crear más oportunidades en el ámbito de los negocios utilizando los recursos únicos de los que dispone Rusia. Moscú también busca trabajar con China en muchos sectores económicos. Por eso creo que sus relaciones bilaterales tienen un gran futuro", comentó a RT el empresario chino Wei Song.

El Banco de China, uno de los cuatro mayores bancos estatales del país, y el VTB, el segundo grupo bancario más grande de Rusia, han firmado este martes un acuerdo que incluye realizar los pagos mutuos en sus divisas nacionales.

El presidente ruso, Vladímir Putin, se encuentra estos días de visita oficial a China, donde mantiene conversaciones con el presidente Xi Jinping y se reúne con representantes de los círculos de negocios de China y Rusia. El histórico acuerdo interbancario firmado en presencia del mandatario ruso y su homólogo chino estipula la cooperación en el sector de las inversiones, la esfera crediticia y las operaciones en los mercados de capital.

El Banco de China es el prestamista número dos en China en general y es uno de los 20 más grandes del mundo. El total de sus activos en 2011 llegó a unos 1,9 billones de dólares. Opera tanto en China como en otros 27 países del mundo. El 60,9% de las acciones del grupo VTB pertenecen al Estado ruso, el grupo funciona en 20 países y el total de sus activos llega a unos 253.300 millones de dólares.

Según el comunicado estipulado en el marco del encuentro entre los dos presidentes, Moscú y Pekín aumentarán el volumen de pagos directos en divisas nacionales en todas las esferas y estimularán las inversiones mutuas, sobre todo en las infraestructuras de transporte, la exploración de recursos naturales y la construcción de viviendas de clase económica. El presidente Putin subrayó que especialistas de ambos países están considerando también la posibilidad de elaborar nuevos instrumentos financieros.

En 2013 los volúmenes del comercio bilateral entre Rusia y China llegaron a un total de 90.000 millones de dólares. Se pronostica que para el año 2015 alcanzará los 100.000 millones de dólares.

Rusia y China están a punto de cerrar un contrato de suministro de gas que supondrá 30.000 millones de dólares de inversiones y en un futuro podría cubrir el 40% de las necesidades del gigante asiático.

El propio presidente ruso, Vladímir Putin, en vísperas de su visita a China, que se celebrará los días 20 y 21 de mayo, dijo que el acuerdo sobre la exportación a China de gas natural ruso está en un "alto grado de preparación", recuerda la página web de la cadena estatal rusa Vesti.

El gigante estatal de gas ruso Gazprom lleva negociando esta transacción los últimos 10 años. El empuje más activo a estas negociaciones se dio en 2006, cuando Vladímir Putin anunció planes para organizar los suministros de gas a la segunda mayor economía del mundo.

¿Por qué las negociaciones han durado tanto?

A pesar de la gran cantidad de reuniones bilaterales, el cierre del 'acuerdo del siglo' había fracasado hasta ahora. El problema han sido los parámetros económicos, ya que China está peleando por muy fuertes rebajas de precio, mientras que Rusia quiere que el megaproyecto sea económicamente rentable.

El contrato que se negocia supone las exportaciones de gas a China durante 30 años, por lo que las partes deberían tener en cuenta todos los riesgos a largo plazo ya que reconsiderar los parámetros del contrato ya firmado sería muy difícil.

Por otra parte, los suministros de gas ruso no eran muy urgentes para China, país que hasta hace poco se conformaba con el gas que recibía desde Turkmenistán, vía Uzbekistán y Kazajistán. Sin embargo, el consumo de gas en China ha crecido tanto que el gigante industrial ya empieza a temer la insuficiencia de suministros.

Precio del gas ruso para China

El precio del gas para China ha sido un punto importante de la pelea durante varios años. Pekín ha insistido en que, dado el gran volumen y la duración del contrato, el precio mínimo no deberá ser superior al que Rusia tiene establecido para Europa.

Tradicionalmente, el precio del gas centroasiático ha sido más barato para China que el precio del gas ruso para Europa, mientras que para Rusia es importante que el precio del gas se coloque a un nivel de 360-400 dólares por 1.000 metros cúbicos ya que cualquier precio que sea inferior colocaría estos suministros por debajo del límite de rentabilidad.

Por ahora los especialistas hablan de precios en torno a los 350-380 dólares, es decir, se trata de un nivel de precios equivalente al europeo.

Los ingresos y volúmenes de suministros previstos

En marzo de 2013 las partes firmaron un memorando de entendimiento en el cual figuraba la enorme cantidad de 38.000 millones de metros cúbicos por año a partir de 2018, con un posterior aumento hasta 60.000 millones de metros cúbicos.
Considerando el precio estimado del gas y el plazo del contrato, Rusia podría ingresar 400.000 millones de dólares.

El costo de la construcción del gasoducto bautizado Sila Sibiri (Fuerza de Siberia) se estima en 30.000 millones de dólares.


 

La importancia del gas ruso para China

China necesita volúmenes adicionales de gas debido al aumento de la demanda interna. La demanda de gas en la segunda economía del mundo está creciendo rápidamente. En el primer trimestre de este año las importaciones de gas a China crecieron un 20% respecto al mismo periodo del ejercicio anterior.

Expertos chinos calculan que en 2020 el consumo de gas en el país será en torno a 300.000 millones de metros cúbicos, mientras que en 2030 esta cifra podría subir a 600.000 millones.

En otras palabras, el contrato con Rusia es imprescindible para una perspectiva a largo plazo.

La importancia del proyecto para Rusia

Las exportaciones de gas ruso a China son de suma importancia para Rusia en términos de diversificación de los suministros, sobre todo ahora de cara a posibles sanciones por parte de la Unión Europea, hoy en día el principal consumidor de gas ruso.

Dada la competencia de Turkmenistán, así como la de proveedores de gas natural licuado, Gazprom debe estar presente en el mercado chino.

Se calcula que mientras el contrato esté en vigor, Rusia reciba unos 400.000 millones de dólares de ingresos. Además, el fortalecimiento de las relaciones con China supondrá el aumento de las inversiones mutuas.

Moscú: Rusia y China realizarán ocho proyectos estratégicos

Moscú y Pekín crearán un cuerpo especial para la supervisión de la ejecución de ocho proyectos estratégicos, anunció el viceprimer ministro ruso Dmitri Rogozin.

"En Pekín, junto con el viceprimer ministro chino Wang Yang, firmamos un protocolo sobre el establecimiento del grupo de supervisión de los ocho proyectos estratégicos", publicó Rogozin en a través de su cuenta en Twitter. 

Rogozin agregó que estos proyectos están relacionados con el espacio y con la creación de una infraestructura fronteriza mutua. "Entre ellos: la cooperación en el espacio y en el mercado de la navegación espacial, en la ingeniería de aviones y helicópteros, y la construcción de una infraestructura fronteriza y de transporte común", escribió el viceprimer ministro en Facebook.

"Ampliar nuestros lazos con China, nuestro amigo de confianza, es definitivamente una prioridad de la política exterior rusa. Actualmente la cooperación bilateral está entrando en una nueva etapa de amplia asociación y cooperación estratégica", declaró el presidente ruso, Vladímir Putin, en una entrevista a los principales medios del país, en vísperas de su visita a China.

Merkel confirma el interés de Europa por mantener buenas relaciones con Rusia

La canciller alemana, Angela Merkel, entrevistada por el periódico Leipziger Volkszeitung, dijo que Rusia es un socio cercano de Alemania y que las buenas relaciones con Moscú responden a los intereses de Europa.

“Para nosotros, los alemanes, Rusia es un socio cercano. Existen numerosos contactos fiables entre los alemanes y los rusos, así como entre la UE y Rusia. Estamos interesados en mantener buenas relaciones con Rusia”, indicó.

La canciller confesó que debate regularmente con el presidente ruso Vladímir Putin la crisis en Ucrania y no descarta una reunión personal.

Durante la última conversación telefónica, Mérkel y Putin analizaron este tema con vistas a las elecciones presidenciales que Ucrania planea celebrar el 25 de mayo.

“A los comicios ucranianos asistirán observadores de la OSCE. Si la OSCE reconoce que su celebración se efectuó según normas universales, espero que Rusia, como miembro de esta organización, también reconozca sus resultados”, dijo la canciller.

La Oficina para las Instituciones Democráticas y los Derechos Humanos de la OSCE abrió el 20 de marzo su misión en Kiev para monitorear las presidenciales en Ucrania.

La misión está integrada por 18 expertos que permanecerán en Kiev y 100 observadores con mandato a largo plazo que trabajarán en todo el territorio del país. En el día de las elecciones, otros 900 observadores con mandato a corto plazo seguirán su desarrollo.

Merkel señaló que durante los últimos años Alemania se planteó el objetivo de “cohesionar a Rusia y Europa”. Al recordar que el presidente ruso promovió la idea de crear una zona de libre comercio desde Lisboa hasta Vladivostok (Lejano Oriente ruso), dijo que existen buenos argumentos a favor de la realización de este plan.

En Rusia y crece la satisfacción con la vida

Los rusos cada vez están más satisfechos con la vida y no tienen ganas de protestar, según se desprende de las encuestas conjunta del Centro Levada y el Centro VTsIOM.

De acuerdo al sondeo del VTsIOM, en abril el 46% de los rusos estaban contentos con su vida, frente al 43% en marzo y el 40% en febrero.

La mayoría de los satisfechos con la vida tienen entre 18 y 24 años de edad. También están contentos con su nivel de vida los ciudadanos con altos ingresos.

Al mismo tiempo, el 80% de los rusos, según Levada, no participarían en actos de protesta si estos llegasen a celebrarse en su localidad. Además, el 95% de los encuestados manifestaron no haber participado en huelgas durante un año.

mercredi, 21 mai 2014

Some Thoughts on the Creation of Intellectual Eurasianism

vona_iroda.jpg

Some Thoughts on the Creation of Intellectual Eurasianism

Leader of Hungarian political party "Jobbik" about Eurasian ideas

 
Ex: http://www.geopolitica.ru
 

"Actually, the truth is that the West really is in great need of  »defense«, but only against itself and its own tendencies, which, if they are pushed to their conclusion, will lead inevitably to its ruin and destruction; it is therefore »reform« of the West that is called for instead of »defense against the East«, and if this reform were what it should be---that is to say, a restoration of tradition---it would entail as a natural consequence an understanding with the East."

– René Guénon[1]

1. Euroatlantism and anti-traditionalism

Today's globalized world is in crisis. That is a fact. However, it is not quite clear what this crisis is. In order to get an answer, first we need to define what globalization means. For us, it does not mean the kind of public misconception, which says that the borders between the world's various economic and cultural spheres will gradually disappear and the planet becomes an organic network built upon billions of interactions. Those who believe in this also add that history is thus no longer a parallel development of great spheres, but the great common development of the entire world. Needless to say, this interpretation considers globalization as a positive and organic process from the aspect of historical development.

From our aspect, however, globalization is an explicitly negative, anti-traditionalist process. Perhaps we can understand this statement better if we break it down into components. Who is the actor, and what is the action and the object of globalization? The actor of globalization - and thus crisis production - is the Euro-Atlantic region, by which we mean the United States and the great economic-political powers of Western Europe. Economically speaking, the action of globalization is the colonization of the entire world; ideologically speaking, it means safeguarding the monopolistic, dictatorial power of liberalism; while politically speaking, it is the violent export of democracy.  Finally, the object of globalization is the entire globe. To sum it up in one sentence: globalization is the effort of the Euro-Atlantic region to control the whole world physically and intellectually. As processes are fundamentally defined by their actors that actually cause them, we will hereinafter name globalization as Euroatlantism. The reason for that is to clearly indicate that we are not talking about a kind of global dialogue and organic cooperation developing among the world's different regions, continents, religions, cultures, and traditions, as the neutrally positive expression of "globalization" attempts to imply, but about a minor part of the world (in particular the Euro-Atlantic region) which is striving to impose its own economic, political, and intellectual model upon the rest of the world in an inorganic manner, by direct and indirect force, and with a clear intention to dominate it.

As we indicated at the beginning of this essay, this effort of Euroatlantism has brought a crisis upon the entire world. Now we can define the crisis itself. Unlike what is suggested by the news and the majority of public opinion, this crisis is not primarily an economic one. The problem is not that we cannot justly distribute the assets produced. Although it is true, it is not the cause of the problem and the crisis; it is rather the consequence of it. Neither is this crisis a political one, that is to say: the root cause is not that the great powers and international institutions fail to establish a liveable and harmonious status quo for the whole world; it is just a consequence as well. Nor does this crisis result from the clashes of cultures and religions, as some strategists believe; the problem lies deeper than that. The world's current crisis is an intellectual one. It is a crisis of the human intellect, and it can be characterized as a conflict between traditional values (meaning conventional, normal, human) and anti-traditionalism (meaning modern, abnormal, subhuman), which is now increasingly dominating the world. From this aspect, Euroatlantism - that is to say, globalism - can be greatly identified with anti-traditionalism. So the situation is that the Euro-Atlantic region, which we can simply but correctly call the West, is the crisis itself; in other words, it carries the crisis within, so when it colonizes the world, it in fact spreads an intellectual virus as well. So this is the anti-traditionalist aspect of the world's ongoing processes, but does a traditionalist pole exist, and if it does, where can we find it?

2. Eurasianism as a geopolitical concept

Geographically speaking, Eurasia means the continental unity of Europe and Asia, which stretches from the Atlantic to the Pacific. As a cultural notion, Eurasianism was a concept conceived by Russian emigrants in the early 20th century. It proved to be a fertile framework, since it has been reinterpreted several times and will surely continue to be so in the future as well. Nicolai Sergeyevich Trubetskoy is widely considered as the founder of Eurasianism, while Alexandr Dugin is referred to as the key ideologist of the concept. Trubetskoy was one of the greatest thinkers of the Russian emigration in the early 20th century, who attempted to redefine Russia's role in the turbulent post-World War I times, looking for new goals, new perspectives, and new meanings. On the one hand, he rejected Pan-Slavism and replaced the Slavophile ideology with a kind of "Turanophile" one, as Lajos Pálfalvi put it in an essay.[2] He tore Russian thinking out of the Eastern Slavic framework and found Genghis Khan as a powerful antetype, the founder of a Eurasian state. Trubetskoy says that it was the Khan's framework left behind that Moscow's Tsars filled with a new, Orthodox sense of mission after the Mongol occupation. In his view, the European and Western orientation of Peter the Great is a negative disruption of this process, a cultural disaster, while the desirable goal for Russia is to awaken as a part of Eurasia.

So Eurasianism was born as a uniquely Russian concept but not at all for Russia only, even though it is often criticized for being a kind of Great Russia concept in a cultural-geopolitical disguise. Ukrainian author Mikola Ryabchuk goes as far as to say that whoever uses this notion, for whatever reason, is basically doing nothing but revitalizing the Russian political dominance, tearing the former Soviet sphere out of the "European political and cultural project".[3] Ryabchuk adds that there is a certain intellectual civil war going on in the region, particularly in Russia and also in Turkey about the acceptance of Western values. So those who utter the word "Eurasianism" in this situation are indirectly siding with Russia. The author is clearly presenting his views from a pro-West and anti-Russian aspect, but his thoughts are worth looking at from our angle as well.

As a cultural idea, Eurasianism was indeed created to oppose the Western, or to put it in our terms, the Euro-Atlantic values. It indeed supposes an opposition to such values and finds a certain kind of geopolitical reference for it. We must also emphasize that being wary of the "European political and cultural project" is justified from the economic, political, and cultural aspects as well. If a national community does not wish to comply, let's say, with the role assigned by the European Union, it is not a negative thing at all; in fact, it is the sign of a sort of caution and immunity in this particular case. It is especially so, if it is not done for some economic or nationalistic reason, but as a result of a different cultural-intellectual approach. Rendering Euro-Atlantic "values" absolute and indisputable means an utter intellectual damage, especially in the light of the first point of our essay. So the opposition of Eurasianism to the Euro-Atlantic world is undeniably positive for us. However, if we interpreted Eurasianism as mere anti-Euro-Atlantism, we would vulgarly simplify it, and we would completely fail to present an alternative to the the anti-traditionalist globalization outlined above.

What we need is much more than just a reciprocal pole or an alternative framework for globalization. Not only do we want to oppose globalization horizontally but, first and foremost, also vertically. We want to demonstrate an intellectual superiority to it. That is to say, when establishing our own Eurasia concept, we must point out that it means much more for us than a simple geographical notion or a geopolitical idea that intends to oppose Euro-Atlantism on the grounds of some tactical or strategic power game. Such speculations are valueless for me, regardless of whether they have some underlying, latent Russian effort for dominance or not. Eurasianism is basically a geographical and/or political framework, therefore, it does not have a normative meaning or intellectual centre. It is the task of its interpretation and interpreter to furnish it with such features.

3. Intellectual Eurasianism - Theories and practice

We have stated that we cannot be content with anti-Euro-Atlantism. Neither can we be content with a simple geographical and geopolitical alternative, so we demand an intellectual Eurasianism. If we fail to provide this intellectual centre, this meta-political source, then our concept remains nothing but a different political, economic, military, or administrative idea which would indeed represent a structural difference but not a qualitative breakthrough compared to Western globalization. Politically speaking, it would be a reciprocal pole, but not of a superior quality. This could lay the foundations for a new cold or world war, where two anti-traditionalist forces confront each other, like the Soviet Union and the United States did, but it surely won't be able to challenge the historical process of the spread of anti-traditionalism. However, such challenge is exactly what we consider indispensable. A struggle between one globalization and another is nonsensical from our point of view. Our problem with Euro-Atlantism is not its Euro-Atlantic but its anti-traditionalist nature. Contrary to that, our goal is not to construct another anti-traditionalist framework, but to present a supranational and traditionalist response to the international crisis. Using Julius Evola's ingenious term, we can say that Eurasianism must be able to pass the air test.[4]

At this point, we must look into the question of why we can't give a traditionalist answer within a Euro-Atlantic framework. Theoretically speaking, the question is reasonable since the Western world was also developing within a traditional framework until the dawn of the modern age, but this opportunity must be excluded for several reasons. Firstly, it is no accident that anti-traditionalist modernism developed in the West and that is where it started going global from. The framework of this essay is too small for a detailed presentation of the multi-century process of how modernism took roots in and grew out of the original traditionalist texture of Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian thinking and culture, developing into today's liberal Euroatlantism. For now, let us state that the anti-traditionalist turn of the West had a high historical probability. This also means that the East was laid on much stronger traditionalist foundations and still is, albeit it is gradually weakening. In other words, when we are seeking out a geopolitical framework for our historic struggle, our choice for Eurasianism is not in the least arbitrary. The reality is that the establishment of a truly supranational traditionalist framework can only come from the East. This is where we can still have a chance to involve the leading political-cultural spheres. The more we go West, the weaker the centripetal power of Eurasianism is, so it can only expect to have small groups of supporters but no major backing from the society.

The other important question is why we consider traditionalism as the only intellectual centre that can fecundate Eurasianism. The question "Why Eurasia?" can be answered much more accurately than "Why the metaphysical Tradition?". We admit that our answer is rather intuitive, but we can be reassured by the fact that René Guénon, Julius Evola, or Frithjof Schuon, the key figures in the restoration of traditionalist philosophy, were the ones who had the deepest and clearest understanding of the transcendental, metaphysical unity of Eastern and Western religions and cultures. Their teaching reaches back to such ancient intellectual sources that can provide a sense of communion for awakening Western Christian, Orthodox, Muslim, Hindu, or Buddhist people. These two things are exactly what are necessary for the success of Eurasianism: a foundation that can ensure supranational and supra-religious perspectives as well as an intellectual centrality. The metaphysical Tradition can ensure these two: universality and quality. At that moment, Eurasianism is no longer a mere geopolitical alternative, a new yet equally crisis-infected (and thus also infectious) globalization process, but a traditionalist response.

We cannot overemphasize the superior quality of intellectual Eurasianism. However, it is important to note here that the acquisition of an intellectual superiority ensured by the traditionalist approach would not at all mean that our confrontation with Euroatlantism would remain at a spiritual-intellectual level only, thus giving up our intentions to create a counterbalance or even dominance in the practical areas, such as the political, diplomatic, economic, military, and cultural spheres.  We can be satisfied with neither a vulgar Eurasianism (lacking a philosophical centre) nor a theoretical one (lacking practicability). The only adequate form for us is such a Eurasianism that is rooted in the intellectual centre of traditionalism and is elaborated for practical implementation as well. To sum up in one sentence: there must be a traditionalist Eurasianism standing in opposition to an anti-traditionalist Euroatlantism.

The above also means that geopolitical and geographical positions are strategically important, but not at all exclusive, factors in identifying the enemy-ally coordinates. A group that has a traditionalist intellectual base (thus being intellectually Eurasian) is our ally even if it is located in a Euro-Atlantic zone, while a geographically Eurasian but anti-traditionalist force (thus being intellectually Euro-Atlantic) would be an enemy, even if it is a great power.

4. Homogeneousness and heterogeneousness

If it is truly built upon the intellectual centre of metaphysical Tradition, intellectual Eurasianism has such a common base that it is relevant regardless of geographical position, thus giving the necessary homogeneousness to the entire concept. On the other hand, the tremendous size and the versatility of cultures and ancient traditions of the Eurasian area do not allow for a complete theoretical uniformity. However, this is just a barrier to overcome, an intellectual challenge that we must all meet, but it is not a preventive factor. Each region, nation, and country must find their own form that can organically and harmoniously fit into its own traditions and the traditionalist philosophical approach of intellectual Eurasianism as well. Simply put, we can say that each one must form their own Eurasianism within the large unit.

As we said above, this is an intellectual challenge that requires an able intellectual elite in each region and country who understand and take this challenge and are in a constructive relationship with the other, similar elites. These elites together could provide the international intellectual force that is destined to elaborate the Eurasian framework itself. The sentences above throw a light on the greatest hiatus (and greatest challenge) lying in the establishment of intellectual Eurasianism. This challenge is to develop and empower traditionalist intellectual elites operating in different geographical areas, as well as to establish and improve their supranational relations. Geographically and nationally speaking, intellectual Eurasianism is heterogeneous, while it is homogeneous in the continental and essential sense.

However, the heterogeneousness of Eurasianism must not be mistaken for the multiculturalism of Euroatlantism. In the former, allies form a supranational and supra-cultural unit while also preserving their own traditions, whereas the latter aims to create a sub-cultural and sub-national unit, forgetting and rejecting traditions. This also means that intellectual Eurasianism is against and rejects all mass migrations, learning from the West's current disaster caused by such events. We believe that geographical position and environment is closely related to the existence and unique features of the particular religious, social, and cultural tradition, and any sudden, inorganic, and violent social movement ignoring such factors will inevitably result in a state of dysfunction and conflicts. Intellectual Eurasianism promotes self-realization and the achievement of intellectual missions for all nations and cultures in their own place.

5. Closing thoughts

The aim of this short essay is to outline the basis and lay the foundations for an ambitious and intellectual Eurasianism by raising fundamental issues. We based our argumentation on the obvious fact that the world is in crisis, and that this crisis is caused by liberal globalization, which we identified as Euroatlantism. We believe that the counter-effect needs to be vertical and traditionalist, not horizontal and vulgar.  We called this counter-effect Eurasianism, some core ideas of which were explained here. We hope that this essay will have a fecundating impact, thus truly contributing to the further elaboration of intellectual Eurasianism, both from a universal and a Hungarian aspect.

[1] René Guénon: The Crisis of the Modern World Translated by Marco Pallis, Arthur Osborne, and Richard C. Nicholson. Sophia Perennis: Hillsdale, New York. 2004. Pg. 31-32.

[2] Lajos Pálfalvi: Nicolai Trubetskoy's impossible Eurasian mission. In Nicolai Sergeyevich Trubetskoy: Genghis Khan's heritage. (in Hungarian) Máriabesnyő, 2011, Attraktor Publishing, p. 152.

[3] Mikola Ryabchuk: Western "Eurasianism" and the "new Eastern Europe”: a discourse of exclusion. (in Hungarian) Szépirodalmi Figyelő 4/2012

[4] See: Julius Evola: Handbook of Rightist Youth. (in Hungarian) Debrecen, 2012, Kvintesszencia Publishing House, pp. 45–48

lundi, 19 mai 2014

Terre & Peuple: pourquoi l'Eurasie?

59couv.jpgLe numéro 59 de TERRE & PEUPLE Magazine est centré autour du thème mobilisateur Pourquoi l'Eurasie ?

Communication de "Terre & Peuple-Wallonie"

Dans éditorial sur 'le communautarisme identitaire', Pierre Vial évoquant les communautarismes qui déchirent l'Afrique, constate l'échec total de la 'nation arc-en-ciel, promise par Mandela à l'Afrique-du-Sud.  Entre temps, le reste de l'Afrique s'explique à la kalachnikov.

Ouvrant le dossier sur l'Eurasie, Pierre Vial souligne les incohérences de la pensée d'Alexandre Douguine, porte-voix de l'eurasisme que relaye Alain de Benoist.  Poutine en a fait la promotion pour étayer la dimension continentale de son ambition patriotique.  Comme ce projet tend à légitimer le métissage, nous adoptons de préférence le mythe mobilisateur du réveil des peuples blancs de l'Eurosibérie.  Une raison de plus pour une présentation objective du concept d'Eurasie.

Robert Dragan fait le relevé des peuplements européens en Asie et mesure l'entité géographique, dominée par des Européens, qui déborde sur l'Asie.  Les archéologues révèlent la présence, dès -3500AC, dans l'Altaï mongol d'une culture identique à celle, plus récente, des Kourganes, pratiquée par des dolichocéphales de race blanche.  Plus près de nous (-1500AC), les Tokhariens du Tarim (ouest de la Chine) étaient des Indo-Européens blonds, qui parlaient une langue de type scandinave et tissaient des tartans écossais.  Strabon et Ptolémée les citent.  Au début de notre ère, les Scythes qui occupaient l'ouest sibérien avaient détaché vers le Caucase la branche des Alains, qui y subsistent de nos jours sous le nom d'Ossètes.  A l'ère chrétienne, le mouvement va s'inverser avec les migrations des Huns,  Alains, Wisigoths, Petchénègues et Tatars.  Jusqu'à ce que, au XIIe siècle, Gengis Kahn et ses descendants dominent la Russie.  Jusqu'à ce que, au XVIe siècle, les tsars, à la suite d'Ivan le Terrible, se dotent d'une armée disciplinée.  La reconquête reposera sur l'institution de la caste guerrière des cosaques, hommes libres, notamment d'impôt.  Cavaliers voltigeant aux frontières, ils renouent avec une tradition ancestrale.  Après qu'ils se soient emparés de Kazan, capitale des Tatars, des pionniers ont pu s'enfoncer au delà de la Volga dans les profondeurs sibériennes.  Chercheurs d'or mou (les fourrures), ils y ont établi des forts et des comptoirs commerciaux.  Réfractaires à la réforme liturgique et persécutés, les Vieux Croyants s'y sont enfuis pour fonder des colonies.  Les Russes ne sont alors en Sibérie que des minorités infimes ( 200.000 au XVIIe siècle), sauf dans le Kazakhstan, mais dominantes. Le Transsibérien (1888-1904) va provoquer une expansion explosive : les comptoirs deviennent des métropoles. La Sibérie compte aujourd'hui quarante millions d'habitants, dont 94% de Russes, 1% d'Allemands et 0,02% de Juifs.  A l'égard des îlots d'asiates, Poutine se comporte comme l'a fait la Grande Catherine II, dans le respect de leur identité culturelle et religieuse.  La seule inquiétude vient de l'immigration incontrôlée des Chinois, qui s'insinuent dans le commerce de détail et l'artisanat.  Le projet d'une Eurosibérie, enthousiasmant pour un Européen de l'Ouest, éveille la méfiance en Russie, qui n'a pas oublié les envahisseurs polonais, suédois, teutoniques, autrichiens, prussien et français.  Comment se confondre avec un Occident qui l'a constamment trahi ?

Alain Cagnat s'autorise de Vladimir Volkoff pour remarquer qu'il existe sur 180° de la circonférence terrestre une terre peuplée majoritairement de Blancs marqués par le christianisme.  L'Europe n'est qu'une minuscule péninsule à l'ouest de l'Eurasie.  Mise à part l'île britannique, hantée par son obsession séculaire de tenir les mers et d'entretenir la division du continent, depuis que Mackinder l'a convaincue que « Qui tient le Heartland tient le monde ».  La puissance anglo-saxonne vise à contrôler la mer et le commerce et par là la richesse du monde.  Elle a gagné les deux guerres mondiales, qui ont consacré la castration des puissances européennes et la partition du continent, en un Occident 'libre' et une 'tyrannie'.  L'implosion inespérée de celle-ci, en 1990, a évacué la hantise d'un holocauste nucléaire.  L'Occident s'identifie alors à un monde américanisé et globalisé, tueur des peuples, à remplacer désormais par un 'village-monde' d'heureux consommateurs crétinisés.  La Russie et la Chine ne se laissent pas séduire, pas plus que l'Iran ni le monde arabo-sunnite.  Les Etats-Unis organisent alors leur 'Containment'.   Par les révolutions de couleur, orchestrées par les ONG de la démocratie et des Droits de l'Homme, et par l'extension de l'Union européenne et de l'Otan.  Par des opérations de déstabilisation de Poutine et par un bouclier antimissile, censé protéger contre une agression de l'Iran !  La Chine fait l'objet d'un encerclement maritime.  L'Union européenne, géant économique, mais nain politique et larve militaire, n'est plus qu'une banlieue des Etats-Unis.  Elle n'en demeure pas moins le seul cadre possible pour notre idée d'empire.  Poutine n'a-t-il pas dit : « La Grande Europe de l'Atlantique à l'Oural, et de fait jusqu'au Pacifique, est une chance pour tous les peuples du continent. »   Moscou se voit comme la Troisième Rome et la gardienne de l'orthodoxie chrétienne.  Mais les Russes sont d'opinions partagées.  Il y a les occidentalistes, prêts à moderniser la Russie millénaire.  Il y a les slavophiles, férus du mysticisme de l'âme slave, qui avec Soljenitsine méprisent volontiers le pourrissoir occidental.  Il y a les eurasistes, qui avec Douguine jugent que l'Europe n'a pas à s'intégrer à l'Eurasie.  L'empire eurasiste est multiethnique.  Il place les autres peuples au même rang que les Russes et juge les autres religions égales à l'orthodoxie.  En conclusion : l'Europe doit revoir sa stratégie et renverser ses alliances.  Elle dépend des Russes pour un quart de son pétrole et un tiers de son gaz et 80% des investissements étrangers en Russie sont européens.  En dressant un nouveau Rideau de Fer, l'Union européenne fracasse sur l'autel de l'utopie mondialiste américaine le rêve de l'unité européenne.  Celle-ci devrait, de préférence, ne pas se réaliser dans l'orientation eurasiste grand-russe d'un mélange des races et des ethnies européennes et asiatiques, mais dans celle d'un axe Paris-Berlin-Moscou du continent uni sous l'hégémonie pan-européenne.

Jean-Patrick Arteault attend des élections européennes que l'Union européenne voie  punies ses trahisons et son partenariat avec une finance apatride qui s'auto-désigne comme l'Occident.  Le but des vrais Européens est d'acquérir la puissance d'assurer à leurs peuples leur développement culturel et social.  Il est acquis qu'ils ont perdu la guerre et que leur 'Père-Fondateur' Jean Monet s'est révélé être l'homme des Américains, familier des mondialistes anglo-américains.  L'UE s'affaire à la mise en place du Grand Marché transatlantique, base du futur Etat occidental qui confirmera une domination anglo-saxonne irréversible. C'est la réalisation de grand projet de Cecil Rhodes et de Milner.  Ce GMT alignera les normes européennes sur les normes américaines,  en toutes matières, tant de sécurité que sanitaire, environnementale, sociale, financière.  2014 doit être le tournant de la nouvelle Guerre Froide,  nourrie de deux visions géopolitiques antagonistes : le projet mondialiste de l'Occident et le projet d'Union eurasiatique de Poutine, lequel souhaitait y inclure l'Ukraine.  L'eurasisme russe est divisé entre Occidentalistes, partisans du modernisme, et Slavophiles, réfractaires aux Lumières occidentales et qui voient la vraie Russie dans la synthèse de la slavité médiévale et d'une Eglise orthodoxe qui a médiatisé l'apport des Grecs. Pour les slavophiles, c'est le lieu d'enracinement qui est finalement décisif, le Boden pesant alors plus que le Blut.  Poutine a entre temps mis sur pied l'Organisation du traité de sécurité collective, pour la défense mutuelle de la Russie, de la Biélorussie, de l'Arménie, du Kazakhstan, du Kirghizistan, de l'Ouzbékistan et du Tadjikistan.  En regard de l'idée eurasiste, le concept d'Eurosibérie a été forgé en 2006 par Guillaume Faye et Pierre Vial en réponse à ce que Carl Schmidt appelle un « cas d'urgence », l'affrontement des peuples blancs à tous les autres.  C'est le mythe mobilisateur d'un empire confédéral, ethniquement homogène et autarcique, avec la Russie au centre.

Roberto Fiorini dénonce la trahison de l'Union européenne, qui s'attaque aux revenus du travail salarié, en violation de son objectif originel, qui est, aux termes du Traité de Rome, l'amélioration des conditions de vie des travailleurs, en évitant notamment des zones pauvres à chômage élevé et à salaires bas, qui incitent à délocaliser les activités, à mettre les salariés en compétition.  Le ré-équilibrage des régions est un échec et l'Acte Unique de 1986 a ouvert la libre circulation des personnes et des capitaux, premier pas vers la mondialisation.  La compétition des salaires introduit l'abandon de leur indexation.  Dès 1994, l'OCDE prônait la flexibilité des salaires, la réduction de la sécurité de l'emploi et la réforme de l'indemnisation du chômage.  L'appauvrissement et la précarisation des ménages amorce une spirale infernale.  La BCE, gardienne du temple, veille par la modération salariale que l'inflation reste proche de zéro.  Les syndicats, qui ont accompagné le grand projet de mondialisation, sont rendus quasiment inefficaces et réduits à un simulacre d'opposition.  Au profit de multinationales, qui pillent sans contribuer.

Alexandre Delacour révèle que le nouvel OGM TC1507 est légalement commercialisé malgré une large opposition d'Etats membres (67%) et d'eurodéputés (61%), qui légalement devaient représenter 62% de la population de l'Union et n'en représentaient que 52,64% !  Paradoxalement, les petits pays sont moins dociles aux lobbies semenciers, qui mettent le monde agricole en servage, la santé publique en péril (la fertilité des spermatozoïdes des Européens en chute vertigineuse :-30%).

Claude Valsardieu poursuit son relevé des peuplements blancs hors d'Europe. Sur le flanc sud des forêts et toundras sibériennes, les Scytes et leur prédécesseurs les civilisations successives des Kourganes (IVe millénaire AC) de l'Ukraine à l'Altaï. La civilisation des oasis, dans le bassin du Tarim, et la civilisation de l'Indus (du IIe au IVe millénaire AC).  Ensuite, la désertification facilita l'installation d'Aryens et la nomadisation de hordes conquérantes vers l'ouest : Huns blancs d'Attila, Turcs blancs seldjoukides, Mongols de la Horde d'Or.  En Afrique septentrionale, à partir de 3000 AC, la seconde vague mégalithique pénètre en force en Méditerranée.  Qu'étaient les hommes du Sahara humide néolithique ? A la période des chasseurs ont succédé la période des pasteurs bovidiens et celle du cheval avec l'arrivée des Peuples de la Mer, dont l'écrasement par Ramsès III est célébré sur les bas-reliefs de Medinet Abou.

jeudi, 01 mai 2014

The Crimea and the Eurasianist idea as resistance geopolitics

tank-crimea-russia-identity-full.jpg

The Crimea and the Eurasianist idea as resistance geopolitics

 
Ex; http://www.geopolitica.ru
 
Professor Bruno De Cordier from the Department of Conflict and Development Studies of Gent University examines the perception and realities behind an aspired ‘great space’.
 
“I know one thing and I’ll tell you: if Russia survives this period and is eventually saved, it will be as a Eurasian entity and through the Eurasianist idea”, said the Russian ethnographer, historian and geographer Lev Gumilyev in an interview which he gave shortly after the demise of the USSR and briefly before passing away himself in the summer months of 1992.  Back then, it were dire years of decay, unraveling and loss of self-esteem in Russia and the rest of the enormous space that used to be the USSR shortly before. Even the existence of the Russian Federation, the USSR’s core entity, had become uncertain with the rise of separatism in the North Caucasian republics of Dagestan and Chechnya and with the rise of local and provincial potentates on which Yeltsin’s Kremlin hardly had any real influence left. So now, Crimea is set to join Russia. How things can turn.
 
The 1990s trauma
 
I have been thinking often of Gumilyev and his Eurasianist idea lately, for it indeed explains quite a lot of what had been going on. In brief, it states that the old USSR and the tsarist imperial space that preceded it are essentially grafted in an old cultural sphere in which Slavic and Turkic cultures, Orthodox Christianity, and Sunni and Shi’ite Islam have been cohabiting and interacting for centuries. The core of this sphere, of this ‘great space’ as the Russian political scientist Alexander Dugin calls it, is Russia which, indeed, geographically spreads out over the European and Asian continents and has, through the adoption of Byzantine Christianity in the 980s – after contact first established with Greek bishops on the Crimea by the way – and its incorporation in the system of the Khanate of the Golden Horde (1240-1502), is anchored in the Orient as well as in the West. The whole notion that Russia thus forms a separate sphere around which crystalizes a greater Eurasia, seems also to be present and well alive at the grassroots up to this day.
 
In a survey conducted among the Russian population in spring 2007 for example, the thesis that Russia is a Eurasian entity in its own right with its own societal and developmental ways, was agreed upon by almost three-quarters of the respondents.[1] Of course, it is more an indicator yet it’s also reflecting a reality. In a similar but much more recent survey last year about the question how Russia will look like in fifty years’ time, the largest share of respondents after the ‘don’t-know/no-answer’ category answered, that its technology and sciences will be quite similar to that of the West but that Russian society and culture will be entirely different from it.[2] Furthermore, as another survey conducted last fall learns, the share of those in Russia who regret the demise of the USSR is high: 57 percent, understandably higher among age categories with active memories of that period (which involves still a fair share of people of active age), yet still amounting to up to one-third among the categories of respondents who were not yet born in 1991 or who were too young to have active memories.[3]
 
The impact of what we could call the ‘1990s trauma’ caused by the dire years following the unraveling and eventually demise of the USSR should really not be underestimated. In a matter of a couple of years, a decent human capital, a high level of social safety, and a fair level of social infrastructure were squandered and destroyed to make way for a particularly rapacious form of capitalism – dubbed ‘market reforms’ by foreign consultants and scores of profiteers – an acute identity crisis, a dramatic demographic downturn and general degradation and loss of status. The mid-nineties were actually the period when I started to work in Eurasia. Back then, I understood already that all this was going to backlash one day. And indeed it did. Since the beginning of this century, not a small part of public opinion and opinion makers and officials blames an abstract ‘West’  – where certainly the US is being increasingly negatively perceived[4] – and, especially, local and regional liberals in Eurasia itself.
 
Economic great space
 
So, what are the different fibers still connecting Russia with its wider historical sphere, and with the rest of the region formerly known as the USSR, in particular? Let us first take a look at the economic substructure, starting with foreign trade. Officially, in the year 2013, almost 21 percent of Russia’s overall foreign trade was with other former states of the USSR, without the three Baltic countries. Some three-quarters of its trade within Eurasia was, in that particular order, with Ukraine, Belarus and Kazakhstan. The latter two are also part of both the customs’ union and the Eurasian Economic Community which are being led and promoted by Moscow. Attempts to also integrate Ukraine in these structures actually sparked the protest movement in Kiev last year. Furthermore, more than 50 percent of Russia’s external commerce takes place with the EU, almost 10 percent with China and some 3 percent with the US. Russia’s external trade pattern is thus primarily oriented towards the EU, which also implicates something else by the way: that economies and corporations from the EU need the Eastern European market.
 
Hence economic sanctions against Moscow will first of all affect an EU which has primarily acted as an extension and aid of the US in the whole episode of the Ukraine crisis. For those keen on stressing the importance of energy policies, well, there is also the position and activities of Gazprom in Eurasia.  This parastatal corporation, which is closely connected to the Kremlin, controls about one-third of the world’s production of natural gas and also has interests and activities in other sectors like transport, oil, banking and media. It is actively present in all former Soviet countries including the Baltics who actually depend on it for most of their supply in natural gas. Gazprom also participates, in one form or another, in oil extraction and in upgrading infrastructure in gas- and oil-exporting countries like Turkmenistan, Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan. Gazprom’s sheer weight explains why Russia, together with Iran and Qatar, has taken the lead in mid-2001 in the establishment of the so-called Forum of Gas-Exporting Countries. The structure, which currently has 11 member states and in which Kazakhstan is an observer, is to be a blueprint of some sort of ‘gas OPEC’.
 
Migrant workers and oligarchs
 
Let us go back to society and everyday life. One of the most important sociocultural vectors of Russian influence in greater Eurasia is, of course, the Russian language. The historical aversion against it is by far not as strong as it was in the Baltics and Central Europe in the nineties or as it is in Western Ukraine at the moment. Despite the righteous promotion of local or national languages other than Russian in the 1988-91 period, the Russian language still, or again, has official or semi-official status in Ukraine (although its future in ‘rump Ukraine’ is uncertain), Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. The use of Russian in the societies concerned usually goes well beyond the people of Russian origin and ethnicity. Even in countries where it does no longer have official status, such as Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan, it is still the idiom of the political and intellectual elites, part of the more urbanized population segments, ethnic minorities and it often serves as the language of inter-ethnic communication. Its position also sustains the influence of the Russian mass media, popular culture and opinion makers.
 
A very important binding agent in Eurasia, one situated on the interface of the grassroots and macro-economics, is seasonal as well as permanent labor migration to Russia. The vast majority of some one and a half million of guest workers who officially stayed in Russia in the year 2011 came from other countries of Eurasia.  The largest group, some 510,000, were from Uzbekistan.  Additionally, in the same year, some 280,000 guest workers were from Tajikistan, 193,000 from Ukraine, 110,000 from Kyryzstan, 80,000 from Moldova, 71,000 from Armenia, 68,000 from Azerbaijan and 53,000 from Georgia. Besides the old USSR countries, the second-largest country of origin of labor migrants in Russia is China. Kazakhstan and Belarus have also become host countries for migrant workers form southern Eurasia.
 
They visibly form a large portion of the bazaar traders, construction workers, cleaners and maintenance and catering personnel in the metropolises as well as of the seasonal workers in the agricultural sector. Many have double citizenship.  The infrastructure of the recent winter games in Sochi, for instance, has largely been built by workers from southern Eurasia and Moldova. This sort of migration feeds a remittance economy, which in countries like Armenia, Moldova and Tajikistan for instance, contributes a large GDP share amounting from 21 to 48 percent. The remittances of the hundreds of thousands of migrant workers, a majority of them men, are a vital financial lifeline for their families and areas of origin. Socially and psychologically, the impact of migration and the remittance economy is a mixed bag. They have revitalized regions but also disrupted local societies, yet do ensure a permanent interaction at the basic popular level within Eurasia.
 
At the other end of the social pyramid, there is something peculiar going on. A number of industrialists and oligarchs from Uzbekistan, Azerbaijan and Georgia with connections to the upper echelons of power in Russia are based in Moscow or Saint-Petersburg. Through patronizing sociocultural associations and through media, several of them try to build a political base among the diasporas in Russia of their respective countries or origin. On the mid-term, this is important since several of the personalities concerned have ambiguous if not outright tense relationships with the regimes, or with specific personalities or fractions therein, in their respective countries. Personally, I consider it likely that Moscow will try to steer or recuperate regime change in some Eurasian  countries – Uzbekistan for example – with unreliable or fractionalized regimes and a large potential for social unrest, before pro-Western of Western-backed figures and networks do so.  In this sense, the personalities concerned as well as they movements and networks form ‘replacement elites’.
 
Military imperialism?
 
The navy base in Sebastopol was a hotspot and departure point in Russia’s recent intervention in, or, depending on how you look at it, invasion, of the Crimean peninsula. Yet how can one characterize Moscow’s military cooperation with the rest of Eurasia?  Since fall 2002, the institutional framework has been the Collective Security Treaty Organization, a sort ‘contra-NATO’ which, beside Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan, has Armenia, Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan as its members. Serbia, amongst others, is an observer to the organization. With the exception of Georgia and, increasingly, also Azerbaijan, Eurasia’s respective national armed forces are still psychologically and technically quite oriented towards Russia and purchase most of their military technology and weaponry from it. The Russian armed forces, for their part, have bases and military advisors in Tajikistan, Armenia and Kyrgyzstan. Additionally, they co-manage the space launch facility of Baykonur is Kazakhstan and radar stations in Belarus and, until last year, also in Gabala in Azerbaijan. And since mid-1992, Russia has also a 9,200 strong peacekeeping force in Transnistria, an area seceded from Moldova in 1990. Beyond the territory of the old USSR, Russia has one naval base on the Mediterranean, in the Syrian port of Tartus. To put things in perspective, the US has some nine-hundred bases or other forms of military presence outside of its territory, including in Eurasia.
 
Since about a decade, Russia has also become, like the USSR used to be, a donor of various forms of development and humanitarian aid.[5] It has channeled its aid, for instance, multilaterally through a number of UN organizations and also donated aid to contexts of high political and symbolic significance, such as Syria, Serbia and the Serbian minority in Kosovo. The bulk of Russia’s foreign aid, however, is destined for Eurasia. During the 2007-13 period, about 57 percent went to Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Armenia and South Ossetia. The latter brings up the existence and the role of Eurasia’s so-called quasi-states, areas that seceded in one form or another between 1989 and 1993, which have many if not all characteristics and attributes of states but that are not recognized as such by other countries and the UN, or only by a handful of countries.[6] There are currently four such entities in the former USSR:  the enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh in Azerbaijan, previously-mentioned Transnistria, and South Ossetia and Abkhazia which both seceded from Georgia in the early nineties and officially declared themselves independent after the 2008 South Ossetia War. In some way, the Crimea also fits into this category.[7]
 
The said four quasi-states largely sustain on an informal economy, on financial and other material aid, pensions and migrant remittances from Russia. In most of these entities, there is also a strong identification with and favorable opinion of Russian among local public opinion. Just like Kosovo, which is in fact a protectorate, is an important pivot and hold of NATO-US presence in the Balkans,  they form a core element of Moscow’s presence in greater Eurasia. In that sense, Transnistria, in particular, along with Sebastopol and the Baltic exclave of Kaliningrad (an old part of Prussia which was annexed by the USSR after the Second World War and is still part of the Russian Federation), is perceived to be a necessary outpost of Eurasian resistance on the western frontier against a NATO that is perceived to be increasingly aggressive and expansionist. A few days after the Crimean referendum, the parliament of Transnistria, which like the peninsula has a Russian or at least Russia-speaking majority, proposed to also accede to the Russian Federation.[8]
 
Bismarck and the ‘neo-USSR’
 
So, to conclude, Moscow definitely has aspirations in this enormous space between the Baltic Sea and Alaska. But contrary to the American neo-empire these aspirations of dominance are not planetary.[9] Following Russia’s military intervention on the Crimea, which was, amongst others, legitimized by the necessity to protect the peninsula’s Russian population, some suggested that Kazakhstan, with its large Russian minority of about one quarter of the population and in the majority in a number of districts bordering Russia itself, might be next in line. This is quite improbable though. When one looks at the pattern of Russian military intervention over the last few years, one notices that these have taken places in countries  – South Ossetia and Georgia, where Russians form barely 1.5 percent, and now Ukraine and the Crimea – which have been the setting of so-called ‘color revolutions’ which eventually largely championed a pro-NATO and generally pro-Western societal and political project.
 
Much more than something driven and inspired by aggressive expansionism or access to resources, the recomposing of a greater Eurasia is perceived to be a necessary resistance movement against forces and centers of power the eventual aim of which is nothing less than the dismantling of Russia itself, or its reduction to a submissive and obedient entity.[10] To prevent this, a ‘great space’ has to be formed that takes the lead in the formation of the multi-polar world order which has to succeed to American neo-imperial hegemony. There will eventually be no replica of the USSR. The customs’ union between Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan is definitely meant to be a blueprint for more in-depth integration or reintegration in Eurasia though, quite similar to the way the Prussian Zollverein from 1839 laid the bases for the unification of the German states and principalities which was achieved by Otto von Bismarck by the year 1871. And this design is certainly not less legitimate than the EU, the Gulf Cooperation Council or the US’ free-trade area for the Americas are. Whether the national elites involved, especially those of Kazakhstan, will eventually be willing to transfer power to a supra-national entity in the near future remains to be seen. Yet the perception of a process and threat of externally steered chaos, regime change and further balkanization of Eurasia, and, especially, the objective interests and advantages of a more multi-polar world order could definitely offer the necessary psychological impetus to do so.
 
[1]Аналитический Центр Юрия Левады-YuriLevadaAnalyticalCentre, «Л.А. Седов: Россия и мир», 2007, http://www.levada.ru/press/2007081001.html
[2]Аналитический Центр Юрия Левады-YuriLevadaAnalyticalCentre,  «Россия-2063», 2013, http://www.levada.ru/22-08-2013/rossiya-2063
[3]Аналитический Центр Юрия Левады-YuriLevadaAnalyticalCentre, «Россияне о распаде СССР», http://www.levada.ru/14-01-2014/rossiyane-o-raspade-sssr
[4]Аналитический Центр Юрия Левады- YuriLevadaAnalyticalCentre, «Россияне об отношении к другим странам», www.levada.ru/11-10-2013/rossiyane-ob-otnoshenii-k-drugim-stranam
[5]For more on Russia and a donor of aid, see the study by Oxfam International which is available both in Russian and English at http://www.oxfam.org/en/policy/russia-humanitarian-aid-donor
[6]For a more in-depth examination of quasi-states in the former USSR and elsewhere, see the excellent special issue of Diplomatie: affaires strategiques et relations internationales by Francois Grunewald and Anne Rieu, ‘Entre guerre et paix: les quasi-etats’, Diplomatie: affaires strategiques et relations internationales, №30, 2008.
[7]The first to recognize Crimea’s referendum on independence besides Russia itself were Nagorno-Karabakh, South Ossetia and Abkhazia. Kazakhstan, Armenia and the Bolivarian republic of Venezuela had followed at the time of writing.
[8]Joris Wagemakers ascertains the existence of an outright resistance identity among both the authorities and much of the population of Transnistria. For those interested, see Joris Wagemakers, ‘National identity in Transnistria: a global-historical perspective on the formation and evolution of a ‘resistance identity’’. Journal of Eurasian Affairs, 1(2), 2014, pp. 50-55.
[9]I use the term neo-empire because unlike the Roman, Frankish, Napoleonic and British empires, to name a few examples, it does not consider nor calls itself one and actively maintains an illusion of equality between itself and its subjects.
[10]The fact that well before to the Ukraine and Crimea crisis, the person of Vladimir Putin and Russia on the whole have been demonized for months with almost hysterical international media campaigns supported by a some transnational corporations, celebrities and foreign parliamentarians about a non-issue like the arrest of a nihilist rock band, and about the so-called persecution of homosexuals, has certainly strengthened this perception.
 
Регион: 

dimanche, 20 avril 2014

Une alliance pour l’endiguement du pouvoir mondialiste

CHINE, RUSSIE, EUROPE

Une alliance pour l’endiguement du pouvoir mondialiste

Auran Derien
Ex: http://metamag.fr
 
Trois situations apparaissent qui pourraient ouvrir un chemin aux  Européens. Il y a toujours des alternatives. Si l’on veut mettre en fonctionnement des systèmes de paiement sans dollar pour le commerce international, il n’y a rien d’impossible. Une civilisation cherche à naître, malgré le pouvoir actuel en place.
 
L’exemple chinois 

La Chine a déposé une plainte à l’OMC (Organisation Mondiale du Commerce) contre les pratiques mensongères étatsuniennes, l’humeur de ses dirigeants les incitant à modifier les tarifs douaniers sans aucune justification. La tournée européenne du président chinois a été l’occasion de formuler une proposition de partenariat bilatéral UE - Chine en quatre volets : paix, croissance, réformes et civilisation. Herman Van Rompuy, président du Conseil européen, n’a évidemment pas été à la hauteur dans sa réponse. Il a menti une fois de plus en affirmant que l’Europe allait sortir de la récession. Chacun sait que la Commission de Bruxelles fait régresser l’Europe par des destructions massives de son économie appelées réformes. destinées à abaisser les peuples au niveau des Tchandalas de l’Inde.
 
La Chine, elle, s’active. Elle achète moins de devises. Au mois de mars  le yuan avait baissé par rapport au dollar signifiant ainsi que le pays ne se laisserait pas faire dans le cadre de la guerre des monnaies. Il a été publié à la même époque que la croissance économique chinoise avait ralentie, mais que la Banque Centrale intervenait lorsque cela lui paraissait nécessaire sans s’adonner aux productions massives de monnaie à l’inverse des anglo-saxons. Elle fournit juste ce qu’il faut de liquidités pour continuer à investir (notamment dans les chemins de fer) et développer le commerce.

La Bundesbank, après la visite du Président Chinois fin mars, a annoncé la signature d’un mémoire qui prévoit la création à Francfort d’un centre de compensation pour les paiements en Yuan. L’Allemagne est le pays d’Europe dont le commerce avec la Chine est le plus important. Il est prévisible que cela sera un point de départ pour réduire l’usage de la monnaie américaine dans le commerce Europe-Chine. Cependant, il ne suffit pas d’oublier le dollar, il conviendrait aussi de larguer les banques qui en promeuvent l’usage. 

Du côté Russe

La Russie est partante pour diminuer le poids des anglo-saxons en cessant d’utiliser le dollar, en particulier dans le commerce des matières premières. Les deux personnages à l’origine de la nouvelle orientation russe sont Sergey Glaziev, conseiller économique de la Présidence et Igor Sechin, PDG de Rosneft, la principale entreprise pétrolière russe. Le Président de la banque publique VTB a affirmé que les entreprises à capitaux publics spécialisées dans la vente d’armes pouvaient démarrer la signature de contrats en roubles ou en monnaies de leurs acheteurs, sans passer par le dollar. La direction du Centre d’échanges de Saint-Pétersbourg a été confiée à Igor Sechin qui avait déclaré courageusement, en Octobre 2013 au Forum Mondial de l’Energie tenu en Corée, que le temps était venu de mettre en place des mécanisme d’échange pour le gaz naturel entre tous les pays concernés et que les transactions soient enregistrées en monnaies de chacun . Il est question par exemple de signer des accords de swap biens - pétrole entre l’Iran et la Russie. 

Il est fondamental maintenant que d’autres puissances suivent la Russie et la Chine dans cette politique d'émancipation. La Chine incite aussi les autres pays du BRICS (Brésil, Russie, Inde, Chine et Afrique du Sud) à éliminer le dollar de leurs transactions et donne l’exemple, en ouvrant deux centres de traitement du commerce en yuan, à Londres et maintenant Francfort.

Des Européens soumis aux Européens éveillés ?

Les Européens doivent secouer leur torpeur. L’Asie, mise en selle pour que les multinationales y produisent à bas prix des produits vendus en Europe aux prix européens, ne ruine pas directement l’Europe. Les responsables sont les hommes politiques mondialistes qui ont liquidé toute protection pour s’enrichir de ces trafics. Mais désormais la Chine, la Russie, l’Iran, le Vénézuela, le Brésil, l’Inde…et d’autres certainement ouvrent les yeux. L’Occident est entre les mains d’une finance mondialiste et il est fondamental de s’émanciper pour faire prospérer une autre civilisation.
 
Dès 2017, a affirmé le Boston Consulting Group à la fin du mois de février 2013, l’Asie (hors Japon) sera la région la plus riche du monde. Il sera essentiel que les banques spécialisées dans la gestion de fortune soient laissés de côté, même si la volonté de ces fanatiques consiste justement à convaincre les nouveaux riches de les laisser administrer leurs actifs. Rien de grand n’est jamais sorti de la finance anglo-saxonne, sinon de grandes guerres. Depuis le XVIIIème siècle, toutes les guerres ont eu des banquiers comme responsables en chef. Il faut enfin que cela cesse.

samedi, 19 avril 2014

Sommaire TP Mag n°59

Sommaire: "Terre & Peuple Magazine", n°59

59couv

 

59sommaire

mardi, 01 avril 2014

The U.S. Empire Is Trying Desperately To Contain the Eurasian Alliance

belarusrepublicflag.png

The U.S. Empire Is Trying Desperately To Contain the Eurasian Alliance of Russia, China, Central Asian Nations, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Pakistan

By

Ex: http://www.lewrockwell.com

The U.S. and its puppets, especially the E.U. and Nato, have been trying to weaken the rebuilding Russian empire as much as possible to contain it, while maintaining the  U.S. Global Empire.

This has become a vital, crucial goal because of the rapid growth of Chinese power and the ever closer Alliance of Russia, China, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Central Asia, Pakistan, etc.

The U.S. and E.U. are desperate to stop Russia from rebuilding its vast Central Asian states within the Russian Federation and this new Alliance, especially because of the vast Caspian Sea oil and gas. The E.U. is highly dependent on Russia for gas and on Russia, Iraq, Iran and the pro-Russian Caspian Sea powers, especially Kazakhstan. The Russian move into the Black Sea is another major step in that direction. Kazakhstan publicly supported the Russian move to reunite with the Crimea. Kazakhstan is the great prize, with 30% of its population  Russian and a vast border with Mother Russia. Russia is probably not at this time trying to reunite Kazakhstan with Russia, since that would involve many more problems, but simply to keep it as a close ally, as the Ukraine was until the violent overthrow of the Kiev government by the U.S. supported coup.

Russia, Iran, Iraq, and their Central Asian allies are close to a vast oligopoly on the oil and gas exports of the world, especially to the E.U., U.K., China, India, etc.

Saudi Arabia is desperate to break the growing Iran-Iraq-Syria-Hizbollahp-Russian-Central Asian power block. Right now it is trying desperately to build its own military forces to offset the U.S. withdrawal from the region, but that is absurd. In the long term, Saudi Arabia will align with Russia-China-Iran-Central Asia or be overthrown from within by those who will become reasonable.

China, now firmly in the Russian-Central Asia-Iran-Iraq block with gas lines from Russia, etc., is moving forcefully into all of the South China Sea to control oil and gas there. The U.S. is desperate to stop that, but China keeps moving out.

All of that puts the dying U.S. Empire on a collision course with the vast Russian-Chinese-Iranian-Central Asian Alliance. Pakistan has become very anti-U.S. because of the U.S. attacks in Pakistan and is allying more and more with China. Even India is working more and more closely with Iran and its allies to get the gas they need. Just yesterday the president of Iran spoke in Afghanistan calling for a great regional entente, working together more and more closely. That is the likely route for Iranian oil and gas to India.

Ultimately, the U.S. Empire must withdraw from its vast over-stretch to save itself financially and economically, politically and militarily.

The E.U. knows that, so Germany’s Prime Minister talks privately with Putin in German and Russian about the American Global Crisis. [She knows Russian and he knows German, so it's easy.] Germany, the E.U. and Russia are moving toward a long run understanding once the crippled U.S. implodes financially or withdraws to save itself. The CEO of Siemens, the giant and vital German technology corporation, has just visited with Putin in Russia and made public statements of strong plans to continue working with Russia very closely. Other German CEO’s have done the same, acting as informal reassurances from the Prime Minister that her public words going along with the U.S. more or less do not mean any kind of break with the close relations with Russia.

President Xi calls on China, Germany to build Silk Road economic belt

President Xi calls on China, Germany to build Silk Road economic belt

(Xinhua) - Ex: http://www.chinadaily.com

 

President Xi calls on China, Germany to build Silk Road economic belt
 
Chinese President Xi Jinping (center) visits Port of Duisburg of Germany March 29, 2014. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

DUSSELDORF, Germany - Chinese President Xi Jinping Saturday called on China and Germany to work together to build the Silk Road economic belt.

Xi made the remarks during a visit to Port of Duisburg, the world's biggest inland harbor and a transport and logistics hub of Europe.

 

 

 

 

The Chinese leader expressed the hope that Port of Duisburg will play a bigger role in the China-Germany and China-Europe cooperation.

Xi witnessed the arrival of a cargo train at the railway station in Duisburg from the southwestern Chinese city of Chongqing. The train had travelled all the distance along the Chongqing-Xinjiang-Europe international railway.

The Chinese president, accompanied by Vice German Chancellor and Minister of Economics and Energy Sigmar Gabriel, was warmly welcomed by Hannelore Kraft, premier of the State of North Rhine-Westphalia, and Soren Link, mayor of the city of Duisburg.

Kraft and Link, in their speeches at the welcome ceremony, said the state and the city will grasp the opportunities that the initiative on the Silk Road economic belt brings to them, and step up the cooperation with China.

samedi, 29 mars 2014

Eurasisme, Alternative à l'hégémonie libérale

Eurasisme, Alternative à l'hégémonie libérale

 

mercredi, 19 mars 2014

Russland und die Krim

Russland und die Krim

von Gereon Breuer

Ex: http://www.blauenarzisse.de

Kriegsspiele. Was haben Merkel und Steinmeier gemeinsam? Ihnen fehlt jede Vorstellung des strategischen Werts der Geopolitik für außenpolitisches Handeln. Das Ergebnis: Außenpolitischer Dilettantismus.

Ohnehin genießt die Geopolitik in Deutschland seit dem Ende des II. Weltkriegs einen eher schlechten Ruf. Dieser ist vor allem auf der Missinterpretation politischer Intellektueller gegründet, dass die Wahrnehmung eigener Interessen per se als „böse“ gelte. Das zeigt nun auch wieder die „Krim-​Krise“. Schon allein von einer Krise zu sprechen offenbart die schlichte Natur dessen, der sich bemüßigt fühlt, die Wahrnehmung von Interessen mit einer Krise zu assoziieren. Denn Russland unternimmt auf der Krim, bei der es sich noch dazu um eine autonome Republik handelt, nichts anderes, als in Zeiten unsicherer politischer Verhältnisse in der Ukraine die eigene Einflusssphäre zu wahren. Das heißt konkret: Den Stützpunkt der Schwarzmeerflotte und damit die maritime Herrschaft über das Schwarze Meer zu sichern.

In geostrategischer Hinsicht ist das ein sehr kluges und umsichtiges Verhalten. Dass die EU – und vor allem Deutschland – Russland deshalb nun mit Sanktionen drohen, zeigt, dass die bürokratischen Führer in Berlin und Brüssel nicht verstanden haben: „Staaten haben keine Freunde, nur Interessen.“ Dieses unter anderen dem britischen Premierminister Ewald Gladstone zugeschriebene Diktum lässt ahnen, dass Außenpolitik vor allem egoistisch funktioniert oder eben nicht. Wladimir Putin scheint das verstanden zu haben und in seinem Handeln äußert sich, was Halford Mackinder (18611947) in seiner „Heartland-​Theory“ beziehungsweise „Herzland-​Theorie“ niederlegte: „Wer Osteuropa beherrscht, kommandiert das Herzland, wer das Herzland beherrscht, kommandiert die Weltinsel, wer die Weltinsel beherrscht, kontrolliert die Welt.“

Bedeutung der „Herzland-​Theorie“

Der britische Geograph und Geopolitiker verstand unter der Weltinsel Eurasien und den afrikanischen Kontinent. Das Herzland sah er in Sibirien und im europäischen Russland konstituiert.Heartland Er ging davon aus, dass unter anderem die Rohstoffreserven der Weltinsel es ermöglichen würden, von dort aus alle anderen Länder zu beherrschen, also solcher in kontinentaler Randlage und langfristig auch den amerikanischen Kontinent, Japan und Australien. Für Mackinder ist damit die Beherrschung des Kernlandes Eurasien der Schlüssel zur Weltmacht. In Deutschland fand seine Theorie so gut wie keine Rezeption und sein 1904 erschienenes Werk Democratic Ideals and Reality, in dem auch der für die Herzland-​Theorie grundlegende Aufsatz The Geographical Pivot of History erschien, hat bis heute keine deutsche Übersetzung erfahren.

In den USA beispielsweise war die Rezeption eine völlig andere. Dort werden Mackinders Ausführungen bis auf den heutigen Tag sehr ernst genommen. Mackinder selbst ging sogar so weit zu behaupten, dass nur durch den I. Weltkrieg verhindert werden konnte, dass Deutschland sich die Herrschaft über Herzland und Weltinsel sicherte. Dass die USA das um jeden Preis verhindern wollten, ist hinlänglich bekannt. Unter anderen stehen heute Zbigniew Brzezinski oder Henry Kissinger als prominente Vertreter der politischen Kreise, die das außenpolitische Handeln der USA im Wesentlichen an Mackinders Herzland-​Theorie ausrichten – theoretisch und auch in praktischer Hinsicht. Ein Blick auf die Weltkarte zeigt auch ohne umfassende geographische Kenntnisse, dass Russland heute immer noch einen wesentlichen Teil des Herzlandes abdeckt. Am Rande des Herzlandes befindet sich auch die Krim. Ihr geostrategischer Wert für Russland ist daher offensichtlich.

Böse geopolitische Realität

Während nun in Moskau und Washington bezüglich den aktuellen politischen Entwicklungen in der Ukraine Geopolitik betrieben wird, beschränken sich die EU-​Bürokraten auf die Ankündigung von Sanktionen. Unter anderem soll ein Drei-​Stufen-​Plan im Gespräch sein, den die EU durchführen möchte, sofern Russland seine Truppen nicht von der Krim abzieht. Auf eine solche Idee würden Staatsmänner nie kommen. Das ist Sache von Bürokraten, denen die Realität nur aus Erzählungen bekannt ist. Vielleicht sollten die Schreibtischtäter in Brüssel stattdessen mal über einen Drei-​Stufen-​Plan der EU nachdenken, sofern die USA ihre Truppen nicht aus Deutschland zurückziehen. Aber nein, das wäre dann doch wieder zu viel Geopolitik. Und die ist ja böse.

Bild 2: Mackinders Herzland (Pivot Area), Abbildung in seinem 1904 erschienenen Text The Geographical Pivot of History

lundi, 10 mars 2014

Pourquoi les Allemands n’ont guère envie de se fâcher avec Poutine

gazrusse.jpg

Pourquoi les Allemands n’ont guère envie de se fâcher avec Poutine

Ex: http://aucoeurdunationalisme.blogspot.com

 
La Russie fournit un tiers du gaz naturel et du pétrole [consommé par] l’Allemagne. Et leurs économies sont si imbriquées que l’idée même de sanctions effraient les champions de l’exportation.
 
Sanktionen nein danke ! S’il est un patronat qui veut éviter toute sanction économique contre Moscou, c’est bien l’allemand. Les deux économies sont tellement imbriquées que Berlin aurait énormément à perdre. Les échanges entre l’Allemagne et la Russie s’élèvent à près de 80 milliards d’euros (4 fois plus que la France).
 
L’hebdomadaire Wirtschaftswoche résumait cette semaine : “Plus de 6.000 entreprises, de la multinationale aux PME, sont présentes en Russie, où elles ont investi directement plus de 20 milliards. 300.000 emplois dépendent en Allemagne de ces échanges“. Berlin est le deuxième fournisseur de Moscou, après Pékin (la France, 8ème).
 
D’ailleurs jeudi 6 mars, alors que la crise ukrainienne battait son plein et que le Kremlin ne semblait pas disposé à faire baisser la tension, Sigmar Gabriel, ministre de l’économie et Vice chancelier est allé à Moscou, en voyage officiel et a rencontré Poutine. Cette visite “prévue de longue date“, a-t-on précisé à Berlin, portait sur la “politique énergétique et de développement économique“. Elle va tout à fait dans le sens de la diplomatie allemande : pas de coup de menton, un pragmatisme qui respecte les intérêts bien compris de chacun.
 
Des sanctions qui pourraient coûter cher
 
Car la Russie pourvoit aux besoins énergétiques de notre voisin : elle lui fournit 31% de son gaz naturel (contre moins de 10% en France) et 35 % du pétrole qu’elle consomme. En échange, l’Allemagne lui vend des biens pour une valeur d’une quarantaine de milliards d’euros, essentiellement des machines-outils, de la chimie et des automobiles. Metro, Volkswagen, BMW ou Daimler sont des acteurs de poids.
 
Tout au long de la semaine, la presse Outre Rhin y est allée de ses avertissements contre les sanctions, comparées par exemple à “un poison coulant dans le sang“, par le quotidien Süddeutsche Zeitung. “Chaque sanction a son prix“, mettait en garde le quotidien des affaires Handelsblatt, en écho à l’hebdomadaire Focus qui parlait de “spirale des sanctions“.
 
L’économiste star, Wener Sinn, patron de l’institut de Munich IFO, estimait, quant à lui que les représailles économiques contre Moscou mettraient en danger la transition énergétique allemande, qui rend le pays “encore plus dépendant des importations russes“.
 
Schröder fait du [lobbying] pro-russe
 
Le 3 mars, l’ex chancelier Gerhard Schröder était à l’ambassade d’Allemagne à Paris devant un parterre de politiques et d’hommes d’affaires français. Soucieux de pacifier le débat, il a émis des doutes sur l’utilité des armes économiques. “A quoi servirait d’appeler au boycott de la Russie, alors que l’on ignore qui va en pâtir le plus ?“, avait notamment déclaré ce proche de Poutine, qui appelle le patron du Kremlin son “ami” et qui l’a invité à la fête de ses 60 ans.
 
Il n’est pas le seul Allemand proche de Moscou. Plusieurs politiques et hommes d’affaires de premier plan se sont reconvertis dans le lobbying pour la puissance orientale. Dernier en date, Peter Löscher, ancien président de Siemens qui vient tout juste d’être embauché par un oligarque.
 
 

L’Inde soutient la Russie dans la crise ukrainienne

197039831.jpg

L’Inde soutient la Russie dans la crise ukrainienne

Ex: http://www.dedefensa.org

Notre estimé MK Bhadrakumar attire notre attention sur une intervention du conseiller de sécurité nationale du gouvernement indien Shivshankar Menon (notamment rapportées par le Times of India de ce 7 mars 2014). Menon estime que la Russie a des “intérêts légitimes” en Crimée, ce qui revient, pour le moins, à “comprendre” avec une nuance presque approbatrice la position russe en Crimée et vis-à-vis de la crise ukrainienne.

Cette position indienne est doublement surprenante, d’une part parce qu’elle marque un engagement inhabituel de ce pays dans une crise majeure, contre le bloc BAO et les USA, d’autre part parce qu’elle surpasse largement le “soutien” ambiguë de la Chine à la Russie. La Chine favorise en général les coups d’arrêt à l’hégémonie du bloc BAO, ce qui implique un certain soutien à la Russie, mais se montre intraitable sur la question du principe de la souveraineté, ce qui porte une ombre sur ce soutien dans la circonstance présente, – et bien qu’il reste à savoir qui est investi et protecteur de ce principe lorsqu’on mesure les circonstances ayant mené à la chute de Ianoukovitch ... (Selon MK Bhadrakumar, «China is indulging in doublespeak. Its propaganda apparatus queers the pitch for the West’s confrontation with Russia and, in fact, blatantly admits that Moscow is also fighting China’s cause by resisting western hegemony, while at the same time, Beijing’s diplomacy marks a careful distance from the Russian stance and takes to the high ground of ‘principles’.»)

La position indienne est une marque de plus des bouleversements en cours dans la situation internationale, avec surprises et désordre à mesure... Voici comment Bhadrakumar salue cette prise de position de son pays, lui qui est rarement tendre pour l’équipe au pouvoir, le 7 mars 2014 sur son Indian PunchLine) :

«The National Security Advisor Shivshankar Menon’s remark to the effect that Russia has “legitimate interests” in the Ukraine developments, as much as other interests are involved, is a statement of fact at its most obvious level.

»Russia’s interests in a stable, friendly Ukraine are no less than what India would have with regard to, say, Nepal or Bhutan. Delhi simply cannot afford to have an unfriendly government in Kathmandu or Thimpu, and it is hard to overlook the gravity of Russian concerns that ultra-nationalists staged a violent coup in Kiev. But Menon’s statement inevitably becomes a big statement, not only because he is a profoundly experienced and thoughtful scholar-diplomat but also given the high position he holds and his key role as an architect of India’s foreign policy in the recent years. Simply put, he is India’s voice on the world stage.

»To be sure, what Menon said will reverberate far and wide and would have been the content of many coded cables relayed by the antennae atop the chancelleries in Chanakyapuri to the world capitals yesterday. The point is, what Menon said is one of the most significant statements made by Delhi in a long while regarding the contemporary international situation. No doubt, the Ukraine is a defining moment in the post-cold era world politics and by reflecting on its templates, Menon voiced India’s concern over the dangerous drift in world politics...»

dimanche, 09 mars 2014

L'Allemagne, future puissance européenne tournée vers l'Est?

albrics.jpg

L'Allemagne, future puissance européenne tournée vers l'Est?
 
Conséquence de l’affaire Ukraine-Crimée

Michel Lhomme
Ex: http://metamag.fr
 
Que se passe-t-il ? L'Otan ne forme même plus des officiers loyaux dans ses cours ! Les nouvelles autorités euro compatibles de Kiev voient, en effet, leur armée se réduire de jour en jour. Hier, c’était le chef de la marine ukrainienne, l’amiral Denis Berezosvki, qui prêtait allégeance aux autorités pro-russes de Crimée. Puis, le gouvernement de Crimée a annoncé le ralliement de la 204ème brigade d’aviation de chasse des forces aériennes d’Ukraine dotée d’avions de chasse MiG-29 et d’avions d’entraînement L-39. Selon les autorités de Crimée, 800 militaires déployés sur la base aérienne de Belbek sont passés dans le camps du « peuple de Crimée ». Au total 45 avions de chasse et 4 avions d’entraînement se trouvent sur l’aérodrome. Précédemment dans la journée, les autorités de Crimée avaient annoncé que plus de 5 000 militaires des troupes de l’Intérieur, du service de garde-frontière et des forces armées d’Ukraine étaient passés aussi sous leur commandement. On parle donc de 22.000 militaires ukrainiens et plusieurs dizaines de systèmes de missiles sol-air S-300, passés sous l'autorité du gouvernement de la république autonome de Crimée. C'est pour Poutine, sans faire même couler le sang, un exploit et pour l'Otan, un sérieux revers et surtout un beau manque de loyauté après tous les cocktails servis !
 
Ainsi, toute la journée du 4 mars, on a suivi de part et d'autre la frégate Hetman  Sahaydachny, vaisseau amiral des forces navales d'Ukraine, entrer dans le détroit des Dardanelles. Quel pavillon battait-elle ? Pavillon ukrainien ? Pavillon russe ? A un moment, la presse russe avait indiqué que la frégate  refusait de suivre les ordres de Kiev et arborait le pavillon de Moscou. De son côté, le ministère de la Défense ukrainien démentait les allégations selon lesquelles le Hetman Sahaydachny aurait pris le parti de la Russie. On en est donc là à une guerre de pavillons en Mer Noire ! 

nord-stream-gazoduc-europe-russie.jpg

Craignant un coup d'Etat comme à Kiev, les habitants de Crimée ont créé des comités d'autodéfense et pris le commandement des unités militaires locales. Le Conseil suprême de Crimée avait déjà décidé, fin février, de tenir un référendum sur l'élargissement des pouvoirs de la république autonome ukrainienne de Crimée. Initialement fixée au 25 mai, la date du référendum a depuis été avancée au 30 mars. Par ailleurs, le premier ministre de Crimée, Sergueï Aksenov a renouvelé sa demande d'aide légitime et légale au président russe Vladimir Poutine. L’Otan quant à elle ne devrait pas intervenir en Crimée, mais selon le politologue russe, Alexandre Douguine, une filiale d’Academi (les ex-Blackwater d'Irak), Greystone Limited, aurait déjà débuté son déploiement en Ukraine. Les mercenaires arriveraient par groupe, en civil, avec de lourds paquetages, à l’aéroport de Kiev, d’où ils seraient envoyés vers Odessa. C'est eux que l'on évoquait hier.
 
L'Allemagne nouvelle puissance européenne d'équilibre 

Que se passera-t-il ? Les médias surenchérissent et dramatisent mais cela s'éclaircit et rappelle ironiquement l'épopée syrienne terminée par une victoire diplomatique russe et une humiliation des Etats-Unis et de la France. La France menace la Russie de sanctions, mais Laurent Fabius est  coincé: la Russie lui a fait immédiatement savoir, par ambassadeurs interposés, que cela entraînerait de facto la suspension immédiate de ses contrats militaires avec Paris, soit la suspension immédiate de la commande faite à la France en 2011 de deux bâtiments BPC (bâtiment de projection et de commandement) de type Mistral, plus une option pour deux autres. La France à genoux économiquement n'a plus les moyens de ses menaces.
 

merkepout.jpg

Petit à petit, l'unanimité européenne face à la Russie se lézarde. Londres est de plus en plus eurosceptique et pense aussi à son économie : qui paiera la partition de l'Ukraine ? Londres tient un double langage. Alors que David Cameron menaçait Vladimir Poutine il y a quelques jours de «conséquences économiques, politiques, diplomatiques et autres» (sic), une note confidentielle du Ten Downing Street a fuitée permettant réellement de douter de sa sincérité. On y lit que le Royaume-Uni «ne doit pas, pour l'instant, soutenir de sanctions commerciales contre la Russie ou lui bloquer la City». Le texte recommande également de «décourager» toute discussion de représailles militaires notamment à l'Otan !
 
Au sein de l'Union Européenne, ce sont donc les Allemands devenus pro-russes qui mènent la danse ! Pourquoi ? L'Allemagne est d'abord le premier exportateur vers la Russie. 35% du gaz et 35% du pétrole consommés en Allemagne viennent de Russie. L'Allemagne sait que la Crimée est, pour la Russie, non négociable. Comment ne pourrait-elle pas le savoir ? Enfin, et ce n'est pas négligeable dans les relations internationales, l'Allemagne n'a pas apprécié les propos de Nuland mais surtout l'espionnage par Prism des conversation téléphoniques d'Angela Merkel. N'oublions pas qu'Angela Merkel parle russe (Poutine parle aussi couramment allemand) et qu'elle a été élevée en RDA. Elle connaît presque intimement le caractère et la valeur de chef d'état de Poutine.
 
La crise ukrainienne risque d'avoir par ricochets un drôle d'effet collatéral, un effet choc pour l'Union Européenne. Elle accélère le rapprochement à l'est de l'Allemagne, une Allemagne qui se tournera donc de plus en plus vers l'Est et non vers la France. Or, sans le couple franco-allemand, l'UE n'est plus rien. Il est inutile de rappeler les liens historiques entre l'Allemagne et la Russie et d'évoquer ici la reconnaissance allemande toujours forte envers l'Union Soviétique de Gorbatchev qui a rendu possible la réunification. Les liens entre l'Allemagne et la Russie sont naturels et stratégiques: la Russie est maintenant incontournable pour l'Allemagne puissance. Enfin, le potentiel des relations économiques avec la Russie est pour l'Allemagne sans commune mesure  avec ce qu'elle peut attendre maintenant de son partenaire français en voie de paupérisation et de déliquescence manifeste. Tous les politiciens et les hommes d'affaires allemands en sont bien conscients. Ils misent maintenant tous sur l'essor d'un marché à l'Est qu'ils connaissent en plus très bien. La partition de l'Ukraine pourrait même être carrément négociée secrètement avec la Russie, la partie non russophone offrant ainsi à Berlin sur un plateau d'argent une main d'œuvre très bon marché et plus proche de la main d'œuvre chinoise qui, par ailleurs, se renchérit !

Alors, la France dans tout ça ?... 

Le porte-parole du Quai d’Orsay sait-il au moins que la pointe extrême de la Crimée abrite Sébastopol, le grand port militaire russe fondé par Catherine II en 1783 ?  Sans doute mais il feint l'ignorance pour tomber dans la caricature grossière et  outrancière de Poutine. Dans toute la crise, la France a été  indécrottable dans l'idéologie et Bernard-Henri Lévy, l'émissaire à peine voilé de Fabius. 

La France n'a en fait plus aucune vision des relations internationales sauf des obsessions idéologiques, des idées fixes. C'est là l'effondrement des compétences diplomatiques pour paraphraser le texte de notre collaborateur Raoul Fougax. Il en va de même aux Affaires étrangères comme à l'Intérieur ou à l'Education. La France voit des Hitler partout, même sous les sofas des Ambassadrices ! Elle ne peut du coup rien récolter sauf quelques lauriers jaunis pour les Droits de l'Homme. La France s'est ainsi coupé de l'Allemagne pragmatique. C'est donc l'Allemagne et non la France qui conforte à l'Est sa place d’interlocuteur européen privilégié de la Russie.

vendredi, 24 janvier 2014

Quel avenir pour le nationalisme français?

Quel avenir pour le nationalisme français?

Ex: http://cerclenonconforme.hautetfort.com

Quel avenir pour le nationalisme français?

Dans un précédent développement, je questionnais l’idée du nationalisme en replaçant l’histoire même du nationalisme, de façon un peu rapide certes, mais telle est la loi du genre lorsqu’on publie sur internet.

Il est important de poursuivre notre réflexion sur un nationalisme français du XXIe siècle, partant du constat que les différents évènements géopolitiques, les crises économiques et financières et les crispations identitaires conduisent de nombreux mouvements à travers l’Europe à s’enraciner dans le fait national. Nous pouvons penser immédiatement au Front National en France, à Casapound en Italie, à l’Aube Dorée en Grèce, au Jobbik en Hongrie. On peut tout à fait avoir une opinion négative de certains de ces mouvements et ils n’ont pas forcément de rapports les uns avec les autres, mais ils traduisent tous à leur façon le simple fait que face à l’UE, face à l’offensive du Capital et face à l’immigration de peuplement, la nation, produit d’une longue histoire apparaît presque « spontanément » comme l’échelon de résistance, de défense mais aussi, et surtout, de reconquête.

Cependant le nationalisme français est aujourd’hui sujet à une profonde crise interne qu’il convient d’analyser. Nous avons déjà donné notre opinion sur le FN, nous n’y reviendrons pas. De même nous avons donné de façon synthétique quelques éléments sur la pensée identitaire et la pensée dissidente. Ce texte est donc un complément de toutes nos réflexions récentes. Il vise à comprendre dans quels univers s’ébroue le camp « national », est-il d’ailleurs vraiment « national » ?

L’influence « allemande » : l’ethno-régionalisme identitaire

Le nationalisme français a été depuis de nombreuses décennies mis en concurrence avec la pensée ethno-régionaliste identitaire, de fait que si les deux familles aspirent souvent à préserver une identité héritée, le cadre de réflexion, d’expression et d’action n’est pas vraiment le même. La Seconde Guerre mondiale aura marquée une véritable rupture à ce niveau, de même que les années 60 en auront marquées une seconde.

Jusqu’au second conflit mondial, la résistance et la reconquête se faisait dans un cadre national, sans véritable volonté hégémonique, à l’exception de l’Allemagne qui souhaitait en finir avec le traité de Versailles. Les combats sur le front de l’est contre l’URSS auront fait naître dans l’esprit des nationalistes l’idée que l’unité européenne pouvait permettre d’être plus fort contre un ennemi commun, qui était ici le bolchevisme. Cela a pu conduire à l’idée qu’il fallait bâtir d’un nouvel ordre européen sous l’influence d’une nouvelle chevalerie, les SS, qui serait basée sur des régions historiques comme vous pouvez le voir ici :

http://www.laiq2012.net/waffen2.png

Carte de l'Europe des SS

Cela nous fait « étrangement » penser aux théories de l’anarchiste autrichien Leopold Kohr, qui faisait l’éloge des micro-états (non ethniques), pour favoriser la concorde continentale, théories inspirées par une vision médiévale de l’Europe comme vous pouvez le voir ici :

https://strangemaps.files.wordpress.com/2006/10/7europe.jpg

Carte de l'Europe de Leopold Kohr

Après guerre des personnalités comme Saint Loup ou Robert Dun, à l'origine issus de l’ultra-gauche mais engagés dans la Waffen SS contre le bolchevisme, se feront les relais de cette conception de l’Europe. D’autres personnalités, comme le breton Yann Fouéré iront dans ce sens, comme l’indique l’ouvrage L’Europe aux cents drapeaux qui reprend « curieusement » le drapeau de l’Union Européenne sur cette édition* :

http://pmcdn.priceminister.com/photo/l-europe-aux-cent-drapeaux-essai-pour-servir-a-la-construction-de-l-europe-de-yann-fouere-913148172_ML.jpg

Couverture de l'Europe aux Cents drapeaux de Yann Fouéré

Ces personnalités auront une influence sur le second tournant des années 60. Avec eux, les déçus du nationalisme historique, qui prennent conscience que le monde change. En raison de la perte des colonies, la France perd un pan de sa puissance et paraît être de moins en moins capable de faire face aux défis qui s‘annoncent, comme la résistance au communisme. Ce sera la fonction historique du GRECE, de renouveler le discours politique et de mettre en place un corpus permettant aux européens de trouver leur place face aux deux blocs. De nombreuses structures à tendance volkisch et régionalistes vont graviter autour du GRECE ou en émaner.

Mais cette idée d’une Europe divisée en petites régions à fort caractère identitaire et regroupées dans un « empire européen » ne peut pas totalement être dissociée de la tradition politique allemande. En effet, depuis le Moyen Âge, la vocation allemande et d’être un empire central regroupant des régions autonomes.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7c/Holy_Roman_Empire_1000_map_with_more_colours-fr.svg/1000px-Holy_Roman_Empire_1000_map_with_more_colours-fr.svg.png

Carte du Saint-empire romain germanique vers l'an Mil

L’unité allemande n’a pas véritablement rompu avec ce fait là, accentuant simplement le caractère ethnique dans le contexte du XIXe siècle, tout comme la Nouvelle Droite mènera de nombreuses études sur les indo-européens pour renforcer l’idée d’unité ethnique du continent. L’unité allemande s’est également faite par l’unité économique (ex : Zollverein) et c’est précisément comme cela que procède l’UE aujourd’hui. Nous pouvons sincèrement nous demander si les ethno-régionalistes identitaires n’ont pas aspirés, à un moment, à ce que l’Europe naissante (par la CEE puis par l’Euro) soit tôt ou tard conforme à leurs vœux, que de l’unité économique naisse ensuite une unité politique sur des bases ethniques. Les récents événements battent en brèche cette aspiration, sans pour autant disqualifier totalement la nécessaire concorde entre européens, ni un projet alter-européen. Mais il est aujourd’hui de plus en plus difficile de faire passer un message favorable à l’unité européenne sans passer clairement pour un suppôt du Capital.

L’influence états-unienne et anglo-saxonne : le suprématisme blanc et la « défense de la race blanche »

 Il est impossible de parler d’identité ethnique sans s’attarder sur tous les mouvements de défense de la race blanche. Ici la question est beaucoup moins épineuse car il paraît évident que :

 -         le nationalisme historique n’a jamais eu comme base de « défendre la race blanche » et a toujours perçu le fait racial, et ethnique, comme un moyen, et non comme une fin.

 -         la race n’est en aucun cas la seule dimension d‘une identité, qui est le produit d'un héritage historique, culturel et se construit dans le temps

Mais alors qui peut très concrètement en venir à faire reposer la nation et l’identité sur la race ? Les états-uniens, bien sur !

Les Etats-Unis sont le produit des migrations de nombreux européens, souvent protestants, mais pas seulement, qui ont cherché dans le « nouveau monde » une seconde chance. Ils sont aussi le produit de la rencontre de nombreux autres déracinés : chinois ou africains par exemple. Les Etats-Unis sont historiquement, et malgré la guerre d’indépendance des 13 premiers états contre la couronne britannique, un pays profondément marqué par le fait ethnique, voire racial, les migrants se regroupant bien souvent sur le territoire en fonction de leur origine. Ainsi certaines villes sont profondément liées à cette histoire comme Boston qui est dans tous les esprits la ville des irlandais, au même titre que certains quartiers comme Little Italy ou Chinatown traduisent clairement la fragmentation ethnique du pays, y compris à l’échelle locale.

Les Etats-Unis ne connaissent pas de « nationalisme » au sens européen. Nous avons clairement expliqué que le nationalisme est un processus historique qui a conduit en Europe à se sentir Français, Allemand, Italien, Grec, Espagnol, etc…. rien de tout cela aux Etats-Unis. Aux Etats-Unis on parlera plutôt de patriotisme, c'est-à-dire d’un attachement à cet Etat porte étendard de l’unité des populations et de la liberté. Mais au sein de cette fédération, certains mouvements ont eu l’idée qu’il fallait diviser le pays en fonction des races. Malgré une influence du nazisme allemand, on ne peut pas résumer le nazisme à la seule question raciale, étant donné que celui-ci est profondément rattaché au nationalisme romantique allemand, ce qui n’est pas le cas aux Etats-Unis, où toute dimension nationale est évacuée au profit de la seule dimension raciale. Certes certains objecteront que les mouvements suprématistes piochent abondamment dans le folklore germanique (runes, etc…) mais cela est plus le fruit d’une démarche racialiste que nationaliste. Aux Etats-Unis la démarche racialiste et suprématiste est souvent rattaché à quelques ouvrages comme le fameux « White Power » de Georges Lincoln Rockwell ou les non moins célèbres « Carnets de Turner » de Andrew Mac Donald. Il n’est pas question ici d’affirmer que tout ce qui est raconté par ses mouvements est à 100% du délire, mais de montrer que leur combat est propre à l’histoire des Etats-Unis et à une conception états-unienne (ou plutôt WASP), du monde… Un des grands leitmotiv de ce suprématisme est la RAHOWA (Pour Racial Holy War – Guerre Sainte Raciale) et qui place au centre de sa pensée l’idée qu’il y aurait une lutte des races (et non une lutte des classes, d’où l’anti-marxisme qui conduit à dire que le marxisme oppose les gens d’une même race comme en Europe à l’accusait d’opposer les gens d’une même nation**). Cette Guerre Sainte peut être adjointe à une forme de messianisme protestant comme c’est le cas par exemple de l’Aryan Nation de G. Butler. Les Anglo-saxons seraient la race élue de Dieu, Jésus Christ était un « aryen » et l’Amérique était la terre promise. Notez qu’on retrouve exactement la même chose en Afrique du sud pour certains Afrikaners (voir ce que j’avais écris ici).

http://cerclenonconforme.hautetfort.com/media/01/00/1167494064.jpeg

Le logo de "Aryan nations"
(Notre race est notre nation)

Ce discours s’est massivement diffusé en Europe par certains mouvements anglais et pose une vraie question. S’il est clair que l’immigration de peuplement menace biologiquement les européens et que la propagande subventionnée prône le métissage et la dévirilisation de l’homme blanc, doit-on pour autant ne combattre que sur cet aspect, en oubliant que nous avons une histoire propre et que nous devons intégrer cette donnée dans notre tradition politique et non calquer des logiciels de pensée anglo-saxons sur une vieille nation comme la France ? Il n’est pas question de Guerre Sainte raciale en France ou de Pouvoir blanc sur la Terre. Il est simplement question de reprendre les leviers de la souveraineté pour refonder une France et une Europe nouvelles, définir clairement un Français comme un européen de langue française et replacer le droit du sang au centre du débat.

L’influence russe : l’eurasisme

Après les Etats-Unis, la Russie. Si nous pouvons contester l’influence de la pensée anglo-saxonne américaine sur le nationalisme français, nous pouvons également nous questionner sur l’influence russe, cela n’est pas un exercice simple étant donné que nous avons plutôt de la sympathie pour l’histoire et la culture russe. Mais il est nécessaire d’avoir un regard critique.

https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTx0COc4Nc1azbvb2f5ePvq_BTUirgRQ-3qj-S_eCBpE0K29OSc

L’eurasisme est une conception géopolitique propre à la Russie qui est un pays à cheval sur deux continents (Europe et Asie). Un Russe ne peut abandonner ni sa dimension européenne, ni sa dimension asiatique. De là va naître l’eurasisme. La pensée eurasiste a beaucoup percée ces dernières années par l’intermédiaire d’Alexandre Douguine, qui a fait paraître il y a quelques mois la Quatrième Théorie Politique, celle qui doit succéder au libéralisme, au communisme et au fascisme et affronter la seule qui a survécu au XXe siècle : le libéralisme. Les théories de Douguine ne sont pas dénuées d’intérêts et reprennent un large aspect traditionnel, fortement séduisant pour tous ceux qui se sont intéressés à la Tradition (Evola, Guenon, etc…). C’est une façon pour les russes de répondre aux Etats-Unis, qui impulsent la mondialisation libérale, l’unipolarité et la sous-culture de la consommation de masse (par la musique ou le cinéma). Cependant cela ne doit pas nous faire oublier qu’il s‘agit d’une vision russe du monde.

En effet l’eurasisme est une vision impériale russe ce qui pose immédiatement la question du voisinage de la Russie. Ainsi les eurasistes considèrent que la Biélorussie, l’Ukraine et les pays baltes sont des territoires qui doivent leur être liés, alors que les nationalistes de ces pays veulent quant à eux être indépendants de ce voisin gargantuesque. D’où les tentatives d’intégration zélée, et malheureuses, au sein de l’espace euro-atlantique matérialisé par l’UE.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c9/Eurasia_and_eurasianism.png

Les Français auraient tort d’embrasser de façon trop naïve cette vision du monde, car cela pourrait les conduire à se couper des pays de l’est, l’Allemagne a sur ce point bien plus de finesse, en appliquant, encore une fois, sa stratégie impériale à l’est via l’UE (en intégrant la Pologne, les pays Baltes et en faisant des appels au pied à l’Ukraine) tout en se ménageant de bons rapports avec la Russie (Nord Stream, grâce de Khordokovski). Ce n’est pas en embrassant béatement l’eurasisme que le nationalisme français sortira de sa crise doctrinale actuelle. Au contraire, la France est historiquement un pays d’équilibre entre les empires et porte également son propre projet impérial, et l’eurasisme ne consiste pas simplement à défendre la souveraineté de l’Etat-nation russe, il consiste à encourager la Russie à avoir une hégémonie sur d’autres Etats-nations, Alexandre Douguine ne fait aucun mystère là-dessus. Il faut donc retrouver notre voie d’équilibre des puissances, développer notre propre projet impérial et favoriser l’idée selon laquelle les peuples doivent se gouverner eux-mêmes. Un nationaliste français doit pouvoir mener des tractations diplomatiques qui permettent à des voisins de vivre en paix. En un mot la Russie devra être un partenaire, mais cela ne nous empêche pas de faire valoir notre vision du monde et nos intérêts propres. Nous n’avons pas à devenir une colonie russe après avoir été une colonie des Etats-Unis.

Conclusion:

Ainsi par ces quelques modestes considérations nous avons pu passer au crible trois tentations de sortir du nationalisme traditionnel pour apporter une réponse aux temps présents : la volonté d’une autre Europe qui serait fédérale et ethnique, la volonté de préserver la race blanche ou la volonté de s’opposer aux Etats-Unis par le biais de la Russie.

Bien que le courant ethno-régionaliste soit surement le plus capable de faire l’équilibre entre les deux autres (suprématisme et eurasisme) ce qui explique que des personnalités issues du GRECE flirtent depuis longtemps avec l’un ou l’autre courant, ces trois grands courants, ne doivent pas nous faire oublier notre tradition politique propre, il faut plutôt les voir comme des sources d’inspiration pour constituer un corpus idéologique sérieux permettant aux Français d’affronter le monde dans lequel ils sont.

Il paraît important de ne pas rejeter l’idée fédérale, ni l’idée d’Europe puissance, il faut aussi enrayer la disparition de l’Homme européen et il convient de (re)trouver notre place dans le jeu géopolitique actuel qui tend vers la multipolarité depuis plusieurs années. La question de la sortie du capitalisme est ici fondamentale.

Nous pourrions œuvrer à bâtir une France fédérale et communale (ce qui reprend l’idée maurrassienne et proudhonienne, et non simplement « allemande ») au sein d‘une Europe puissance à l’ouest constituée des nations libérées du Léviathan euro-atlantiste, de la finance et du Capital. Il faudrait redéfinir la nationalité française sous un angle plus ethnique et revitaliser les Européens. Enfin, cet ensemble mènerait une politique de désaméricanisation, de coopération avec les puissances émergentes et les pays non-alignés, tout en préservant ses intérêts et ceux, in fine de l’Europe romano-carolingienne vers laquelle nous devrons nous projeter.

Jean/CNC

Note du C.N.C.: Toute reproduction éventuelle de ce contenu doit mentionner la source.

* On trouvera quelques points communs entre la carte de l'Europe des Waffen SS et celle du projet actuel de redécoupage régional de la France:

http://static.lexpress.fr/medias_9138/w_400,h_400,c_fill,g_north/regions-fusionnees_4678904.png

 **: La Rahowa, tout comme la lutte des classes, reposent paradoxalement sur des théories plutôt darwinistes de lutte entre des groupes humains concurrents.

mercredi, 18 décembre 2013

Milestones of Eurasism

3265133011.jpg

Milestones of Eurasism

By Alexander Dugin 

Ex: http://www.counter-currents.com

Eurasism is an ideological and social-political current born within the environment of the first wave of Russian emigration, united by the concept of Russian culture as a non-European phenomenon, presenting–among the varied world cultures–an original combination of western and eastern features; as a consequence, the Russian culture belongs to both East and West, and at the same time cannot be reduced either to the former or to the latter.

The founders of eurasism:

  • N. S. Trubetskoy (1890–1938)–philologist and linguist.
  • P. N. Savitsky (1895–1965)–geographer, economist.
  • G. V. Florovsky (1893–1979)–historian of culture, theologian and patriot.
  • G. V. Vernadsky (1877–1973)–historian and geopolitician.
  • N. N. Alekseev – jurist and politologist.
  • V. N. Ilin – historian of culture, literary scholar and theologian.

Eurasism’s main value consisted in ideas born out of the depth of the tradition of Russian history and statehood. Eurasism looked at the Russian culture not as to a simple component of the European civilization, as to an original civilization, summarizing the experience not only of the West as also–to the same extent–of the East. The Russian people, in this perspective, must not be placed neither among the European nor among the Asian peoples; it belongs to a fully original Eurasian ethnic community. Such originality of the Russian culture and statehood (showing at the same time European and Asian features) also defines the peculiar historical path of Russia, her national-state program, not coinciding with the Western-European tradition. 

Foundations

Civilization concept

The Roman-German civilization has worked out its own system of principles and values, and promoted it to the rank of universal system. This Roman-German system has been imposed on the other peoples and cultures by force and ruse. The Western spiritual and material colonization of the rest of mankind is a negative phenomenon. Each people and culture has its own intrinsic right to evolve according to its own logic. Russia is an original civilization. She is called not only to counter the West, fully safeguarding its own road, but also to stand at the vanguard of the other peoples and countries on Earth defending their own freedom as civilizations. 

Criticism of the Roman-German civilization

The Western civilization built its own system on the basis of the secularisation of Western Christianity (Catholicism and Protestantism), bringing to the fore such values like individualism, egoism, competition, technical progress, consumption, economic exploitation. The Roman-German civilization founds its right to globality not upon spiritual greatness, as upon rough material force. Even the spirituality and strength of the other peoples are evaluated only on the basis of its own image of the supremacy of rationalism and technical progress.

The space factor

There are no universal patterns of development. The plurality of landscapes on Earth produces a plurality of cultures, each one having its own cycles, internal criteria and logics. Geographical space has a huge (sometimes decisive) influence on peoples’ culture and national history. Every people, as long as it develops within some given geographical environment, elaborates its own national, ethical, juridical, linguistic, ritual, economic and political forms. The “place” where any people or state “development” happens predetermines to a great extent the path and sense of this “development”–up to the point when the two elements became one. It is impossible to separate history from spatial conditions, and the analysis of civilizations must proceed not only along the temporal axis (“before,” “after,” “development” or “non-development,” and so on) as also along the spatial axis (“east,” “west,” “steppe,” “mountains,” and so on). No single state or region has the right to pretend to be the standard for all the rest. Every people has its own pattern of development, its own “times,” its own “rationality,” and deserves to be understood and evaluated according to its own internal criteria.

The climate of Europe, the small extension of its spaces, the influence of its landscapes generated the peculiarity of the European civilization, where the influences of the wood (northern Europe) and of the coast (Mediterraneum) prevail. Different landscapes generated different kinds of civilizations: the boundless steppes generated the nomad empires (from the Scythians to the Turks), the loess lands the Chinese one, the mountain islands the Japanese one, the union of steppe and woods the Russian-Eurasian one. The mark of landscape lives in the whole history of each one of these civilizations, and cannot be either separated form them or suppressed.

State and nation

The first Russian slavophiles in the 19th century (Khomyakov, Aksakov, Kirevsky) insisted upon the uniqueness and originality of the Russian (Slav, Orthodox) civilization. This must be defended, preserved and strengthened against the West, on the one hand, and against liberal modernism (which also proceeds from the West), on the other. The slavophiles proclaimed the value of tradition, the greatness of the ancient times, the love for the Russian past, and warned against the inevitable dangers of progress and about the extraneousness of Russia to many aspects of the Western pattern.

From this school the eurasists inherited the positions of the latest slavophiles and further developed their theses in the sense of a positive evaluation of the Eastern influences.

The Muscovite Empire represents the highest development of the Russian statehood. The national idea achieves a new status; after Moscow’s refusal to recognize the Florentine Unia (arrest and proscription of the metropolitan Isidore) and the rapid decay, the Tsargrad Rus’ inherits the flag of the Orthodox empire. 

Political platform

Wealth and prosperity, a strong state and an efficient economy, a powerful army and the development of production must be the instruments for the achievement of high ideals. The sense of the state and of the nation can be conferred only through the existence of a “leading idea.” That political regime, which supposes the establishment of a “leading idea” as a supreme value, was called by the eurasists as “ideocracy”–from the Greek “idea” and “kratos,” power. Russia is always thought of as the Sacred Rus’, as a power [derzhava] fulfilling its own peculiar historical mission. The eurasist world-view must also be the national idea of the forthcoming Russia, its “leading idea.”

The eurasist choice

Russia-Eurasia, being the expression of a steppe and woods empire of continental dimensions, requires her own pattern of leadership. This means, first of all, the ethics of collective responsibility, disinterest, reciprocal help, ascetism, will and tenaciousness. Only such qualities can allow keeping under control the wide and scarcely populated lands of the steppe-woodland Eurasian zone. The ruling class of Eurasia was formed on the basis of collectivism, asceticism, warlike virtue and rigid hierarchy.

Western democracy was formed in the particular conditions of ancient Athens and through the centuries-old history of insular England. Such democracy mirrors the peculiar features of the “local European development.” Such democracy does not represent a universal standard. Imitating the rules of the European “liberal-democracy” is senseless, impossible and dangerous for Russia-Eurasia. The participation of the Russian people to the political rule must be defined by a different term: “demotia,” from the Greek “demos,” people. Such participation does not reject hierarchy and must not be formalized into party-parliamentary structures. “Demotia” supposes a system of land council, district governments or national governments (in the case of peoples of small dimensions). It is developed on the basis of social self-government, of the “peasant” world. An example of “demotia” is the elective nature of church hierarchies on behalf of the parishioners in the Muscovite Rus’. 

The work of L. N. Gumilev as a development of the eurasist thinking

Lev Nikolaevic Gumilev (1912–1992), son of the Russian poet N. Gumilev and of the poetess A. Akhmatova, was an ethnographer, historian and philosopher. He was profoundly influenced by the book of the Kalmuck eurasist E. Khara-Vadan “Gengis-Khan as an army leader” and by the works of Savitsky. In its own works Gumilev developed the fundamental eurasist theses. Towards the end of his life he used to call himself “the last of the eurasists.” 

Basic elements of Gumilev’s theory

  • The theory of passionarity [passionarnost’] as a development of the eurasist idealism;
  • The essence of which, in his own view, lays in the fact that every ethnos, as a natural formation, is subject to the influence of some “energetic drives,” born out of the cosmos and causing the “passionarity effect,” that is an extreme activity and intensity of life. In such conditions the ethnos undergoes a “genetic mutation,” which leads to the birth of the “passionaries”–individuals of a special temper and talent. And those become the creators of new ethnoi, cultures, and states;
  • Drawing the scientific attention upon the proto-history of the “nomad empires” of the East and the discovery of the colossal ethnic and cultural heritage of the autochthone ancient Asian peoples, which was wholly passed to the great culture of the ancient epoch, but afterwards fell into oblivion (Huns, Turks, Mongols, and so on);
  • The development of a turkophile attitude in the theory of “ethnic complementarity.”

0_9b9e1_f9f45d79_L.jpgAn ethnos is in general any set of individuals, any “collective”: people, population, nation, tribe, family clan, based on a common historical destiny. “Our Great-Russian ancestors–wrote Gumilev–in the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries easily and rather quickly mixed with the Volga, Don and Obi Tatars and with the Buriates, who assimilated the Russian culture. The same Great-Russian easily mixed with the Yakuts, absorbing their identity and gradually coming into friendly contact with Kazakhs and Kalmucks. Through marriage links they pacifically coexisted with the Mongols in Central Asia, as the Mongols themselves and the Turks between the 14th and 16th centuries were fused with the Russians in Central Russia.” Therefore the history of the Muscovite Rus’ cannot be understood without the framework of the ethnic contacts between Russians and Tatars and the history of the Eurasian continent.

The advent of neo-eurasism: historical and social context

The crisis of the Soviet paradigm

In the mid-1980s the Soviet society began to lose its connection and ability to adequately reflect upon the external environment and itself. The Soviet models of self-understanding were showing their cracks. The society had lost its sense of orientation. Everybody felt the need for change, yet this was but a confused feeling, as no-one could tell the way the change would come from. In that time a rather unconvincing divide began to form: “forces of progress” and “forces of reaction,” “reformers” and “conservators of the past,” “partisans of reforms” and “enemies of reforms.” 

Infatuation for the western models

In that situation the term “reform” became in itself a synonym of “liberal-democracy.” A hasty conclusion was inferred, from the objective fact of the crisis of the Soviet system, about the superiority of the western model and the necessity to copy it. At the theoretical level this was all but self-evident, since the “ideological map” offers a sharply more diversified system of choices than the primitive dualism: socialism vs. capitalism, Warsaw Pact vs. NATO. Yet it was just that primitive logic that prevailed: the “partisans of reform” became the unconditional apologists of the West, whose structure and logic they were ready to assimilate, while the “enemies of reform” proved to be the inertial preservers of the late Soviet system, whose structure and logic they grasped less and less. In such condition of lack of balance, the reformers/pro-westerners had on their side a potential of energy, novelty, expectations of change, creative drive, perspectives, while the “reactionaries” had nothing left but inertness, immobilism, the appeal to the customary and already-known. In just this psychological and aesthetic garb, liberal-democratic policy prevailed in the Russia of the 1990s, although nobody had been allowed to make a clear and conscious choice.

The collapse of the state unity

The result of “reforms” was the collapse of the Soviet state unity and the beginning of the fall of Russia as the heir of the USSR. The destruction of the Soviet system and “rationality” was not accompanied by the creation of a new system and a new rationality in conformity to national and historical conditions. There gradually prevailed a peculiar attitude toward Russia and her national history: the past, present and future of Russia began to be seen from the point of view of the West, to be evaluated as something stranger, transcending, alien (“this country” was the “reformers’” typical expression). That was not the Russian view of the West, as the Western view of Russia. No wonder that in such condition the adoption of the western schemes even in the “reformers’” theory was invoked not in order to create and strengthen the structure of the national state unity, but in order to destroy its remains. The destruction of the state was not a casual outcome of the “reforms”; as a matter of fact, it was among their strategic aims.

The birth of an anti-western (anti-liberal) opposition in the post-Soviet environment

In the course of the “reforms” and their “deepening,” the inadequacy of the simple reaction began to be clear to everyone. In that period (1989–90) began the formation of a “national-patriotic opposition,” in which there was the confluence of part of the “Soviet conservatives” (ready to a minimal level of reflection), groups of “reformers” disappointed with “reforms” or “having become conscious of their anti-state direction,” and groups of representatives of the patriotic movements, which had already formed during the perestroika and tried to shape the sentiment of “state power” [derzhava] in a non-communist (orthodox-monarchic, nationalist, etc.) context. With a severe delay, and despite the complete absence of external strategic, intellectual and material support, the conceptual model of post-Soviet patriotism began to vaguely take shape.

Neo-eurasism

Neo-eurasism arose in this framework as an ideological and political phenomenon, gradually turning into one of the main directions of the post-Soviet Russian patriotic self-consciousness. 

Stages of development of the neo-eurasist ideology

1st stage (1985–90)

  • Dugin’s seminars and lectures to various groups of the new-born conservative-patriotic movement. Criticism of the Soviet paradigm as lacking the spiritual and national qualitative element.
  • In 1989 first publications on the review Sovetskaya literatura [Soviet Literature]. Dugin’s books are issued in Italy (Continente Russia [Continent Russia], 1989) and in Spain (Rusia Misterio de Eurasia [Russia, Mystery of Eurasia], 1990).
  • In 1990 issue of René Guénon’s Crisis of the Modern World with comments by Dugin, and of Dugin’s Puti Absoljuta [The Paths of the Absolute], with the exposition of the foundations of the traditionalist philosophy.

In these years eurasism shows “right-wing conservative” features, close to historical traditionalism, with orthodox-monarchic, “ethnic-pochevennik” [i.e., linked to the ideas of soil and land] elements, sharply critical of “Left-wing” ideologies.

2nd stage (1991–93)

  • Begins the revision of anti-communism, typical of the first stage of neo-eurasism. Revaluation of the Soviet period in the spirit of “national-bolshevism” and “Left-wing eurasism.”
  • Journey to Moscow of the main representatives of the “New Right” (Alain de Benoist, Robert Steuckers, Carlo Terracciano, Marco Battarra, Claudio Mutti and others).
  • Eurasism becomes popular among the patriotic opposition and the intellectuals. On the basis of terminological affinity, A. Sakharov already speaks about Eurasia, though only in a strictly geographic–instead of political and geopolitical–sense (and without ever making use of eurasism in itself, like he was before a convinced atlantist); a group of “democrats” tries to start a project of “democratic eurasism” (G. Popov, S. Stankevic, L. Ponomarev).
  • O. Lobov, O. Soskovets, S. Baburin also speak about their own eurasism.
  • In 1992–93 is issued the first number of Elements: Eurasist Review. Lectures on geopolitics and the foundations of eurasism in high schools and universities. Many translations, articles, seminars.

3rd stage (1994–98): theoretical development of the neo-eurasist orthodoxy

  • Issue of Dugin’s main works Misterii Evrazii [Mysteries of Eurasia] (1996), Konspirologija [Conspirology] (1994), Osnovy Geopolitiki [Foundations of geopolitics] (1996), Konservativnaja revoljutsija [The conservative revolution] (1994), Tampliery proletariata [Knight Templars of the Proletariat] (1997). Works of Trubetskoy, Vernadsky, Alekseev and Savitsky are issued by “Agraf” editions (1995–98).
  • Creation of the “Arctogaia” web-site (1996) – www.arctogaia.com [2].
  • Direct and indirect references to eurasism appear in the programs of the KPFR (Communist Party], LDPR [Liberal-Democratic Party], NDR [New Democratic Russia] (that is left, right, and centre). Growing number of publications on eurasist themes. Issue of many eurasist digests.
  • Criticism of eurasism from Russian nationalists, religious fundamentalists and orthodox communists, and also from the liberals.
  • Manifestations of an academic “weak” version of eurasism (Prof. A. S. Panarin, V. Ya. Paschenko, F.Girenok and others) – with elements of the illuminist paradigm, denied by the eurasist orthodoxy – then evolving towards more radically anti-western, anti-liberal and anti-gobalist positions.
  • Inauguration of a university dedicated to L. Gumilev in Astan [Kazakhstan].

4th stage (1998–2001)

  • Gradual de-identification of neo-eurasism vis-à-vis the collateral political-cultural and party manifestations; turning to the autonomous direction (“Arctogaia,” “New University,” “Irruption” [Vtorzhenie]) outside the opposition and the extreme Left and Right-wing movements.
  • Apology of staroobrjadchestvo [Old Rite].
  • Shift to centrist political positions, supporting Primakov as the new premier. Dugin becomes the adviser to the Duma speaker G. N. Seleznev.
  • Issue of the eurasist booklet Nash put’ [Our Path] (1998).
  • Issue of Evraziikoe Vtorzhenie [Eurasist Irruption] as a supplement to Zavtra. Growing distance from the opposition and shift closer to the government’s positions.
  • Theoretical researches, elaborations, issue of “The Russian Thing” [Russkaja vesch’] (2001), publications in Nezavisimaja Gazeta, Moskovskij Novosti, radio broadcasts about “Finis Mundi” on Radio 101, radio broadcasts on geopolitical subjects and neo-eurasism on Radio “Svobodnaja Rossija” (1998–2000).

5th stage (2001–2002)

  • Foundation of the Pan-Russian Political Social Movement EURASIA on “radical centre” positions; declaration of full support to the President of the Russian Federation V. V. Putin (April 21, 2001).
  • The leader of the Centre of Spiritual Management of the Russian Muslims, sheik-ul-islam Talgat Tadjuddin, adheres to EURASIA.
  • Issue of the periodical Evraziizkoe obozrenie [Eurasist Review].
  • Appearance of Jewish neo-eurasism (A. Eskin, A. Shmulevic, V. Bukarsky).
  • Creation of the web-site of the Movement EURASIA: www.eurasia.com.ru [3]
  • Conference on “Islamic Threat or Threat to Islam?.” Intervention by H. A. Noukhaev, Chechen theorist of “Islamic eurasism” (“Vedeno or Washington?,” Moscow, 2001].
  • Issue of books by E. Khara-Davan and Ya. Bromberg (2002).
  • Process of transformation of the Movement EURASIA into a party (2002).

Basic philosophical positions of neo-eurasism

pour-une-theorie-du-monde-multipolaire.jpgAt the theoretical level neo-eurasism consists of the revival of the classic principles of the movement in a qualitatively new historical phase, and of the transformation of such principles into the foundations of an ideological and political program and a world-view. The heritage of the classic eurasists was accepted as the fundamental world-view for the ideal (political) struggle in the post-Soviet period, as the spiritual-political platform of “total patriotism.”

The neo-eurasists took over the basic positions of classical eurasism, chose them as a platform, as starting points, as the main theoretical bases and foundations for the future development and practical use. In the theoretical field, neo-eurasists consciously developed the main principles of classical eurasism taking into account the wide philosophical, cultural and political framework of the ideas of the 20th century.

Each one of the main positions of the classical eurasists (see the chapter on the “Foundations of classical eurasism”) revived its own conceptual development.

Civilization concept

Criticism of the western bourgeois society from “Left-wing” (social) positions was superimposed to the criticism of the same society from “Right-wing” (civilizational) positions. The eurasist idea about “rejecting the West” is reinforced by the rich weaponry of the “criticism of the West” by the same representatives of the West who disagree with the logic of its development (at least in the last centuries). The eurasist came only gradually, since the end of the 1980s to the mid-1990s, to this idea of the fusion of the most different (and often politically contradictory) concepts denying the “normative” character of the Western civilization.

The “criticism of the Roman-German civilization” was thoroughly stressed, being based on the prioritary analysis of the Anglo-Saxon world, of the US. According to the spirit of the German Conservative Revolution and of the European “New Right,” the “Western world” was differentiated into an Atlantic component (the US and England) and into a continental European component (properly speaking, a Roman-German component). Continental Europe is seen here as a neutral phenomenon, liable to be integrated–on some given conditions–in the eurasist project.

The spatial factor

Neo-eurasism is moved by the idea of the complete revision of the history of philosophy according to spatial positions. Here we find its trait-d’union in the most varied models of the cyclical vision of history, from Danilevsky to Spengler, from Toynbee to Gumilev.

Such a principle finds its most pregnant expression in traditionalist philosophy, which denies the ideas of evolution and progress and founds this denial upon detailed metaphysical calculations. Hence the traditional theory of “cosmic cycles,” of the “multiple states of Being,” of “sacred geography,” and so on. The basic principles of the theory of cycles are illustrated in detail by the works of Guénon (and his followers G. Georgel, T. Burckhardt, M. Eliade, H. Corbin). A full rehabilitation has been given to the concept of “traditional society,” either knowing no history at all, or realizing it according to the rites and myths of the “eternal return.” The history of Russia is seen not simply as one of the many local developments, but as the vanguard of the spatial system (East) opposed to the “temporal” one (West). 

State and nation

Dialectics of national history

It is led up to its final, “dogmatical” formulation, including the historiosophic paradigm of “national-bolshevism” (N. Ustryalov) and its interpretation (M. Agursky). The pattern is as follows:

  • The Kiev period as the announcement of the forthcoming national mission (IX-XIII centuries);
  • Mongolian-Tatar invasion as a scud against the levelling European trends, the geopolitical and administrative push of the Horde is handed over to the Russians, division of the Russians between western and eastern Russians, differentiation among cultural kinds, formation of the Great-Russians on the basis of the “eastern Russians” under the Horde’s control (13th–15th centuries);
  • The Muscovite Empire as the climax of the national-religious mission of Rus’ (Third Rome) (15th–end of the 17th century);
  • Roman-German yoke (Romanov), collapse of national unity, separation between a pro-western elite and the national mass (end of the 17th-beginning of the 20th century);
  • Soviet period, revenge of the national mass, period of the “Soviet messianism,” re-establishment of the basic parameters of the main muscovite line (20th century);
  • Phase of troubles, that must end with a new eurasist push (beginning of the 21st century).

Political platform

Neo-eurasism owns the methodology of Vilfrido Pareto’s school, moves within the logic of the rehabilitation of “organic hierarchy,” gathers some Nietzschean motives, develops the doctrine of the “ontology of power,” of the Christian Orthodox concept of power as “kat’echon.” The idea of “elite” completes the constructions of the European traditionalists, authors of researches about the system of castes in the ancient society and of their ontology and sociology (R. Guénon, J. Evola, G. Dumézil, L. Dumont). Gumilev’s theory of “passionarity” lies at the roots of the concept of “new eurasist elite.”

The thesis of “demotia” is the continuation of the political theories of the “organic democracy” from J.-J. Rousseau to C. Schmitt, J. Freund, A. de Benoist and A. Mueller van der Bruck. Definition of the eurasist concept of “democracy” (“demotia”) as the “participation of the people to its own destiny.”

The thesis of “ideocracy” gives a foundation to the call to the ideas of “conservative revolution” and “third way,” in the light of the experience of Soviet, Israeli and Islamic ideocracies, analyses the reason of their historical failure. The critical reflection upon the qualitative content of the 20th century ideocracy brings to the consequent criticism of the Soviet period (supremacy of quantitative concepts and secular theories, disproportionate weight of the classist conception).

The following elements contribute to the development of the ideas of the classical eurasists:

The philosophy of traditionalism (Guénon, Evola, Burckhardt, Corbin), the idea of the radical decay of the “modern world,” profound teaching of the Tradition. The global concept of “modern world” (negative category) as the antithesis of the “world of Tradition” (positive category) gives the criticism of the Western civilization a basic metaphysic character, defining the eschatological, critical, fatal content of the fundamental (intellectual, technological, political and economic) processes having their origin in the West. The intuitions of the Russian conservatives, from the slavophiles to the classical eurasists, are completed by a fundamental theoretical base. (see A. Dugin, Absoljutnaja Rodina [The Absolute Homeland], Moscow 1999; Konets Sveta [The End of the World], Moscow 1997; Julius Evola et le conservatisme russe, Rome 1997).

The investigation on the origins of sacredness (M. Eliade, C. G. Jung, C. Levi-Strauss), the representations of the archaic consciousness as the paradigmatic complex manifestation laying at the roots of culture. The reduction of the many-sided human thinking, of culture, to ancient psychic layers, where fragments of archaic initiatic rites, myths, originary sacral complexes are concentrated. Interpretation of the content of rational culture through the system of the ancient, pre-rational beliefs (A. Dugin, “The evolution of the paradigmatic foundations of science” [Evoljutsija paradigmal’nyh osnovanij nauki], Moscow 2002).

The search for the symbolic paradigms of the space-time matrix, which lays at the roots of rites, languages and symbols (H. Wirth, paleo-epigraphic investigations). This attempt to give a foundation to the linguistic (Svityc-Illic), epigraphic (runology), mythological, folkloric, ritual and different monuments allows to rebuild an original map of the “sacred concept of the world” common to all the ancient Eurasian peoples, the existence of common roots (see A. Dugin Giperborejskaja Teorija [Hyperborean Theory], Moscow 1993.

A reassessment of the development of geopolitical ideas in the West (Mackinder, Haushofer, Lohhausen, Spykman, Brzeszinski, Thiriart and others). Since Mackinder’s epoch, geopolitical science has sharply evolved. The role of geopolitical constants in 20th century history appeared so clear as to make geopolitics an autonomous discipline. Within the geopolitical framework, the concept itself of “eurasism” and “Eurasia” acquired a new, wider meaning.

From some time onwards, eurasism, in a geopolitical sense, began to indicate the continental configuration of a strategic (existing or potential) bloc, created around Russia or its enlarged base, and as an antagonist (either actively or passively) to the strategic initiatives of the opposed geopolitical pole–“Atlantism,” at the head of which at the mid-20th century the US came to replace England.

The philosophy and the political idea of the Russian classics of eurasism in this situation have been considered as the most consequent and powerful expression (fulfilment) of eurasism in its strategic and geopolitical meaning. Thanks to the development of geopolitical investigations (A. Dugin, Osnovye geopolitiki [Foundations of geopolitics], Moscow 1997) neo-eurasism becomes a methodologically evolved phenomenon. Especially remarkable is the meaning of the Land – Sea pair (according to Carl Schmitt), the projection of this pair upon a plurality of phenomena – from the history of religions to economics.

The search for a global alternative to globalism, as an ultra-modern phenomenon, summarizing everything that is evaluated by eurasism (and neo-eurasism) as negative. Eurasism in a wider meaning becomes the conceptual platform of anti-globalism, or of the alternative globalism. “Eurasism” gathers all contemporary trends denying globalism any objective (let alone positive) content; it offers the anti-globalist intuition a new character of doctrinal generalization.

The assimilation of the social criticism of the “New Left” into a “conservative right-wing interpretation” (reflection upon the heritage of M. Foucault, G. Deleuze, A. Artaud, G. Debord). Assimilation of the critical thinking of the opponents of the bourgeois western system from the positions of anarchism, neo-marxism and so on. This conceptual pole represents a new stage of development of the “Left-wing” (national-bolshevik) tendencies existing also among the first eurasists (Suvchinskij, Karsavin, Efron), and also a method for the mutual understanding with the “left” wing of anti-globalism.

“Third way” economics, “autarchy of the great spaces.” Application of heterodox economic models to the post-Soviet Russian reality. Application of F. List’s theory of the “custom unions.” Actualization of the theories of S. Gesell. F. Schumpeter, F. Leroux, new eurasist reading of Keynes.

Source: Ab Aeterno, no. 3, June 2010.

 


Article printed from Counter-Currents Publishing: http://www.counter-currents.com

URL to article: http://www.counter-currents.com/2013/12/milestones-of-eurasism/

dimanche, 08 décembre 2013

TWO STUDIES ON NEO-EURASIANISM

das-sakrale-eurasische-imperium-des-aleksandr-dugin-074326820.jpg

TWO STUDIES ON NEO-EURASIANISM

by Martin A. Schwarz

Ex: http://www.eurasia-rivista.org

Marlene Laruelle: Russian Eurasianism: An Ideology of Empire. Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson Press/Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008, 288 p.

Alexander Höllwerth: Das sakrale eurasische Imperium des Aleksandr Dugin. Eine Diskursanalyse zum postsowjetischen Rechtsextremismus. Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society, Vol. 59. Stuttgart: Ibidem Verlag 2007. 735 p.

Different strands of Russian Eurasianism (Laruelle, part 1)

Marlene Laruelle, a young but prolific French-American scholar, who has already published books about the classic Eurasianism and about its precursor in the 19th century, has now written “Russian Eurasianism. An ideology of Empire”, one of the first comprehensive academic studies of Neo-Eurasianism, or at least in the West. In difference to other works of this kind, the author sticks to her principles of impartiality, which does not mean that she does not present her own theories about history and function of Eurasianism as an “ideology of Empire”, but, in her own words “this book analyzes Neo-Eurasianism without judging it, for two reasons. First, I do not think one may, either methodologically or ethically, judge and analyze at the same time. Knowledge is a prerequisite of argument, but the former must precede the latter. Second, as Pierre-André Taguieff has remarked, ‘There is no need to put words into an author’s mouth or demonize him in order to critically examine theses that one believes must be opposed.’” (Laruelle, p. 13)
 
russian-eurasianism--an-ideology-of-empire.jpgAfter a brief introduction in which she points to the relevance of the subject, her different approach (as mentioned), and the specific weight of the personalities she choose for presentation, the first chapter is devoted to the original Eurasianism from 1920-1930. This is a rather brief outline, as she has already written a book on the subject (L’Idéologie eurasiste russe ou comment penser l’empire, Paris 1999) , and brings not many new or original informations about a movement, which was the “conservative revolution” á la Russe, borrowing from Fascism and Bolshevism, but denouncing their short-comings and “Western” features. Two things though seem to be central for Laruelle’s understanding of the Eurasianists: the notion of a “geographic identity” for Russians, instead of the Western self-understanding of a “historic” and therefore progressive understanding of the identity of nations (which of course was transferred as “historical materialism” to Russia, and also was promoted by liberals and – inverted – by nostalgic monarchists). Therefore the geographic orientation of Eurasianism lies at the core of the movement, but was paradoxically developed in the Western exile: “The Eurasianist doctrine must be grasped in its fundamentally provocative character. It was born of the malaise of young nationalists who were reluctant to integrate into the host culture and who refused to resign themselves to the thought that links with homeland were definitely broken. Their rejection of Europe can only be understood if we remember that it was elaborated in the West by those Russians who, culturally speaking, were the most Europeanized.” (p. 25) While it is undeniable true, that Eurasianism as self-affirmation could only become self-knowledge in the encounter and subsequently (at least partial) rejection of Western ideologies, Laruelle shows a tendency to psychologize the phenomenon: “(Eurasianism) attempts to theorize what is above all an experience and a feeling: the experience of young men in exile who feel humiliated by the defeat of the Whites and try to understand the reality of the motherland and stay in touch with it.” (p. 47)
 
Another paradox or ambiguity can be found in the Eurasianist re-evaluation of the Far Eastern part of Russian history and culture, the Mongolic and Islamic one. „(…) before Eurasianism in the 1920s, no Russian intellectual movement displayed a real openness to the Turko-Mongol world. Asia was only ever highlighted under the aspects of Aryanism; it was a mere detour to reinforced claims of Europeaness.“ (p. 4) While this heritage was now used by the Eurasianists as an argument for the distinction of Russia not only to Western Europe but also to Pan-Slavism, the religions and cultures of Buddhism and Islam as such were denigrated in favor of a militant Orthodox Christianity. As the final parts of this book are dedicated to the relation between (neo-)Eurasianism and Islam, this question has not to be answered at this point.
 
After this brief, not very differentiated presentation of the original Eurasianists, Laruelle looks more in detail in the thinking of the three most influential neo-Eurasianists. These are, in her words “the theories of ethnogenesis elaborated by the Orientalist Lev N. Gumilëv (1912-92); the fascistic geopolitics of the fashionable theorist Aleksandr Dugin (1962-); the philosopher Aleksandr Panarin’s (1940-2003) defense of a multipolar world.” (p. 2)
 
Lev Gumilëv, the missing link – or rather: not missing link – between “old” and “new” Eurasianism enjoys nearly universal popularity in Russia. His theories of Ethnogenesis are generally excepted and taught in schools and universities, often without reference to the Eurasianist Weltanschauung, although they are deeply connected with their organic understanding of peoples and societies. While Gumilëv shares with the Eurasianists the idea that the individual draws the meaning from the totality, Gumilëv’s theory of ethnos is definitively on the more biologistic and deterministic side of possible variations of this idea. One that, as I must say, does not fit well with the ideas of an supra-natural origin of culture, which is the normal religious concept, and also especially stressed by the representatives of integral traditionalism (René Guénon, Julius Evola, and others), whose ideas were introduced to neo-Eurasianism by Aleksandr Dugin and Geidar Dzhemal. As Laruelle writes, “he [Gumilëv] takes up the original Eurasianists’ organicism and radicalizes it, using numerous biological or even genetic metaphors with far-reaching political implications”, although “he does not, strictly speaking, develop a political theory; and […| he cannot be considered a partisan of conservative revolution.” (p. 82) Instead he stressed (as must remembered: in the time of Soviet stagnation of the Brezhnev era) very social conservative norms: endogamy, family life, respect for the elderly, the nation, and rejection of any challenge to the powers that be, all necessary for the survival of the ethnos. Laruelle considers him – understandably – “the least intellectually relevant and the least original (Neo-)Eurasianist.” (p. 82) As Gumilëv was neither in touch with Western intellectuals nor in tune with Soviet science , “his thought, the product of intellectual solitude, was fundamentally autistic” (p. 82), This result, if true, is by the way in striking contradiction to his notion of the supremacy of the collective ethnos as a sovereign whole, and also a total contrast to the very mercurial and alert ideologue of Neo-Eurasianism, Aleksandr Dugin, well-known in the West and very present in Russian media.
 
Before devoting space to Dugin, Laruelle discusses Aleksandr Panarin, whom she clearly favors. She calls him intellectually superior to Dugin and Gumilëv, or to be exact: she writes that “many”, but unnamed “Russian scholars” (p. 86) did consider him to be. Be this at it may, Panarin was in the Yeltsin era a promoter of “people’s capitalism” (p. 87) and in the Putin era an advocate of “the restoration of both Orthodox spirituality and Stalinist statehood.” (p. 88) Maybe he could be considered as flexible or opportunist as Dugin? Nevertheless he presented a “civilized Eurasianism”, “civilized” here being the indicator of “the exact opposite to Dugin’s variety.” (p. 88) Nevertheless Panarin became a member of the Central Council of Dugin’s Eurasian Party in 2002, and planned to write a foreword to a book by Dugin, but as Laruelle writes, “death put an end to this unlikely cooperation.” (p. 89) Panarin’s work was marked by the search for a third way, “between the West’s egalitarian universalism and the ethnic particularism of the non-European world.” (p. 93) Panarin’s model for an Eurasian Empire in his words, as quoted by Laruelle: “The principle of cultural pluralism, as well as attention and tolerance for different ethnocultural experiences are combined with a monist political authority that tolerates no opposition.” (p. 97) One of the intriguing but also problematic ideas of Panarin was the need for a combination of the Eurasian religions into something, what he calls the “Great Tradition” (p. 98), especially a fusion between Orthodox Christianity and Islam. In his quoted words: “We need a new, powerful world-saving idea that would ensure a consensus between Orthodox and Muslim culture for the benefit of a common higher goal.” (p. 99) Later he seemed to have abandoned this attempt in favor of an Orthodox supremacism and a renewed pan-Slavism, according to Laruelle in reaction to the NATO bombardment of Serbia. (p. 100)
 
The chapter on Aleksandr Dugin in titled “Aleksandr Dugin: A Russian Version of the European Radical Right?“ and was published before as a study by the Woodrow Wilson Institute in Washington, DC. While the title indicates the direction and the somewhat limited approach to the multi-faceted Dugin, it can be said that this attempt to analyze the influences of the New Right and the „Traditionalist school“ on Dugin’s theories is of much superior quality than the ramblings of the ubiquous Andreas Umland and his school of Dugin bashing. Like the New Right in Western Europe Dugin has attempted to adopt the teachings of Carl Schmitt, Karl Haushofer, Ernst Niekisch and Moeller van den Bruck, the so-called “Conservative Revolution” in Germany’s Weimar period, to the present situation of Russia, which largely means the attempted forced Westernization through Globalization and the counter-measures of the re-establishment of state power. This “conservative revolution” intellectual heritage is accompanied by two more currents, the New Right or rather: Nouvelle Droite, and the „integral Tradition“, both not so much of German but French and Italian origins, although the thinking of Alain de Benoist not only has a strong „Conservative Revolutionary“ foundation, but was also influenced by Armin Mohler, the personal link between Ernst Jünger and Carl Schmitt, and Alain de Benoist. Additionally and largely unrelated to Benoist was the Belgian European activist Jean Thirirat, whose model of an „European nation“ has preformed Dugin’s „Eurasian nation“ as much as the French Nouvelle Droite’s think tank GRECE and their meta-political approach did for the somehow fluctuating style of Dugin’s intellectual enterprises. Therefore Laruelle is not mislead, when she writes: “Dugin distinguishes himself from other figures in the Russian nationalist movements precisely through his militant Europeanism, his exaltation of the Western Middle Ages, and his admiration for Germany. All these ideological features contrast strongly with the ethnocentrism of his competitors.“ (p. 128)
 
Even more on the point is her acknowledgment of the influence of René Guénon and Julius Evola, and their minor intellectual allies and successors, on Dugin. She calls „Traditionalism“ the „foundation of Dugin’s thoughts“. While it can correctly be said, that the notion of a primordial Tradition as the common origin of all the religious-cultural traditions of Eurasia, can not be found in the writings of the „founding fathers“ of Eurasianism and was directly alien to some of their ideas – the rambling against the „Roman-Germanic civilization“ - , nevertheless Dugin could find only here the organic and integral solution to some of the most urgent problems of Russia’s Eurasian (com)position between Orthodoxy, Islam, Buddhism and other more minor elements: the transcendent – esoteric - unity of the exoteric different heirs of one primordial Tradition. Which is why – in our not Laruelle’s view – and without considering possible personal idiosyncrasy and political opportunism, his brand of neo-Eurasianism must be considered superior to those of his „competitors“, take for example the ill-fated attempt of Panarin’s Islam/Orthodoxy „melting pot“. Dugin’s claim of post-Guénonism because of his attempt to „Russify“ Guénon and to criticize the lack of references to Orthodox Christianity (p. 123), should be seen rather as a complementary effort. Similar is his attempt to reconcile Evolian „paganism“ (p. 123), or rather Aryanism, with Russian Christianity, with its strong national element. And not only of theoretically value is the distinction between Traditional Islam – as represented in the Sufi traditions and in Shiite Iran – and the Western-allied Wahhabite branch. In this context Laruelle makes reference to the important symposium “Islamic Threat or Threat against Islam?” (p. 118) which intended to establish a Russian-Muslim strategic partnership.

A „discourse analysis“ of Aleksandr Dugin (Höllwerth)

Alexander Höllwerth’s doctor thesis in Salzburg (Austria) on the „sacred Eurasian empire of Alexander Dugin“ impresses by it sheer quantity of more than 700 pages. The reader expects to gain access to fundamental texts of Russian neo-Eurasianism, otherwise only available in Russian. This expectation is fulfilled only partially because the author does give way to much space to his own objections, considerations and assumptions. A part called „contextualisations“, which brings nothing new, but gives an oversight of the historical Eurasianist movement, follows the book’s methodological reflections (reaching from Foucault’s discourse notion to Buruma’s occidentalism model).
 
Höllwerth then summarizes the literature from Stephen Shenfield („Russian Fascism“) to Andreas Umland (who is the editor of this volume and wrote its preface) on the biography of Aleksandr Dugin. He gives his estimation of the relationship between the subject of the book and the current Russian regime. Höllwerth states that Dugin is one of the few prominent intellectuals in Russia whom it is allowed to criticize the Kremlin without being banned from public discourse into the small niches of opposition media (which are rather the domain of Dugin’s enemies, the Western orientated liberals). Dugin has written in 2005 that the “acting of Putin can be evaluated as an artificially masked continuation of the pro-American, liberal, pro-oligarch strategy of Yeltsin, as a camouflage of the decline of Russia and its geopolitical spheres of influence.” (Höllwerth, p. 182) But this harsh assessment was followed by a phase of “reconciliation”. One could consider this as an evaluation of differing politics by a principled intellectual, the changes being on the side of the Kremlin and not on the side of the commentator. Höllwerth tends to mystify this point of view, but with the help of Dugin himself or rather his edition of Jean Parvulesco’s book “Putin and the Eurasian Empire” which differentiates between “Putin-1”, the real Putin, and “Putin-2”, the metaphysical Putin, the “mysterious builder of the Great Eurasian Empire of the End” (p. 184), the agent or tool of the great Eurasian conspiracy, a vulgarized or at least popularized variation of the initiation as described by René Guénon, but assuming in the sketch of Parvulesco rather counter-initiative features.
 
But what is the real and not “metaphysical” influence of Aleksandr Dugin, according to Höllwerth? “The attempt to estimate the ‘real political influence’ of Dugin is confronted with the difficulty to separate the plane of staging from the plane of factuality. This difficulty, with which the external scholar is confronted, seems to be part of a conscious strategy: the meaning of Dugin’s staging does, metaphorically put, not be to let the viewer look behind the scenery of the staging, but to focus his attention on the staging itself. (…) ‘Behind the scenery’ activities in connection with the Dugin phenomenon (secret services, political string-pullers, etc.) can not be excluded, are even probable, but should not lead to ambitious speculations based on few evidences.” (p. 194 f.) By the way, a sensationalist piece of work, based on such “ambitious speculations based on few evidences” was published by the same publishing house, which did not dare to include it in their scientific series and did flank it with cautious remarks. (Vladimir Ivanov: Alexander Dugin und die rechtsextremen Netzwerke. Fakten und Hypothesen zu den internationalen Verflechtungen der russischen Neuen Rechten. Stuttgart: Ibidem Verlag, 2007) And of course also with a preface by the inevitable Andreas Umland. A work to be put on the same shelve with Jean Parvulesco’s political fiction, but one has to admit that it has better entertainment value than Höllwerth’s rather sour work.
 
With page 197 starts the real discourse-theoretical body of the book, being also the real achievement of Höllwerth: „Dugin’s construction of world and reality“. Which is itself parted into three: Space, Order, Time, or also: Geopolitics, State, and History. But through these 500 pages goes one leitmotif: Höllwerth tries to reduce the complexity of Dugin’s system of synthesis and distinction to simple dualisms; we and the other, Eurasia (=Russia) against the West, Empire against democracy, etc., which are in return recognized as redundant repetitions of one and only mantra of power. After Dugin’s philosophy and policy has passed through Höllwerth’s mechanism of discourse analysis we arrive at exactly the same result, a more temporizing genius like Andreas Umland did achieve with one piece of paper and only two quotes of Dugin out of context: the exposure of a dangerous enemy of freedom and democracy. Vade retro, Dugin! But with Höllwerth’s help the Western reader can uplift himself by dining from a broad protruding self-affirmation of Western values with a more than saturating scientific apparatus.
 
The most compelling aspect of Höllwerth’s de- and reconstruction of Dugin’s discourse is its stringent structure. Also the obvious inclusion of the most important Western and Eastern authors must be noted. The confrontation with the matadors of Western liberalism (Jürgen Habermas, Sir Karl Popper, Bassam Tibi, Jean-François Lyotard) could be seen as helpful. But the extensive reproduced arguments of Dugin’s counter-parts are put on the same level of discourse with Dugin, even where Höllwerth notes the metaphysical character of Dugin’s traditionalists argument. The resulting impossibility of a dialogue between equals is construed by Höllwerth as a deficit of Dugin’s discourse.
 
Another example of Höllwerth’s inadequate approach: Höllwerth did indeed – and this is rather remark- and laudable - read the French metaphysician René Guénon. But only to point out the deviations of Dugin from the Guénon traditionalist “standard”, which is rather pointless, because Höllwerth himself has already classified Dugin correctly as Russian Evolianist (p. 355 ff.) and most of Höllwerth’s arguments seemingly advocating Guénon could also been directed against Julius Evola, and on this subject a large intra-traditionalist discussion could be cited. More than once Höllwerth argues that Dugin postulates a metaphysical dichotomy of East and West, while Guénon did stress the common original unity and only accepted a difference East-West since the decline of the West beginning with the modern era. But the West is the Occident, the sphere of sunset, by definition, and essential before the temporal decline began. So Dugin and Guénon are both correct, if they are read correctly!
 
Not unrelated is another important objection, which may indeed be problematic if true. This is the dependency of Dugin not only from Western authors in general, but also in his understanding of Eastern, meaning mainly Russian-Orthodox authors. Höllwerth tries to argue this in detail in some examples (for example: p. 664 ff.), this unfortunately cannot be assessed by me, due to my lack of knowledge of the Russian sources. But one thing is clear, this argument of Western influence can cut in two directions. Höllwerth points out that in one of Dugin’s best known texts “The metaphysics of national-bolshevism” Dugin does refer to Sir Karl Popper’s view of Platon, (p. 320 ff.) but everything the ideologue of the “open society” does characterize negatively is affirmed by Dugin, therefore he arrives at the holistic, total state of the philosophical rulers and the caste of watchers, this not through an adequate study of Platon, but as the reverse of an one-sided caricature made by Popper. If we see the Western history of philosophy not as a footnote to Platon, as was famously said, but as the decline from Platon to Popper, which really was the case, we can still see a partial truth in Höllwerth’s criticism of Western dependency by Dugin, but we have also to recast it into a much greater blame against the West, not to have remained true to its origin.
 
The adherence of Dugin to a kind – and which kind - of nationalism or a nation-transcending form of Eurasianism would be another question which would need a deeper consideration than Höllwerth provides. The question of nation can in the East not be separated from the confession. From the point of view of metaphysics and tradition (in the sense of René Guénon) most of the values attributed to the Russian nation should be rather connected with the Russian-Orthodox church. The formulation of the “angels of peoples” by the great Russian philosophers and theologians are thought from the premise of the identity nation=religion and correct for all authentic traditions but certainly not for nations in the modern Western sense, where Evola’s and Guénon’s critique of nationalism is totally applicable. Höllwerth’s attempt to find a contradiction between Dugin and the different strands of thought which convene in his own – traditionalist, conservative revolutionary, Orthodox and Russian – can therefore not be followed so easy.
 
Russia’s Eurasian mission, which lies in the simple fact to be Eurasia in the excellent sense (there is a incomplete Eurasia possible without China or India or Western Europe, but without Russia it makes to sense to speak from Eurasia), is not necessarily a chauvinism of thinking of itself as the hub of the world, but a fact of geopolitics, which can be confirmed by a look at the world map. If the space called Russia would be not be populated by Russians, there would be another people populating this space, and it would have to adopt to the stated property of large space, and would become exactly “Russian” in this way. Thus it becomes clear, why Höllwerth can quote Dugin’s definition of the being (Wesen) of the Russians as space (extension) (p. 401). All this is to keep in mind, when Höllwerth agitates himself on Dugin’s corresponding affirmation, that Russia is the whole (of Eurasia).


The difference between land (Eurasia) and sea (Anglo-America), coincident with rise and decline, Orient and Occident (in the afore mentioned sense of temporal difference by same origin in the metaphysical North, p. 212 ff.) would demand another thorough study. Höllwerth makes a lot out of the seemingly different use of the term “Nomos of the earth” (Nomos der Erde) by Carl Schmitt and Aleksandr Dugin. While Schmitt did mean the search for a new principle of international law for the whole globe, Dugin exclusively uses the phrase as synonym with “Nomos of the land” as contrasted with “Nomos of the sea” (p. 249). This dichotomy of laws according to the different Nomos is not the only problem of mediation, the intra-Eurasian and therefore more urgent is the juristic mediation of the different tradition, when according to Dugin the law is not universal but traditional (for each tradition) (p. 475 ff.). The “integral traditionalism” is exactly the only possible foundation to preserve the differences of the traditions while acknowledging their common and in this sense universal origin (the primordial Tradition). The “universalism” of traditionalism allows to stress the discerned internally and the common ground externally. Especially Hindu tradition and Islam have traditionally absolutely no problems in recognizing the other traditions as varieties of the one Tradition. (But Dugin may not evaluate these two as much as would be desirable, especially in their function of beginning and closing the cycle of mankind.) Finally it becomes absurd when Höllwerth in his “discourse analysis” regards the universalism of all traditions as structurally equivalent to the arrogant “universalism” of Western liberalism. On the one hand, favored by Dugin, the land-bound traditions take all part in the whole of Tradition (analogue to the classic model of idea by Platon), on the other hand, the Western universalism, championed by Höllwerth, is nothing more than a particular, very late development deviation from one specific tradition, the rejection of Western Christianity in its own boundary, and its violent expansion on the way of the world’s seas, postulating itself as the only valuable, and this exactly because it is anti-traditional (“enlightened”)!
 
Coping with Dugin’s philosophical and geopolitical notion of sacredness, Höllwerth seems to misled by a point of view, which he seems to have adopted from Mircea Eliade, a founder of the modern science of comparative religion (p. 209, p. 529 f.). A partial truth, the difference of profane and sacred, is been used as absolute segregation. There exist sacred places (and times), and on this the sacred geography (and sacred history) is founded, whose importance for Dugin’s geopolitics Höllwerth does carve out – much to his credit, as this level of argument is overlooked to often as pure rhetoric. But are there also in a strict sense profane things? “Come in, here do dwell Gods, too”, Heraclitus did say. Or, speaking with Guénon: there exists no profane thing, but only a profane point of view. Dugin seems to look at all questions also – certainly not only – in a metaphysical perspective, and in general he is able to explain why a certain political action is seen as necessary in this metaphysical perspective by him. This opens here the possibility of misuse through the sacralization of the profane, as on the other hand the profanization of the sacred in the West. The Western man is the one who takes the utilitarism as the measure for all things. The pure action – of which Julius Evola speaks - , which principle of not-clinging to the fruits of action has been affirmed by Dugin, the exact opposite of utilitarism, can only be seen as measure for the validity of Dugin’s decisions. To say, that he may not always be in the right in his metaphysical decisions is a different thing than saying he is guided by profane utility, as the sacred point of view does not make a saint. Höllwerth´s grasp of this problems is flawed because of his attempt to arrange the perceived oppositions into mirrored congruencies, instead of acknowledgment their structurally inequality, which would lead to the necessarily conclusion of the metaphysical superiority of the Eurasian tradition over its Western descent and rival.

Eurasianism and Islam (Laruelle, continuation)

In the last two chapters of her book Marlene Laruelle gives attention to the Muslim Eurasianists, first between the Muslim minorities of the Russian federation and then outside. This topic, though well-known by specialists, did not grasp the attention of a broader public as much as for example Dugin’s role in relation to the Kremlin. Therefore Laruelle’s retelling of the sometime short-lived organizational and personal development is very helpful, but can obviously not been retold in this review. In general there are two kinds of involvement of the Muslim minorities, one in specific Islamic Eurasianist parties, and the other the involvement of Islamic representatives in the general Eurasianist movement. There are two rival organizations representing the Muslim citizens of the Russian Federation, who were headed by two personal rivals, Mufti Talgat Tadzhuddin, who died shortly ago, and Mufti Ravil Gainutdin. The first was a member of Dugin’s party, close to the Kremlin, and a friend of the Russian patriarch Alexis II (p. 156), who coincidentally also died shortly ago. Gainutdin on the other hand keeps more distant to the Orthodox Church and the Kremlin (p. 158), and supports one of the more important Eurasianists rival of Aleksandr Dugin, Abdul-Vakhed V. Niizaov and his Eurasianist Party of Russia. (p. 161) The author summarizes the differences of the Muftis, which also reflect the differences of Dugin and Niizaov: “Tadzhuddin and Gainutdin embody two poles of traditional Russian Eurasianism: on the one hand, Russian nationalism and Orthodox messianism; and on the other hand, a more secular patriotism, which combines great-power ambitions with an acknowledgment of Russia’s multiethnic and multireligious character. Thus Eurasianism has become one of the crystallization points between the various Islamic representative bodies (…)” (p. 161 f.) Alongside these two mainstream bodies of Islam in Russia, there exist many smaller groups. One deserves special mention, the Islamic Commitee of Russia, lead by a former ally of Aleksandr Dugin, who broke with him on several issues, Geidar Dzhemal. The philosopher Dzhemal is an Azeri Shiite (Shiism being the dominant branch of Islam in Azerbaijan), with a close relation to the Islamic Republic of Iran, what separates Dzhemal from the other mentioned Muslim representatives. Strangely this fact is not mentioned by Laruelle. What she stresses, is the importance Dzhemal gives to Islam for securing Russia’s future: “Dzhemal […] states: ‘Russia’s only chance to avoid geopolitical disappearance is to become a Islamic state.’ Thus the movement remained on the borderline of Eurasianism, because it talked of conversion rather than cultural symbiosis ” (p. 147) Dugin’s apparently strong opposition to any conversions on the other hand is self-contradictory given his heavy reliance of his “Traditionalist” foundation on the teaching of René Guénon, also known as Sheikh Abd al-Wâhid Yahya. But it cannot neglected that the Orthodox-Islamic tension in the Eurasianist movement is as much ethnic as religious. The Turkic people can claim to represent “Eurasia” even more than Russians do. “In this view, the Russian people are European and party alien to Eurasia, as opposed to the Turkic people, who are considered to better illustrate the great meeting between Europe and Asia. Russia is no longer understood as a great power but as the most backward part of Europe, by contrast with the dynamism of the Far East and China.” (p. 169) A certain ambiguity in this question goes back to the classic Eurasianist movement of the Twenties of the last century, as Laruelle earlier in a different context has already stated: “Eurasianism’s place within the Russian nationalist spectrum has remained paradoxical due to the fact that it can be interpreted in either a ‘Russocentric’ or a ‘Turkocentric’ way. However, the paradox is not simply in the eye of the outside beholder; it has also divided the Neo-Eurasianists, who have accused each other of advocating the supremacy of one people over another.” (p. 5)
 
Naturally there is no question on which side the Eurasianist interpretation leans in the cases of Turkish Eurasianism outside of Russia, which is the final topic of this manifold book. In Kazakhstan one can state a “Eurasianism in Power” (p. 171), but a pragmatic Eurasianism this is, without any of the eschatological or traditionalist features of Dugin’s world-view. But Kazhakh Eurasianism as a whole is a multifaceted movement: “’Eurasianist’ Kazakh nationalism has several embodiments: a literary tradition introduced by Olzhas Suleimenov; a highly pragmatic variety used by the presidential administration; and a type of Eurasianist rhetoric that merely masks a much more traditional view of the nation and its right to exist, and mentions Russia only in the negative.” (p. 172) Suleimenov being a friend and ally of Lev Gumilëv (p. 175) and an apologist of “multiethnicity, tolerance, and diversity”, as characteristics of Eurasia. (p. 175) Also present in this intellectual Eurasianism seems to be a religious syncretism, “embracing all the religions that have ever (co)existed in the steppe. For example, the Kazakh Eurasianists make a great deal of archaeological traces of Nestorian Christianity, Zoroastrianism, Buddhism, and Shamanism, trying to go beyond the classic Orthodox-Islamic dualism.” (p. 176) President Nazarbaev proposed a “Union of Eurasian States” already in 1994 (p. 177) and embodies a mainly “economically based Eurasianism, whose integrationists ideas are popular among those who have suffered from the breakdown of links between the former Soviet republics.” (p. 177) But Nazarbaev is nothing less than an ideology-free technocrat, he has written even a book “In the stream of history”, in which he claims the Aryan and sedentary origin of Kazakhstan, predating the Mongol nomadic arrival. (p. 186) Additionally, the country’s Muslim character of the country is stressed, and Nazarbaev is proud of the global Islamic relevance Muslim scholars of Kazhakh origin like Al-Farabi and Al-Buruni.
 
Finally the only example of Eurasianism beyond the border of the former Soviet Union, studied by Laruelle, is the case of Turkey. Here the Eurasianist claim of the Turkish people goes along with the implication, “that Russia and Turkey are no longer competing for the mythical territory of Inner Asia – which both Eurasianists and pan-Turkists claim as their people’s ancestral homeland – but are Eurasian allies.” (p. 171) Laruelle starts by postulating common ideological roots of Eurasianism and Turkism, the “official Turkish state discourse on the nation’s identity” (p. 193), in romanticism and “Pan-“Ideologies (p. 188), but this seems to be rather a feature of Pan-Slavism than of Eurasianism with its re-evaluation of the non-Russian strands of the Empire. A similar development in the development from Turkism to Avrasyanism seems to be lacking. Rather it can be seen as a turning the back to the West, to which Mustafa Kemal, the so-called Atatürk (Father of the Turks), wanted to direct the aspirations of the Turks. The author states the original competition between the Turkish Avrasyian tendency and the Russian Eurasianist movements, similar to the natural antagonistic relation of nationalisms. But the interesting developments are the recently “attempts (…) to turn the two ‘Eurasias’ into allies rather than competitors” and parallel “a Dugin-style ideologization of the term in response to American adcendancy.” (p. 198) The few pages Laruelle dedicates to these developments are rather brief, and she has in the mean time published a more extensive study (Russo-Turkish Rapprochement through the Idea of Eurasia: Alexander Dugin’s Networks in Turkey, Jamestown Foundation, Occasional Paper, 2008), which itself has been overtaken by the dismantling of large parts of these „networks“ through the Ergenekon affair, but which is definitively outside the scope of this review.
 
The different manifestations of Eurasianism in this book leave the author and the reader with the question of the unity of Eurasianists idea. Laruelle states that Eurasianism is “a classic example of a flexible ideology. This explains its success, its diversity, and its breadth of coverage.” (p. 221) Without arguing about sheer words the author cannot be followed in her strict subsumption of Eurasianism under the term nationalism. At least a more nuanced view of nation in a more traditional sense, common to both Orthodox and Islamic thinking, in difference to the Western concept of nation-state (as I discussed in the part on Höllwerth) would have to be considerated instead of stating that the Eurasianists “concept of ‘civilization’ is only a euphemism for ‘nation’ and ‘empire.’” (p. 221).

 


Article printed from eurasia-rivista.org: http://www.eurasia-rivista.org

URL to article: http://www.eurasia-rivista.org/two-studies-on-neo-eurasianism/19891/

lundi, 11 novembre 2013

“Rusia es la Tercera Roma”

El 16 de octubre de 2013 se publicaba esta entrevista en el prestigioso medio italiano BARBADILLO, laboratorio di idee nel mare del web. Alfonso Piscitelli entrevistaba a Adolfo Morganti, presidente de la asociación italiana IDENTITÀ EUROPEA, que estudia y promueve la construcción de una Europa fiel a sus raíces clásicas y cristianas. El tema central que aborda la entrevista es Rusia, pero la cultura del entrevistador y del entrevistado logran que sea todo un diálogo ameno y provechoso. Hemos creído oportuno traducirla y publicarla en RAIGAMBRE para el público hispanohablante

La asociación Identità Europea tiene en los históricos Franco Cardini y Adolfo Morganti, editor del “Il Cerchio”, a sus exponentes más importantes. Hace años que promueve iniciativas que reclaman una reflexión sobre las raíces del continente europeo (raíces clásicas y cristianas) y sobre su destino. Recientemente “Identità Europa” ha organizado en San Marino un Congreso sobre “Europa en la época de las grandes potencias, desde 1861 a 1914”, en el ámbito de ese discurso se ha abordado también la naturaleza compleja de las relaciones entre Italia y Rusia. Replanteamos el argumento a menudo descuidado por los historiadores contemporáneos, con el presidente de Identità Europea, Morganti.

Alfonso Piscitelli.: En la segunda mitad del XIX se articulaba una red compleja de alianzas entre naciones europeas continentales: la Triple Alianza (Alemania, Austria, Italia) y por un cierto tiempo el Pacto de los Tres Emperadores (Alemania, Austria, Rusia). ¿Fue el intento de superar los nacionalismos en orden a una cooperación continental?

Adolfo Morganti: Era la tentativa de superar los límites y los conflictos cebados por el nacionalismo jacobino, pero al mismo tiempo eran fuertes las tensiones estratégicas que se localizaban en el área balcánica con Rusia, que patrocinaba los movimientos nacionalistas del pueblo eslavo y Austria que contenía estas pulsiones subrayando el aspecto supranacional del Imperio de los Habsburgo. Sarajevo no fue una sorpresa, como localización del foco de la primera guerra mundial.

A. P.: E Italia, ¿cómo se movía sobre el plano internacional?

A. M.: Todos conocemos el impulso profundo que el arte italiano dio a Rusia: un impulso evidente en San Petersburgo. Menor fue la intensidad de las relaciones marítimas entre Italia y el Mar Negro, que han plasmado la estructura económica misma de aquellas regiones. Sobre el plano diplomático, después de la intervención piamontesa en la Guerra de Crimea, las relaciones con Rusia indudablemente tenían que recuperarse: en efecto, por largo tiempo, Rusia representó algo extraño y distante, en los mismos años en los que Italia establecía una alianza con Austria y Hungría.

A. P.: Con el enemigo por excelencia de la época del Risorgimento [Austria].

A. M.: Más tarde, con el viraje que supuso 1914, obviamente la situación cambió las tornas: los rusos vinieron a ser aliados en el curso de la Primera Guerra Mundial, pero las relaciones gubernamentales y diplomáticas no fueron tan frecuentes y orgánicas como lo fueron, en cambio, las relaciones económicas.

A. P.:: ¿Crees que hoy Rusia deba ser incluida en la identidad europea, a la que alude el nombre de tu asociación?

A. M.: Con seguridad, la parte europea de Rusia debe ser considerada un elemento importante en el discurso sobre la Europa contemporánea. A partir de su conquista de Siberia, relativamente reciente, Rusia ha adquirido una vocación más amplia: la de Eurasia; pero Europa es impensable sin su área oriental, así como la identidad cristiana del continente es impensable sin contemplar el papel de la ortodoxia. Rusia, por una parte es Europa y reconocida como tal (y desde un punto de vista existencial hoy defiende los valores europeos incluso más que muchos estados de la Comunidad Europea), por otra parte, se atribuye una misión y una identidad que rebasa los confines de la misma Europa.

A. P.: El diálogo ortodoxo se ha reanudado a lo grande en los años sesenta con Pablo VI, con la recíproca retirada de excomuniones y el abrazo con el patriarca Atenagoras.

A. M.: Generando entusiasmos y resistencias a las dos bandas: resistencias que en el ámbito ortodoxo amenazaron con producir un cisma, que más tarde se hizo realidad.

A. P.: Y el hecho de que Juan Pablo II fuese un eslavo, un polaco (no extraño al “humus cultural” del nacionalismo polaco), ¿ha facilitado o ha creado alguna fricción y malentendidos entre las dos partes?

A. M.: Ciertamente, cuando la primera jerarquía católica de la Rusia post-soviética fue elegida por Juan Pablo II, la presencia de prelados polacos fue relevante y esto creó notables problemas de coexistencia con los ortodoxos. La misma acción de los franciscanos en Rusia era vista como una fuerza de penetración católica en el área del cristianismo ortodoxo. Ahora, con el cambio de jerarquía, en que la presencia de Italia está representada autorizadamente por el actual Obispo de Moscú, estos problemas casi se han disuelto.

A. P.: Si recuerdo bien, fue Ratzinger quien determinó una nueva relación, promoviendo el cambio de jerarcas.

A. M.:: Exactamente.

A. P.: Un recordatorio siempre es útil… ¿por qué se originó y por qué persiste la división entre cristianos católicos y cristianos ortodoxos?

A. M.: Hay toda una serie de diferencias dogmáticas que dividen a católicos y ortodoxos: la cuestión del “filioque” (de la procesión del Espíritu Santo), la diversas valoraciones de ultratumba (los ortodoxos no conciben el purgatorio), el diverso modo de entender la confesión. Son diferencias importantes, pero en la historia del cristianismo tales divergencias no han impedido necesariamente la unidad de las iglesias: por caso, pensemos que, durante una época en la historia, el cristianismo irlandés calculaba la Pascua de manera diferente al cristianismo continental. Ya hemos tenido otras situaciones de diversidad, que no afectan a la unidad subyacente. En el caso ortodoxo vino, en cambio, una separación profunda, pero no ocultemos que el cisma maduró sobre la cuestión del primado del Obispo de Roma, primado de honor, según los ortodoxos; primado jerárquico, según los católicos.

A. P.: También hay temas fuertes que unen a los dos mundos espirituales, pensemos en la gran devoción a la Madre de Dios; y en lo que atañe al tema mariano no podemos olvidar que al inicio del siglo XX, la profecía de Fátima está estrechamente ligada al tema de Rusia. ¿Qué ideas te has hecho a propósito de esto?

A. M.: La profecía de Fátima veía en Rusia el centro de una gran apostasía, que luego se verificó con el comunismo; pero las profecías son un terreno resbaladizo. Sin lugar a dudas, el gran gigante ruso constituye un escenario fundamental para la articulación de las fuerzas en la confrontación entre tradición y modernidad, entre el cristianismo y la tentativa ilustrada de disolverlo o reducirlo a la esfera privada, está a los ojos de todos.

A. P.:  ¿Es verdad o solo es una simplificación decir que el espíritu cristiano de Rusia está atraído particularmente por el Evangelio de San Juan y por el Apocalipsis?

A. M.: Es un enfoque para la escatología en general. Pero este enfoque es compartido con la milenaria tradición católica: en el ámbito católico hasta lo que no ha mucho se hacía en las llamadas meditaciones sobre los “Novísimos” (muerte, juicio universal, infierno y paraíso) era intensa; después (por usar un eufemismo) no ha sido valorada al máximo…

A. P.: Y el tema típicamente ruso de la Tercera Roma, ¿puede todavía jugar el papel de idea movilizadora en el ánimo de Rusia y en el ánimo de los europeos que miran con atención a Rusia?

A. M.:: Rotundamente: sí. Rusia es la Tercera Roma, tanto para los rusos creyentes como para los laicos. Los laicos ven en el poder de Moscú la continuación efectiva de una autoridad imperial a través de todas las modificaciones históricas posibles. Para el creyente, el concepto de Tercera Roma tiene una resonancia ulterior, pero todos los sujetos político-culturales rusos comparten el sentido de esta misión histórica, sean comunistas o nacionalistas, religiosos o laicos.

A. P.: Sin embargo, en el inmenso territorio ruso existen también otras tradiciones religiosas: el ministro de defensa Shoigú es un budista de la zona siberiana.

A. M.: También hay regiones de la Federación Rusa de mayoría hebrea y zonas en las que se arraigó el islam chiíta (principalmente en la parte ocupada por población turcófona) o sunnita. Desde los tiempos del imperio zarista, la multiplicidad de tradiciones religiosas no ha creado problemas de convivencia.

A. P.: ¿Podría decirnos su valoración personal de la figura de Vladimir Putin?

A. M.: ¡Putin es un ruso! En cuanto tal, él continúa encarnando esta misión de Rusia, cristiana e imperial. El hecho de que Putin sea más creyente o menos es indiferente. Su misión personal es la de proteger a Rusia y Rusia tiene esta identidad (imperial y cristiana) y no otra alguna…

(Traducción al español por Manuel Fernández Espinosa)

Fuente original en italiano: L’intervista. L’editore Adolfo Morganti: “Mosca è ancora la Terza Roma”

Fuente: Raigambre

vendredi, 25 octobre 2013

Eurasian Union: Substance and the Subtext

EurasianUnion_6051.jpg

Eurasian Union: Substance and the Subtext


Ph.D., Professor of the School of International Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India.
 
Ex: http://www.geopolitica.ru
 

The Eurasian Union has come to the present stage in its evolution within a remarkably compressed time-frame. Although the idea was first mooted by the Kazakh president Nursultan Nazarbaev in 1994, it hibernated for long years.[1] It was only in late 2011 that Vladimir Putin revived the idea; visualised it as one of the major centres of economic power alongside the EU, the US, China and APEC; and initiated the process of its implementation. In November 2011, the presidents of Russia, Kazakhstan and Belarus signed an agreement to establish the Eurasian Economic Space (EES) that would graduate towards the Eurasian Union. The EES came into existence on 1 January 2012. The paper proposes to examine the origin of the idea and assess its implementation todate with an analysis of the substance and subtext of the organization.

Eurasian Union: The Origins

On 3 October 2011, Vladimir Putin published a signed article in the daily newspaper Izvestia titled “New Integration Project in Eurasia: Making the Future Today.” Putin was the Russian Prime Minister at that time and set to take over the Russian Presidency. The article can thus be interpreted as the assignment he set for himself in his second tenure. On the ground, the “Treaty on the Creation of a Union State of Russia and Belarus” already existed. The Treaty envisaged a federation between the two countries with a common constitution, flag, national anthem, citizenship, currency, president, parliament and army. On 26 January 2000, the Treaty came into effect after the due ratifications by the Russian Duma and the Belarus Assembly. It provided for political union of the two, creating a single political entity. Whether the Treaty laid down a proto Eurasian Union remains to be seen.

The European Union (EU) announcement in 2008 of its Eastern Partnership Programme (EPP) may also have inspired the Russian drive towards reintegration of the Eurasian space. The EPP was initiated to improve political and economic relations between the EU and six "strategic" post-Soviet states -- Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine -- in the core areas of democracy, the rule of law, human rights, the promotion of a market economy, and sustainable development.[2]  There was much debate over whether to include Belarus, whose authoritarian dictatorship disqualified it. The eventual invitation to Belarus was the concern over an excessive Russian influence in that country.

The US plan to deploy the NATO missile defence system in Poland and Czech Republic was already a source of concern for the Russians. China was emerging as a serious player in the region through its heavy investments in energy and infrastructure. The Russian determination to keep the post-Soviet states away from the US, the EU and China made the Eurasian project a priority in its foreign policy. The Treaty between Russia and Belarus intended to keep the latter into the Russian fold.[3]

 Eurasianism: The Idea

Eurasianism as an idea predates the Soviet Union. The Russian identity has been contested by the Occidentalists, the Slavophils and the Eurasianists. The latter claim Russia as the core of the Eurasian civilization. Today, the former Soviet states accept the Russian centrality but not the core-periphery division bet Russia and the rest.

Within Russia itself, the Eurasianists always considered the Soviet Union to be a Greater Russia. With the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Eurasian political project is to reunite the Russians from the former Soviet territories and ultimately to establish a Russian state for all the Russians. Aleksander Dugin is an ideologue and activist for neo-Eurasianism in Russia. His political activities are directed at restoring the Soviet space and unification of the Russian-speaking people. The South Ossetian President Eduard Kokoity is a sworn Eurasianist himself and eager to make his country a part of Russia.

Organization and Accomplishments

The Eurasian Economic Commission (EEC), the governing body of the EES is set up in Moscow for the time being. Kazakhstan has already staked its claim to host its permanent headquarters. The formula under which the 350-member body would be filled allots Russians 84 percent of staff, the Kazakhs 10 percent and the Belarusians a mere 6 percent. The formula has been worked out on the basis of the population in the three countries. The expenses towards accommodation and infrastructure would be borne by Russia.

The EEC will be eligible to make decisions with regard to customs policies, as also the issues relating to macroeconomics, regulation of economic competition, energy policy, and financial policy. The Commission will also be involved in government procurement and labour migration control.[4] The right of the EEC to sign contracts on behalf of all of them is contested.

The Supreme Eurasian Union Council will be the apex body of the group. The vice- premiers of the three countries would be leading their countries’ delegations in this body. There are differing opinions on the powers of its apex body.

Eurasian Union is an economic grouping. Its objective is to expand markets and rebuild some of the manufacturing chains destroyed by the collapse of the Soviet Union. The Customs Union of Russia, Kazakhstan and Belarus had set the process toward this goal and the Eurasian Union is a continuation of the same process.[5]

The EEC has made some progress, in the meantime. It has simplified the trade rules, eliminated border customs and facilitated free movement of goods, services and capital. It has also encouraged migration of labour among its signatories. The trade among the three is estimated to have gone up by forty percent last year alone. Russia has benefitted from cheaper products and labour force from the rest of the two and several hundred Russian enterprises have re-registered in Kazakhstan to avail cheaper tax rates. Kazakhs and Belarusians have found a large market for their products in Russia.

Major hurdles still remain. A common currency has not been agreed to. The pace of economic integration is yet another point of debate among the three. Belarus would not be comfortable with market integration, which would require economic reforms. Eventually, the economic reforms could lead to political reforms and even changes in political system. Belarus is least prepared for such an eventuality.

Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan         

Within Russia, the Eurasianism still holds an appeal; and not just among the marginal groups. The Eurasian Union is perceived as an expression of Eurasianism that would lead to the state of Russia for all Russians. There are calls to invite countries like Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Finland and even China and Mongolia to join the Eurasian Union. At the leadership level, Putin may also prefer ruling over an expanded space encompassing the entire or most of the former Soviet territory.

The Russian raison d’état for the Eurasian Union cannot be traced to such feelings alone. The missionary zeal to reach out to the neighbours involves subsidizing them. As a general rule, economic integration must necessarily involve mutual benefits for all the parties - even when the benefits are not in equal measure. An economic arrangement does not only eliminate tariffs and other restrictive trade barriers among the signatories, it also formulates and implements tariffs and trade barriers against the non-signatories. Facilitating trade among themselves and restricting trade with the outsiders is the dual track of any economic group. 

As regional integration proceeds in much of the world (not just through the EU but also via NAFTA, ASEAN and Washington’s proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership, among others), the post-Soviet space remains largely on the sidelines. A lack of horizontal trading links and isolation from global markets contribute to the region’s persistent underdevelopment. By reorienting members’ economies to focus on the post-Soviet space, a Eurasian Union would create new barriers between member states and the outside world.[6] Russia is particularly worried about the Chinese forays into its neighbourhood. And the EU Eastern Partnership Programme threatens to encroach into the space that Moscow considers its own sphere of influence.

A second powerful reason for Russia to reach out to its neighbours is that the neighbours are steadily making Russia their home. The influx of migrants from the former Soviet territories has generated a lot of resentment and will soon become a serious political issue. In the circumstances, helping to improve the economic situation beyond the Russian borders and assimilate the new arrivals in a common citizenship is being considered. The then president Dmitry Medvedev explicitly linked the issue of immigrants to the expansion of the state borders. He spoke of the time when the giant state had to comprise different nationalities that created “Soviet People”. "We should not be shy when bringing back the ideas of ethnic unity. Yes, we are all different but we have common values and a desire to live in a single big state," he said.[7]

Russia is not single-mindedly committed to the Eurasian Union. It has initiated and nurtured several other multi-lateral organizations and become a member of scores of others initiated by others. The Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) consisting of Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan[8] is one such. So is the Commonwealth of Independent States comprising most of the post-Soviet countries. It is a member of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization that is clearly a China-led group. The Quadrilateral Forum comprising Russia, Tajikistan, Afghanistan and Pakistan is a Russian project.

It has not shied away from making deals with the EU, either. In 2003, it entered into an agreement with the EU to create four common spaces: 1. of freedom, security and justice; 2. cooperation in the field of external security; 3. economy; and 4. research, education and cultural exchange. Since the formalisation of the Customs Union, Putin has insisted that the EU formalise its relations with the Customs Union before a new basic treaty between the EU and Russia could be formalised. At the EU-Russia Summit in June 2012, he also sought the EU support for the Kazakh and Belarusian bids to join the WTO.[9]

Kazakhstan has formulated and pursued a “multivector” foreign policy since independence. It seeks good relations with its two large neighbours as also with the West. Its operational idiom, therefore, is “diversify, diversify and diversify”.

Its relations with the US are centred on counter-terrorism. In Central Asia, it is now the most favoured US partner in the war on terror. It has welcomed the US-sponsored New Silk Road. The Aktau Sea port is expected to emerge as the capital city on this cross-Caspian Road as the central point for transportation, regional educational cooperation and tourism. The Transportation and Logistics Centre is being developed in the city. Aktau hopes to play a role within the New Silk Road that Samarkand played in the Old Silk Road.[10]

Its relations with Europe are as good. Its bilateral cooperation with the EU dates back to 1999, when it entered into the Partnership and Cooperation Agreement with it. The European Commission has agreed to support its application for membership of the WTO. On 1 January 2010, Kazakhstan became the first post-Soviet state to assume the chairmanship of the 56-member Vienna-based Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. Its trade with the EU accounts for as much as the trade of all the Central Asian countries put together. France has a trade agreement with it that is worth $2 billion under which France would help build a space station and cooperate on nuclear development.

It is its close ties – in fact, too close ties – with China that explains its active membership of the Eurasian Union. China’s presence in the country is pervasive. In 2005, the Asatu-Alashanku oil pipeline between the two countries went into use. The second stage of the same from Kenkyiak to Kumkol is already in works. A gas pipeline is being discussed. In the same year, China bought Petrokazakhstan that was the former Soviet Union’s largest independent oil company. At $4.18 billion, it was the largest foreign purchase ever by a Chinese company. In 2009, it gained a stake in the MangistauMunaiGas, a subsidiary of the KazMunaiGas, which is the Kazakh national upstream and downstream operator representing the interests of the state in the petroleum sector. Even as economic ties get stronger, there could be a point of friction between the two regarding the Uighur-based East Turkestan Islamic Movement in the Xinjiang province of China. There are 180,000 Kazakhs of Uighur descent, which is a source of discomfort to China.

Belarus is a landlocked country and dependent on Russia for import of raw materials and export to the foreign markets. Its dependence on Russia is aggravated by the fact that the US has passed the “Belarus Democracy Act”, which authorizes funding for pro-democracy Belarusian NGOs and prevents loans to the government. The EU has imposed a visa ban on its president Alexander Lukashenko. Even as the Belarus’s dependence on Russia is overwhelming, their bilateral relations have gone through severe frictions. In 2004, there was a gas dispute as Russia stopped the gas supply for six months before a compromise on the price was worked out.

In 2009, the two fought what has come to be called “milk wars”. Moscow banned import of Belarusian dairy products, claiming that they did not meet Russian packaging standards, a non-tariff measure allowed under the common customs code. The disagreement cost Belarus approximately $1 billion. The real problem was that Belarusian farmers were heavily subsidized, meaning that the cost of milk production in Belarus was substantially lower than that in Russia. As a result, Russian dairy producers were on the verge of bankruptcy and looked to their government for support. In response to Russian action, Belarus introduced a ban on the purchase of Russian agricultural machinery, accusing Russia of not providing leasing for Belarusian tractors (a major source of income for Belarus).[11]

Destination Ukraine?

Ukraine is the raison d’être for the entire Eurasian project, according to many. “Once past the verbal hype, it becomes clear that in fact it [Eurasian Union] has nothing to do with Eurasia and has everything to do with a single country, which, incidentally, is situated in Europe of all places: Ukraine,” according to an analyst.[12] Its key task is to draw Kiev into the integration project.

The primary reason for Russian stake in Ukraine is the Ukraine-Russia-Turkmen gas pipeline. Till the break-up of the Soviet Union, it was a domestic grid. Today, the gas trade between Turkmenistan, Russia and Ukraine is not just a commercial proposition, but an illustration of triangular dependencies of the three countries. The key issues in terms of transit are that all Turkmenistan’s gas exports outside Central Asia pass through Russia, which puts the latter in complete control of around three-quarters of Turkmenistan’s exports. Russia’s position vis-à-vis Ukraine is extremely vulnerable in that more than ninety percent of its gas exports to Europe pass through that country.

Thus, Ukraine is the transit point as well as the choke point of the Turkmen and Russian exports. It has also been a leaking point of the deliveries. In early 1990s, there were serious disruptions as Ukraine pilfered the gas for its own domestic use. Since then the gas deliveries have become an important issue in the political and security relationship between Russia and Ukraine, having featured in the package of agreements which have included issues such as the future of the Black Sea Fleet and Ukrainian nuclear weapons. There was a serious stand-off between the two in 2009, when the Russians cut off natural gas supplies to Ukraine over price dispute. A compromise was reached only after Ukraine agreed to pay more for the gas that was, till then, subsidised.[13]

The second most important Russian stake in Ukraine is that Ukraine’s Crimea peninsula hosts a Russian navy base whose lease term was extended for twenty-five years in 2010 by a special agreement between Presidents Dmitry Medvedev and Viktor Yanukovych, despite an unresolved gas dispute. This facility provides Moscow with strategic military capabilities in an area that Russia once considered crucial for the security of its southwestern borders and its geopolitical influence near the “warm seas.”[14] In return for the extension of the lease, Russia agreed to a thirty percent drop in the price of natural gas it sold to Ukraine.

A third reason for Russian interest in Ukraine could be that the latter represents a promising market of 45 million potential consumers, in the context where Russia seeks to diversify its own economy and export destinations.

Russian diplomacy to retain control over Ukraine and the US diplomacy to extend its control over the same have repeatedly to come to a clash. Till recently, Ukraine was pointedly excluded from both the EU and the NATO expansions[15]; as also from the list of possible invitees. Since the “Orange Revolution”, the situation has radically changed. How the energy pipeline politics plays out in the changed circumstances remains to be seen.

For its part, Ukraine has not closed its options between the EU and the Eurasian Union. Its prime minister Mykola Azarov, speaking at a meeting to discuss “Ukraine at the Crossroads: The EU and/or the Eurasian Union: Benefits and Challenges” said, “Ukraine has never contrasted one economic organization with the other and we cannot do that from many points of view. We are in ‘between’ and we must have friends both here and there.”[16]

Conclusions

There is no Eurasian Union todate. And yet, it has been the subject of intense scholarly scrutiny as also of prescriptive analysis. Its future membership, the direction of its evolution and the gamut of its activities must remain speculative in the meanwhile.

In lieu of the final conclusions, some tentative recapitulation of the above is in order. The Russians aim to retain the former Soviet space within their own sphere of influence, seeking to diminish the US, Chinese and the EU presence out of it to the extent possible. The Kazakhs are keeping all their options open: seeking a central role in the US-sponsored war on terror and the New Silk Road, permitting pervasive Chinese presence in their economy, promoting bilateral and institutional ties with the EU, and becoming a member of the Eurasian Union. “Diversify” is the name of the Kazakh game. Belarus is landlocked and dependent on Russia for its trade exports and imports, and the Belarus president is persona non grata in much of the West. Under the circumstances, the Eurasian Union is a solution to much of its problems.

Ukraine has signed a Memorandum of Understanding on trade cooperation with Eurasian Economic Commission. Much will depend on whether and when Ukraine decides to join the Eurasian Union.

Published in Journal of Eurasian Affairs


[1] The Kazakh people like to point out that Kazakhstan’s president Nursultan Nazabaev was the first leader to propose the Eurasian Union in 1994. Chinara Esengul, “Regional Cooperation”, March 27, 2012. http://www.asiapathways-adbi.org/2012/03/does-the-eurasian-union-have-a-future/

[2] Kambiz Behi and Daniel Wagner, “Russia’s Growing Economic Influence in Europe and beyond”,  23 July 2012. 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kambiz-behi/russias-growing-economic-influence_b_1696304.html

[3]  On 30 September 2011, Belarus withdrew from the EU initiative citing discrimination and substitution of the founding principles. Three days thereafter, it refuted its decision to withdraw. The EU-Russia competition was obviously at work in quick turnarounds in Belarusian position.

[4] Retrieved from news.mail.ru and kremlin.ru in Russian. Quoted in Wikipedia, “Eurasian Union”.

[5] The Customs Union came into existence on 1 January 2010. Removing the customs barriers among them, the countries took the first step towards economic integration.

[6]Jeffrey Mankoff, “What a Eurasian Union Means for Washington”, National Interest  http://nationalinterest.org/commentary/what-eurasian-union-means-washington-6821

[7] Gleb Bryanski, “Putin, Medvedev Praise Values of the Soviet Union”, Reuters, 17 November 2011,  http://in.reuters.com/article/2011/11/17/idINIndia-60590820111117   

[8] In June 2012, Uzbekistan decided to suspend its membership of the CSTO.

[9] http://www.euractiv.com/europes-east/putin-promotes-eurasian-union-eu-news-513123 “Putin Promotes Eurasian Union at the EU Summit”, 5 June 2012

[11] Behi and Wagner, n. 2

[12] Fyodor Lukyanov, gazeta.ru. 17 September 2012. Quoted in http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sponsored/russianow/opinion/9548428/eurasian-union-explanation.html   

[13] The Ukrainian prime minister at that time, Yulia Tomashenko, has since been sentenced to seven years in prison for abusing the authority and signing the deal.

[14]  Georgiy Voloshin, “Russia’s Eurasian Union: A Bid for Hegemony?”, http://www.geopoliticalmonitor.com/russias-eurasian-union-a-bid-for-hegemony-4730

[15] Putin was reported to have declared at the NATO-Russian Summit in 2008 that if Ukraine were to join the NATO, he would consider annexing the Eastern Ukraine and Crimea in retaliation.

 

Раздел: 
Регион: