Ok

En poursuivant votre navigation sur ce site, vous acceptez l'utilisation de cookies. Ces derniers assurent le bon fonctionnement de nos services. En savoir plus.

mercredi, 09 novembre 2016

Progressive Foreign Policy Fails Again

Failure-Blog_Ankit.png

Progressive Foreign Policy Fails Again

impech.jpgWhat happened in Libya and Syria is simply a manifestation of a very dangerous mindset known as progressivism.  Progressivism amounts to a blind faith that government force can improve any given situation.  It is usually associated with domestic policy but progressivism also operates in foreign policy. Progressives ignore costs and consequences.  Progressives plunge into situations they do not understand, heedless of the consequences.  When progressives fail, they invariably attribute the failure to not using enough government force.  Thus, Obama, explaining his failure in Libya, stated, “I think we underestimated... the need to come in full force.”[1]

Thus, it is not merely Obama and Clinton who need to be held responsible.  Their underlying ideology also needs to be called to account.  We need to impeach progressivism too lest that dangerous ideology leads us into an endless series of future foreign policy disasters as it has already led us into 100 years filled with them. 

It is important to understand that a callous disregard of consequences is intrinsic to progressivism,[2] whether applied to domestic or foreign policy. One consequence of foreign intervention which the progressives utterly ignore is blowback in the form of terrorist attacks in direct retaliation against the intervention.  It is probably a Freudian slip that those who supported overthrowing Gaddafi and Assad were oblivious to the consequences as these men had few ties to terrorism in recent years.  However, if all that was said about them was true, then they should have been concerned about such retaliation.  There is no similar excuse concerning ISIS, however.  And true to form, ISIS has delivered, in Paris, in the skies of Egypt and in San Bernardino and Orlando.  As of November of 2015, ISIS had engaged in over 1500 terrorist attacks.[3]

Another consequence of war that is rarely discussed in advance is the legal risk of engaging in war.  When a state is attacked, it has the legal right to respond and defend itself.[4]  Such a response may include attacking any military facility in the attacking state. Obviously, any such attacks in modern war run the risk of civilian casualties.  Since this is rarely if ever mentioned by politicians, they apparently expect us to simply put all of this out of our minds.

What is truly revolting is this.  Obama and Clinton, who are protected by heavy security, have launched the United States into wars against parties likely to retaliate against innocent and vulnerable civilians, when the perpetrators of these illegal wars are utterly incapable of stopping such attacks or protecting such civilians.  The only legal remedy for such moral depravity is impeachment. 

Although foreign progressivism is a species of the same genus as domestic progressivism, it is important to understand that foreign progressivism is even worse.  Foreign progressive intervention has several features that differ from the domestic variety.  First, progressives know even less about foreign lands than they do about their own country where they still make huge policy blunders.  They are particularly unaware of the age-old conflicts among racial, ethnic and religious groups. They bring with them a Western-style assumption, rooted in archism, that national borders are rational, just and sacrosanct.  Thus, they are blind to the fact that the state boundaries in most parts of the world are unjust, arbitrary and usually imposed by imperial powers after violent conquest.  Of course, as progressives (and archists), the notion that states need to be broken up into smaller parts that would allow the various warring tribes and groups to run their own nations, is loathsome to them.  Centralization is a primary progressive value.  So, for example, after the U. S. conquest of the artificial state of Iraq, they insisted on its continued integrity.  It was thus predictable that the Shiite majority would control the entire state after elections and impose its will on the minority Sunnis and Kurds, leading to the inevitable civil war.  Hillary Clinton, who voted for the Iraq War, was herself blissfully unaware of this inevitability.

progrostrow.jpgSecond, people in foreign lands have never approved in any way the progressives’ intervention into their own country.  Third, that being the case, while domestic intervention has a number of tools at its disposal, foreign intervention has only one primary tool, war.  War involves killing people and destroying property.  Not only does this directly engender resistance and retaliation but it also strips away the protective coating of propaganda that usually cloaks state action.  For example, since most people comply with tax laws, the state only rarely has to use actual force to collect them.  Thus, the violent nature of taxation is hidden underneath the usual avalanche of birth-to-death progressive propaganda.  For example, it is based on voluntary compliance; it is the citizens’ duty, and it’s all good because it was democratically approved.  While all these rationalizations are nonsense, it is not easy to cut through the propaganda when the audience spent twelve years in a government school being brainwashed.  In sharp contrast, when a bomb blows up an apartment building and kills thirty people, the facts are plain and the ability of propaganda to make people think that black is white, is minimal.  Naturally, they tend to react, resist and retaliate.

To sum up, progressivism fails in foreign policy for a number of important reasons.  First, the progressives are pervasively ignorant about the countries they are invading and conquering.  Second, such intervention fails to deal with the underlying causes of problems, usually being related to the preexisting culture and character of a people or the arbitrary borders into which disparate ethnic, racial and religious groups have been consigned.  Third, such intervention sparks resistance and retaliation among the victims. Finally, such intervention usually results in unforeseen and unintended bad consequences.

Thus, the lesson of this book is not just that Obama and Clinton blundered by intervening into Libya and Syria but that, once again, progressives applied their utopian theory beyond the borders of the United States with the usual disastrous consequences.

Notes:

[1] T. Friedman, “Obama on the World,” nytimes.com, Aug. 8, 2014 (emphasis added); Progressivism: A Primer, supra at 21, et seq.

[2] And archism as well.

[3] M. Keneally & J. Diehm, “Sobering Chart Shows ISIS Is the Terror Group With Most Mass Killings Since 2000,” abcnews.go.com, Nov 16, 2015.

[4] See, United Nations Charter, Article 51.

James Ostrowski is a trial and appellate lawyer in Buffalo, NY. He is CEO of Libertymovement.org and author of several books including Progressivism: A Primer on the Idea Destroying America. See his website.

jeudi, 08 septembre 2016

Le clivage droite/gauche est-il mort?

gauche_droite.jpg

Le clivage droite/gauche est-il mort?

Entretien avec Arnaud Imatz

Propos recueillis par Alexandre Devecchio

(Figaro Vox, 4 septembre 2016)

Ex: http://metapoinfos.hautetfort.com

AIm-1.jpgEmmanuel Macron a présenté sa démission à François Hollande, qui l'a acceptée. L'ancien ministre de l'économie va se consacrer à son mouvement «En marche» et préparer une éventuelle candidature à la présidentielle. Il entend dépasser le clivage droite/gauche. Est-ce le début de la fin de ce que vous appelez une «mystification antidémocratique»?

À l'évidence Monsieur Macron a des atouts dans son jeu. Il est jeune, intelligent, il apprend vite et il n'est pas dépourvu de charisme et de charme. Il a en outre eu la bonne idée de créer une petite structure, En Marche ce que n'avait pas pu, su, ou voulu faire en son temps Dominique de Villepin. Mais si un «mouvement» ou -pour être plus exact - une simple association de notables peut jouer un rôle de parti charnière, et in fine obtenir un ou deux portefeuilles ministériels, je ne crois pas qu'elle puisse suffire pour positionner sérieusement un leader comme candidat crédible à la présidentielle de 2017. Sous la Ve République, seuls les chefs de grands partis, ceux qui en contrôlent les rouages, ont des chances de succès. On voit mal comment dans un parti socialiste aux mains de vieux éléphants un consensus pourrait se dégager spontanément autour de quelqu'un dont le style et les idées ne sont appréciés ni des barons, ni de la majorité des militants. Mais en politique il ne faut exclure aucune hypothèse. Macron est un politicien, sinon chevronné, du moins déjà expérimenté. Il connaît très bien la magie des mots. Il a dit et laisser dire qu'il souhaitait dépasser le clivage droite/gauche et qu'il n'était pas socialiste (après tout il semble qu'il ne l'ait été, comme membre du Parti socialiste, que de 2006 à 2009… à l'époque où il était encore banquier d'affaires). Il s'est réclamé récemment de Jeanne d'Arc flattant à peu de frais un certain électorat de droite toujours sensible aux envolées lyriques devant un des symboles de la nation. Le jour de sa démission, il a précisé qu'il n'avait jamais dit qu'il était «ni de droite, ni de gauche», ce qui d'ailleurs ne lui a rien coûté car cette double négation ne veut pas dire grand-chose. Sans doute eût-il été plus honnête et plus correct d'affirmer devant les français: «je ne suis pas simultanément de droite et de gauche». Cela dit, il s'est aussi déclaré dans le camp des progressistes contre celui des conservateurs. J'imagine sans peine que forcé de nous expliquer ce que sont pour lui les progressistes et les conservateurs, il ne manquerait pas de nous asséner quelques lieux-communs sur les prétendus partisans du progrès, de la raison, de la science, de la liberté, de l'égalité et de la fraternité face aux immobilistes, aux réactionnaires et aux populistes. Je dirai que Macron est un énième remake de Tony Blair, Bill Clinton et Gerhard Schröder. N'oublions pas que ces vedettes politiques de l'époque cherchaient à s'approprier, par-delà les clivages de droite et de gauche, la capacité de mobilisation de la «troisième voie».

Le système des primaires est-il un moyen de faire perdurer cette «mystification»?

Oui! bien évidemment. Il y a en fait une double mystification antidémocratique. Il y a d'abord celle de la division droite / gauche, à laquelle je me réfère dans mon livre. C'est celle que José Ortega y Gasset qualifiait de «formes d'hémiplégie morale» dans La révolte des masses déjà en 1929. C'est aussi celle dont Raymond Aron disait qu'elle reposait sur des «concepts équivoques» dans L'opium des intellectuels en 1955 (Je fais d'ailleurs un clin d'œil admiratif à son œuvre dans l'intitulé de mon livre). Cette dichotomie a été également dénoncée ou critiquée par de nombreuses figures intellectuelles aussi différentes que Simone Weil, Castoriadis, Lasch, Baudrillard ou Gauchet et, elle l'a été plus récemment par une kyrielle d'auteurs. Mais il y a aussi une seconde mystification antidémocratique qui affecte directement les partis politiques. Ce sont les leaders et non les militants qui se disputent le pouvoir. À l'intérieur des partis la démocratie est résiduelle, elle exclut la violence physique mais pas la violence morale, la compétition déloyale, frauduleuse ou restreinte. Il y a bien sûr des partis plus ou moins démocratiques qui parviennent à mitiger et à contrôler les effets de leur oligarchie mais s'ils existaient en France, en ce début du XXIe siècle, je crois que ça se saurait.

AIm-3.jpg

L'opposition droite/gauche peut-elle vraiment se résumer à un «mythe incapacitant»? Comme le souligne Denis Tillinac, ces deux courants ne sont-ils pas, malgré tout, irrigués par un imaginaire puissant dans lequel les électeurs se reconnaissent?

Il ne s'agit pas d'essences inaltérables. Je ne crois pas qu'il y ait «des valeurs permanentes de droite» et des «principes immortels de gauche». Il n'y a pas d'opposition intangible entre deux types de tempéraments, de caractères ou de sensibilités. Il n'y a pas de définitions intemporelles de la droite et de la gauche. Denis Tillinac nous parle de deux courants qui seraient «irrigués par un imaginaire puissant». Mais un imaginaire forgé par qui? Par les Hussards noirs de la République et les Congrégations religieuses? Et depuis quand? Depuis 1870, depuis1900 voire depuis 1930 nous répondent les historiens.

Je n'ignore pas bien sûr le point de vue des traditionalistes. Je sais que pour les traditionalistes être de droite ce n'est pas une attitude politique mais une attitude métaphysique. Je sais qu'ils considèrent que la gauche s'acharne à réduire l'homme à sa mesure sociale et économique. Que pour eux la droite et la gauche sont caractérisées par deux positions métaphysiques opposées: la transcendance et l'immanence. Ils sont les défenseurs d'une droite idéale, sublime, transcendantale ou apothéotique, celle que les partisans de la religion républicaine, d'essence totalitaire, Robespierre et Peillon, vouent perpétuellement aux gémonies.

Pour ma part, en me situant sur les plans politique, sociologique et historique, je constate que les chassés croisés idéologiques ont été multiples et permanents. Je peux citer ici le nationalisme, le patriotisme, le colonialisme, l'impérialisme, le racisme, l'antisémitisme, l'antichristianisme, l'antiparlementarisme, l'anticapitalisme, le centralisme, le régionalisme, l'autonomisme, le séparatisme, l'écologisme, l'américanophilie/américanophobie, l'europhilie/europhobie, la critique du modèle occidental, l'alliance avec le tiers-monde et avec la Russie, et bien d'autres exemples marquants, qui tous échappent à l'obsédant débat droite/gauche. Il suffit de s'intéresser un minimum à l'histoire des idées pour se rendre compte très vite que les droites et les gauches ont été tour à tour universalistes ou particularistes, mondialistes ou patriotiques, libre-échangistes ou protectionnistes, capitalistes ou anticapitalistes, centralistes ou fédéralistes, individualistes ou organicistes, positivistes, agnostiques et athées ou théistes et chrétiennes. Un imaginaire puissant dans lequel les électeurs se reconnaissent? Non! je dirais plutôt, avec le marxologue Costanzo Preve, que ce clivage est «une prothèse artificielle».

Selon vous, un nouveau clivage politique oppose désormais le local au mondial, les enracinés aux mondialisés…

J'avoue que la lecture de la philosophe Simone Weil m'a profondément marqué dans ma jeunesse. Elle a su brillamment démontrer que la dyade vecteur du déracinement / soutien de l'enracinement, explique la rencontre durable ou éphémère entre, d'une part, des révolutionnaires, des réformistes et des conservateurs, qui veulent transformer la société de manière que tous ouvriers, agriculteurs, chômeurs et bourgeois puissent y avoir des racines et, d'autre part, des révolutionnaires, des réformistes et des conservateurs qui contribuent à accélérer le processus de désintégration du tissu social. Elle est incontestablement une «précurseuse». Depuis le tournant du XXIe siècle nous assistons en effet à une véritable lutte sans merci entre deux traditions culturelles occidentales: l'une, est celle de l'humanisme civique ou de la République vertueuse ; l'autre, est celle du droit naturel sécularisé de la liberté strictement négative entendue comme le domaine dans lequel l'homme peut agir sans être gêné par les autres. L'une revendique le bien commun, l'enracinement, la cohérence identitaire, la souveraineté populaire, l'émancipation des peuples et la création d'un monde multipolaire ; l'autre célèbre l'humanisme individualiste, l'hédonisme matérialiste, le «bougisme», le changement perpétuel, l'homogénéisation consumériste et mercantiliste, l'État managérial et la gouvernance mondiale sous la bannière du multiculturalisme et du productivisme néocapitaliste.

Le général De Gaulle savait qu'on ne peut pas défendre réellement le bien commun la liberté et l'intérêt du peuple, sans défendre simultanément la souveraineté, l'identité et l'indépendance politique, économique et culturelle. Passion pour la grandeur de la nation, résistance à l'hégémonie américaine, éloge de l'héritage européen, revendication de l'Europe des nations (l'axe Paris-Berlin-Moscou), préoccupation pour la justice sociale, aspiration à l'unité nationale, démocratie directe, antiparlementarisme, national-populisme, ordo-libéralisme, planification indicative, aide au Tiers-monde, telle est l'essence du meilleur gaullisme. Où voyez-vous les gaullistes aujourd'hui? Henri Guaino? qui est peut être l'héritier le plus honnête? Mais combien de couleuvres a déjà avalé l'auteur des principaux discours du quinquennat de «Sarko l'Américain»?

AIm-4.jpg

La chute du mur de Berlin a-t-elle mis fin à ce clivage?

Souvenez-vous de ce que disait le philosophe Augusto del Noce peu de temps avant la chute du mur de Berlin: «le marxisme est mort à l'Est parce que d'une certaine façon il s'est réalisé à l'Ouest». Il relevait de troublantes similitudes entre le socialisme marxiste et le néo-libéralisme sous sa double forme sociale-libérale et libérale-sociale, et citait comme traits communs: le matérialisme et l'athéisme radical, qui ne se pose même plus le problème de Dieu, la non-appartenance universelle, le déracinement et l'érosion des identités collectives, le primat de la praxis et la mort de la philosophie, la domination de la production, l'économisme, la manipulation universelle de la nature, l'égalitarisme et la réduction de l'homme au rang de moyen. Pour Del Noce l'Occident avait tout réalisé du marxisme, sauf l'espérance messianique. Il concluait à la fin des années 1990 en disant que ce cycle historique est en voie d'épuisement, que le processus est enfin devenu réversible et qu'il est désormais possible de le combattre efficacement. Je me refuse à croire que la décomposition actuelle nous conduit seulement à la violence nihiliste. Je crois et j'espère qu'elle est le signe avant-coureur du terrible passage qu'il nous faudra traverser avant de sortir de notre dormition.

Arnaud Imatz, propos recueillis par Alexandre Devecchio (Figaro Vox, 4 septembre 2016)

jeudi, 30 juin 2016

Racism, Eugenics, & the Progressive Movement

eugenics.jpg

Racism, Eugenics, & the Progressive Movement

Thomas C. Leonard
Illiberal Reformers: Race, Eugenics & American Economics in the Progressive Era [2]
Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2016

eugenics2book.gifIn many ways the Progressive Era embodies the best of white America. It was a period of compassion, community concern, attempts to raise the living standard of average Americans, a desire to achieve class harmony, to end (or at least reduce) capitalist corruption, and to create a workable, harmonious racial nationalism that would ensure the long-term fitness of American society. The concerns of the Progressives were as much for the future as they were for the present, something almost wholly lacking in contemporary American politics. These scholars, politicians, and activists thought deeply about future generations and recognized, almost to a man, the validity of race science and the crucial role race plays in the historical trajectory of any country.

Thomas Leonard, a research scholar and lecturer in economics at Princeton University, has written an interesting history of the interaction between race, eugenics, and economics in the context of the Progressive movement. It is broadly informative and happily lacking the willful opacity of much contemporary scholastic writing, thus making it accessible to a wide audience. Unfortunately, yet unsurprisingly, this book begins with a blatant lie upon which he constructs his narrative: “Eugenics and race science are today discredited” (p. xiv). As such, the book is fundamentally flawed. Dr. Leonard offers no evidence whatsoever as to why Progressive notions of racial health and eugenics were wrong but, in keeping with contemporary academic fashion, merely resorts to shaming words and moral judgments rather than even a cursory investigation into the validity of the claims.

The book provides a detailed history of the many important Progressive intellectuals who believed that race was a fundamental concern and how they thought it should be dealt with politically, socially, and economically. The Progressives are perhaps the best example of a genuine American attempt to transcend the awkward political dichotomy of Left and Right for the sake of the greater good and a vision of a better and healthier future. Progressive diagnoses and predictions of racial degeneration and a dystopian future were so accurate that one suspects this book, to the extent it is read by objective and open-minded readers, will emphasize rather than deemphasize the importance of these issues.

The first chapter, entitled “Redeeming American Economic Life,” the author sets the context for the development of Progressivism by describing their reaction to the cycle of boom and bust of the dramatically expanding postbellum American economy: the rapid industrialization and urbanization of American society; and the tensions between labor, farmers, and capitalists. Despite the range of attitudes within the Progressive movement towards possible solutions to the problems faced at this time, Progressives shared three things in common: first, discontent with liberal individualism; second, “discontent with the waste, disorder, conflict, and injustice they ascribed to industrial capitalism”; and third, a concern with the problems of monopoly (pp. 8-9). Their understanding of these issues drove them to believe in the necessity of an administrative state to remedy these root problems and their many offshoots. As Dr. Leonard writes, the “progressives had different and sometimes conflicting agendas” but “nearly all ultimately agreed that the best means to their several ends was the administrative state” (p. 9). Those intellectuals who would become Progressives began to turn their focus away from the traditional and reflective scholarly disciplines and towards active ones, i.e. economics, politics, sociology, and public administration (p. 11). This activist turn was integral to the movement.

The author traces some of this activist drive for public improvement to the “social gospel” wing of Protestantism, but as knowledge of science and the use of scientific language increasingly became a marker of intellectual sophistication, the two were eventually combined into a mutually-reinforcing reformist spirit. Following World War I, after which the West experienced something of an existential crisis, the specifically Christian reform rhetoric mostly faded, or, as the author terms it, was “socialized” (p. 13), and mostly replaced by the hard empirical language of the above-mentioned burgeoning “active” disciplines. However, the sense of missionary zeal and notions of secular “salvation” remained a hallmark of the Progressive movement. If salvation could be socialized so too could sin (p. 13). That is to say, those problems that had previously been seen at least partially as religious in nature became social. Laissez-faire capitalism, for example, was not rapacious and exploitative merely because it was a sinful system run by sinful people but because it was “scientifically” incorrect. The Bible could offer insights into social problems but ultimately the responsibility fell to the state to re-make society in accordance with Christian ethics.

In the second chapter, “Turning Illiberal,” Dr. Leonard describes the professionalization of economics, the turn away from British classical liberalism towards German economic theory, and the origins of tensions within the Progressive movement between those who believed in democracy and those who did not. Germany, by the late 19th century had become the premier destination for graduate students wishing to study political economy. Germans were on the cutting edge of this newly formalized discipline — one that was almost entirely nonexistent in American universities. In contrast to Anglo-American classical liberalism, Germans saw the economy as a “product of a nation’s unique development” and believed that its “workings were not unalterable natural laws, [but] were historically contingent and subject to change” (p. 17). The author writes:

The progressives’ German professors had taught them that economic life was historically contingent. The economy wrought by industrial capitalism was a new economy, and a new economy necessitated a new relationship between the state and economic life. Industrial capitalism, the progressives argued, required continuous supervision, investigation, and regulation. The new guarantor of American progress was to be the visible hand of an administrative state, and the duties of administration would regularly require overriding individuals’ rights in the name of the common good (pp. 21-22).

Germans had demonstrated to American students that economics could be a tool of statist reform with a sound theoretical basis. They also demonstrated that it could be a distinguished and respected career path (p. 18). Those students who returned from Germany came home with a very different conception of the role of the economy in relation to the state and, at the same time, had little competition in establishing themselves in American universities and think tanks. It was a powerful position from which to begin their activism, both in terms of knowledge and opportunity.

Just as the German view of the relationship between state and economy had informed American Progressives, so too did the German Historical School’s conception of the nation as an organism (p. 22). This, coupled with the tremendous influence of Darwinist evolutionary theory in all intellectual circles, caused a distinct shift away from American individualism. Richard Ely, founder of the American Economic Association and a highly influential Progressive, explicitly rebuked the notion that the individual comes before society. Washington Gladden, a charter member of the same organization, argued that American individualism was “a radical defect in the thinking of the average American” (p. 22). The concept of the autonomous individual was seen by Progressive economists as a relic of a soundly refuted, old-fashioned ideology. A new class of superior, scientifically-informed men had to take charge of society if it were to rid itself of such antiquated and backwards beliefs.

In the third chapter, “Becoming Experts,” the author delves deeper into the tensions between expertise and democracy, the differences between Left and Right Progressives, the building of the administrative state, and “war collectivism.” Progressives maintained that the good of the people could best be guaranteed by limiting the power of the people — or, expressed positively, by entrusting the care of the people to experts. Dr. Leonard writes: “Financial crisis, economic panic, violent labor conflict, a political war over monetary policy, and the takeoff of the industrial merger movement combined to generate a groundswell of support for economic reform” (p. 30). This convinced many important Progressive intellectuals that government service was a far more important use of their expertise than was the role of public intellectual. Activism was a crucial strategic and ideological element of their project. The future, according to Progressives, should not be left to chance. It had to be engineered, and someone had to engineer it. If one genuinely cared for future generations, a processes to guarantee their success had to be put in motion rather than simply theorized.

eugenics_tree_1921.jpg

In his discussion of the distinction between Left and Right, Dr. Leonard accurately dismantles the problems with this dichotomous analytical tool. He writes that “progressive” is a “political term and political historians tend to an ideological lens . . . Ideology is [a] useful tool of taxonomy, but when it is reduced to one dimension, it is the enemy of nuance” (p. 38). Rather than frame Progressives as either Left or Right, he usually prefers the term “illiberal” — the belief that, contra liberalism, society takes preference over the individual. Indeed, the very concept of “reform” is often tainted with a Leftism that isn’t always quite there. Many of the positions that modern progressives hold today would be abhorrent to historical Progressives, just as many positions that conservatives hold today would be abhorrent to conservatives of the era. For example, the Progressive Republican Theodore Roosevelt was no fan of laissez-faire capitalism and favored an increase in the regulatory powers of the government, while William Graham Sumner, a conservative opponent of Progressivism, was a believer in free markets but a staunch opponent of imperialism and big business (pp. 39-40). The political battle lines of today differ greatly from those of the past, a fact which seems to validate the 19th century Germanic conception of the relationship of state, economy, and law as being historically contingent. What we think of now as Left or Right was largely absent from Progressive discourse.

Dr. Leonard goes on to discuss the creation of what he calls the “fourth branch” of government (the administrative agencies). The quintessential example of the ascendancy of the fourth branch is the Wisconsin Idea — the integration of government and academic experts in Wisconsin in order to govern the state with maximum efficiency. Many involved in the creation of this integrated system credited its success specifically with the heavy German population of the state. In his 1912 book on the subject, Charles McCarthy described the architect of the Wisconsin Idea, Robert Ely, “as a pupil of German professors, who returned from Germany with German political ideals to teach German-inspired economics at a German university (the University of Wisconsin) in the German state of Wisconsin, where the young men he most inspired were, yes, of German stock” (p. 41). The state government was, to a previously unknown degree, put in the charge of Progressive experts who created on American soil what was in effect an ethnic German state. The Progressive movement, both in theory and in practice, was distinctly Teutonic in conception.

This “fourth branch” of government was established in Washington D.C. by Woodrow Wilson and solidified during World War I by the success of “war collectivism.” The hand of the federal government was greatly strengthened at this time in order to aid the war effort. This is the period in which the income tax was established and was soon followed by corporate and inheritance taxes as well as numerous other reforms and the creation of various administrative agencies (pp. 43-45). Having established themselves as experts, the expert recommendations of the Progressives usually included the establishment of permanent regulatory agencies — “ideally an independent agency staffed by economic experts with broad discretionary powers to investigate and regulate” (p. 43). The author credits much of this to personal ambition rather than idealism, which is doubtless true to some extent but is at odds with his earlier descriptions of the visionary reformist mission of Progressives. Perhaps writing a century later it is hard not to be cynical about such things, but little in his prior discussion would indicate personal ambition as a primary motivating force. And even if it had been the case, their efforts were consistent with their ideology. Personal ambition without value-compromise can hardly be seen as a negative. But throughout the book attempts to tarnish the images of Progressives by insinuating that they were somehow morally compromised (how else to explain their illiberal views?).

Toward the end of the chapter, the author begins his discussion of race, a central concern of Progressives. It was simply understood by Progressives (and most others of the time) that blacks were incapable of freedom. Woodrow Wilson wrote that blacks were “unpracticed in liberty, unschooled in self-control, never sobered by the discipline of self-support, never established in any habit of prudence . . . insolent and aggressive, sick of work, [and] covetous of pleasure” (p. 50). The sociologist Edward Ross, in a statement the author refers to as demonstrating contempt for his “imagined inferiors” (p. 50) wrote: “One man, one vote . . . does not make Sambo equal to Socrates” (p. 50). Such statements seem to contradict the Progressive belief in the elevation of the common man (as contemporarily understood) but as Dr. Leonard points out, the “progressive goal was to improve the electorate, not necessarily expand it” (p. 50). The whole of the country would be better off if its leadership could be entrusted to a superior piece of the American electorate. This was a fundamental tension among Progressives: “Democracies need to be democratic, but they also need to function . . .” (p. 51). American democracy could not function with unintelligent people voting but, given American history, the concept of voting was not up for debate. Thus began the deliberate disenfranchisement of blacks and others deemed unfit for equal rights in American society.

In chapter four, “Efficiency in Business and Public Administration,” the author details the Progressive push for efficiency, the influence of Taylorism, and the beginning of the scientific measurement of mankind for utilitarian purposes. Objective as possible in their approach to the economy, Progressives (with few exceptions) did not regard big business itself as a problem. Scale was, for them, unrelated to efficiency. Efficiency was a goal that could be handled by experts regardless of the size of the project. The classical liberal notion of market efficiency, even if it could be demonstrated to be true, was, like Darwinian evolution, a slow and haphazard process that could be sped up and forced in entirely desirable directions with proper management. Big business was simply a fact of the new economy. As such, it was not undesirable in and of itself, but required outside guidance to achieve socially acceptable results while avoiding “market-made waste” (p. 57). Progressives famously feared monopoly because it could produce political corruption as well as reduce innovation but, as the author writes, “progressives distinguished monopoly from size, and because of this, were not antimonopoly in the populist sense of the term” (p. 57). Indeed, big business was generally thought to be inherently more efficient than small business. As with everything else, proper administration was the key to success.

scientificmanagement.jpgThe 1911 publication of Frederick Taylor’s The Principles of Scientific Management was a watershed moment for Progressives. It offered a scientific method for improving workplace efficiency. By measuring and analyzing everything from workplace break times to the weight of shoveled material, industry would be able to maximize efficiency down to the minute and the pound. Taylorism has since become an epithet, used to describe the dehumanizing effects of the time clock, the oppressive nature of constant managerial supervision, and the turn away from skilled labor in the workforce. However, for Progressives it promised a new approach to the workplace that could make life better for everyone. Those experts who would take charge of industry would be able to maximize the public good while minimizing the power of capitalists and financiers. Men such as the Progressive political philosopher Herbert Croly believed that Taylorism would “[put] the collective power of the group at the hands of its ablest members” (p. 62). For Progressives, scientific management was a noble goal and a model to be followed. It fit perfectly with their basic beliefs and soon spread elsewhere, including into the home, the conservation movement, and even churches (p. 66-69).

The Progressive era was the era of social science. Scholars, commissioners, politicians, and journalists set out to understand the reality of American social life through scientific methods. Few reading this will be surprised with the conclusions of virtually all of these efforts. What this research — into race, into immigration, into domestic behavior, into social conditions — demonstrated was that there was a clear correlation between race and intelligence and the ability to function in American society. Intelligence tests and vast amounts of data collected from the military and immigration centers were collected and analyzed. For Progressives, race science was obviously and demonstrably real and had to be treated with the same scientific objectivity as the economy or any other facet of human existence. America was then, as it is now, being populated rapidly with provably inferior and/or inassimilable human beings. Progressives began to warn of the dangers of Jewish and other non-white immigration to the United States, as well as the problems stemming from rapidly breeding inferior American citizens.[1]

Chapter five, entitled “Valuing Labor: What Should Labor Get?,” describes how Progressives dealt with the question of labor. They sought to determine what labor was getting, how wages were determined, and what labor should get (p. 78). Dr. Leonard writes:

For nearly all of recorded history, the notion of laborers selling their labor services for wages was nonsensical. Labor was the compelled agricultural toil of social inferiors in the service and under the command of their betters. In the United States, this remained true well into the nineteenth century. The value of labor depended on what the worker was — free or slave, man or woman, native or immigrant, propertied or hireling — not what the worker produced or wished to consume (p. 78).

The thinking behind these categories is treated with contempt by the author, of course. The idea that the labor of a black man could be worth less than that of a white man based on something external to mere prejudice against “skin color” or that the labor of an immigrant could be worth less than the labor of a citizen to those who might feel a deeper affinity for their own countrymen was, to him, symptomatic of a “hierarchy that plagued economic life” (p. 79). He relates the claims of race science with contempt but offers no justification for his disdain. But, by simply ignoring the reality of race and sex differences, the author is able to trace the concept of inferior labor back to the Greeks — as if attitudes towards labor even between similar peoples are not themselves historically contingent.

The author sees two fundamental and separate approaches to political economy throughout history: “market exchange and administrative command” (p. 79). He notes correctly that in the centuries between Socrates and Adam Smith, the market was seen as a place of chaos, disorder, Jews (he uses the semi-cryptic “Shylocks” rather than Jews), and unscrupulous persons of various sorts. The Greek prioritization of the political over the economic is, for Dr. Leonard, the source of the various manifestations of human hierarchies in Western societies and economies.[2] [3] Greek men somehow just decided for no valid reason whatsoever that women should supervise the household, market services be left to foreigners, and labor relegated to non-Greeks. These were simply ideas that had “extraordinary staying power in Europe” (p. 80) and thus led to aristocracy and other unnatural hierarchies until Adam Smith blessed Europe with his belief in individualism and natural liberty. Again, the author deliberately chooses to ignore the very real biological bases for such facts of human social life. Command economies are, to the author, somehow “bad” because he sees them as having been based in ignorance and vaguely conspiratorial hierarchical social arrangements.

Enlightenment notions of individualism and liberty were, of course, central to the rhetoric of the American project. However, America did not practice what it preached (nor did it really preach “what it preached” but that is far beyond the scope of this piece): slavery existed in the South and was defended by Southerners as far more humane than the wage-slavery of the North; Northern abolitionists saw this as an absurd comparison and argued that at least free laborers could get up and leave if they were unhappy. But both saw the laborer in one form or another as being an inferior creature. This attitude was to carry through to the Progressive era. As the author puts it, “reformers still saw a bit of the slave in the wage earner, no matter how ubiquitous the employee now was” (p. 84). He goes on to note that when millions of women and immigrants joined the workforce, this reinforced the notion of the laborer as inferior.[3] [4]

If the laborer is inferior, what should they be paid? Progressives believed in the power of the government to change social conditions. As such, they believed that policies could be enacted that would enable laborers to live comfortably, with enough money to be upstanding citizens and raise healthy families. Differing theories existed for how fair wages should be determined, but Progressives tended to reject the idea that wages were anything less than a “worker-citizen’s rightful claim upon his share of the common wealth produced when the laborer cooperated with the capitalist to jointly create it” (p. 86). As is always the case among economists, vigorous debate ensued. The goal was for workers to receive a living wage but how this was to be accomplished was a matter of some controversy. The author discusses some of these theoretical disagreements but concludes that the one thing that united all Progressives in this matter was the belief that “work will always go to the lowest bidder . . . there was a race to the bottom, and the cheapest labor won” (p. 88). However, he pathologizes this as an “anxiety” rather than a real problem experienced by rational people so that Progressive concerns about the intersection of economy and race be seen by the reader as a kind of irrational social “disease,” a collective neurosis with deep roots in the American (read white) psyche.

eugenics3755357.jpgIn chapter six, “Darwinism in Economic Reform,” Dr. Leonard relates how Darwinism was used by Progressives to acquire the “imprimatur of science” (p. 105). Darwinism proved to be a very flexible conceptual tool. It allowed for incorporation into various fields of thought and, within those, still more differing points of view: it was used to advocate for capitalism and for socialism; war and peace; individualism and collectivism; natalism and birth control; religion and atheism (p. 90). Darwinism and related ideas (such as Lamarckism) provided Progressives with a scientific basis upon which to argue for both economic improvement and biological improvement. There was no consensus on which aspects of Darwinism to incorporate into their logic but something the vast majority had in common was the belief in the importance of heredity and that artificial selection, as opposed to natural selection, was the most efficient means of securing a healthy society comprised of evolutionarily fit individuals.

Social Darwinism was a concept championed by believers in the free market. As the author notes, it was always a used as a pejorative and Progressives had to distance themselves from it (p. 99). They did so by challenging laissez-faire using Darwinist principles, an idea that came to be known as Reform Darwinism. The Reform Darwinists, led by the sociologist and botanist Lester Frank Ward, challenged laissez-faire by asserting that capitalists thrived in the Gilded Age because “they had traits well adapted to the Gilded Age” but that these traits were not necessarily “socially desirable” (p. 100). They also asserted that society was an organism that “had a necessary unity” but “not an inclusive one” (p. 102). An organism must always protect itself from threats and an organism must also prioritize the whole over the part. This organic model of society influenced every Progressive concern. If, for example, a corporation was a legal person entitled to the same protections as an individual citizen, then surely “the state was an even larger organism, one that encompassed and thus subsumed corporate and natural persons alike” (p. 100).

Progressives also attacked natural selection as “wasteful, slow, unprogressive, and inhumane” (p. 100). Agreeing that robber barons and rich fat cats were an example of the degenerative tendencies of capitalism, society had a duty to protect itself from such people (p. 100). Natural selection did not always lead to progress. It was environmentally contingent. Richard Ely argued that “Nature, being inefficient, gives us man, whereas society ‘gives us the ideal man'” (p. 104). The free market rewarded those who could make the system work to their advantage by any means necessary, not those who possessed traits that were desirable for a healthy, moral society. Regulation could help fix this problem. Woodrow Wilson wrote that “regulation protected the ethical businessman from having to choose between denying his conscience and retiring from business” (p. 105). Combined with German economics, German historical theory, an activist sociology, and a commitment to the benefits of efficiency, the influence of Darwinism made the development of workable eugenics policies almost a certainty.

In the seventh chapter of the book, “Eugenics and Race in Economic Reform,” Dr. Leonard provides a brief overview of the history of eugenics. He also describes how it entered American intellectual discourse and how it was applied to race science. With roots as far back as Plato and popularized by Francis Galton in the late 19th century, eugenics was the obvious solution to many of the social problems that the Progressives were tackling. The author quotes Galton for a broad explanation: “what nature does blindly, slowly, and ruthlessly, man may do providently, quickly and kindly” (p. 109). The ideas of eugenicists gained mainstream traction rapidly. By the early 20th century, states were passing sterilization laws. By the end of World War I, concerns about the terrible death toll of white men had prompted many American intellectuals to worry deeply about the crisis caused by the loss of so much “superior heredity” (p. 110). American universities began teaching eugenics courses, textbooks on eugenics were written, journals were published, and societies devoted to encouraging the spread of eugenics programs and race science were created.

Francis Galton had gone so far as to declare a “Jehad [sic]” on the “customs and prejudices that impair the physical and moral qualities of our race” (p. 112). Influential Progressives like Irving Fisher and John Harvey Kellogg sought to make this a reality by creating a sort of religion out of eugenics (p. 112). Concern for the white race played an explicit part in Progressive thought. There was nothing coded about it. Like the social gospelers of early Progressivism, the eugenics movement evangelized very effectively. The concept of racial health was soon to be found virtually everywhere one turned, from women’s magazines, movies, and comic strips to “fitter family” and “better baby” contests at agricultural fairs across America (p. 113). Lothrop Stoddard published his classic The Rising Tide of Color Against White World-Supremacy in 1920, and the famous Supreme Court decision in the case of Buck v. Bell in 1927 affirmed that the state had a right to sterilize individuals deemed a genetic threat to society. It is important to note that not all eugenicists were Progressives but the vast majority of Progressives were eugenicists. For them, things such as environmental conservation went hand in hand with racial “conservation.”

For Progressive eugenicists, the administrative state was the most effective defense against racial degeneration (the effects of adverse conditions on a race of people) and race suicide (the effects of a superior race being outbred by inferior races) (p. 117). Poor and uneducated whites were seen to be redeemable given the proper environmental conditions and thus genetically able to assimilate into American society. Non-whites were incapable of assimilation because of their lower intelligence and racially-specific habits and attitudes. Of particular concern was the American black population. White Progressives saw them, at best, as docile children who should be treated as such for the good of all, and, at worst, as a weight that would sap American energy and  character (p. 122). Even among the handful of black Progressives, such as W.E. B. DuBois and Kelly Miller, race was seen as a problem for America. Though they rejected the notion of the genetic inferiority of blacks, they recognized that the rapidly breeding lowest IQ blacks threatened to overwhelm the elite few — the “Talented Tenth,” as DuBois famously described them (p. 122).

But non-whites were not the only concern of the Progressive eugenicists. As indicated above, racial degeneration was of great concern. Literature on degenerate families became wildly popular at this time, bringing to the American lexicon such names as the Jukes and the Kallikaks. These families (given aliases by the authors of these studies) had their histories published as warnings about the dangers of what some would now refer to as “white trash.” The contradictions here are apparent: Progressives sought to improve the conditions of the white poor while at the same time wrestling with the question of whether poor whites were genetically unfit and simply irredeemable by external measures. The latter question, however, was also asked of the rich, who some Progressives saw as even better evidence of racial degeneracy. As with every other issue, there was a certain amount of disagreement among Progressives about specific questions and how to best administer solutions, but the concerns themselves were universal.

Perhaps the greatest concern was with the effects of immigration on the American gene pool. The author subscribes to the notion of an imagined “whiteness” and, as is customary, uses the Anglo-Saxonist tendencies of Progressives to call into question the validity of race science. This is to be expected and can be ignored. But it was indeed a concern of the era, especially as immigrants poured onto American shores. Some Progressives argued that democracy had its origins in the Anglo-Saxon race and that immigration from other areas of Europe was detrimental to survival of the American way of life. Walter Rauschenbach, a “radical social gospeler” (p. 124) argued that capitalism “drew its ever-increasing strength from the survival of the unfit immigrant” (p. 125). Rauschenbach was a committed Anglo-Saxonist and such views had long held sway in Progressive circles, from social gospelers to anti-Catholics to Prohibitionists. But it does not follow that concerns about immigration were irrational because one particular group of whites at the time did not like the customs of another group of whites. Nor do these antiquated distinctions invalidate the entirety of race science, however many times they are used in attempts to do so by this author and so many others.

Chapter eight is entitled “Excluding the Unemployable.” In it the author delves into how Progressives related racial inferiority and other traits deemed as markers of inferiority to labor and wages. He writes: “The Progressive Era catalog of inferiority was so extensive that virtually any cause could locate some threat to American racial integrity” (p. 129). Obviously, non-whites were seen as a threat, but so were white alcoholics, the poor, epileptics, and others. He argues that in antebellum America, laborers knew their place and stayed there. From slaves to women, strict social and sometimes legal controls assured the maintenance of this hierarchy. Postbellum industrialization and the emancipation of slaves threatened this order: “Inferiors were now visible and perceived to be economic competitors” and were either “portrayed as the exploited dupes of the capitalist” or “as the capitalist’s accomplices” (p. 130). Those who were literally incapable of work and those who were willing to work for lower wages than “superior” Anglo-Saxon stock were given the label “unemployable.”

citizens-l.jpgThese “unemployables” were seen as being parasitic. They undercut wages and threatened American racial integrity. The capitalist drive towards cheap labor was certainly seen as partly to blame for this problem, but Progressive discourse began to focus more on biology than economics. Blame was increasingly shifted towards the actual laborers themselves rather than the system that encouraged them to accept lower wages. In what was known as the “living-standard theory of wages,” the unemployables were seen as being able to live on less than the average American worker due to their willingness (either racially-determined or resulting from inferior minds) to accept poor living conditions. The white American worker, it was believed, would reduce his number of children rather than sacrifice his standard of living, thereby increasing the risk of Americans being outbred by inferior stock. This line of argument gained popular currency with the sometimes violent union activism against Chinese workers. Edward Ross wrote that “should wors[e] come to the worst, it would be better for us if we were turn our guns upon every vessel bring [Asians] to our shores rather than permit them to land” (p. 135). The notion of immigrants and others being regarded as scab labor was widely accepted across the political spectrum but was central to Progressive concerns because they were able to see it as symptomatic of multiple grave problems with American society. In order to correct these problems, better methods were needed to identify and exclude the inferiors who were threatening American jobs and lowering the American quality of life.

In chapter nine, “Excluding Immigrants and the Unproductive,” Dr. Leonard examines the methods used for exclusion. The most obvious method was the use of immigration restrictions. Numerous laws were enacted either limiting or barring entirely immigration from certain parts of the world. Restrictions were also imposed by those otherwise deemed a threat to the country, i.e. anarchists, polygamists, and epileptics (p. 142). In 1905, a law was passed that prohibited contract labor altogether (companies paying immigrants to come to America in exchange for labor). A literacy test was also proposed for anyone trying to enter the country, however the effort actually failed when Woodrow Wilson inexplicably vetoed the bill in 1917. Edward Ross blamed Jews for this loss. He wrote that they were financing the anti-restrictionist campaign and pretending that it was for the benefit of all immigrants but was actually “waged by and for one race” (p. 158). But does the author investigate this claim? Of course not. It is easier to label Ross an anti-Semite and move on. To do otherwise might turn up some uncomfortable facts.

Other restrictionist actions met with success: in 1907, the Expatriation Act required American women who married foreigners to surrender their citizenship; massive federal investigations were undertaken to study the problems of immigration; and various private organizations sprung up devoted to anti-immigration advocacy. (p. 143). For Progressives, the issue of race had become one of their deepest concerns. It was, generally, either considered the main determinant of historical change, for better or for worse, or at least an extremely important one. It comes as no surprise that the founding of the United States would be interpreted through a Darwinist lens by Progressives. The author spends some time critiquing their use of Darwinist concepts to defend the original colonists as pioneers and conquerors (that is, “fit”) and later immigrants as simply following a path already tread in opportunistic fashion (“unfit”). Never mind that this is quite obviously at least partially true. He even fails to see the distinction between a colonist and an immigrant, wholeheartedly buying into the ridiculous “nation of immigrants” theory of American demographics that is so popular today.

Progressive eugenicists saw the immigration problem as an opportunity to assert their particular interests. Interest in race science grew exponentially. Various classificatory systems were proposed, studied, and refined, each of which generally had the expected hierarchies: whites at the top, blacks on the bottom. Within each category were, of course, numerous other sub-categories. But almost all races (both in the contemporary sense and in older sense meaning “ethnicity”) was charted and described in great detail. It was crucial from the standpoint of the Progressive eugenicists to use this information to prevent the race conflict that they believed would naturally arise from the intermingling of dissimilar peoples from across the globe. Even the few Progressive intellectuals who were genuinely egalitarian in outlook believed that race-based immigration policies were crucial. John Dewey, for example, supported them because he believed average Americans were too primitive to adopt his supposedly enlightened view that race was a fiction, thus making race conflict inevitable anyway (p. 153). Unsurprisingly, those who opposed immigration restrictions tended to be Jews such as Franz Boas, philosemites such as Emily Balch, and/or laissez-faire capitalists. The motives of the restrictionists are called into question by the author — but not those of the anti-restrictionists, of course. They were simply uniquely informed and tolerant for their time.

The above also fueled the debate over the minimum wage. It was commonly accepted that a legal minimum wage would put some people out of work. Progressives tended to see this as a good thing insofar as it removed inferior laborers from the job market. Dr. Leonard writes: “It deterred immigrants and other inferiors from entering the labor force, and it idled inferior workers already employed. The minimum wage detected the inferior employee, whether immigrant, female, or disabled, so that he or she could be scientifically dealt with” (p. 161). Ways in which these inferiors could be dealt with “scientifically” included simple things such the return of formerly-employed women to the home and far more complex solutions such as labor colonies for the unfit and forced sterilization. As was the case with all internecine Progressive debates, however, the thinking was always keenly focused on future generations. One particular intellectual might disagree with another about a certain policy proposal or belief, but the goal was the same: a harmonious society and healthy race. And since neither can exist without women, it was natural for Progressives to consider the role of women in society.

In the tenth and final chapter of the book, entitled “Excluding Women,” Dr. Leonard examines the views of women’s employment and civil rights within the Progressive movement. Women were always an important part of efforts at labor reform and the drive to improve various aspects of social life. But most Progressives had very strong views on the proper role of women in society. Richard Ely argued that women should be barred from the workplace (p. 170). Many, however, did not go to quite to this extreme. Efforts were made to simply limit the number of hours women were legally allowed to work, for example. The idea behind this was, of course, that women were physically weaker and needed protection from exploitative employers. But there were other issues of importance to Progressives as well, including the desire to combat prostitution. This concern was sometimes used to defend the minimum wage. If working women could make more money per hour they would be less likely to resort to prostitution to make ends meet. The obvious problem here is that the minimum wage was supposed to make certain people unemployed, and this group included women. It was assumed, however, that unemployed women would be cared for by the men in their lives, thereby providing the benefits of higher wages to men, a more appropriate environment for women, and helping to guarantee the health of the race. Whatever limitations this placed on a woman’s individual rights were explicitly justified by concern for the race.

For some Progressive feminists, male social domination had had a dysgenic effect by punishing the race’s strongest women by confining them to the household (p. 179). Most Progressives, however, believed that motherhood was the duty of women and had to be encouraged and thought such ideas absurd. Theodore Roosevelt, for example, had special contempt for those women from privileged backgrounds who did not have enough children despite being able to afford it. Referring to them as “race criminals,” he believed that such behavior was the height of selfishness (p. 180).

The debate over birth control was related to this attitude. Birth control, then as now, was mostly used by the most privileged in society and less so by the lowest classes. It thus had an obvious dysgenic effect. The author sees the synchronic concerns of Progressives with women’s health, sexual virtue, economic competition with men, and health of the race as contradictory. He writes:

If she were paid very little, she was admonished for endangering her health, risking her virtue, and threatening hereditary vigor. If she commanded a slightly higher but still modest wage, she was condemned for undercutting men’s family wages and for neglected [sic] her maternal duties. If she were well paid, she was admonished for selfishly acquiring an education, pursuing a career, and thus shirking her reproductive responsibilities to society and the race (p. 182).

Though there is a superficial tension between these things, he fails to see that there is no necessary contradiction here. It is entirely possible for women to be economically exploited laborers whose employment lowered men’s wages and for their ideal place to be in the home, nurturing the future of the race. Progressives generally saw the employment of women as a precursor to starting a family or as a result of misfortune anyway (p. 178). Sex-specific protections in the workplace, as well as a minimum wage that would displace many of them, would be a perfectly sensible goal for any state that had the future of the race as a primary focus. Dr. Leonard’s concern with finding hypocrisy in every statement relating to race and sex blinds him to reasonable conclusions. The Progressives, however, were not handicapped by ideological taboos and ultimately rejected the small, internal strain of equal-rights feminism within their ranks in favor of protecting the race. Progressives fought hard against the Equal Right Amendment of 1923, but by the mid-1920s, the Progressive Era was winding down and within a few years the zeitgeist would change considerably.

We see in the Progressive movement the last explicit, mainstream advocacy for the white race on American soil. The author clearly realizes this and chooses to ignore every single claim made by Progressives that does not fit with contemporary notions of social constructivism. He quotes Progressives in order to mock them, not to investigate whether what they said had a basis in fact. One might object by saying that it is beyond the scope of the book to investigate race science itself in order to discuss its role in the Progressive era. But the book starts out with the lie that race science has been discredited and everything that follows is therefore either directly based on a lie or has a lie as its overarching context. The point of the book, however, is not to enlighten the reader about anything of substance. His goal is merely to frown upon “racists” and “sexists” with the reader, to roll his eyes at ignorant Progressives along with his academic colleagues, and pray that his book is assigned in universities across the country in order to further indoctrinate students into the secular religion of egalitarianism.

This is not to say that there are not important issues discussed in the book. Clearly, there are. Nor is any of the above meant to suggest that Progressives were correct about everything. Clearly, they were not. But one cannot help but wonder how different America would look today if the Progressives had been able to further investigate and discuss these important issues as a part of the mainstream. What would this country look like now if such ideas had not been turned into “thought crimes?” In so many ways what we see in progressives today is a complete about-face from the intellectual heritage they claim. And in so many ways what we can see in the real Progressive movement is profoundly, devastatingly prescient and of utmost relevance to the contemporary American sociopolitical landscape. These issues are just too important to be left to a hack.

Notes

1. As many readers will be aware, there was a distinct bias towards Nordics among American whites at this time. Many Southern and Eastern European whites were deemed inferior–a hammer used frequently to hit racialists over the head in arguments intended to “deconstruct” whiteness. It is also, unfortunately, still found in White Nationalist circles. Nordicism is dealt with very well by Greg Johnson here (http://www.counter-currents.com/2016/03/nordics-aryans-an... [5]).

2. One wonders how he might explain similar hierarchies in non-European civilizations.

3. How labor would have fared in the 20th century without the presence of millions of women and immigrants to bolster notions of their inferiority is a question that should be asked of every contemporary “progressive.” One might also ask why, if racial diversity is such a tremendous and obvious social good, how it is that highly-educated Progressives completely failed to realize this — especially considering that theirs was a mission to increase the standard of living in America.

Article printed from Counter-Currents Publishing: http://www.counter-currents.com

URL to article: http://www.counter-currents.com/2016/06/racism-eugenics-and-the-progressive-movement/

URLs in this post:

[1] Image: http://www.counter-currents.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/IlliberalReformers.jpg

[2] Illiberal Reformers: Race, Eugenics & American Economics in the Progressive Era: http://amzn.to/293MqYr

[3] [2]: #_ftn2

[4] [3]: #_ftn3

[5] http://www.counter-currents.com/2016/03/nordics-aryans-and-whites/: http://www.counter-currents.com/2016/03/nordics-aryans-and-whites/

lundi, 02 mai 2016

Robert Redeker: «Le progrès est un échec politique, écologique et anthropologique»

robert-redeker-jpg_2899033.jpg

Robert Redeker: «Le progrès est un échec politique, écologique et anthropologique»

Ex: https://comptoir.org

Philosophe agrégé, Robert Redeker est principalement connu pour une polémique créé par l’une de ses tribunes sur l’islam parue en 2006 sur “Le Figaro”. Si nous jugeons très contestables – mais pas condamnables – ses propos, nous déplorons qu’ils occultent la pensée du philosophe. Depuis une quinzaine d’années, Redeker mène en effet une critique radicale de l’idéologie du progrès, dominante depuis le XVIIIe siècle. C’est sur ce sujet que nous avons souhaité l’interroger, quelques mois après la sortie d’un ouvrage intitulé “Le Progrès ? Point final” (Éditions Ovadia).

Le Comptoir : Vous avez écrit plusieurs livres sur le Progrès (Le Progrès ou l’Opium de l’histoire  ; Le Progrès  ? Point final), et vous semblez voir dans l’idéologie du Progrès un nouvel opium, à l’instar de la religion chez Marx. Le Progrès serait-il une religion à critiquer elle-aussi  ?

RR-prog.jpgRobert Redeker : Pourquoi ces livres ? D’abord, il y a l’urgence d’établir le droit d’inventaire philosophique de la période historique que nous venons de vivre depuis le XVIIIe siècle et qui paraît se clore – c’est la période que l’on appelle “la Modernité”, qui a été marquée par une religion inédite, celle du progrès. Ce livre pourrait se découper ainsi : le progrès, sa naissance, sa vie, son déclin, sa mort. Il s’agit du progrès entendu comme idéologie, c’est-à-dire comme grille métaphysique de lecture du monde, et comme valeur identifiée au Bien. Ensuite, j’ai voulu continuer à penser les mutations de l’homme et du monde dans une lignée que je trace depuis mes premiers livres (Le déshumain ; Nouvelles Figures de l’Homme ; L’emprise sportive) et d’autres plus récents (Egobody). Enfin, le monde en charpie dans lequel nous vivons, et la “montée de l’insignifiance” qu’un philosophe comme Castoriadis diagnostiquait déjà il y a trois décennies, sont des phénomènes qui invitent à penser. Le livre sur la vieillesse s’articule autour de la réflexion sur ces mutations. L’homme est avant tout un être qui a horreur de la vérité, qui ne la supporte que difficilement, qui a besoin de l’occulter derrière un voile d’illusion. L’idéologie du progrès est un voile de cette sorte. Les promesses du progrès – rassemblées dans le vocable progressiste – ne se sont pas réalisées. Le progrès est un triple échec : politique, ou politico-historique, écologique, ou économico-écologique, et anthropologique (l’homme étant devenu, pour parler comme Marcuse, « l’homme unidimensionnel »). La religion du progrès promettait, dès ses origines avec les Lumières, un homme toujours meilleur dans une société toujours meilleure qui finirait par aboutir à une paix aussi universelle que définitive. Le paradoxe pointé par le mythe de Prométhée tel que Platon le narre est toujours vrai : si les techniques évoluent, s’améliorent, l’homme de son côté n’acquiert pas la sagesse qu’elles requièrent, il reste le même. Dans cette identité de l’homme à travers le temps réside le message de la forte idée qu’est celle du péché originel. Les peuples et les gouvernants n’ont, comme l’a fort bien dit Hegel, jamais rien appris de l’histoire et n’en apprendront jamais rien [i]. L’homme réinvente sans cesse le cadre de son existence, c’est l’histoire, mais il ne se réinvente pas lui-même. L’illusion consiste à s’imaginer que cette réinvention perpétuelle a un sens. Le mythe du progrès est cette illusion même.

« Je ne développe pas une technophobie encore moins un irrationalisme. On peut plutôt comprendre ma démarche aussi comme une critique de l’idolâtrie. »

Je n’appelle pas progrès les améliorations qui adoucissent l’existence des hommes, sans d’ailleurs en changer la réalité métaphysique. Ce que j’appelle progrès est autre chose : une valorisation idéologique de ces améliorations, une métaphysique de l’histoire (ce qu’on appelle le progressisme). Mieux : un substitut athée à Dieu, survenant après la mort de Dieu, un directeur de l’histoire. La croyance qu’il en va de l’histoire, de la politique et de la morale comme de la nature chez Descartes – dont nous pouvons devenir « comme maîtres et possesseurs ». Cette conception de la nature traduit le prométhéisme des modernes. Le progrès désigne tantôt la métaphysique de l’histoire, tantôt l’extension du prométhéisme technique au domaine moral. Tantôt et souvent à la fois.

Quant à sa critique, tout dépend de ce que l’on appelle critique. Il y a un sens haut et un sens bas de critique. Le sens haut se retrouve chez Kant, où critique veut dire crible qui établit les usages légitimes et récuse les usages abusifs des concepts. Kant déjà faisait sans le savoir un droit d’inventaire concernant les concepts de la métaphysique. En ce sens- là, kantien, mon travail est une critique de la religion du progrès.

Pouvez-vous nous retracer brièvement les moments fondateurs de cette idéologie?

On pourrait remonter à Joachim de Flore et son immanentisation de l’eschaton chrétien. C’est lui qui met en place les conditions de possibilité d’une pareille idéologie, une parareligion. Mais il faudra quelques siècles pour qu’elles deviennent effectives. C’est le concept de sécularisation qui est ici éclairant. Le progressisme est une sécularisation du christianisme. Le protestantisme a joué le rôle de sas permettant l’extériorisation du christianisme en progressisme. Sans la Réforme, il n’y aurait jamais eu de progressisme.

« Le Progrès prend la place de Dieu comme directeur de l’histoire. »

RR-nfh.gifLa majuscule au “P” de “Progrès” dit tout. Le Progrès ainsi saisi a le statut d’une entité métaphysique planant sur l’histoire et dirigeant sa marche. Il prend la place de Dieu comme directeur de l’histoire – un Dieu dépersonnalisé, désindividualisé, n’existant pas, réduit à un concept exsangue. Cette conception du progrès fut beaucoup plus qu’une idée philosophique (celle de Kant, Condorcet, Hegel, Comte, Marx), ce fut une opinion populaire, répandue dans les masses, en ce sens-là elle fit l’objet d’une croyance collective. Elle fut distribuée comme l’hostie des curés par des milliers de hussards noirs de la République tout au long de la IIIe République. On – surtout à gauche – croyait au progrès comme on avait cru en Dieu. Tous – Kant aussi bien que, quoique confusément, les masses – attribuaient une valeur métaphysique aux évolutions de la technique, de l’industrie, du droit, de la politique. Ma critique n’est pas celle du progrès des connaissances, de l’évolution des techniques et des améliorations de l’existence humaine, ce qui serait aussi absurde que grotesque, mais du sens abusivement conféré à ces évolutions, de leur transformation en fétiche et idole. Je ne développe pas une technophobie encore moins un irrationalisme. On peut plutôt comprendre ma démarche comme une critique de l’idolâtrie.

D’une part, le progrès a été, après le christianisme, et dans la foulée de celui-ci, le second Occident, le second chemin par lequel l’Occident s’est universalisé, planétarisé. On ne peut plus voir l’histoire comme une totalité en mouvement – ainsi que la voyaient Hegel, Marx ou bien encore Sartre – doté d’un pas, d’une marche, c’est-à-dire d’un sens (le sens est à la fois la direction, la signification et la valeur). L’idée de progrès permettait encore une telle représentation, illusoire, de l’histoire. L’Occident se représentait volontiers comme l’avant-garde de cette marche. Mais d’autre part, paradoxalement, cette mort de la métaphysique progressiste de l’histoire et du leadership occidental qu’elle présuppose est en même temps le moment où les exigences typiquement occidentales, nées en Occident, liées au progressisme occidental, de démocratie, de souveraineté populaire, d’émancipation des femmes, de justice sociale, se planétarisent. Elles se déploient à la façon de métastases du progrès après sa mort, déconnectées de la religion du progrès qui les a vu naître, sans qu’on puisse être assuré, puisque les conditions dans lesquelles elles sont nées ont disparu, qu’elles perdureront, ni bien entendu qu’elles triompheront, ne serait-ce qu’un temps.

Comment faire une critique du progressisme en évitant de tomber dans les écueils réactionnaires (du type contre-révolutionnaire ou décadentiste) ou postmodernes (relativiste, antirationnel, antiscientifique, etc.) ?

En premier lieu, la réaction n’est qu’une posture. Elle possède une valeur littéraire, mais aucune valeur philosophique ou politique. La valeur des réactionnaires tient, comme l’a bien montré Antoine Compagnon (Les Antimodernes, 2005), dans leur “charme” [ii]. Les écrivains réactionnaires sont charmants, intéressants, troublants ; les philosophes réactionnaires contemporains – il y en a quelques-uns – ne sont que nuls. Par contre les philosophes du passé étiquetés comme “réactionnaires” donnent à penser – tels Gustave Thibon ou Pierre Boutang. La qualification de “réactionnaire”est extensive, elle peut s’étendre jusqu’à très loin : Badiou, qui se croit progressiste, en certaines de ses opinions est un philosophe réactionnaire au sens où ses propos sont traversés par la nostalgie d’un état du monde dépassé, par des espoirs qui étaient présents dans cet état du monde dépassé. De ce point de vue, Alain Badiou ressemble tout à fait à Joseph de Maistre, le charme intellectuel, la puissance de penser et le talent littéraire en moins. Joseph de Maistre mythifie sur un mode nostalgique l’Ancien Régime tout comme Alain Badiou mythifie sur le même mode l’espoir défunt dans le communisme.

En second lieu, l’échec des postmodernes est patent. De Derrida à Feyerabend, bref des déconstructionnistes (« Jacques Derrida, sophiste moderne s’il en est » dit excellemment Baptiste Rappin dans Heidegger et la question du management publié en 2015) aux relativistes absolus (car c’est bien à cet incroyable paradoxe qu’aboutit l’antirationalisme de Feyerabend), la pensée postmoderne relève de deux jugements : elle n’a aucune prise sur le réel, ni l’histoire (qu’elle nie en la rejetant dans le passé) ni le présent, et elle ne laisse que des ruines derrière elle. De cette galaxie postmoderne seul Gilles Deleuze doit être sauvé. Leur échec est celui des sophistes de l’antiquité grecque. Dans ma critique du progressisme je me garde autant de la posture réactionnaire que des facilités passées de saison du postmodernisme (j’y récuse la notion de fin de l’histoire par exemple).

« Les utopies politiques ont conduit au crime, le capitalisme à la dévastation. Ce dernier est une révolution permanente sans plan ni projet, sans métaphysique structurante »

Le Progrès a défini la téléologie dominante de la modernité, avec une vision allant toujours vers un meilleur, voire un Éden ultime – le marché auto-régulé ou la réalisation des droits de l’homme chez les libéraux, la société sans classe et transparente à elle-même chez les marxistes – mais nous avons dépassé cette période, pour entrer en postmodernité (ou modernité tardive, liquide, etc. selon les auteurs). Le Progrès a subi les déconvenues du XXe siècle avec notamment la barbarie technicienne des deux guerres. Cette critique n’en est-elle pas devenue caduque ?

RR-ego.jpgCette croyance au progrès nous a rendu criminels et aveugles, criminels par aveuglement (le progrès est alors l’opium et l’ivresse de l’histoire) et dévastateurs pour la nature. Par sa faute nous avons confondu le ménagement du monde – le monde que l’on tient comme on fait le ménage, avec amour et précaution, “ménager” – et l’exploitation du monde, sa dévastation. Les utopies politiques ont conduit au crime, le capitalisme à la dévastation. Or, le capitalisme n’a pas besoin de la croyance métaphysique dans le progrès pour aller de l’avant. Il se peut se contenter d’ériger l’innovation, le mouvement, “le bougisme”, comme dit Taguieff en impératifs incontestables. Il est une révolution permanente sans plan ni projet, sans métaphysique structurante (à l’inverse des révolutions politiques d’obédience progressistes), une révolution pour la révolution.

On constatera cependant qu’alors même que la croyance au progrès est morte, que l’idéologie progressiste n’a plus cours, l’emprise de la technique, ce que Heidegger appelait le Gestell, l’arraisonnement de l’existence par la technique, son engloutissement par elle, s’accroît. Le progrès a disparu, mais l’instrument du progrès, la technique, triomphe.

Pierre-André Taguieff, qui a lui aussi beaucoup écrit sur la question – et vous a par ailleurs inspiré – propose de « penser une conception mélioriste du progrès comme exigence morale et raison d’agir ». Peut-on ré-envisager la notion de progrès à l’aune des désastres du XXe siècle (Hiroshima, la crise écologique, etc.) ?

Je me situe dans la lignée des travaux de Pierre-André Taguieff à qui je voue une très grande admiration. Sans son inspiration plusieurs de mes livres n’existeraient pas.

La mort du progrès signifie de fait la fin des finalités que nous appellerons “transcendantes”, qui transcendent l’existence hic et nunc de chacun. Bien entendu cela inclut la fin de la finalité politique, c’est-à-dire fin de la politique, car le capitalisme a finalement réalisé le slogan peint sur les murs en mai 68 et qui se voulait révolutionnaire, à savoir la « fin de la politique ».

Pourquoi la croyance au progrès s’est-elle perdue ? Il y a d’abord la banalisation des améliorations de l’existence, devant lesquelles nous ne savons plus nous émerveiller. Au milieu du siècle dernier, 65 ans était un bel âge pour mourir ; aujourd’hui, on tient sans s’en étonner, blasés, un décès à cet âge-là pour une injustice, un trépas de jeunesse. Cette banalisation (qui est un appauvrissement pour l’esprit) barre désormais la route à la généralisation métaphysique du progrès, à l’idée de progrès avec un “P” majuscule. Il y a ensuite les doutes sur la compatibilité entre les progrès techniques et la nature, autrement dit la fin du paradigme cartésien – pour Descartes, dans le Discours de la méthode de 1637, la science et la philosophie devaient nous rendre « comme maîtres et possesseurs de la nature ». Mais je crois que ce sont là des causes secondes. La cause première de la décroyance au Progrès est ailleurs. Elle est métaphysique et politique. Les régimes politiques promettant un avenir radieux, autrement dit le progressisme dans son expression politique, se sont révélés être totalitaires et sanguinaires, sans parvenir même à améliorer la vie matérielle aussi bien que le réussirent les régimes capitalistes. La connexion entre progrès techniques et accomplissement politique de l’humanité dans une cité prospère dénuée d’inégalités et d’injustices ne s’est pas faite. De même ne s’est pas faite la connexion entre progrès techniques et progrès moraux, qui était pourtant annoncée par les Lumières. L’époque de la « domination planétaire de la technique » (pour parler comme Heidegger) a aussi été celle des grands génocides, comme la Shoah, de la liquidation industrielle de millions de personnes. Mais surtout, l’histoire du progrès est l’histoire des promesses non tenues, qui étaient intenables. Cependant il y a aussi des aspects désastreux à la fin de la croyance dans le progrès. En particulier politiques.

Fin du progrès ne signifie pas que le progrès ne continue pas. Dieu continue bien de vivre après la mort de Dieu, mais sur un autre régime d’existence. Le progrès continue après la mort du progrès – mais il ne convainc plus, il n’enthousiasme plus, on ne croit plus en lui. Au contraire : il inquiète et terrifie.

« Le transhumanisme est un scientisme et un technicisme de la plus consternante naïveté. »

Vous avez écrit un livre sur le sport et ses impacts sur le corps humain ainsi que la vision de l’humain de manière générale. Vous parlez de créer un “homme nouveau”. Dans quelle mesure l’idéologie du Progrès peut-elle être reliée au transhumanisme et autres tentatives de dépasser notre condition humaine par la techno-science ?

RR-viv.jpgComme programme, le transhumanisme est une utopie post-progressiste qui ne conserve de ce progressisme que le fétichisme de la science et de la technique. La dimension morale, historique et métaphysique du progressisme est jetée par-dessus bord. De fait, le transhumanisme est un scientisme et un technicisme de la plus consternante naïveté. Il n’est que l’un des produits de la décomposition du cadavre du progrès, une sorte de jus de cadavre du progrès. Mais il est aussi une réalité sociale sous la forme d’un fantasme qui hante la médecine, le show-business, le sport. Peu à peu l’homme “naturel” est remplacé par un homme d’un type nouveau, indéfiniment réparable, dont les organes sont des pièces détachées remplaçables, dont le corps est entièrement composé de prothèses. Une figure du sport comme Oscar Pistorius peut être prise pour l’emblème de cette transformation anthropologique. Nommons egobody [ii] (l’être pour qui le moi, égo, est le corps technologiquement fabriqué, le body) cet homme nouveau. Nous sommes tous à des degrés divers en train de devenir des egobodys. Bien entendu l’immortalité est l’horizon d’un tel anthropoïde. Le sport en est l’atelier de fabrication le plus visible. Il s’agit bien plus que de dépasser la condition humaine ; il s’agit de changer la nature humaine elle-même. Ce processus est à l’œuvre sous nos yeux.

Nos Desserts :

Notes :

[i] Hegel, La Raison dans l’Histoire (1822-1830), Paris, 10/18, 1979, p.35.

[ii] Robert Redeker, Egobody, Paris, Fayard, 2010.

RR-protrr.jpg

samedi, 26 décembre 2015

«Le progrès? Point final» de Robert Redeker

Redeker-Progrès.jpg

«Le progrès? Point final» de Robert Redeker

par Pierre Le Vigan,

écrivain, essayiste

Ex: http://www.polemia.com

De quoi le progrès est-il le nom ?

Repenser le progrès (et l’utopie) avec Robert Redeker

Le progrès est une idéologie au double sens d’une âme collective mais aussi d’un masque. Mais c’est aussi un médium, un dispositif intermédiaire entre soi et le monde, et aucun médium n’est neutre : c’est une représentation du réel qui transforme le réel. Où en sommes-nous avec le progrès ?

Le thème a été traité par Pierre-André Taguieff (1), par Alain de Benoist (2) et quelques autres philosophes. L’immensité du sujet laisse toutefois des choses à dire. Ou à redire pour mieux les penser et comprendre.


Le progrès est une religion de l‘avenir – et même du temps. L’avenir, en effet, donne son sens au temps et permet de rejeter un passé toujours « moins bien » que « ce qui vient ». Le progrès est aussi une religion de la science, la science qui a besoin du temps pour se déployer dans le sens d’une nature et de la matière toujours plus et mieux maîtrisée par l’homme. Le progrès est aussi en ce sens une religion de l’homme, comme le voit bien de son côté Rémi Brague (3).

On trouve dans l’idée du progrès un messianisme (bien vu par Jean Grenier le père spirituel d’Albert Camus), une religion du salut par l’homme et par la science. Mythe créé par l’homme, le progrès est donc – et c’est ce qu’examine Robert Redeker – à la fois un scientisme et un hyperhumanisme. Le progrès, religion du salut matériel par l’homme, est aussi une religion de la sortie de toutes les autres religions, notamment celles d’un salut immatériel. Depuis Descartes, nous savons que la médecine, la mécanique et la morale doivent nous apporter le bonheur dans ce monde, « dans cette vie », comme dit encore Descartes. Tout est question de volonté, car celle-ci vaut plus que toute croyance. Elle est, en d’autres termes, la seule chose en laquelle nous devons croire : la puissance de notre volonté.

Poser l’hypothèse Dieu comme « chiquenaude » initiale (Pascal) permet ensuite à l’homme de passer aux choses sérieuses : son bien terrestre. Telle est l’hypothèse de la modernité : ce n’est pas tant de nier Dieu que de considérer que c’est une question qui ne doit pas empêcher – que l’on réponde oui ou non à la question de son existence – de passer aux choses sérieuses, c’est-à-dire « strictement » humaines, comme si l’homme pouvait être abstrait du fond sur lequel il apparaît, à savoir le monde, créé ou incréé (4). Le monde : ce qui fait lien et ouvre au sens des choses. Or, en affirmant le caractère infini de la volonté humaine, Descartes offre au pouvoir humain un champ de déploiement sans limites. Il permet la « souveraineté du sujet dans les temps modernes » (Heidegger, Nietzsche II). L’homme tend alors à s’émanciper du monde.

A partir de ce schéma, Robert Redeker enquête sur les différents aspects du culte du progrès. Nous voyons comment notre croyance a refaçonné le monde et nous-mêmes. Un des chapitres les plus novateurs met en parallèle la création du sujet comme individu et comme intériorité, cette véritable « découverte métaphysique du sujet » (Ferdinand Alquié) chez Descartes, et, moins attendu, chez Thérèse d’Avila. Dans les deux cas, il y a la négation de « cet assemblage que l’on appelle le corps humain » (Descartes). A la suite de Martin Heidegger, Robert Redeker voit dans le creusement de cette intériorité hors corps, chez Thérèse et chez Descartes, appelée cogito (mouvement de reconnaissance de soi par soi) ou « âme », la matrice du subjectivisme moderne.

Si le progrès n’a par définition pas de fin, l’utopie apparaît comme le contraire du progrès. L’utopie se veut point d’équilibre durable; elle est « remède et prévention contre la démesure ». En effet, l’utopie est, en un sens, contre l’histoire; elle arrête l’histoire. Elle arrête donc le progrès. L’idéal atteint ne requiert plus aucun progrès. Il est frappant de voir qu’une certaine droite, qui critique le progrès, critique aussi les utopies, alors qu’elles peuvent être une solution autre que le progrès et le progressisme sans fin. L’utopie s’oppose au programme. Mais l’usage du programme n’exclut pas celui de l’utopie.

redeker782213655000.jpgPrenons un exemple allemand dans les années vingt et trente. Il y avait un programme du NSDAP. Il y avait une utopie nationale-socialiste, admirablement étudiée par Frédéric Rouvillois (5). Idem pour le marxisme léniniste. Il y avait le programme de Lénine et l’utopie d’une société où chacun s’épanouirait totalement et librement. Robert Redeker rappelle à ce sujet le lien entre marxisme et millénarisme, relevé avant lui par Ernst Bloch. Avec l’utopie c’en est fini de l’histoire et de l’avenir. L’utopie en termine avec l’avenir. Elle ex-termine l’avenir, dit, dans une formule très heureuse, Robert Redeker. Elle fait sortir l’avenir du jeu. Que voulait l’utopie nationale-socialiste ? En finir avec toute faillibilité de l’homme allemand. L’utopie, note encore Redeker, est une anti-chronie. Elle suppose l’arrêt du temps. Elle n’est, au contraire, pas sans lieu. Elle suppose au contraire un lieu définitivement limité. Elle suppose un lieu sans temps. Un pays sans histoire. Kant juge nécessaire l’idée d’une société idéale tout comme Rousseau juge nécessaire l’hypothèse de l’état originel de nature. L’utopie est moins un progressisme qu’un millénarisme qui met fin à tous les progressismes.

C’est un « arrachement au temps » qui suppose lui-même un espace arraché à l’histoire. Cette dernière devient une simple momie. L’utopie relève de la puissance du rêve, et non de la conviction par les preuves. Redeker souligne l’ambivalence de l’utopie : par son goût de la géométrie, de l’ordre parfait elle ressemble aux traits de la modernité, mais par son exposition d’un monde clos sur lui-même, où le bien est déjà et définitivement réalisé, l’utopie est antimoderne.

En même temps une certaine utopie est importée dans le système actuel, que Redeker se refuse à appeler « totalitarisme soft et gélatineux » (et c’est sans doute notre seul point de divergence avec lui). Cette utopie importée c’est celle de la santé et du bonheur. Les questions privées deviennent des questions publiques. L’Etat n’est pas seulement le grand assureur du bon collectif, ce qui est sa fonction, il devient le grand consolateur des malheurs privés, ce qui ne l’est plus. Redeker remarque que le sport, qui suppose la santé et fabrique l’euphorie, est au centre de cette utopie importée dans le monde hypermoderne.

L’utopie moderne s’y niche aussi ailleurs. Le progressisme encastrait la mort de chacun dans un rachat collectif : la nation pour Barrès et en fait toute la IIIe République, la classe des exploités pour le marxisme. Le post-progressisme, qui se veut en même temps un progressisme supérieur, veut abolir la mort en la fondant dans l’homme prothèse (on ne meurt que par petits bouts donc pas vraiment) et dans l’euthanasie qui fait de la mort, non point l’événement terminal, mais une procédure, indolore de surcroît et cool. Il s’agit toujours de modifier la condition humaine – en fait, de la nier. C’est pourquoi l’auteur a amplement raison de voir dans l’idée de perfectibilité, issue des Lumières, y compris de l’atypique Rousseau, une machine de guerre contre l’idée de péché originel, et contre le christianisme, qui s’est historiquement construit sur cette idée depuis la défaite de Pélage.

Avec le progrès les hommes se sont voulus comme « maîtres et possesseurs » de l’histoire – pas seulement de la nature. En même temps, le progrès a évidé l’homme de son propre. C’est l’ère du vide. Sauf pour ceux qui n’ont jamais cru au progrès : les hommes et les peuples mentalement hors Occident.

Pierre Le Vigan
23/12/2015

Robert Redeker, Le Progrès ? Point final, Les Carrefours d’Ariane (28 mai 2015), Editions d’Ovadia, 216 pages.

Ce texte est paru dans la revue Perspectives Libres n°15 – 2015 publiée par le Cercle Aristote http://cerclearistote.com/

Notes :

(1) Du progrès, Librio, 2001 ; Le sens du progrès, Flammarion, 2004.
(2) «  Une brève histoire de l’idée de progrès » in alaindebenoist.com. Voir aussi TVLibertés, émission « Les idées à l’endroit » n°3, 2015 ; Radio Courtoisie avec Frédéric Rouvillois, mai 2014.
(3) Le règne de l’homme, Gallimard, 2015.
(4) Certes, Markus Gabriel (à la suite d’autres) croit expliquer Pourquoi le monde n’existe pas, JC Lattes, 2015. Cela vaut comme stimulant sophisme mais pas plus.
(5) Crime et Utopie, Flammarion, 2014.

Correspondance Polémia – 23/12/2015

lundi, 09 novembre 2015

L’homo reactus, le progressiste et le conservateur

john-plampin.jpg

L’homo reactus, le progressiste et le conservateur

Confondus à tort et à dessein dans le langage médiatique, le réactionnaire et le conservateur ont pourtant de quoi nourrir une querelle d’importance. Leur rapport au temps et à l’Histoire les distingue en même temps qu’il structure leur comportement politique et esthétique.

Rien n’est moins évident que de définir le réactionnaire, et nombreux sont ceux qui continuent d’entretenir le flou. Si Joseph de Maistre et Louis de Bonald sont parfois présentés comme les réactionnaires archétypaux, ils ne répondent pourtant pas à cette définition communément admise, qui est aussi la nôtre, selon laquelle le réactionnaire souhaite un retour en arrière. Ces penseurs dont la téléologie était avant tout chrétienne, ont laissé la place à un vague héritier que nous appellerons homo reactus. Réactionnaire contemporain manifestement plus influencé par la pensée moderne, idéaliste et républicaine héritée des Lumières, que par la tradition eschatologique catholique, à l’image de messieurs Onfray et Zemmour. Ceux-là n’en ont guère après la Révolution française, mais bien plus après la très bourgeoise et parodique révolte de mai 68. Et pendant que l’homo reactus s’écharpe avec son pendant progressiste, le conservateur s’impose, avec une vision nouvelle de l’Histoire, comme une alternative salutaire.

L’Homo reactus au pays du progrès

En réalité, la petite armée des réactionnaires médiatisés valide à son insu les postulats de ses adversaires. La modernité, dans laquelle la Révolution française nous a jetés en donnant corps aux idées des Lumières, repose sur une téléologie moralisée, héritée de la pensée d’Hegel. La pensée moderne conçoit l’Histoire de façon linéaire : des âges sombres de la nuit des temps, l’humanité progresserait sans cesse vers la « fin de l’Histoire », soit vers le triomphe des Lumières libérales et rationalistes. Le temps qui passe serait synonyme de croissance irrépressible, inévitable et nécessaire du Dieu Progrès. Le sort de l’humanité serait la convergence de tous les êtres qui, unis dans le même Esprit – au sens hégélien du terme, et selon cette idée que la raison de l’homme est semblable à celle de Dieu – peuplent la Terre. Ainsi pour Hegel, l’absolu progrès est incarné par Napoléon Ier, porteur de la lumière révolutionnaire universaliste et républicaine, entrant majestueux dans Iéna en 1806 : là est la fin de l’Histoire, le progrès absolu qui gagnera le monde entier à force de conquêtes. À l’horizon se dessine l’avènement de l’État universel et homogène rêvé par le commentateur et continuateur d’Hegel Alexandre Kojève.

Joseph de Maistre réactionnaire ?

Si Joseph de Maistre est considéré comme un réactionnaire emblématique, il faut préciser qu’il est également un réactionnaire problématique. En effet, le Savoyard ne défend pas l’idée d’un retour en arrière, c’est-à-dire la restauration d’un « temps » politique antérieur à la Révolution française. Sa phrase célèbre formulée dans Les considérations sur la France – « le rétablissement de la Monarchie qu’on appelle contre-révolution, ne sera pas une révolution contraire, mais le contraire de la révolution » – résume bien la complexité de sa position. Maistre est plus antirévolutionnaire que contre-révolutionnaire. La perspective de Maistre étant providentialiste, il ne s’agit pas de se positionner pour ou contre la Révolution mais bien plutôt de comprendre sa nature et le dessein divin. Dieu utilise le mal incarné par la Révolution pour châtier le royaume de France compromis par la Réforme et les Lumières. Maistre exprimera d’ailleurs son scepticisme lorsque Louis XVIII accédera au trône. Pour lui, la Restauration entérine définitivement la Révolution.

Matthieu Giroux

Telle est l’idée qui continue d’alimenter la logique des progressistes de tout crin. La téléologie, d’imprégnation chrétienne, a paradoxalement gagné le camp de l’athéisme en contaminant, des Lumières jusqu’au marxisme, des philosophies anti-chrétiennes. Mais telle est aussi la conception que les réactionnaires contemporains valident, en s’affirmant en hommes du passé portant des idées du passé. Des idées révolues en somme, dépassées par la marche du prétendu progrès, confondue avec celle du temps, à laquelle ils assistent hagards et néanmoins contents de leur impuissance qui pare leurs propos d’un tragique dont ils goûtent l’amertume.

Le rapport dialectique qui oppose le progressiste à l’homo reactus ne joue résolument pas en faveur de ce dernier, à moins que sa quête ne soit qu’esthétique. Lui qui valide la téléologie dominante et se place du côté des destitués, des perdants, de l’obsolescence, ne peut rien attendre du présent. Son discours est comme inopérant, inapte à influencer le cours des choses. Tout juste pourra-t-il convaincre quelques-uns de ses auditeurs les moins rongés par la morale médiatique du caractère aussi dramatique qu’inévitable de la marche du temps. Mais n’a-t-il pas tort sur ce point ?

De Burke à Mohler : une philosophie alternative de l’Histoire

Si le triomphe de la philosophie linéaire déchristianisée de l’Histoire est à dater de la Révolution française et de la controverse qu’elle a suscité dans toute l’Europe, on ne peut pas faire l’impasse sur l’intuition d’Edmund Burke, contemporain de ce grand chambardement, qui structure la pensée conservatrice. Contre l’obsession révolutionnaire de la mise à mort de l’ordre ancien au profit d’un progrès compris comme une sorte de deus ex machina, Burke croit à l’évolution. Pierre Glaudes parle de « sédimentation » : le présent se nourrit du passé et l’Histoire apparaît donc comme un mouvement de réforme ou de restauration permanente. C’est l’exact inverse de l’idéologie révolutionnaire et néo-idéaliste qui consiste en une dialectique de la destruction et de la reconstruction, le présent se construisant contre le passé.

Plus radicaux, les auteurs de la Révolution conservatrice allemande prolongent l’intuition de Burke en rupture totale avec cette conception résolument moderne de l’Histoire. Armin Mohler, disciple d’Ernst Jünger et historien de la Révolution conservatrice, nous invite à considérer l’Histoire non pas de façon linéaire, ni même purement cyclique, mais sphérique, à la suite de Friedrich Nietzsche. Si l’idée hégélienne que nous avons définie autant que la conception cyclique de l’histoire sont frappées d’un certain fatalisme, concevoir le temps comme une sphère revient à considérer que toutes les bifurcations sont toujours possibles. Il n’y a plus de sens inévitable, de début ni de fin, de progrès ou de déclin contre lesquels toute tentative humaine serait vaine ! Le cycle n’a pas non plus totalement disparu, mais c’est une infinité de cycles différents que la sphère représente.

Il y a donc une place pour l’inattendu, autant dire pour la volonté, chère aux nietzschéens. Ainsi Robert Steuckers, disciple d’Armin Mohler, écrit : « Cela signifie que l’histoire n’est ni la simple répétition des mêmes linéaments à intervalles réguliers ni une voie linéaire conduisant au bonheur, à la fin de l’histoire, au Paradis sur la Terre, à la félicité, mais est une sphère qui peut évoluer (ou être poussée) dans n’importe quelle direction selon l’impulsion qu’elle reçoit de fortes personnalités charismatiques. » L‘hypothèse de la résignation s’abolit totalement dans cette philosophie de l’Histoire, et il revient aux hommes de bonne volonté de donner forme au lendemain. Car la Révolution conservatrice allemande ne s’en remet guère à Dieu, à la Providence, ni à une vague idée de l’évolution de la société. Mais elle croit à l’incarnation et aux figures, au héros et aux chefs charismatiques.  

D’un côté, l‘enthousiasme béat et autodestructeur des progressistes dont « les conceptions linéaires dévalorisent le passé, ne respectent aucune des formes forgées dans le passé, et visent un télos, qui sera nécessairement meilleur et indépassable » (Steuckers). De l’autre, la passivité mortifère des réactionnaires qui peut conduire au nihilisme. Par contraste, on comprend que le conservatisme est un art de l’action et de l’appréhension du réel, et non pas seulement de la réflexion philosophique. Le conservatisme est une attitude qui convient à la réalité du temps présent et à la nécessité du choix, et non pas une posture contemplative.

L’attitude conservatrice ou l’agir dans l’Histoire

Le conservateur n’est pas figé dans le passé (ou dans le futur, dans la fuite en avant incarnée par le progressisme), mais bien ancré dans le présent. Non pas qu’il se contente bêtement d’approuver toute nouveauté, au contraire, son attitude consiste à préférer le familier à l’inconnu, la réalité du présent au futur incertain. Mais lorsque l’inévitable se produit, le conservateur refuse la résignation. Ainsi Michaël Oakeshott, dans Du Conservatisme, tente de décrire l’attitude conservatrice : « En outre, être conservateur ne signifie pas simplement être hostile au changement (comportement qui peut être idiosyncrasique) ; c’est également une manière de s’accommoder aux changements, activité imposée à tous. »

L’exemple de la technique dans les années 1930, après le traumatisme causé par la Première Guerre mondiale, est frappant. Le réactionnaire s’insurge, vocifère contre cette technique aliénatrice et destructrice, prométhéenne et dégénérée… À croire qu’il envisagerait qu’on puisse la dés-inventer ! Face à cette réaction sans doute légitime mais néanmoins absurde, le conservateur avise : Ernst Jünger qui, mieux que quiconque, a vu la technique destructrice en action, fait naître quelques années plus tard l’idée d’une technique dite mobilisatrice. De même que Carl Schmitt s’appropriera l’idée de démocratie. Au régime parlementaire bourgeois, il oppose sa vision d’un lien fort entre la race et les chefs qu’elle se choisit. Du socialisme au bolchévisme, des sciences à la technique, la Révolution conservatrice allemande reprend toutes les innovations de son époque à son compte. 

Le conservateur ne rejette pas par principe toute nouveauté. Il ne pourrait d’ailleurs la rejeter qu’intellectuellement, mais en aucun cas effectivement. Il l’admet, et se l’approprie. Il ne considère pas d’abord le changement comme foncièrement bon ou, à l’inverse, comme profondément mauvais, mais il entend le subordonner à des valeurs qu’il croit éternelles. Là est l’objet de sa démarche : conserver l’ordre élémentaire des choses dans l’Histoire en soumettant les réalités de son époque à quelque chose qui les transcende. Le conservateur ne s’oppose pas au temps qui passe, il s’oppose à la dégénérescence, au péril et à l’incertitude. Il n’entend pas conserver le temps passé, les idées du passé, les réalités du passé, mais simplement ce qui constitue le centre de gravité de cette sphère qu’est l’Histoire. C’est l’idée qu’un certain nombre de choses ne doit pas disparaître, à cause de la négligence, du mépris et du détachement et surtout pas de la destruction volontaire. Les progressistes l’ont dans le dos, les réactionnaires en pleine face, mais tous deux sont dans le vent. Paisible, le conservateur rit des agités des deux camps : lui, bâtit l’avenir les deux pieds dans le présent.

jeudi, 01 octobre 2015

Progressivism Cannot Deliver Multicultural Tolerance and Peace

533480_10151569728154922_1323042588_n.jpg

Progressivism Cannot Deliver Multicultural Tolerance and Peace

By

Ex: http://www.lewrockwell.com

[This is an excerpt from Progressivism: A Primer on the Idea Destroying America (2014).]

One of the great virtues of liberalism is that, it alone among the political worldviews, discovered a way for people from different ethnic, racial and religious groups to live together in relative peace.  In all systems of powerful government, including progressivism, these groups struggle with each other for control of the state.  As I demonstrated in a paper presented at the Mises Institute in 2002, the major cause of war in the last fifty years was conflict between or among competing ethnic, racial and religious groups inside states: civil war.[1]  The state system has not only failed to solve the problem of peace among disparate groups but in fact is itself the major cause of conflict and violence among these groups.  The cause of the violence is the fear of or the actual exploitation and domination of ethnic, racial or religious groups by a state controlled by hostile groups.

It is also a myth that the best way to smooth over multicultural differences is through the ballot box.  This is false. The ballot box is simply a means to determine how state violence is to be used against the losers of the election and how those losers will then be exploited economically and in other ways by the majority.  Thus, the incentive for minority groups to attempt to secede or seize control of the state to avoid such domination and exploitation exists in democracies and dictatorships. In 23 of the 25 recent intrastate wars, the prevailing regime was democratic throughout the dispute or at least at certain times during the dispute.[2] In certain cases, a democratic government was overthrown because of the feeling of an ethnic or religious subgroup that its interests were not being protected or advanced by the democratic state.

Thus, in strong states that exercise a great deal of control over people’s economic and personal lives, groups that do not control the state live in constant fear of exploitation, domination, and sometimes genocide itself.  In such states, whether democratic or not, different groups live in continual fear that competing groups may increase their political power, including by increases in population and immigration and thus, the state creates a conflict of interests that would not otherwise exist! In a liberal market society, disparate groups and individuals may live side by side, house to house, without the slightest fear that those who differ from them will seize control of the state and deprive them of their life, liberty or property.  They may associate with them if they wish, trade with them to their mutual benefit if they wish, or not associate with them if that is preferred.  Most importantly, peace is achieved!

It must be emphasized that progressive government, contrary to popular myth, exacerbates racial, ethnic and religious tensions and does not ameliorate them.  Every progressive policy, involving as it does state violence, creates winners and losers and thus resentment among the losers.  The progressive’s favored policies such as civil rights laws (forced association), affirmative action (affirmative racism) and welfare, create winners and losers and therefore resentment among the losers.  Under liberalism, both parties in every voluntary transaction are winners and positive relations among different groups are attained.

Multiculturalism and big government are a toxic mix.  We see this today all over the world with ethnic, racial or religious violence ongoing in Iraq, Ukraine, Syria, Sudan, Israel/Palestine, Darfur, Chechnya and other regions. Those who look forward to a peaceful multicultural world should embrace liberalism and the free market.  No other political system can maintain peace and tolerance in a multicultural world.

Notes

[1] “The Myth of Democratic Peace: Why Democracy Cannot Deliver Peace in the 21st Century,” LewRockwell.com, Feb. 19, 2005.

[2] Id.

mercredi, 23 septembre 2015

Progressivism: The Horrors of an Idea

Gay_Pride_Madrid_2013_017.jpg

One of the most interesting developments of the post-Bush years has been the resurgence of the popularity of the term “progressivism.” With that popularity has come, of course, a resurgence of the ideas traditionally associated with progressivism, though highly sanitized. Some very good and well-intentioned scholars and commentators–who in general are NOT aligned with the left–have even attempted to co-opt and redefine the term for their own belief systems. In particular, those who support rather radical free markets have claimed that progress and progressivism can best be attained by the methods (or anti-methods, as the case may be) of competitive enterprise.

Let me make my point as up front as possible. Not only should we avoid ever praising progressivism or the progressives, we should, without hesitation, shun the term and its advocates (while, of course, loving the person).

First, and importantly, the term itself is one of the most tainted in our history as a western people. And it should be. Indeed, it never should have a good cast to it in the least. Ironically, the very people who today claim the mantle of progressive as a force for humanist harmony have almost no conception of its origins as a brutally racist concept. From its origins and employment by Americans in the 1870s, it was associated with anything that despised and attempted to control non-Anglo-Saxon-Celtic (but only the Scotch, not the Irish) Protestant peoples. Germans and Scandinavians were barely tolerable, but not Irish, Italians, Spaniards, Yugoslavs, Jews, blacks, or any other people that didn’t fit a horrendous racialist norm. The WASP stereotype was much more than a stereotype. It was, for many, a reality. The progressives advocated the separation of the races, the stealing of children from parents, eugenics, and the eventual destruction of anything remotely Catholic, Jewish, or not “perfectly” white. They were as arrogant as they were inhumane. It’s worth remembering that Woodrow Wilson, often considered the greatest and yet most representative of the progressives, re-segregated all federal offices in D.C. as well as the military. He also listened in silence as blacks were lynched while simultaneously speaking out against lynchings of whites.

Frankly, the progressives are the very folks C.S. Lewis used as the model of the “conditioners” in his own fiction and non-fiction. They would use nature to dominate others, present and future, for the appeasement of their own very strong if misguided conceits.

Here’s a rather telling example of a leading progressive, writing in 1914.

“These oxlike men are descendants of those who always stayed behind.… To the practiced eye, the physiognomy of certain groups unmistakably proclaims inferiority of type. I have seen gatherings of the foreign dashboard in which narrow and sloping floor heads were the rule. The shortness and smallness of the crania were very noticeable. There was much facial asymmetry. Among the women, beauty, aside from the fleeting, epidermal bloom of girlhood, was quite lacking. In every face there was something wrong—lipstick, mouth course, upper lip too long, cheek–bones too high, chin poorly formed, the bridge of the nose hollowed, the base of the nose tilted, or else the whole face prognathous. There were so many sugar–loaf heads, moon–faces, slit mouths, lantern–Jaws, and goose–bill noses that one might imagine a malicious jinn had amused himself by casting human beings in a set of skew–molds discarded by the Creator.” [Edward Alsworth Ross, The Old World in the New: The Significance of Past and Present Immigration to the American People (New York: The Century, 1914).]

Not to be smug, but show me where a Warren Harding or Calvin Coolidge would ever stoop to such depths. Never, of course. But the progressives, on the other hand, rather gleefully played with the ideas of racialism and scientism and eugenics.

fjt86264.jpgPicture: Frederick Jackson Turner

Second, progressivism as a theory of politics and society demands a dualistic and conflict-oriented view of the universe. All progress comes—in whatever form—from the clashing of the thesis (old) and the antithesis (opposition) to form a third thing, the synthesis. That synthesis then becomes the old and struggles with a new opposition. This is whence the term “progressive” derives, the unceasing clash of impersonal forces toward some utopia in the far or not-so-distant future. Perhaps the best known American progressive historian, Frederick Jackson Turner, explained this best in his 1893 frontier thesis. American history, he claimed, found its origins in the continual struggle of civilization and savagery that resulted not in one winning, but in a synthesis of the two, in Americanization. Turner was actually quite conservative, and his case allows us to realize clearly that progressivism can be as rightist as it can be leftist in its political orientation. One must note, however, that even in the rather gentle and patriotic vision of Turner, there are winners and there are losers. The American Indian, far from being an independent person endowed with dignity and free will, becomes nothing but a member of an impersonal force, doomed to die. The very existence of the American Indian, therefore, serves only as a catalyst for white American civilization to thrive. It’s like the old Far Side cartoon—the Indians impatiently waiting at Plymouth Rock as the Pilgrims slowly make their way over the Atlantic. Oh, to have purpose in life!

Finally, but inherently related to the previous idea, the progressive sought not the traditional common good of a republic, but the general good of a democracy. That is, they cared little about what minorities thought. Indeed, they resented minorities and the power they might wield. The Progressives wanted man to conform in every way. They were the harbingers of the “mass man” so powerful in the main of the twentieth century. The common good seeks the humane for all, while the great good cares only about utility and power.

So, when a well-meaning person claims the mantle of “progressive,” run. For that way lies democratic despotism, fascism, nationalism, socialism, and communism. Madness.

Books by Bradley Birzer may be found in The Imaginative Conservative Bookstore.

00:05 Publié dans Philosophie | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0) | Tags : philosophie, philosophie politique, progressisme | |  del.icio.us | | Digg! Digg |  Facebook

samedi, 20 juin 2015

L'utopie progressiste débouche sur l'enfer...

hell.jpg

L'utopie progressiste débouche sur l'enfer...

par Robert Redeker

Ex: http://metapoinfos.hautetfort.com

Nous reproduisons ci-dessous un entretien avec le philosophe Robert Redeker, cueilli sur le Figaro Vox et consacré à la question du progrès. Robert Redeker vient de publier un essai intitulé Le progrès ? Point final. (Ovadia, 2015).

FIGAROVOX. - L'idée de progrès, expliquez-vous, n'est plus le moteur des sociétés occidentales. Partagez-vous le constat de Jacques Julliard qui explique que le progrès qui devait aider au bonheur des peuples est devenu une menace pour les plus humbles?

Robert REDEKER. - Le progrès a changé de sens. De promesse de bonheur et d'émancipation collectifs, il est devenu menace de déstabilisation, d'irrémédiable déclassement pour beaucoup. Désormais, on met sur son compte tout le négatif subi par l'humanité tout en supposant que nous ne sommes qu'au début des dégâts (humains, économiques, écologiques) qu'il occasionne. Le progrès a été, après le christianisme, le second Occident, sa seconde universalisation. L'Occident s'est planétarisé au moyen du progrès, qui a été sa foi comme le fut auparavant le christianisme. Il fut l'autre nom de l'Occident.

Aujourd'hui plus personne ne croit dans le progrès. Plus personne ne croit que du seul fait des années qui passent demain sera forcément meilleur qu'aujourd'hui. Le marxisme était l'idéal-type de cette croyance en la fusion de l'histoire et du progrès. Mais le libéralisme la partageait souvent aussi. Bien entendu, les avancées techniques et scientifiques continuent et continueront. Mais ces conquêtes ne seront plus jamais tenues pour des progrès en soi.

Cette rupture ne remonte-t-elle pas à la seconde guerre mondiale et de la découverte des possibilités meurtrières de la technique (Auschwitz, Hiroshima)?

Ce n'est qu'une partie de la vérité. L'échec des régimes politiques explicitement centrés sur l'idéologie du progrès, autrement dit les communismes, en est une autre. L'idée de progrès amalgame trois dimensions qui entrent en fusion: technique, anthropologique, politique. Le progrès technique a montré à travers ses possibilités meurtrières sa face sombre. Mais le progrès politique -ce qui était tenu pour tel- a montré à travers l'histoire des communismes sa face absolument catastrophique. Dans le discrédit général de l'idée de progrès l'échec des communismes, leur propension nécessaire à se muer en totalitarismes, a été l'élément moteur. L'idée de progrès était depuis Kant une idée politique. L'élément politique fédérait et fondait les deux autres, l'anthropologique (les progrès humains) et le technique.

Les géants d'Internet Google, Facebook, promettent des lendemains heureux, une médecine performante et quasiment l'immortalité, n'est-ce pas ça la nouvelle idée du progrès?

Il s'agit du programme de l'utopie immortaliste. Dans le chef d'œuvre de saint Augustin, La Cité de Dieu, un paradis qui ne connaît ni la mort ni les infirmités est pensé comme transcendant à l'espace et au temps, postérieur à la fin du monde. Si ces promesses venaient à se réaliser, elles signeraient la fin de l'humanité. Rien n'est plus déshumanisant que la médecine parfaite et que l'immortalité qui la couronne. Pas seulement parce que l'homme est, comme le dit Heidegger, «l'être-pour-la-mort», mais aussi pour deux autres raisons.

D'une part, parce qu'un tel être n'aurait besoin de personne, serait autosuffisant. D'autre part parce que si la mort n'existe plus, il devient impossible d'avoir des enfants. C'est une promesse diabolique. Loin de dessiner les contours d'un paradis heureux, cette utopie portée par les géants de l'internet trace la carte d'un enfer signant la disparition de l'humanité en l'homme. Cet infernal paradis surgirait non pas après la fin du monde, comme chez saint Augustin, mais après la fin de l'homme. Une fois de plus, comme dans le cas du communisme, l'utopie progressiste garante d'un paradis déboucherait sur l'enfer.

La fin du progrès risque-t-elle de réveiller les vieilles religions ou d'en créer de nouvelles?

Le temps historique des religions comme forces de structuration générale de la société est passé. Cette caducité est ce que Nietzsche appelle la mort de Dieu. La foi dans le progrès -qui voyait dans le progrès l'alpha et l'oméga de l'existence humaine- a été quelques décennies durant une religion de substitution accompagnant le déclin politique et social du christianisme. Du christianisme, elle ne gardait que les valeurs et la promesse d'un bonheur collectif qu'elle rapatriait du ciel sur la terre. Bref, elle a été une sorte de christianisme affaibli et affadi, vidé de toute substance, le mime athée du christianisme. Les conditions actuelles -triomphe de l'individualisme libéral, règne des considérations économiques, course à la consommation, mondialisation technomarchande-, qui sont celles d'un temps où l'économie joue le rôle directeur que jouaient en d'autres temps la théologie ou bien la politique, sont plutôt favorables à la naissance et au développement non de religions mais de fétichismes et de fanatismes de toutes sortes. L'avenir n'est pas aux grandes religions dogmatiquement et institutionnellement centralisées mais au morcellement, à l'émiettement, au tribalisme du sentiment religieux, source de fanatismes et de violences.

redeker-copenhagen-may-4-2009-110.jpg

Peut-on dire que vous exprimez en philosophie ce que Houellebecq montre dans Soumission: la fin des Lumières?

Il doit y avoir du vrai dans ce rapprochement puisque ce n'est pas la première fois qu' l'on me compare à Houellebecq, le talent en moins je le concède. Ceci dit dans ma réflexion sur le progrès je m'appuie surtout sur les travaux décisifs de Pierre-André Taguieff auquel je rends hommage. Ce dernier a décrit le déclin du progrès comme «l'effacement de l'avenir». Peu à peu les Lumières nous apparaissent comme des astres morts, dont le rayonnement s'épuise. Rien n'indique qu'il s'agisse d'une bonne nouvelle. Cependant, cet achèvement n'est non plus la revanche des idées et de l'univers vaincus par les Lumières. Elle n'annonce pas le retour des émigrés! Cette fin des Lumières n'est pas la revanche de Joseph de Maistre sur Voltaire!

Le conservatisme, vu comme «soin du monde» va-t-il remplacer le progressisme?

Les intellectuels ont le devoir d'éviter de se prendre pour Madame Soleil en décrivant l'avenir. Cette tentation trouvait son origine dans une vision nécessitariste de l'histoire (présente chez Hegel et Marx) que justement l'épuisement des Lumières renvoie à son inconsistance. Pourtant nous pouvons dresser un constat. Ce conservatisme est une double réponse: au capitalisme déchaîné, cet univers de la déstabilisante innovation destructrice décrite par Luc Ferry (L'Innovation destructrice, Plon, 2014), et à l'illusion progressiste. Paradoxalement, il s'agit d'un conservatisme tourné vers l'avenir, appuyé sur une autre manière d'envisager l'avenir: le défunt progressisme voulait construire l'avenir en faisant table rase du passé quand le conservatisme que vous évoquez pense préserver l'avenir en ayant soin du passé. La question de l'enseignement de l'histoire est à la croisée de ces deux tendances: progressiste, l'enseignement de l'histoire promu par la réforme du collège est un enseignement qui déracine, qui détruit le passé, qui en fait table rase, qui le noie sous la moraline sécrétée par la repentance, alors que l'on peut envisager un enseignement de l'histoire qui assurerait le «soin de l'avenir» en étant animé par le «soin du passé».

Robert Redeker, propos recueillis par Vincent Tremolet de Villers (Figarovox, 12 juin 2015)

dimanche, 05 décembre 2010

Ilustracion y progresismo

Ilustración y progresismo

 

Alberto Buela (*)

 

lumieres.jpgSigue siendo el trabajo del filósofo alemán Emanuel Kant (1724-1804) Was ist Aufklärung?(1784) quien mejor ha definido qué es la Ilustración cuando afirmaba: “es la liberación del hombre de su culpable minoría de edad”. Es decir, de su incapacidad de servirse sólo de la razón sin depender de otra tutela, como lo fue la teología para la Edad Media, donde se afirmaba: philosophia ancilla teologíae= la filosofía es sierva de la teología.

El lema de la Ilustración fue el Sapere aude, el atrévete a saber sirviéndote de tu propia razón.

Pero la Ilustración buscando la emancipación del hombre de la teología, los prejuicios y las supersticiones, terminó endiosando a “La Razón” y sus productos: la técnica y el cálculo cuyas consecuencias fueron contradictorias, pues su opera magna fue la bomba atómica de Hiroshima y Nagasaky.

Luego de tamaño zafarrancho volvió el hombre a ser considerado una isla racional pero rodeado de un mar de irracionalidades. La sabiduría premoderna volvió a ser considerada. Lentamente se van teniendo en cuenta aspectos fundamentales del ser humano que habían sido dejados de lado por la Ilustración y sus seguidores, y que pertenecían a la demonizada Edad Media. El hombre postmoderno vuelve a zambullirse en las aguas de los problemas eternos. Pero, claro está, con una diferencia abismal: es un hombre sin fe, desesperanzado, nihilista. Nace así il pensiero débole. Pensamiento débil que puede dar razones del estado actual del ser humano pero que no puede dar sentido a las acciones a seguir para salir del actual atolladero.

Sin embargo, gran parte del mundo intelectual de postguerra sobre todo el vinculado al marxismo, al comunismo y al socialismo continuó en la vía ilustrada, incluso como la Escuela de Frankfurt, quintaesencia del pensamiento judío contemporáneo( Weil, Lukacs, Grünberg, Horkheimer, Adorno, Marcuse, Fromm, Haberlas et alii) que sostuvo en síntesis que estábamos mal no porque los productos del racionalismo ilustrado habían mostrado sus contradicciones flagrantes provocando el mal en el inocente como sucedió con los miles de japoneses nacidos radioactivos y condenados de antemano, sino porque no se habían podido llevar a cabo plenamente los postulados de la Ilustración.

Los vencedores de la segunda guerra mundial adoptan, con variantes socialdemócratas o neoliberales, el remanente del pensamiento ilustrado pasado por las aguas del Jordán de la Escuela de Frankfurt, poseedora del úcase cultural de nuestro tiempo. Así, su producto más logrado es el actual progresismo.

 

Es por esta razón afirma un buen colega nuestro, que “Quizá sea correcto afirmar que el progresismo es lo que queda del marxismo después de su fracaso histórico como opción política, económica y social y su transitoria (¿o definitiva?) resignación al triunfo del capitalismo. Una suerte de retorno, saltando hacia atrás por encima del bolcheviquismo, al reformismo de la socialdemocracia” [1]. El progresismo ha adoptado como lema “no ser antiguo y estar siempre a la vanguardia”. Como vemos, la resonancia con la Ilustración es evidente.

Qué comparte, a su vez, el progresismo con el neoliberalismo: 1) La adopción a raja tabla de la democracia liberal, rebautizada como discursiva, de consenso, inclusiva, de derechos humanos, etc. 2) la economía de mercado, a pesar de su discurso en contra de los grupos concentrados, y c) la homogeneización cultural planetaria, más allá de su discurso sobre el multiculturalismo.

El progresismo es tal, en definitiva porque cree en la idea de progreso. En realidad el progresismo no es una ideología sino mas bien una creencia, porque como gustaba decir Ortega y Gasset las ideas se tienen y las creencias nos sostienen, pues en las creencias “se está”. Y los progresistas “están creídos” que el hombre, el mundo y sus problemas van en la dirección que ellos van. De ahí, que cualquier contradictor a sus creencias es tomado por “un enemigo”. Es que el progresista al ser un creyente no acepta aprehender, y la única enseñanza que acepta, porque su imposición se le torna incuestionable, es la pedagogía de la catástrofe. Así descubre que hay miles de pobres y desocupados cuando se produce una inundación y que las promocionadas computadoras no funcionan porque en las escuelas rurales no hay electricidad o no hay señal. Una vez más, las catorce cuadras iluminadas por Bernardino Rivadavia, nuestro primer ilustrado presidente (1826), terminaban en el fangal de la cuadra quince donde las jaurías de perros cimarrones devoraban a los caminantes.

En resumen, el progresismo y la Ilustración comparten la creencia que la realidad es lo que ellos piensa que es la realidad y no, que la realidad es la verdad de la cosa o del asunto.

El gran contradictor del progresismo es el denominado realismo político (R.Neibuhr, J.Freund, C.Schmitt, R.Aron, H. Morgenthau, G. Miglio) que asume con escepticismo los proyectos teóricos que formulan la posibilidad de una paz perpetua, una organización perfecta de la sociedad en el marco de un progreso ilimitado. Y entiende la historia como el resultado de una tendencia natural del hombre a codiciar el poder y la dominación de los otros.

El realismo político viene a reemplazar al homo homini sacra res= el hombre es algo sagrado para el hombre, de los ilustrados que tomaron de Séneca por el homo homini lupus= el hombre es lobo del hombre de Hobbes, que tomó de Plauto.

El realismo político viene a sostener que se debe trabajar sobre la base de los materiales que se tienen y la realidad es lo que es más lo que puede ser,  en tanto que el progresismo afirma que se debe trabajar en lo que se cree pues las ideas en definitiva se imponen a la realidad.

 

(*) alberto.buela@gmail.com

UTN (universidad tecnológica nacional) 

 



[1] Maresca, Silvio: El retorno del progresismo,(2006) en internet.

dimanche, 22 février 2009

L'Amérique et le progrès

StatueLiberte0001.jpg

SYNERGIES EUROPÉENNES - ORIENTATIONS (Bruxelles) - juillet 1988

L'Amérique et le progrès

Margarita MATHIOPOULOS, Amerika: Das Experiment des Fortschritts. Ein Vergleich des politischen Denkens in den USA und Europa,  Ferdinand Schöningh, Paderborn, 1987, 408 S., DM 58.

L'auteur, jeune femme de trente ans de souche grecque, avait défrayé la chronique au début de 1987. Elle avait été nommée porte-paroles de la SPD par Willy Brandt, sans être membre du parti et en passe de se marier avec un jeune cadre de la CDU. Sous la pression du parti, elle avait dû renoncer au poste que lui avait confié Brandt. Quelques mois plus tard, elle publiait son livre sur l'Amérique qui dispose des qualités pour devenir un classique du libéralisme occidental contemporain, un peu comparable au travail de Walter Lippmann (La Cité libre, 1946). Margarita Mathiopoulos ne s'interroge pas directement sur la notion et le fonctionnement de la démocratie mais aborde une autre question-clé, avec une bonne clarté d'exposé: l'idée de progrès dans la tradition politique amé-ricaine. Procédant par généalogie  —ce qui constitue un gage de pédagogie—  elle commence par explorer l'idée de progrès dans la philosophie européenne, de-puis l'Antiquité jusqu'à l'époque dite "moderne", où divers linéaments se téléscopent: notions antiques de progrès et de déclin, idéologèmes eschatologiques judéo-chrétiens et rationalisme progressiste. Au XXème siècle, on assiste, explique Margarita Mathiopoulos, à une totalisation (Totalisierung)  du progrès chez les nazis et les communistes, dans le sens où ces régimes ont voulu réaliser tout de suite les projets et les aspirations eschatologiques hérités du judéo-christianisme et/ou de l'hédonisme hellénistique. L'échec, la marginalisation ou la stagnation des solutions "totales" font que seule demeure en course la version américaine de l'idéologie du progrès. Cette version se base sur une conception providentialiste de l'histoire ("City upon a Hill"),  parfois renforcée par une vision et une praxis utilitaristes/hédonistes ("the pursuit of happiness").  Dans l'euphorie, le progressisme prend parfois des dimensions héroïques, romantiques, sociales-darwinistes ("Survival of the fittest"),  à peine égratignées par le pessimisme conservateur d'un Santayana, des frères Brooks et d'Henry Adams. L'idée d'un progrès inéluctable a fini par devenir la pierre angulaire de l'idéologie nationale américaine, ce qui s'avère nécessaire pour maintenir la cohésion d'un pays peuplé d'immigrants venus chercher le bon-heur. Si elle n'existe pas sous le signe du progrès, la société américaine n'a plus de justification. L'identité nationale américaine, c'est la foi dans le progrès, démontre Margarita Mathiopoulos. Identité qui se mue, en politique extérieure, en un messianisme conquérant auquel notre auteur n'adresse aucune critique.

(Robert STEUCKERS).