Ok

En poursuivant votre navigation sur ce site, vous acceptez l'utilisation de cookies. Ces derniers assurent le bon fonctionnement de nos services. En savoir plus.

mercredi, 25 novembre 2020

Kondylis on Conservatism with Notes on Conservative Revolution

30731ab17a806ce97792b1f67f5f481a.jpg

Kondylis on Conservatism with Notes on Conservative Revolution

Fergus Cullen

Ex: https://ferguscullen.blogspot.com

Notes on Panagiotis Kondylis, “Conservatism as a Historical Phenomenon.” This is to my knowledge the only substantial excerpt from Kondylis’ Konservativismus (Stuttgart, 1986) available in English. The translation is by “C.F.” from “Ὁ συντηρητισμὸς ὡς ἱστορικὸ φαινόμενο,” Λεβιάθαν, 15 (1994), pp. 51–67, and remains unpublished, but discoverable in PDF format online. Page references below are to that PDF. I have altered the translation very slightly in some places.

Kondylis aims to understand conservatism not as a “historical” or “anthropological constant,” but as a “concrete historical phenomenon” bound to, and thus coterminous with, a time and a place (pp. 1–2). But even such historicist scholarship often takes too narrow a view, according to which conservatism is a reaction against, and thus “derivative” of, the Revolution, or, at best, against Enlightenment rationalism (pp. 2–3).

Kondylis disputes the conception, often a conservative self-conception, of conservatism as an expression of the “natural […] psychological-anthropological predisposition” of “conservative man” to be “peace-loving and conciliatory” (pp. 5–6). On the contrary, conservatism and “activism” are perfectly compatible, as the “feudal right of resistance and ‘tyrannicide,’ the uprising and rebellion of aristocrats against the throne” shows (pp. 7–8). This is a point against the claim by Klemperer and others that the activism of Conservative Revolutionists is fundamentally unconservative.

“[L]ove and cultivation of tradition” as a “legitimation” of noble privileges is an expression of those nobles’ will to self-preservation and “sense of superiority.” Kondylis posits such a universal will, in place of a conservative disposition at war with a revolutionary “urge to overthrow” (at least as concerns the history of ideas: pp. 8–9).

IMAG0091.jpg.opt758x1347o0,0s758x1347.jpg

Kondylis also disputes the self-conception (“idealised image”) of the conservative as uncritically traditionalist and sceptical of “intellectual constructions,” based upon “the erroneous impression that pre-revolutionary societas civilis did not know of ideas and ideologies, both as systematic intellectual constructions and as weapons” (pp. 9–10). Mediaeval “theological” systems are the equals of modern ideologies in “argumentative refinement,” “systematic multilateralism” and “pretension to universal” (or “catholic”) “validity” (p. 10). Conservatism consists in the “reformulation” of the “legitimising ideology of societas civilis” into an “answer” to the Enlightenment and Revolution (pp. 10–1).

Modernity, for Kondylis, comes about, in part through “lively ideological activity,” not as a result of the “anthropological constitution” of certain persons (intellectual disposition), but as an expression of their basic will to self-preservation, which, given their “lack of weighty social power had to be counterbalanced by their pre-eminence on the intellectual front”; and so conservatives responded in kind (polemic, theory, etc.). The partisans of modernity (“foes of the social dominance of the hereditary aristocracy”) made the first crucial step into political discourse in the modern sense, and were thus “much more intensively reflexive,” just as conservatism is generally purported to be (pp. 11–2).

This, “the importance of theory among the foe’s weaponry,” is also the origin of conservatism’s “purely polemical abhorrence” for intellectuality (p. 12). Not only should conservatism’s professed anti-intellectualism be taken as suspect; but in certain intriguing cases, it should be understood as a sort of demonstration of a theoretical understanding of theory’s (intellectuality’s) role in “Progress” (“Decline”). As Kondylis says: “only theoretically could the idealised description of a ‘healthy’ and ‘organic’ society be made which is not created by abstract theories, nor does it need them” (p. 13).

This “vacillation and indecisiveness” of conservatism re. intellectuality, “Reason,” etc. (i.e. this apparent performative—if not contradiction then—tension, ambiguity), mirrors the tension in the intense ratiocination by Mediaeval theology to show the limits of man’s reason, or by Enlightenment sentimentalism or modern Lebensphilosophie to set instinct above intellect (p. 13). This “indecisiveness” (a telling word, when one recalls Kondylis’ contributions to décisionnisme) and the accompanying unsystematicity and proliferous variety of conservative thought is “natural” to “all the great political—and not only political—ideologies” (pp. 13–4; see part 2 here).

49210108._SX318_.jpg“[C]ommonplaces of conservative self-understanding and self-presentation have crept […] into the scientific discussion,” such as “the coquettish enmity of conservatives towards theory.” The prioritization of the “concrete” over the “abstract” is itself, or relies upon, an abstraction (p. 15).

Kondylis dichotomizes “conservative” and “revolutionary” politics (p. 17).

“Prudent and sagacious adaptation to circumstances and conditions, of which conservatives are so proud, is carried out as a rule under the foe’s pressure”; the foe “pushes conservatives to adopt a defensive or good-natured and easy-going stance”; “conservatives discover their sympathy for ‘true’ progress, and […] talk of the dynamic organic development […] of society and of history” (p. 18). Conservatives are compelled to make certain concessions to modernity. To anticipate my own arguments a bit: revolutionary conservatism is a concession, but, loosely speaking, to the form and not the content of modernity. That is, the conservative revolutionary accepts, must accept, industrialisation, the dissolution of “organic society,” the instrumentalisation of man, secular discourse as the space of (even religious) political discourse, “mediatisation,” mass communication, etc., and wishes to put these at the service of “conservative,” “rightist” principles: that is, abstractions from the concrete expressions that gave birth to conservatism.

Sometimes conservative principles are, or seem to be, expressed concretely without conservative effort, or as a result of “the foe’s” effort, who, “by struggling for the consolidation of his own domination, cares for, or is concerned with, compliance with law, with hierarchy and with property (legally or in actual reality safeguarded and protected)—of course, with different signs and with different content” (p. 20). A liberal or democratic, bourgeois or proletarian “conservatism” can form on this basis, opposed, it would seem as a general rule, by conservative revolution (the bifurcation of C.R. and “mere conservatism”).

Both conservatives and revolutionaries posit “natural” laws or a “natural” condition of man; but both struggle to answer, in the conservative case, the apparently natural development of unnatural conditions (Revolution, “Progress,” “Decline”), or, in the revolutionary case, the apparent primordiality of unnatural conditions (inequality, exploitation, etc.: p. 21). We might add that the revolutionary also struggles to answer how, as suggested in the previous paragraph, his own efforts seem to not only lead to such conditions but instantiate, express concretely, his enemy’s, the conservative’s, principles. Here we approach theodicy.

On Kondylis’ model, conservatism is the ideological expression of noble privilege and of “the resistance of societas civilis against its own decomposition”: against the rise of the bourgeoisie, Enlightenment rationalism, democratisation, etc., apparently ending with “the sidelining of the primacy of agriculture by the primacy of industry”; thereafter “there can be talk of conservatism only metaphorically or with polemical-apologetic intent” (pp. 22–3). Schema: conservatism — liberalism — socialism, in which each overcomes the prior term to culminate in a questionable postmodernity in which “every [concept] passes over into, or merges with, another, and none of them are precise,” indicating “that the end of that historical epoch, from whose social-political and intellectual life they partially or wholly drew their content, is, in part, near and approaching, and has, in part, already come” (p. 23).

The reason to posit a conservative-revolutionary current within this categorially confused, and thus not yet quite navigable, postmodernity is that something, a new (proto-) category, does emerge out of and in tandem with the first warning tremors postmodernity (industrialisation and mass democracy: the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, with the Great War as the first in a series of watersheds). To wit, a conscious or subconscious radicalisation and abstraction of conservative principles, at whose service certain aspects of late modernity are put (see above).

mardi, 27 octobre 2020

Joe Scotchie: Recovering Authentic (= Politically Incorrect) Conservatism

scotchie.jpg

Joe Scotchie: Recovering Authentic (= Politically Incorrect) Conservatism

Joe Scotchie’s recently published anthology Writing on the Southern Front: Authentic Conservatism For Our Times made me aware of the task that confronts every serious student of the Right—recovering what otherwise might slip down the Memory Hole. Both the American media and, more generally, American political culture have moved so far away from anything that looks even vaguely non-Left that we may soon need archeologists to rediscover what has been driven underground. American “conservatism” (yes the scare quotes here are very deliberate) is now represented by Jonah Goldberg, telling us how frighteningly homophobic, racist, anti-Semitic and sexist the 1950s were and Rich Lowry calling for the removal of all statues of Robert E. Lee, since they may offend American blacks.[Mothball the Confederate Monuments, National Review, August 15, 2017]. It is therefore comforting to read Scotchie’s latest effort to revive and defend an “authentic conservatism.”

41+ZcQXQVML._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgSimilarly, I’ve also been watching on Fox News the steady procession of “proud, Republican” homosexuals, lesbians, bisexuals, and “moderate” feminists and wonder whether I’ve tuned in by mistake to a multicultural festival. Recently, I heard the “conservative” Geraldo Rivera explaining on Fox News how truly blessed we are by having so many Latinos streaming across our borders and assimilating “at a rate that’s faster than any ethnic group” in US history. [Tom Brokaw’s Hispanic remarks were ‘shockingly uninformed,’ Geraldo Rivera says, by Joseph A. Wulfsohn, January 30, 2019] My cup runneth over with such “conservative” verities.

Scotchie, a native of Ashville NC who now works as a journalist in Queens NY, has returned to his task of recovering ideas and traditions that don’t pass the current PC litmus test. In books on paleoconservatism, the “Southern” history of Ashville, Richard Weaver and Pat Buchanan, (The Paleoconservatives, A Gallery of Ashevilleans, The Vision of Richard Weaver, and Street Corner Conservative) Scotchie has tried to bring to life what the American Right, when it still existed as part of the permissible political conversation, believed and revered.

Not all of his heroes, like Robert E. Lee, the Southern Agrarians, Thomas Wolfe, Sam Francis, M.E. Bradford, Douglas Southall Freeman, the biographer of Washington and Lee, and Patrick J. Buchanan, would necessarily have agreed on all basic moral and political questions.

But they all fit easily into a plausible Right, a position that I explore in an essay “Defining Right and Left” included in my 2017 anthology Revisions and Dissents. Scotchie associates the Right (even when he doesn’t use that term) with a strong sense of family and place, a settled authority structure, deep reservations about modernity, and the belief in a fixed human nature.

Scotchie is also intensely loyal to the historic South, which he understands as did one of his subjects Richard Weaver, as a premodern, hierarchical society. Throughout his essays and commentaries, including the ones on literature, it is hard to ignore Scotchie’s revulsion for globalism and uprooted anthropoids.

I was particularly struck in reading his anthology by how, in the last piece in the book, Scotchie eulogizes his recently deceased friend “Mark Royden Winchell, the Last of the Vanderbilt Greats.”[PDF]. Like Joe, I was moved by the early death of this brilliant essayist from Clemson University, who rarely expressed political opinions but whose sensibilities were apparent:

More than ever, Mark sided with the cause of the Old Right and the conservative South. He opposed the Iraq War, and on the pages of The American Conservative, offered up the America First foreign policy of his fellow Ohioan Robert Taft as a proper antidote to endless foreign meddling. Mark was also a member of the League of the South, for which he published an extensive critique of the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. one that not only focused on King’s plagiarism, adultery, and support for leftist politics, but one that also mourned the passing of the George Washington—Abraham Lincoln America of Mark’s youth. [Links added].

Although I was hardly aware of Mark’s strong political statements until I read this eulogy, produced in 2008, I am delighted to discover that we were all on the same page regarding the Zeitgeist. It is also good to know that Mark came to the defense of the Southern Agrarians against the charge that they were (what else?) racists.

But I am even more pleased that Mark managed in his abbreviated life to expose the multiple shortcomings of that now exemplary conservative saint, Martin Luther King. [Canonizing Martin Luther King, League of The South Institute, via Archive.is, 2005] The cloying tributes to this glaringly flawed Leftist that come each year around January 19 from Heritage Foundation and other outlets of Conservatism, Inc. were particularly oppressive this year. It is gratifying to known that our fallen comrade weighed in against this mendacious hagiography, variously featuring King as a lover of family values, a traditional Christian theologian, and a martyr for conservative causes.

For clarification: I’ve never shared the deep disgust for King felt by my late friend Sam Francis and by other members of the Old Right. I just loathe the transparent lies told about him by phony conservative journalists and foundations. The fact that these contemptible fabrications don’t attract minority support is not at all surprising, given their nonsensical character and given the now fixed political identity of blacks and the white Left.

joescrevolt.jpgAmong Scotchie’s topics and personalities for discussion, another that especially interested me, given my preoccupation with modern European history, is the essay devoted to British statesman Enoch Powell. Scotchie approaches this British Tory opponent of immigration through Simon Heffer’s exhaustive biography, Like the Roman: The Life of Enoch Powell, which was published in 1999. Despite his lustrous careers as a classics professor, British officer during World War Two, and member of the Tory shadow cabinet in the late 1960s, Powell fell from grace after delivering what is misleadingly called the “Rivers of Blood” speech against unchecked immigration in 1968. The most offending line from that speech, about “the Tiber River foaming with much blood,” was drawn from Virgil’s Aeneid—a Latin epic that Powell had no doubt taught during his years as a classics professor in Sydney, Australia. Immediately after giving this oration, Powell was dropped by Tory leader Edward Heath from the shadow cabinet. Misnamed Conservatives then alternated with the Labourites in denouncing this moving target as a xenophobe.

Powell, one of the most learned and intelligent Englishman to enter national politics in the twentieth century, was destroyed socially and professionally (although VDARE.com Editor Peter Brimelow argues he in fact came much closer to returning as Tory leader than is generally realized) for expressing views on immigration that in 1954 his mentor Winston Churchill had stated far more boldly. [What Churchill said about Britain’s immigrants, by David Smith, Guardian, August 4, 2007] By the late 1960s the political pendulum on immigration and other social questions was moving rapidly Leftward; and so even slightly right-of-center celebrities were being hammered by the Leftward-moving media for stating what had been previously unexceptional views.

Scotchie notes in praising this fallen victim of PC:

Powellism lives, but not in England. Meanwhile the civilization he loved and honored may yet survive, but throughout Western Europe and North America, it is more imperiled than ever.

This judgment may be overly sanguine.

Paul Gottfried [email him] is a retired Professor of Humanities at Elizabethtown College, PA. He is the author of After Liberalism, Multiculturalism and the Politics of Guilt and The Strange Death of Marxism His most recent book is Leo Strauss and the Conservative Movement in America.

jeudi, 17 septembre 2020

La contre-révolution de Thomas Molnar

a_molnar.jpg

La contre-révolution de Thomas Molnar

par Juan Asensio

Ex: http://www.juanasensio.com

L’œuvre de Thomas Molnar, quand elle est traduite en français, ce qui n'est même pas le cas de l'ouvrage qu'il a consacré à Georges Bernanos, reste encore fort peu connue. Il faut s'en étonner et s'en affliger, car la lecture de l'ouvrage qu'il a consacré à la contre-révolution, en ces temps d'inflation des gloses universitaires, est un réel plaisir : tout est fluide, la moindre phrase n'est pas immédiatement flanquée d'une note s'étendant sur plusieurs pages et dévorant la substance même de l'ouvrage pour se perdre dans le pullulement fantomatique des langages seconds, et des langages au cube des langages seconds.

41ctVF9MiML._SX301_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgThomas Molnar ne s'embarrasse pas d'un inutile et poussif appareil de notes et, assez vite, précise sa pensée : évoquer la contre-révolution, c'est, analyser les raisons d'un échec historique, qui se répète jusqu'à nos jours. Il est d'autant plus intéressant et même amusant de constater que l'année de publication du livre de Molnar dans sa langue originale est celle où une révolution de boudoir germanopratin a fait vaciller le pouvoir français si ce n'est la France tout entière, révolution pour intellectuels de salon et demi-mondaines qui aujourd'hui encore reste aussi sacrée, pour tous ces vieux porcs devenus bourgeois (pardon : l'ayant toujours été, mais ayant confortablement arrondi leurs fins de mois), que le Saint-Suaire l'est pour un catholique.

L'échec de la contre-révolution est celui-là même sur lequel se conclut le livre de Molnar, qui écrit que la tâche des contre-révolutionnaires «n'est pas une tâche spectaculaire, elle ne connaît pas de victoire finale, elle obtient ses succès dans le cœur et l'esprit plutôt que sur le forum», car c'est «une tâche sans fin» qui consiste à simplement «défendre la société et les principes d'une communauté d'ordre» (1). Je sais bien que les esprits esthètes affirmeront, comme Thomas Molnar d'ailleurs, que cet échec de la contre-révolution signe non seulement sa grandeur manifeste mais sa réussite, y compris sociale puisque, bon an mal an, les sociétés que nous pourrions définir comme s'inspirant de principes contre-révolutionnaires, disons des sociétés dirigées d'une main de fer par des dictateurs de droite, malgré leurs exactions que je ne minimise en aucun cas (et sur lesquelles Molnar ne semble guère fixer son attention), auront tout de même massacré moins de millions d'hommes que les régimes communistes et autres sectes d'inspiration plus ou moins millénariste dans le monde.
 
Thomas Molnar semble tellement douter de l'échec de la contre-révolution qu'il écrit encore, évoquant un «nouveau Malaparte», la nécessité d'enseigner «aux contre-révolutionnaires quelque chose de mieux qu'une technique : il devrait apporter les paroles de l'esprit et de la vérité aux institutions occidentales» (p. 299), car son objectif premier n'est pas d'agir, «encore moins de dominer la situation sur le mode faustien, mais d'expliquer la nature intime de la relation présent-passé, de sorte que l'avenir ne vienne pas briser la continuité», continuité d'essence métaphysique puisque les contre-révolutionnaires «voient dans le péché originel l'explication de leur inquiétude première et de leur croyance actuelle dans l'immuabilité de la nature humaine» (p. 294). Il faudrait, en somme, imaginer le contre-révolutionnaire heureux sinon accompli, ce qu'il n'est que fort rarement, et capable de se contenter du rôle peu flatteur d'aiguillon, de grogneur jamais content puisqu'il doit constamment rappeler aux hommes les dangers qu'il y a à prendre des vessies pour des lanternes et des avenirs de fer pour des lendemains qui chantent.

I21123.jpgL'auteur explique l'échec historique de la contre-révolution par plusieurs raisons, que nous pouvons toutefois regrouper dans une seule catégorie, relative aux techniques de communication modernes, bien trop délaissées par les penseurs contre-révolutionnaires, «largement incapables d'utiliser des méthodes modernes, une organisation, des slogans, des partis politiques et la presse» (p. 179). C'est d'ailleurs grâce à leurs écrits que les révolutionnaires ont imposé leurs idées, jusque y compris dans le camp adverse : «Á mesure que les années passaient, les idées proposées par le parti révolutionnaire paraissaient de plus en plus attrayantes, non pas en raison de leurs mérites intrinsèques, mais parce qu'elles imprégnaient le climat intellectuel, acquéraient un monopole, isolaient les idées contraires en arguant de leur modération pour prouver leur impotence» (p. 59). Cette idée n'est à proprement parler pas vraiment neuve, puisque Taine puis Maurras l'ont développée avec quelques nuances, le premier critiquant la décorrélation de plus en plus prononcée entre la réalité et les discours évoquant cette dernière (2), le second affirmant que la Révolution française ne s'était pas produite le 14 juillet 1789 mais, comme l'écrit Molnar, qu'«elle s'est faite bien avant au tréfond[s] de l'esprit et de la sensibilité populaires, imprégnés des écrits des philosophes» (p. 65). D'une certaine manière, cette thèse fut aussi développée par le général Giraud qui dans un article paru durant l'été 1940 attribua une partie de la défaite française à la littérature, coupable à ses yeux d'avoir sapé les bases de la nation, puis par Jean Raspail dans son (trop) fameux Camp des Saints. Ne perd que celui qui, secrètement, a déjà perdu, tel est le drame intime de tout contre-révolutionnaire.
Plusieurs fois, Thomas Molnar nous expliquera que les révolutionnaires ont su imposer leurs vues, non seulement parce qu'elles paraissaient moins paradoxales que celles des contre-révolutionnaires (3), mais surtout parce qu'ils ont su se rendre maîtres des techniques modernes de communication je l'ai dit et, aussi, qu'ils sont parvenus à faire accepter du plus plus grand nombre leurs idées et analyses : «Il faut distinguer entre les intellectuels qui forment les concepts révolutionnaires et ceux qui viennent à leur appui en amplifiant leur voix, en allongeant leurs griffes, en élargissant leur public, en préparant ce dernier à recevoir des idées qu'il n'aurait autrement considérées qu'avec méfiance ou indifférence» (p. 96). Thomas Molnar ne cessera d'insister sur le rôle essentiel que jouent non pas les théoriciens de la révolution, mais ses relais, issus de la classe moyenne précise-t-il : «La considération dans laquelle on tient la révolution à notre époque vient principalement de la pénétration progressive des idées d'extrême gauche dans les classes moyennes. Celles-ci les cultivent pour les répandre ensuite dans toutes les directions par tous les moyens de communication disponibles. L'intellectuel issu d'une classe moyenne représente, en tant que membre de la république des lettres, aussi bien individuellement que sur le plan corporatif, un banc d'essai et un champ de bataille pour ces idées; il n'a pas même besoin de faire du prosélytisme : sa profession de professeur, d'écrivain, de politicien ou de journaliste conserve ces idées en vitrine, tandis que la considération dont il bénéficie, reflet de valeurs et d'une conduite plus traditionnelles, témoigne pour la justesse ou du moins la pertinence de ses propos» (pp. 99-100).

9782825102695-xs.jpgIl serait pour le moins difficile de dénier à Thomas Molnar la justesse de tels propos, y compris si nous devions tracer quelque parallèle avec notre propre époque, où triomphent ces «intellectuels des classes moyennes» (p. 108) qui à force de cocktails et de mauvais livres cherchent à s'émanciper de leur caste, pour fréquenter les grands, ou ceux qu'ils considèrent comme des grands, tout en n'affectant qu'un souci fallacieux de ce qu'ils méprisent au fond par-dessus tout et qu'ils sont généralement vite prêts à qualifier du terme méprisant (dans leur bouche) de peuple. Ce peuple est instrumentalisé, et ce n'est que par tactique que les intellectuels révolutionnaires peuvent donner l'impression de le flatter, voire de le respecter : «Ce qui est essentiel, les révolutionnaires ont rapidement compris que bien que 1789 ait ouvert la porte du pouvoir aux masses, celles-ci ne l'utiliseront jamais pour elles-mêmes, mais permettront seulement qu'il passe entre les mains de ces nouveaux privilégiés que sont les entraîneurs de foules, les faiseurs d'opinion et les idéologues» (p. 119). Finalement, la révolution n'est pas grand-chose, si nous nous avisions de la séparer de ses béquilles, que Thomas Molnar appelle «sa méthode de propagation dans tous les coins de la société» (p. 110) et, surtout, l'élevage quasiment industriel de ces intellectuels si remarquablement définis par Jules Monnerot.

Il y a plus tout de même que la simple réussite, fut-être réellement remarquable, d'une politique médiatique ou de ce que nous appellerions actuellement une campagne de presse ou d'opinion, et ce plus réside dans les différences fondamentales qui existent entre la révolution et la contre-révolution ou plutôt, nous le verrons, entre le style révolutionnaire et le style contre-révolutionnaire. Thomas Molnar explique l'échec des contre-révolutionnaires en distinguant la révolution de la contre-révolution, et en précisant que : «la tâche d'incarner la marche du progrès peut être confiée à d'autres mains, mais du point de vue privilégié de l'utopie, il n'est aucun risque de la voir abandonnée. Et pour la raison exactement opposée il semble que les contre-révolutionnaires, cherchant à préserver les structures existantes, s'adressant à la réalité concrète, créent toujours l'impression de défendre quelque chose de temporaire. C'est le mouvement qui constitue le véritable substratum de la philosophie révolutionnaire telle qu'elle s'affiche; une conception immobiliste des choses est considérée comme retardataire, anti-historique» (pp. 124-5) bref, vouée à l'échec. Quelques pages auparavant, l'auteur a pris le soin de séparer les deux frères ennemis en évoquant leur style respectif : «C'est l'insolite qui confère sa popularité au style révolutionnaire; le contre-révolutionnaire respecte les règles établies pour l'usage des mots, des objets, des couleurs, des idées, les règles de syntaxe, les règles du raisonnement rigoureux; il prend la vie au sérieux parce qu'il est convaincu qu'un pouvoir supérieur l'a ordonnée. En conséquence, il croit qu'une idée clairement exprimée n'a pas besoin de publicité, qu'elle est protégée par une providence spéciale qu'il serait presque irrévérencieux de renforcer par trop de persuasion. Par contraste, le révolutionnaire cultive les associations fortuites de mots, d'idées ou de couleurs, il est prêt à sacrifier l'expérience et la raison à la nouveauté et aux produits de l'émotion ou des sensations bizarres» (pp. 113-4).

9781560007432_p0_v3_s550x406.jpgL'écrivain contre-révolutionnaire, quoi qu'il affirme, reste irrévocablement marqué au fer du provincialisme et, précise Thomas Molnar, est accablé par la mauvaise conscience de ceux «qui n'ont pratiquement jamais entendu répéter leurs paroles, vu reprendre leurs idées» (p. 174) : «il ne représente au regard de l'histoire qu'un moment peut-être brillant, mais passé, donc isolé, déposé loin du lit principal du fleuve» (p. 122), alors que, en face de lui, vainqueur qui n'a même pas eu besoin de mener un combat, se dresse l'intellectuel révolutionnaire, un de ces hommes «perpétuellement déchirés entre l'action et la réflexion, le bureau du philosophe et les barricades du révolutionnaire, la prose résignée du sceptique et l'allure de David devant Goliath, le mépris de l'esthète devant le chaos et l'enthousiasme du guerillero dans le feu de l'action» (pp. 126-7), description qui pourrait sans aucune difficulté s'appliquer à la majorité de nos propres penseurs révolutionnaires et même, sans doute, aux rares qui font profession de penseurs contre-révolutionnaires ou, disent les pions universitaires, d'antimodernes.

Un autre tort grève la pensée contre-révolutionnaire, qui constitue, selon Thomas Molnar, la thèse de son livre : si le révolutionnaire fait rêver, le contre-révolutionnaire n'est qu'un emmerdeur, un empêcheur d'utopiser en rond : «l'échec général de la contre-révolution est dû à sa trop grande préoccupation du concret, qu'il s'agisse des faits ou de la nature humaine» (p. 173, l'auteur souligne). En effet, les thèses contre-révolutionnaires, «aussi bien pour Burke, Maistre ou Maurras, commencent avec l'affirmation que l'homme est limité (par ses capacités, son expérience, son lieu et sa date de naissance, les idées propres à son environnement), qu'il est donc mieux fait pour s'occuper de problèmes particuliers, dont il possède une connaissance concrète». Cette «approche conservatrice», précise Thomas Molnar, se définit par la «restriction de l'activité à l'environnement immédiat; le manque d'intérêt pour la structure d'ensemble de cet environnement; une préférence pour les détails; une conception du corps social comme étant essentiellement dérivé du passé; et le concept de liberté non pas dissout dans l'égalité mais compris comme une garantie des libertés et de la diversité locales» (pp. 166-7).

Parvenu à ce stade de son développement, Thomas Molnar a conscience qu'il lui faut différencier le contre-révolutionnaire de ce qu'il appelle l'extrémiste de droite, car «seul un siècle et demi de frustration l'a conduit au désespoir et à la peur; son attitude antidémocratique ne fait qu'un avec sa loyauté à l'égard du principe monarchique, si bien qu'il lui était naturel de tenir ce raisonnement, qu'au fur et à mesure que la démocratie et les partis affaiblissent la nation et en ébranlent l'esprit, la nécessité se fait davantage sentir de trouver un souverain ou un substitut temporaire, qui abolirait les partis, limiterait la sphère de la démocratie et restaurerait l'unité nationale» (pp. 217-8). Une nouvelle fois, Thomas Molnar recourt à l'explication par les médias, dont l'usage a été génialement monopolisé par les révolutionnaires, pour expliquer la «frustration ressentie par les contre-révolutionnaires» (p. 218). Assez étrangement, Thomas Molnar rapproche deux noms que tout oppose, ce qu'il n'oublie pas d'ailleurs de signaler, Adolf Hitler et Karl Kraus, deux hommes qui «concevaient le danger d'un déclin de la civilisation presque de la même manière, compte tenu du vocabulaire brutal du premier et de la subtile acuité du second» (p. 219). L'un et l'autre en tout cas illustrent selon Molnar «le type du diagnostic contre-révolutionnaire» (p. 221) mais aussi, bien sûr, deux formes d'échec, la pensée et la culture contre-révolutionnaires «n'existant qu'à l'extérieur de l'univers dominant du discours» qui est, en somme, un «monopole révolutionnaire» (p. 227), les révolutionnaires étant par ailleurs «constamment sur le pied de guerre» comme une «petite bande d'utopistes entourée de son public de semi-intellectuels», alors que «les contre-révolutionnaires sont divisés en un grand nombre de groupes, qui, tout en partageant les mêmes idées, ne partagent pas la même conscience de la menace qui pèse sur elles» (pp. 240-1).

Notes

(1) Thomas Molnar, La contre-révolution (The Counter Revolution, traduction de l'anglais d'Olivier Postal Vinay, Union Générale d’Éditions, 10/18, 1972), p. 306 et dernière.

(2) Thomas Molnar condense sont propos dans une formule frappante : «L'édifice monarchique s'écroula sous les coups de canon des marchands de formules» (p. 68).

mardi, 18 août 2020

The Essential Burke - From the French Revolution to BLM

Edmund_Burke_by_James_Northcote.JPG

The Essential Burke
From the French Revolution to BLM

Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993 [1791])

91WHIwDZ1ZL.jpg

I recently had the pleasure of speaking with Fróði Midjord and Andrew Joyce on Edmund Burke’s classic counter-revolutionary text, Reflections on the Revolution in France. I invite you all to have a listen as Burke’s work, in particular his psychological analysis of the Left, has stood the test of time and remains uncannily insightful in the age of BLM, trans activism, antifa, and all their radical chic apologists.

Burke attacked, with great eloquence, insight, and ferocity, the basic ideas which had emerged in the eighteenth century and still govern our world today: the so-called Rights of Man. For Burke, basing political order on such abstract, ambiguous, and ever-fluctuating ideological fashions could only lead to perpetual chaos culminating yet-more-vicious governments. Instead, he prefers time-tested institutions and customs in tune with human nature.

In terms of practical politics, Burke is in fact quite moderate. One should only cautiously change one’s inherited customs and institutions, always preserving what is valuable. In general, a mixed democratic, aristocratic, and monarchic regime is preferable, but what is actually best will differ according to circumstance (even a democracy might be preferable in some instances). France’s Ancien Régime, he concedes, certainly could be improved upon and capacity for reform is always necessary: “A state without the means of some change is without the means of its conservation” (21). Revolution is an option in the face of a tyrannical government, but it must be the last option, a gamble to be resorted to in exceptionally grave circumstances.

Burkean Community: An Intergenerational Compact

Burke opposes the individualist and egalitarian tendencies of the Enlightenment. His “social contract” is an organic and indeed intergenerational community:

Society is indeed a contract . . . It is a partnership in all science; a partnership in all art; a partnership in every virtue, and in all perfection. As the ends of such a partnership cannot be obtained in many generations, it becomes a partnership not only between those who are living, but between those who are living, those who are dead, and those who are to be born. Each contract of each particular state is but a clause in the great primaeval contract of eternal society, linking the lower with the higher natures . . . (96-7)

How sublime is such a vision is as against a politics of maximizing personal choice and fictitious equality!

Society being an intergenerational compact, the current generation must treasure the customs and institutions inherited from the past, which have been patiently built up over the centuries. But let me quote Burke himself:

Through the same plan of a conformity to nature in our artificial institutions, and by calling in the aid of her unerring and powerful instincts, to fortify the fallible and feeble contrivances of our reason, we have derived several other, and those no small benefits, from considering our liberties in the light of an inheritance. (34)

Politicians ought to look to “the practice of their ancestors, the fundamental laws of their country, the fixed form of a constitution, whose merits are confirmed by the solid test of long experience, and an increasing public strength and national prosperity” (58). However, the revolutionaries “despise experience as the wisdom of unlettered men” (58).

Burke’s appeal to intergenerational and inherited wisdom also extends to the personal level in the form a striking defense of prejudice. Prejudice is a concentrate of practical and hard-won wisdom handed down from past generations:

You see, Sir, that in this enlightened age I am bold enough to confess, that we are generally men of untaught feelings; that instead of casting away all our old prejudices, we cherish them to a very considerable degree, and, to take more shame to ourselves, we cherish them because they are prejudices; and the longer they have lasted, and the more generally they have prevailed, the more we cherish them. We are afraid to put men to live and trade each on their own private stock of reason . . . better to avail themselves of the general bank and capital of nations, and of ages. Many of our men of speculation, instead of exploding general prejudices, employ their sagacity to discover the latent wisdom which prevails in them.. Prejudice is of ready application in the emergency; it previously engages the mind in a steady course of wisdom and virtue, and does not leave the man hesitating in the moment of decision, sceptical, puzzled, and unresolved. Prejudice renders a man’s virtue his habit; and not a series of unconnected acts. Through just such prejudice, his duty becomes a part of his nature. (87)

Human Nature as the Foundation of Politics

Burke is emphatic in arguing that political institutions must hew closely to the realities of human nature. He says: “I have endeavoured through my whole life to make myself acquainted with human nature: otherwise I should be unfit to take even my humble part in the service of mankind” (137). He provocatively dismisses the Enlightenment philosophes saying he is “[i]nfluenced by the inborn feelings of my nature . . . not being illuminated by a single ray of this new-sprung modern light” (74).

For Burke, political institutions must not be based on an exaggerated notion of humanity’s capacity for reason, but be carefully adapted to our sentiments: building upon religious piety and ‘irrational’ emotional investment in traditions and institutions, and being careful to not unleash the envy, frustration, and bitterness that lies in every human heart.

unnamedcorday.jpg

Charlotte Corday (having killed the revolutionary writer Jean-Paul Marat)

Burke is sensitive to the impact of both in-born human nature and upbringing and living conditions in defining men’s character. The ancient lawgivers, he says, “were sensible that the operation of this second nature [upbringing and living conditions] on the first [in-born nature] produced a new combination; and thence arose many diversities among men” (185).

By contrast, the French revolutionaries refused to recognize the diversity of really existing men, but spoke only of “man” in the abstract. Burke lambasts them for being at war with human nature and destroying inherited institutions which bound society together in the name of impossible equality:

[Y]ou think you are combating prejudice, but you are at war with nature. (49)

This sort of people are so taken up with their theories about the rights of man, that they have totally forgot his nature. (64)

[Y]ou ought to make a revolution in nature, and provide a new constitution for the human mind. (202)

Man may not always like his nature, but he only loses by despising and being ignorant of it:

Those who quit their proper character, to assume what does not belong to them, are, for the greater part, ignorant both of the character they leave, and of the character they assume. (11)

You might change the names. The things in some shape must remain. (142)

A-portrait-of-Marquis-de-Condorcet-This-is-a-public-domain-photograph-courtesy-of.png

Nicolas de Condorcet, a scientist, staunch believer in progress, supporter of the Revolution, and ultimately one of its victims.

The Psychology of Egalitarian Revolutionaries

Burke is particularly strong on the psychological mechanisms underlying revolutionary movements. On the moralizing abstract intellectual lacking ‘skin in the game’:

Hypocrisy, of course, delights in the most sublime speculations; for, never intending to go beyond speculation, it costs nothing to have it magnificent. (63)

In fact, insofar revolutionaries have a vested interest, it is in stoking moral outrage:

[V]ices are feigned or exaggerated, when profit is looked for in their punishment. (140)

Burke sees the revolutionaries as destructively critical:

By hating vices too much, they come to love men too little. (171)

A spirit of innovation is generally the result of a selfish temper and confined views. People will not look forward to their posterity, who never look backward to their ancestors. (33)

Paradoxically, a democracy can be more oppressive for dissenters than an autocracy:

Under a cruel prince [dissidents] have the balmy compassion of mankind to assuage the smart of their wounds; they have the plaudits of the people to animate their generous constancy under their sufferings; but those who are subjected to wrong under multitudes, are deprived of all external consolation. They seem deserted by mankind; overpowered by a conspiracy of their whole species (126)

Democratic Intolerance and Revolutionary Chaos

Burke is emphatic in recognizing the intolerant nature of “the rights of man.” He rightly identifies the rights of man as a kind of declaration of war against all other epochs and societies. All eras and places are judged according to the standards of a gathering of Parisian intellectuals circa 1789, and are ever found sorely lacking. The revolutionaries can have no doubts about the righteousness of imposing their views:

They have “the rights of men.” Against these there can be prescription; against these no agreement is binding; these admit no temperament, and no compromise; any thing withheld from their full demand is so much of fraud and injustice. (58)

The upshot of this is that the rights of man are a recipe for perpetual strife and discontent. For those who believe a monarch is legitimate only if elected then “no throne is lawful but the elective, no one act of princes who preceded their aera of fictitious election can be valid” (23). All inherited institutions and customs that violate contemporary moral fashions then become illegitimate and can no longer serve to stabilize and unify society.

But can the revolutionaries not build up something new? Here too, Burke thinks not, because the very revolutionary principles of equality stoke and irritate the desires of men:

[H]appiness . . . is to be found by virtue in all conditions; in which consists the true moral equality of mankind, and not in that monstrous fiction, which, by inspiring false ideas and vain expectations into men destined to travel in the obscure walk of laborious life, serves only to aggravate and embitter the real inequality, which it never can remove . . . (37)

The French armies naturally became insubordinate and fractious, as soldiers demanded to elect their officers and felt no loyalty either to the discredited monarch nor to the Assembly upstarts.

ddhc.jpg

The 1789 Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen: tablets of a new civil religion.

Liberal-Egalitarian Ambiguity and Hypocrisy

The moral intolerance of egalitarian principles then leads to a chaotic radicalization and the revolutionaries one-up each other. To avoid chaos and excess, or simple violation of their interests, the revolutionaries themselves must institute limits on liberty and equality. The hereditary tax privileges attached to the nobility as individuals were abolished, but peasants still had to pay taxes for privileges attached to land, because many bourgeois were such landowners.

The right to vote was conditioned upon a wealth qualification: only men paying taxes worth three days’ labor were eligible, meaning only about 60% of French men could vote. Thus the very poor were excluded from suffrage, not to mention women and inhabitants of the French colonies. Burke snorts with sarcasm:

What! a qualification on the indefeasible right of men? (175)

You lay down metaphysic propositions which infer universal consequences, and then you attempt to limit logic by despotism. (223)

Advocates of the rights of man are universally intolerant of other regimes in the name of these rights, while seeing fit to curtail these rights themselves as the situation requires.

This highlights the basic moral defensiveness of the Right and the universal fervor of the Left. We saw this even in the age of fascism. When a New York Times interviewer criticized Mussolini’s authoritarian regime, the Italian dictator wryly responded: “Democracy is beautiful in theory; in practice it is a fallacy. You in America will see that some day.” Hitler was similarly emphatic, against those Western democrats that feared his ideology, that National Socialism was not for export. Meanwhile, the communists patiently worked according to the principle that all humanity must embrace their system and the liberals drafted documents imposing their own principles on all the nations and races of the Earth.

The liberals’ violation in practice of the rights they expound in the abstract is grounded in the very ambiguity of these rights. We cannot accuse the French revolutionaries of too much dishonesty in this respect. In fact, the 1789 Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen is often shockingly ambiguous. The American Declaration of Independence states that “all men are created equal,” an observation that, unqualified, is a self-evident falsehood. The French Declaration’s notorious Article I affirms by contrast:

Men are born and remain free and equal in rights. Social distinctions can be founded only on the common good.

One may complain that the latter sentence annihilates the former, but at least it provides a standard for how far rights should extend. In theory, then, even practices of segregation or various hierarchies could be justified if these are considered conducive to “the common good.” The revolutionaries initially did not consider that voting, for instance, was a right, but rather a duty which should only be fulfilled by those best qualified.

Similarly in Article IV’s general provision on liberty:

Liberty consists of doing anything which does not harm others: thus, the exercise of the natural rights of each man has only those borders which assure other members of the society the enjoyment of these same rights. These borders can be determined only by the law.

What “does not harm others”? Does a 70 IQ hereditary idiot fathering 20 children “harm others”? In practice, the reality of universal interdependence annihilates the principle of individual liberty. Today, our liberal democracies regulate every aspect of life, from forcing children to spend years in State education to the hyper-regulation of economic life on redistributive, environmental, and consumer grounds, among many others. Not to mention the massive curtailment of civil liberties and micro-management of citizens’ behavior to fight coronavirus. But, for some reason, our rulers believe that demographic trends, which determine the very character of the nation, should remain wholly unregulated and random.

And Article XI on free speech:

The free communication of thoughts and of opinions is one of the most precious rights of man: any citizen thus may speak, write, print freely, except to respond to the abuse of this liberty, in the cases determined by the law.

The principles may or may not be sound, but they are surely ambiguous and abstract. The United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights by contrast build upon an Anglo-American political and legal tradition, these posit practices (and limits upon them), not merely general principles.

A_Right_Honorable_alias_a_Sans_Culotte.png

One should not necessarily read too much into the 1789 Declaration. The fundamental points were fairly straightforward: hereditary privileges are abolished, the church must be relegated to a secondary role, sovereignty resides in the nation/people (whatever that means), and the law must rule rather than the king. It’s striking the degree to which later nationalism and indeed fascism took on many of these French revolutionary principles (the Italians quite openly, Mussolini after all started out as a militant socialist atheist).

The revolutionaries of 1789, essentially lawyers and liberals, dreamed of a meritocratic and moderate regime founded on reason: hereditary privileges were abolished, the king was subject to the nation’s representatives and (in theory) the rule of law, and the churchlands were nationalized to shore up government finances. This revolution was achieved partly through the boldness of the men representing the Third Estate but also by periodic and chaotic uprisings of the Paris mob against the state’s forces and even the king himself.

Burke could already see that the precedents and principles the revolutionaries had set could only lead to a chaotic situation spiraling out of control. The unifying institutions of monarchy and church had been dragged through the mud, aristocrats and pious peasants had been turned into enemies, while the hungry Parisian mob, those peasants still smarting from taxation, and the fanatical and paranoid revolutionary elements had not been turned into friends. Thus, said Burke, France could only degenerate into civil war, military dictatorship and an ignoble financial oligarchy: “Here end all the deceitful dreams and visions of the equality and rights of men”! (196)

Burke lamented the end of the European aristocracy:

But the age of chivalry is gone. That of sophisters, economists, and calculators, has succeeded; and the glory of Europe is extinguished forever. Never, never more, shall we behold that generous loyalty to rank and sex, that proud submission, that dignified obedience, that subordination of the heart, which kept alive, even in servitude itself, the spirit of an exalted freedom. (76)

In retrospect, the conflicts of the late eighteenth century can seem rather quaint. From our vantage point, we can see that Britain, America, and France were fundamentally on near-parallel and converging trajectories.

The old constraints and disciplines – the specialization of the sexes, the separation of nations, the very idea of legitimate authority – have steadily disintegrated. Appeal to tradition and religion could no longer sustain them. For a time, from the 1860s to the 1930s or so, it seemed as though Western nations might embrace a biopolitics which, combining old philosophical and new scientific principles, would recognize natural differences and inequalities, thus preserving healthy traditions and indeed healthy progress, tending to biological and cultural perfection.

That tendency stalled and was finally annihilated. Custom, that “tyrant unto man,” has been destroyed in the name of name of the basic principle that humans, “the measure of all things,” are all basically equal and interchangeable atoms. Therefore, our ineradicable social inequalities and specializations can only be the result of our societies’ and cultures’ perversion. We must therefore wage war against our history and our societies – and above all against White men, the great malefactors of humankind.

I cannot help but think that this trend is more driven by a kind of petty self-love, vain and injured amour-propre, than by true self-knowledge, whereby each of us would, with due humility, take up with right pride our particular station in the great chain of being.

There is no telling when and how the current strife will end. On a positive note, Western man’s sensitivity to ‘justice’ as an ideal may lead to perpetual strife, but is also clearly a great source of the experimentation and dynamism which characterizes our history. In Europe, the state is smoothly leading the totalitarian march towards the mirage of equality. In America, there is chaos and neither history, nor culture, nor race, nor anything else seems to keep that great landmass-cum-economic zone together. What will be the new equilibrium and when will it arise? Will the liberals, holding true to their ideals over inconvenient facts, completely wreck their own cities? Will the regime stabilize under a Biden presidency tending towards European-style social-democracy? When will meet our Bonaparte?

jeudi, 26 mars 2020

L’esprit de droite

Il existe probablement autant de définitions du concept de droite qu’il existe de personnes s’en revendiquant. Tous ont leur propre opinion sur ce que signifie être de droite, ce qui ultimement, mène à une division de la droite que la gauche ne semble pas connaître. L’indépendance d’esprit est certes une qualité, et il faut rejeter le rigorisme propre au camp de la gauche, mais celle-ci ne devrait pas nuire à une certaine forme d’unité.

Pour parvenir à rallier la droite sous une même bannière, le jeune Louis Le Carpentier, auteur sérieux qui nous a déjà gratifiés de quelques ouvrages chez Reconquista Press, vient de produire L’esprit de droite.

D’abord, il définit la droite comme étant animée par trois grandes idées phares, soit les « valeurs familiales », l’« esprit d’entreprise » et l’« identité nationale ». Ce sont là pour lui les trois impondérables qui définissent la pensée de droite, « radicalement – c’est-à-dire dans sa racine -, conservatrice, entreprenaliste, et nationaliste ». Les divisions actuelles proviennent quant à lui du fait que certains courants mettent davantage l’emphase sur une de ces valeurs, au détriment des deux autres.

Dans son court ouvrage, facile à lire et à digérer, Le Carpentier nous offre un portrait de l’homme de droite. En fait, à bien le lire, ce n’est pas tant une description de ce qu’est l’homme de droite, mais de ce qu’il devrait être. Il nous propose ainsi un guide du « comment être un homme de droite conséquent » ou même simplement « comment être un homme d’honneur dans ce monde sans honneur ».

Il préconise, à l’instar de Dominique Venner, le stoïcisme comme façon d’être. Du côté des valeurs, il met en avant la vertu, le respect de la hiérarchie, la liberté, mais assujettie aux devoirs, car ceux-ci l’emportent sur les droits. On le comprend, ce que Louis Le Carpentier nous exhorte de faire, c’est de devenir des paladins modernes, des chevaliers, preux et sans reproches.

En fin d’ouvrage, il nous présente aussi brièvement un court traité philosophique – qui tranche avec la lourdeur habituelle des travaux de ce genre – qui permet de démonter en quelques pages les sophismes de la démocratie et du progressisme. On ressent bien l’influence thomiste de ce penseur pour qui le bien commun prime tout.

Seulement, peut-être parce que je ne me suis jamais qualifié de droite et que ce n’est pas là une position stratégique ou esthétique, quelques points me semblent pour le moins discutables. À mes yeux, son attachement à l’impérialisme, au colonialisme et à la libre entreprise me semble non seulement dépassé, mais aussi non-désirable en soi. Par exemple, le colonialisme a toujours mené à des catastrophes, car la démographie l’a toujours emporté sur les autres considérations comme le pouvoir politique. De même, la libre entreprise n’est pas le modèle le plus humain de concevoir l’économie, de nombreuses alternatives, comme la gestion de l’offre notamment ou les coopératives, existent, il faut simplement s’y intéresser.

Malgré ces critiques, il n’en demeure pas moins que cet ouvrage tombe à point nommé. Avec le confinement, nous sommes seuls avec nous-mêmes et justement, Louis Le Carpentier nous offre, tel un philosophe brandissant un miroir, une occasion unique d’introspection, car avant de changer le monde, il faut d’abord être en mesure de se changer soi-même.

Louis Le Carpentier, L’esprit de droite, Reconquista Press, 2020.

jeudi, 16 janvier 2020

Le conservatisme, une vision politique à reconquérir

Olivier-Dard-conservatisme.jpg

Le conservatisme, une vision politique à reconquérir

par Franck BULEUX

Préalablement à cette intervention, il est loisible d’affirmer que le conservatisme « à la française » est un terme « à la mode », ce qui peut lui donner un aspect positif au temps de la médiacratie (le fameux « quatrième pouvoir » permet d’avoir un certain nombre d’analyses sur ce courant de pensée); de plus, il est à la une de revues amies : la revue Éléments, « La nouvelle vague du conservatisme », et la revue L’Incorrect de décembre 2017, « 100 % conservateur » et surtout, Le dictionnaire du conservatisme est sorti aux Éditions du Cerf en septembre dernier [2017] avec plusieurs contributions d’intellectuels visant à la mise en place d’une école doctrinale conservatrice française.

Je n’ai nul besoin de vous rappeler que le début de la dernière campagne présidentielle avait fait du candidat François Fillon le candidat estampillé « conservateur », le postulant largement favori avant les déboires que l’on connaît. Et d’ailleurs, le candidat conservateur avait largement éliminé les candidats « sociaux-libéraux » (Alain Juppé, Nathalie Kosciusko-Morizet et Bruno Le Maire) et bonapartiste (Nicolas Sarkozy) de LR (Les Républicains) lors des deux tours de la primaire de la droite et du centre. Depuis le CNIP (Centre national des indépendants et paysans) et La Droite, devenue DLC (Droite libérale chrétienne) de Charles Millon (dont l’épouse, la philosophe Chantal Delsol œuvre au renouveau du conservatisme, notamment dans le dictionnaire pré-cité), on n’avait pas évoqué – autant et à bon escient – la persistance, voire la perspective, d’un conservatisme national, comme voie alternative politique.

9782204123587-59fb496fddd78.jpgPourtant, la question du conservatisme est complexe car le terme, lui-même, renvoie à des phénomènes – et des réalités – politiques différents, du parti conservateur britannique (les Tories, au pouvoir au Royaume-Uni en alternance démocratique avec le Labour travailliste) au monolithique ancien Parti communiste soviétique (PCUS), dont les caciques étaient qualifiés de « conservateurs », sans doute en partie en raison de leur âge… Une seule chose est sûre, l’absence pérenne – ou presque (l’exception Fillon vaincue par le très progressiste hebdomadaire Le Canard enchaîné) – du terme dans le débat français, depuis la fin de la Révolution française au moins jusqu’à récemment (puisque l’on parle de néo-conservateurs que la gauche morale n’hésite pas, d’ailleurs, à qualifier de « néo-cons » – le discrédit sémantique est toujours au cœur des débats et fonctionne d’ailleurs, mais s’agissant de cette tendance, il s’agit, le plus souvent, de « libéraux américains » – donc, la gauche américaine issue des démocrates – défendant des thèses conservatrices liées à la défense de la nation : identités fédérées réaffirmées, rejet du « politically correct », rejet du fiscalisme…).

Quel est le point commun entre ces différents conservatismes ? Il s’agit d’une prise de conscience d’une menace sur des valeurs, des principes jugés essentiels : on peut probablement parler de conservatisme lors des succès en matière de mobilisation de La Manif pour tous, s’agissant de préserver un droit naturel objectif (droits de l’enfant au sein d’une famille établie) face à des exigences progressistes fondées sur des droits subjectifs (droit à l’enfant de tout individu). Le conservatisme peut aussi s’exprimer sur le terrain des institutions comme sur celui de la proximité : la gastronomie, la valeur touristique de la région, l’écologie terrienne, le respect de valeurs liées au sol… Le retour à la terre, voire le retour de la Terre, est une forme naturelle de conservatisme. Le récent vote corse, est selon moi, plus qu’un dégagisme (alors que des sortants sont réélus…), un vote conservateur lié à l’insularité du territoire et à ses conséquences sur les hommes et l’environnement. L’allégorie du jardin utilisée par Chantal Millon-Delsol dans le Dictionnaire du conservatisme est éclairante, évoquant le conservatisme comme une praxis s’opposant à toute doctrine dont l’objet serait de refaire le monde ex nihilo, forme sublime, et totalement abstraite, de l’expression totalitaire. Le retour aux racines s’oppose clairement aux formes de changement inspirées par les slogans de gauche qu’elle soit marxiste « Du passé, faisons table rase » (la tabula rasa marxiste) ou sociale-démocrate : « Le changement, c’est maintenant ! ». Seules l’intensité révolutionnaire et l’horizon utopique font naître la distinction initiale, bien connue et représentée par les bolcheviks et les mencheviks il y a cent ans. Le conservatisme pensé de cette manière est une forme de traditionalisme, c’est-à-dire la conservation des acquis, notamment issus de la Nature, que l’on soit, à titre personnel, déiste ou non. Le terme des « acquis sociaux » fort prisé des marcheurs de Bastille à Nation pourrait aussi être transformé en « acquis moraux » ou en « acquis culturels » ou « naturels ». Serait-ce choquant ou outrancier ? Poser la question, c’est y répondre. Le retour du conservatisme, c’est d’abord le retour aux fondamentaux.

Alors, si le conservatisme est une sauvegarde d’acquis préexistants, peut-on le considérer strictement comme réactionnaire ?

Si l’on considère que le mouvement conservateur est une réponse à un processus révolutionnaire estimé dangereux pour une collectivité et ses membres, il n’est qu’une réaction à une pensée progressiste extrémiste. Au pire, il s’oppose au fameux sacro-saint « cours de l’histoire » en s’arc-boutant sur un maintien de privilèges exprimé dans un statu quo ante, au mieux, il se refuse à une évolution qu’il estime négative, car dangereuse. Le terme « réaction » renvoie à un retour à un point connu, fixé, du passé; il conduit à une destruction. Une révolution peut être réactionnaire, si ses repères sont dans un passé lointain et révolu, un conservatisme peut éviter une réaction, s’il parvient à pérenniser ce qui est. Le conservateur se situe dans la survivance de ce qui est. Même si, dans la bouche des archéo-gauchistes, réactionnaires et conservateurs sont des synonymes, il est indispensable de dissocier les termes. Il n’est pas question d’un retour abstrait, mais de maîtriser un présent concret.

S’il n’est pas réactionnaire, le mouvement conservateur pourrait-il être révolutionnaire ? A priori, les deux termes semblent procéder d’un oxymore. Pourtant, le conservatisme ne peut pas être considéré comme un vulgaire immobilisme. Un corps social est intrinsèquement dynamique, comme la Nature, il vit, il s’adapte. Face au réactionnaire, le conservateur aménage, améliore, restaure le présent pour éviter le retour à un passé, souvent inconnu. Les Révolutionnaires français étaient le plus souvent excessivement réactionnaires, visant au retour d’un ordre ancien. Le conservateur se nourrit de l’expérience, de la praxis, il utilise le présent comme une substance organique permettant de créer de l’histoire, du devenir. On peut ainsi parler de « conservatisme en mouvement », mettant en place des formes nouvelles, elles-mêmes issus du vivant. Une société est un élément organique dont l’évolution procède de son propre état. Le mouvement conservateur, loin d’être figé, permet à la société de muter à partir d’elle-même et non pas d’une société sans passé.

Un mouvement conservateur, non réactionnaire, peut-il être libéral ?

Au sein des familles idéologiques de la droite (ou des droites), le débat, ici, est essentiel : le plus souvent, il est fait référence à des partis libéraux-conservateurs, c’est-à-dire économiquement libéraux et conservateurs en matière sociétale. Les partis de droite en Occident, du Japon à l’Allemagne, en passant par le Royaume-Uni et l’Espagne, sont souvent considérés comme libéraux et conservateurs. Et pourtant, cette liaison, cette fusion même n’est pas si évidente.

147823.1570500005.jpgEn effet, originellement, l’esprit conservateur est de nature collective : il vise à préserver un ordre naturel préexistant alors que le libéralisme post-révolutionnaire naît du développement des besoins exprimés individuellement. Le conservatisme ne nie pas la liberté mais se rattache davantage à la liberté concrète, plus qu’abstraite, à la liberté collective, plus qu’individuelle. Le triomphe de l’individualisme, état suprême du libéralisme, s’oppose au conservatisme des systèmes normatifs. C’est ici, à mon sens, que le renouveau du conservatisme prend tout son sens : le développement de l’individualisme a contribué à l’effacement des repères collectifs, identitaires, religieux ou culturels. La fin du bien commun a rendu la modernité, expression d’un libéralisme fondé sur l’individu, exécrable pour les « oubliés » du Système. L’extension des droits individuels comme le droit à l’enfant, exalté par les « progressistes », vient à exclure ce bien commun qu’est le droit de l’enfant à vivre au sein d’une famille. Alexandre Soljenitsyne dénonçait déjà, en 1978, dans Le déclin du courage, le matérialisme occidental issu de la société de consommation. Le déracinement, fruit de ce conservatisme anglo-saxon, a touché d’abord les classes populaires souvent qualifiées d’« oubliées » par nos chercheurs sociologues. La France des oubliés, c’est d’abord l’expression d’une société qui a fait de l’individualisme libéral son étalon, son exigence. Or, le conservatisme, forme d’enracinement, aurait pu, pourrait, peut encore venir tempérer ce système économique certes nécessaire mais qui doit constituer un des piliers d’une société tridimensionnelle et non le pilier central.

Le conservatisme, une vision politique à reconquérir.

Le conservatisme est une vision de proximité (le conservatisme n’est pas mondialiste); en effet, chaque territoire a un mode de vie à préserver, ce qui le distingue, là aussi, d’un certain libéralisme, à la vision trop universelle. Vision enracinée d’un territoire défini, le conservatisme produit sa propre essence, son propre progressisme. La vision du progrès n’a de sens que dans le cadre de l’évolution naturelle du vivant. L’homme transforme la Nature, il ne la nie pas. Nier la Nature serait une attitude réactionnaire, la transformer est adapter les besoins des populations à l’univers du possible.

Au-delà de cet enracinement indispensable, les conservateurs devront choisir entre le conservatisme libéral et le national-conservatisme, débat qui existe déjà entre les membres du groupe Conservateur et réformistes européens (70 élus, soit 10 % de l’ensemble des parlementaires et troisième groupe du Parlement en nombre de membres). De nombreux mouvements considérés comme « populistes » sont membres de ce groupe, notamment au Nord de notre Vieux Continent (Parti du progrès danois, les Vrais Finlandais, la Nouvelle Alliance flamande, Droit et justice polonais…).

finland-balloon.jpg

Pour en revenir à la France, tout le monde a conscience qu’il a manqué l’électorat populiste à François Fillon au premier tour et l’électorat conservateur à Marine Le Pen au second tour.

Le sujet ne porte pas, ici, sur le populisme. Je n’aborderai donc pas le caractère abstrait de cette expression utilisée aussi bien pour Donald Trump, Bernard Tapie en son temps, Jean-Luc Mélenchon ou Marine Le Pen aujourd’hui. Mais, pour ce qui est du conservatisme, il s’agit bel et bien d’une voie à explorer à la condition de donner à ce mot une expression… révolutionnaire !

Franck Buleux

• D’abord mis en ligne sur EuroLibertés, le 28 janvier 2018.

lundi, 13 janvier 2020

R.I.P Sir Roger Scruton

scruton.jpg

R.I.P Sir Roger Scruton

Ex: https://pvewood.blogspot.com

I am so sorry Sir Roger Scruton has died. He has been one of my great heroes since I read Conservative Essays while a sixth former.

The Liberal Heart, a collection of quotations and extracts from liberals that I read in 1984, was studded by attacks on him and his then outspokenly conservative views on homosexuality. They seemed bracingly High Tory then, but are thought crimes now.

Let's not forget or forgive James Brokenshire’s sacking of Roger Scruton from his unpaid job as a government adviser on beauty in architecture last year, after the latter was stitched up by the New Statesman and falsely accused of antisemitism. Perhaps it is why Boris did not give the wretched Brokenshire a job, even though he was the first cabinet minister to come out in support of Boris. I do hope so.

I would have spent a week with Roger Scruton in Bratislava in 1991 but fate decided otherwise. But I have been reading him and about him since I was sixteen and feel I have lost a friend. Many people do. He was one of England's very few conservative intellectuals and one of the few of them who was a true Tory, albeit one who thought discretion was the better part of valour.

I was disappointed by England: an Elegy, the only book of his I read entire. I had expected to love it or at least to agree with it, but it was too negative, like reading a hundred Daily Mail editorials, too 'Why oh why?'. He could be philistine - as when he dismissed Freud as a fraud.

Sir Roger Scruton, as he then wasn't (David Cameron gave him a knighthood a fortnight before the referendum in which he supported Leave), in 2006 spoke to the Dutch party Vlaams Belang, asking whether Enoch Powell was right about speaking out about immigration and being very shy of answering his own question, for fear as he says of the same fate as befell Powell.


I quote from it.

I do not doubt that there is such a thing as xenophobia, though it is a very different thing from racism. Etymologically the term means fear of (and therefore aversion towards) the foreigner. Its very use implies a distinction between the one who belongs and the one who doesn’t, and in inviting us to jettison our xenophobia politicians are inviting us to extend a welcome to people other than ourselves – a welcome predicated on a recognition of their otherness. Now it is easy for an educated member of the liberal élite to discard his xenophobia: for the most part his contacts with foreigners help him to amplify his power, extend his knowledge and polish his social expertise. But it is not so easy for an uneducated worker to share this attitude, when the incoming foreigner takes away his job, brings strange customs and an army of dependents into the neighbourhood, and finally surrounds him with the excluding sights and sounds of a ghetto.
 
Again, however, there is a double standard that affects the description. Members of our liberal élite may be immune to xenophobia, but there is an equal fault which they exhibit in abundance, which is the repudiation of, and aversion to, home. Each country exhibits this vice in its own domestic version. Nobody brought up in post-war England can fail to be aware of the educated derision that has been directed at our national loyalty by those whose freedom to criticize would have been extinguished years ago, had the English not been prepared to die for their country. The loyalty that people need in their daily lives, and which they affirm in their unconsidered and spontaneous social actions, is now habitually ridiculed or even demonized by the dominant media and the education system. National history is taught as a tale of shame and degradation. The art, literature and religion of our nation have been more or less excised from the curriculum, and folkways, local traditions and national ceremonies are routinely rubbished.

This repudiation of the national idea is the result of a peculiar frame of mind that has arisen throughout the Western world since the Second World War, and which is particularly prevalent among the intellectual and political elites. No adequate word exists for this attitude, though its symptoms are instantly recognized: namely, the disposition, in any conflict, to side with ‘them’ against ‘us’, and the felt need to denigrate the customs, culture and institutions that are identifiably ‘ours’. I call the attitude oikophobia – the aversion to home – by way of emphasizing its deep relation to xenophobia, of which it is the mirror image. Oikophobia is a stage through which the adolescent mind normally passes. But it is a stage in which intellectuals tend to become arrested. As George Orwell pointed out, intellectuals on the Left are especially prone to it, and this has often made them willing agents of foreign powers. The Cambridge spies – educated people who penetrated our foreign service during the war and betrayed our Eastern European allies to Stalin – offer a telling illustration of what oikophobia has meant for my country and for the Western alliance. And it is interesting to note that a recent BBC ‘docudrama’ constructed around the Cambridge spies neither examined the realities of their treason nor addressed the suffering of the millions of their East European victims, but merely endorsed the oikophobia that had caused them to act as they did.

In the Christmas edition of the Spectator three weeks ago Sir Roger wrote:
 
During this year much was taken from me — my reputation, my standing as a public intellectual, my position in the Conservative movement, my peace of mind, my health. But much more was given back: by Douglas Murray’s generous defence, by the friends who rallied behind him, by the rheumatologist who saved my life and by the doctor to whose care I am now entrusted. Falling to the bottom in my own country, I have been raised to the top elsewhere, and looking back over the sequence of events I can only be glad that I have lived long enough to see this happen. Coming close to death you begin to know what life means, and what it means is gratitude.

dimanche, 31 mars 2019

Reflecting on the Interwar Right

mencken.jpg

Reflecting on the Interwar Right

Please note this rightist opposition to war must be distinguished from the objections of Communist sympathizers or generic leftists to certain wars for ideological reasons. For example, George McGovern, who was a longtime Soviet apologist, protested the Vietnam War, while defending his own role in dropping bombs on helpless civilians in World War Two. For McGovern the “good war” was the one in which the US found itself on the same side as the Soviets and world Communism. Clearly McGovern did not object to American military engagements for rightist reasons.

My own list of interwar American Rightists would include predominantly men of letters, e.g., Wallace Stevens, H.L. Mencken, George Santayana (who was Stevens’s teacher at Harvard and longtime correspondent), Robert Lee Frost, the Southern Agrarians, and pro-fascist literati Ezra Pound and Lovecraft, (if accept these figures as part of a specifically American Right). Although Isabel Patterson and John T. Flynn may have regarded themselves as more libertarian than rightist, both these authors provide characteristically American rightist criticism of the progress of the democratic idea. The same is true of the novelist and founder of the libertarian movement Rose Wilder Lane, whose sympathetic portrayal of an older America in “House on the Prairie” has earned the disapproval of our present ruling class. Many of our rightist authors considered themselves to be literary modernists, e.g., Stevens, Pound and Jeffers. But as has been frequently observed, modernist writers were often political reactionaries, who combined literary innovations with decidedly rightist opinions about politics. Significantly, not only Mencken but also Stevens admired Nietzsche, although in Stevens’s case this admiration was motivated by aesthetic affinity rather than discernible political agreement.

This occasions the inevitable question why so many generation defining writers, particularly poets, in the interwar years took political and cultural positions that were diametrically opposed to those of our current literary and cultural elites. Allow me to provide one obvious answer that would cause me to be dismissed from an academic post if I were still unlucky enough to hold one. Some of the names I’ve been listing belonged to scions of long settled WASP families, e.g., Frost, Stevens, Jeffers, and, at least on one side, Santayana, and these figures cherished memories of an older American society that they considered in crisis.  Jeffers was the son of a Presbyterian minister from Pittsburgh, who was a well-known classical scholar. By the time he was twelve this future poet and precocious linguist knew German and French as well as English and later followed the example of his minister father by studying classics, in Europe as well as in the US.

Other figures of the literary Right despised egalitarianism, which was a defining attitude of the self-identified Nietzschean Mencken. The Sage of Baltimore typified what the Italian Marxist Domenico Losurdo describes as “aristocratic individualism” and which Losurdo and Mencken identified with the German philosopher Nietzsche. This anti-egalitarian individualism was easily detected in such figures as Mencken, Pound and the Jeffersonian libertarian, Albert J. Nock.

états-unis,droite américaine,conservatisme,conservatisme américain,littérature,lettres,lettres américaines,littérature américaine,histoire,paul gottfried,philosophie,nietzschéismeIt may be Nock’s “Memoirs of a Superfluous Man” (1943) with its laments against modern leveling tendencies, and Nock’s earlier work “Our Enemy, The State” (1935) which incorporated most persuasively for me this concept of aristocratic individualism. Nock opposed the modern state not principally because he disapproved of its economic policies (although he may not have liked them as well) but because he viewed it as an instrument of destroying valid human distinctions. His revisionist work Myth of a Guilty Nation, which I’m about to reread, has not lost its power since Nock’s attack on World War One Allied propaganda was first published in 1922. Even more than Mencken, whose antiwar fervor in 1914 may have reflected his strongly pro-German bias, Nock opposed American involvement in World War One for the proper moral reasons, namely that the Western world was devouring itself in a totally needless conflagration. Curiously the self-described Burkean Russell Kirk depicts his discovery of Nock’s Memoirs of a Superfluous Man on an isolated army base in Utah during World War Two as a spiritual awakening. Robert Nisbet recounts the same experience in the same way in very similar circumstances. 

Generational influence:

These interwar rightists of various stripes took advantage of a rich academic-educational as well as literary milieu that was still dominated by a WASP patrician class before its descendants sank into Jed Bushism or even worse. These men and women of letters were still living in a society featuring classes, gender roles, predominantly family owned factories, small town manners, and bourgeois decencies. Even those who like Jeffers, Nock and Mencken viewed themselves as iconoclasts, today may seem, even to our fake conservatives, to be thorough reactionary. The world has changed many times in many ways since these iconoclasts walked the Earth. I still recall attending a seminar of literary scholars as a graduate student in Yale in 1965, ten years after the death of Wallace Stevens, and being informed that although Stevens was a distinguished poet, it was rumored that he was a Republican. Someone else then chimed in that Stevens was supposed to have opposed the New Deal, something that caused consternation among those who were attending. At the times I had reservations about the same political development but kept my views to myself. One could only imagine what the acceptance price for a writer in a comparable academic circle at Yale would be at the present hour. Perhaps the advocacy of state-required transgendered restrooms spaced twenty feet apart from each other or some even more bizarre display of Political Correctness.  I shudder to think.

But arguably the signs of what was to come were already present back in the mid-1960s. What was even then fading was the academic society that still existed when Stevens attended Harvard, Frost Dartmouth, though only for a semester, or Nock the still recognizably traditional Episcopal Barth College. Our elite universities were not likely to produce even in the 1960s Pleiades of right-wing iconoclasts, as they had in the interwar years and even before the First World War.  And not incidentally the form of American conservatism that came out of Yale in the post-war years quickly degenerated into something far less appealing than what it replaced. It became a movement in which members were taught to march in lockstep while advocating far-flung American military entanglements. The step had already been taken that led from the interwar Right to what today is conservatism, inc. Somehow the interwar tradition looks better and better with the passage of time.

mercredi, 13 février 2019

Karlheinz Weißmann: Der Konservative und die Rechte - Ein gespanntes Verhaeltnis

KHW-Bericht.jpg

Karlheinz Weißmann: Der Konservative und die Rechte - Ein gespanntes Verhaeltnis

 
Der Historiker Karlheinz Weißmann sprach am 31. Januar 2019 zur Thematik „Der Konservative und die Rechte – Ein gespanntes Verhältnis“. Sein Vortrag diente der Klärung der Begriffe und der damit verknüpften Inhalte, um zu einer Versachlichung der Debatte beizutragen. Weißmann stellte zunächst die historische Entwicklung des politischen Spektrums in links, liberal und rechts dar. Konservatismus sei dabei eine von drei politischen Hauptströmungen innerhalb der Rechten, die sich grundlegend von den anderen beiden (Bonapartisten und Völkische) unterscheide.
 

dimanche, 16 décembre 2018

Edmund Burke & the French Revolutionaries

edmund_burke_quote_2.jpg

Edmund Burke & the French Revolutionaries

Ex: http://www.theimaginativeconservative.com 

The French Revolutionaries, Edmund Burke rightly understood, sought not just the overturning of the old, but, critically, they also desired the destruction of the true, the good, and the beautiful. Only by lying about the nature of the human person could they accomplish their goals…

One of the most important duties of any good person, Edmund Burke argued, was to study, to understand, and to meditate upon the meaning of human nature, its consistencies as well as its gothic deviations from the norm across history. Granted, not everyone had the leisure to ponder this question as often as necessary or as deeply as possible, but this did not lessen the duty. For the vast majority of humanity, they would have to rest content with the vision of human nature as seen in themselves and in their neighbors, as observed in the market and the pub, and as heard from the pulpit.

For those who had the leisure, however, they should spend much of their time considering the nature, follies, and dignity of humanity as a whole as well as in its particulars. This was the first duty of a man of letters, a scholar, an aristocrat, and a priest. In the last decade of his own life, Burke admitted with some satisfaction, he had devoted a significant part of his own thought to the questions of humanity and its nature. “I should be unfit to take even my humble part in the service of mankind,” he wrote, had he neglected this first and highest duty of the good person. Such a study anchored one in humility as well as wisdom, noting that while there would always be those who lived at the margins, they were, while not marginalia, exceptions that proved the norm. Exceptions would always exist in nature, but to focus on them was to miss the essence and dignity of a thing. When studying only the margins, one would be apt to exaggerate the good or the evil, mistaking a particular truth to be a universal one.

When Burke examined the French Revolutionary arguments against the French aristocracy, he found, not surprisingly, that while the Revolutionaries had acquainted themselves very well with the particular evils as practiced by particular aristocrats, they had missed the norm, the essence of the aristocratic class.

Certainly, the Anglo-Irish statesman and philosopher agreed, one could find mistakes, some of which might be horrendous. Of those French aristocrats who lived at the end of the eighteenth century, Burke observed three general failings. First, French aristocrats behaved as children long after they had attained adulthood. They took from their families more than they gave, well past the years of irresponsibility. Second, too many French aristocrats had absorbed and manifested the ignobility of enlightenment philosophy, themselves disgusted with the past and ready thoughtlessly to revolutionize society. They had come to see the past, tradition, mores, norms, and association as means by which to shackle rather than to promote human dignity and freedom. They had, in other words, Burke worried, read way too much Locke and Rousseau and not enough Socrates and Cicero. Third, he claimed, the old aristocracy has held onto its privileges too long and too tenaciously, not allowing the many who had earned it in the eighteenth century into their own ranks. Thus, Burke noted with regret, by being both ignorant in philosophy and selfish in position, they had failed to see the creation of their own enemy class, those who had worked and given, but had not received the titles and honors so richly bestowed. Nowhere in French society did this prove more blatant than in the military orders. There, the old aristocracy remained obnoxiously over-represented, endangering the internal as well as the external order of French society.

Despite these failings, though, Burke noted with much satisfaction that when the French Revolution began in 1789, the monarch as well as the majority of aristocrats apologized for their selfish errors and had been the first to admit that their own orders needed reform for the good and benefit of the whole of society.

Read their instructions to their representatives. They breathe the spirit of liberty as warmly, and they recommend reformation as strongly, as any other order. Their privileges relative to contribution were voluntarily surrendered; as the king, from the beginning, surrendered all pretence to a right of taxation. Upon a free constitution there was but one opinion in France. The absolute monarchy was at an end. It breathed its last, without a groan, without struggle, without convulsion.

S9-B23-02.jpgSuch an apology and a reform (or series of reforms) the real revolutionaries mightily feared. Never had they actually sought reform of French society, whatever their claims and protestations. Instead, from the moment they began the revolution in 1789, they wanted to destroy and overturn all that opposed them and to do so utterly and completely, leaving no remnant and no possible opposition. To destroy as violently and wholly as possible, they needed to make a caricature of the aristocrat and the monarch. They needed to take the particular evils of each and make the average person believe them the universal and norm of each. Rather than examining the human condition, the true revolutionaries exaggerated its faults as manifested in the elites of society. They, Burke claimed in true Aristotelian and Thomistic fashion, redefined the thing, claiming its accidents to be its essence. Being revolutionaries, they could not create, they could only mock and pervert. Though the revolutionaries claimed to hate the violence and errors of the aristocracy, they submitted themselves to the very same evils, creating excuses for their own sins, as if necessary to expiate all of those of the past.

Thus, by attacking the best as the worst, the revolutionaries sought to kill the very heart of France, those who gave it its fame. Were they flawed? Of course, what human being is not? Did they sin? Of course, what human being is without? But, they had done much good, as well, as most humans do. “All this violent cry against the nobility I take to be a mere work of art,” Burke sagaciously noted. In their cries, the revolutionaries proved that they hated not just the nobility but all nobility. Properly understood, “nobility is a graceful ornament to the civil order. It is the Corinthian capital of polished society,” Burke argued, and “Omnes boni nobilitati semper favemus, was the saying of a wise and good man. It is indeed one sign of a liberal and benevolent mind to incline to it with some sort of partial propensity.”

The French Revolutionaries, Burke rightly understood, sought not just the overturning of the old, but, critically, they also desired the destruction of the true, the good, and the beautiful. Only by lying about the nature of the human person could they accomplish their goals. In fighting evil (or, at least as they claimed), they not only absorbed and perpetuated evil, but they mocked the good.

This essay is the twelfth essay in a series.

The Imaginative Conservative applies the principle of appreciation to the discussion of culture and politics—we approach dialogue with magnanimity rather than with mere civility. Will you help us remain a refreshing oasis in the increasingly contentious arena of modern discourse? Please consider donating now

mercredi, 14 novembre 2018

Éléments pour un alter-européisme de Droite

Europa_auf_dem_Stier.jpg

Éléments pour un alter-européisme de Droite

par Thierry DUROLLE

Il y a un an, Europe Maxima mettait en ligne la recension d’un opuscule exhumé de la fin des années 1970 intitulé Pour en finir avec le fascisme. Essai de critique traditionaliste-révolutionnaire. Les auteurs, respectivement Georges Gondinet et Daniel Cologne, sont connus pour leur engagement dans ce que l’on nomma à l’époque le « traditionalisme-révolutionnaire ».

Le lecteur coutumier de nos articles sait que nous avons toujours revendiqué l’influence de ce courant, et plus largement de la Tradition qui est la base de notre vision du monde, bien que d’autres éléments viennent s’y greffer. Le traditionalisme-révolutionnaire connut une certaine effervescence grâce aux auteurs de cet opuscule recensé. Nous rappellerons que celui qui nous intéresse aujourd’hui, à savoir Daniel Cologne, compte parmi les collaborateurs réguliers de ce site.

À la fin de notre recension de Pour en finir avec le fascisme, nous évoquions une brochure de Daniel Cologne répondant au nom d’Éléments pour un nouveau nationalisme. Nous allons tenter de dégager les principales idées d’un court écrit qui, lui aussi, mériterait d’être réédité.

Nous n’avions aucune idée de qui était Daniel Cologne avant de recevoir par « hasard » sa brochure, il y a quelques années. L’auteur y esquissait les contours de ce que nous appelons une Droite authentique, c’est-à-dire une Droite d’obédience évolienne. Cette brochure sans prétention nous apparut dès lors comme un outil militant de premier choix. En effet, Daniel Cologne contourne le marécage de l’intellectualisme pour aller droit au but, tout en faisant preuve d’un excellent esprit de synthèse.

Dans le premier chapitre, Le mythe de la troisième voie, il redéfinit les enjeux qui se cachent derrière les deux blocs. Il écrit que « la véritable alternative n’est pas : capitalisme ou communisme, mais matérialisme ou antimatérialisme. Le vrai choix politique ne doit pas se faire entre la démocratie libérale et la démocratie populaire, mais entre l’égalitarisme et l’élitisme. L’antimatérialisme et l’élitisme ne sont pas les éléments constitutifs d’une “ troisième voie ” idéologique parmi d’autres, mais les composantes d’un courant authentiquement révolutionnaire opposé à la collusion capitalisto-communiste et à l’hydre à deux têtes de la démocratie (p. 7) ».

Capitalisme et communisme sont les deux faces d’une même pièce nommée matérialisme. Du point de vue traditionnel, il s’agit d’une inversion totale de la hiérarchie tri-fonctionnelle puisque la matière, que nous pouvons associer à la caste des producteurs et des marchands, a l’ascendant sur l’esprit associé à la caste sacerdotale. Nous pouvons ajouter ici que la première fonction étant éclipsé dans l’Âge de Fer, celle-ci se voit même parodiée par ce que Oswald Spengler nommait « seconde religiosité ».

Cologne-Nat-202x300.jpgEnsuite, Daniel Cologne tente de définir la Droite dans un deuxième chapitre. Celui-ci fait le constat qu’« une des plus belles victoires du terrorisme intellectuel de la Gauche a été d’imposer à l’opinion une fausse définition de la Droite (p. 9) ». Sa définition de la Droite est en fait synonyme de verticalité, belle référence évolienne. « Julius Evola propose d’ailleurs de redéfinir la Droite comme une tournure d’esprit traditionaliste. L’homme de droite est celui qui adhère aux valeurs dont on trouve l’empreinte dans toutes les grandes civilisations indo-européennes : prééminence du politique, de l’éthique et du culturel sur l’économique et le social, nécessité d’un État fort capable d’organiser en un tout cohérent la pluralité naturelle de la société, nécessité de l’aristocratie (au sens étymologique grec de “ gouvernement des meilleurs ”), reconnaissance des valeurs héroïques comme critères de l’élite, refus du matérialisme (p.10). »

L’auteur ajoute : « Disons plus exactement que la Droite se reconnaît de façon générale à son traditionalisme, par opposition à la Gauche où se rejoignent toutes les idéologies antitraditionnelles : libéralisme bourgeois, socialisme marxiste, anarchisme (p. 10). »

Les concepts de Gauche et de Droite sont éternelles puisque métaphysiques. Que des idées viennent de gauche ou de droite, ou se trouvent dorénavant dans un camp et non plus dans l’autre n’est pas important en soit.

Daniel Cologne poursuit en expliquant ses vues sur l’évolution du nationalisme. Il rend d’abord hommage à Charles Maurras qui a su développer une doctrine nationaliste à tendance positiviste. Celle-ci répond, selon l’auteur de la brochure, à « l’être-jeté-dans-le-monde » de Heidegger en l’ancrant dans un cadre concret. « L’enracinement dans les cercles concentriques que constituent les diverses communautés vitales – famille, cité, nation, civilisation – apporte une réponse immédiate et définitive à la problématique de la Geworfenheit. Le nationalisme est conçu comme le nécessaire attachement à l’une de ces communautés vitales, en l’occurrence la nation (p. 14). »

Ce qui est intéressant dans cette partie de l’exposé de Daniel Cologne réside dans sa compréhension de la nécessité d’un nationalisme prenant en compte les ethnies et les patries charnelles. « La problématique de la lutte des classes s’est considérablement estompée sous l’effet du progrès social pour faire place à une autre problématique bien plus importante aujourd’hui : celle des ethnies. Le réveil des patries charnelles est le grand fait social de l’après-guerre (p. 17) . »

Cette prise en compte doit ainsi se traduire par une ouverture du nationalisme sur l’Europe. L’expression de nationalisme européen nous semble inadéquate; préférons le terme d’altereuropéisme. L’auteur conclut que « le seul moyen de résoudre l’épineuse question des ethnies, dont le réveil menace les nations d’éclatement, est d’ouvrir les nationalismes sur l’Europe. D’une part, le nationalisme doit emprunter à la grande tradition politique de notre continent la notion d’État organique qui concilie l’unité nécessaire à toute société évoluée avec le respect, voire l’encouragement de sa diversité naturelle. Conçu de façon organique, le nationalisme s’accommode d’une certaine autonomie des régions. D’autre part, si la nation, loin de s’ériger en un absolu, se considère seulement comme une composante autonome du grand ensemble organique européen, les régions et les ethnies n’auront aucune peine à se considérer comme les incarnations nécessaires du principe de diversité au sein de la grande unité nationale. Dans une Europe organique des nations organiques, être breton ou français, basque ou espagnol, flamand ou belge, jurassien ou suisse ne sont que des manières parmi d’autres d’être européen (p. 18). »

L’Europe de Daniel Cologne peut se résumer à « la spiritualité héroïque, l’organicisme et l’aristocratie (p. 19) ». La bonne direction selon lui ? « Tant que l’esprit ordonne la matière, nous sommes dans le domaine des cultures supérieures (p. 19) ». La substantifique moelle d’Éléments pour un nouveau nationalisme se trouve condensée dans le paragraphe suivant. « L’héroïsme est l’etymon spirituel européen, l’idée maîtresse de notre culture, la constante de notre tradition s’exprimant à travers toutes les activités de notre esprit : arts, lettres, sciences. […] La concrétisation politique de l’etymon spirituel héroïque de l’Europe est la conception organique et aristocratique de l’État chère à notre continent. L’État organique concilie la diversité et l’unité, par opposition à l’État totalitaire qui annihile la diversité par la force et par opposition à l’anti-État pluraliste qui hypothèque l’unité en favorisant le développement des différences jusqu’à l’absurde (p. 20). »

En conclusion, Daniel Cologne met en garde le lecteur quant à la direction emprunté par le nationalisme-révolutionnaire. Nous ne pouvons qu’approuver son propos. « Le côté révolutionnaire du nationalisme de demain ne réside pas tellement dans l’acceptation d’une certaine forme de socialisme (p. 24) » puisque « l’alliance du nationalisme avec le socialisme démarxisé s’inscrit dans le “ sens de l’histoire ”, ce qui est précisément tout le contraire de la démarche révolutionnaire. […] Le nationalisme-révolutionnaire peut promouvoir dans le domaine de l’économie une certaine forme de socialisme, autant il doit se présenter, sur les plans spirituel,culturel, éthique et politique, comme une des incarnations les plus fidèles de la tradition européenne (p. 25) ».

En définitive, Éléments pour un nouveau nationalismes réussit le pari d’exposer des idées claires, permettant à quiconque, mais plus spécialement aux militants, de saisir les grandes lignes doctrinales d’une Droite authentique et alter-européenne. Plusieurs concepts importants sont évoqués et constituent autant de pistes à explorer, à approfondir et à intégrer. Bien que datant de 1977, ce texte demeure toujours aussi pertinent. Nous croyons en outre que le format court, c’est-à-dire celui des brochures, opuscules et autres vade-mecum, devrait également faire son grand retour à l’heure où les lectures et leurs lecteurs se font de plus en plus rares.

Thierry Durolle

• Daniel Cologne, Éléments pour un nouveau nationalisme, Cercle Culture et Liberté. Pour une Europe libre et unie, 1977, 27 p.

lundi, 24 septembre 2018

La trahison conservatrice

epp.jpg

La trahison conservatrice

par Georges FELTIN-TRACOL

Chers Amis de Radio Libertés,

Dans la soirée du 12 septembre 2018, la caste médiatique hexagonale ne pouvait pas s’empêcher de jubiler et d’avoir une éjouissance journalistique. À l’instigation d’un député Vert féminin néerlandais de seconde classe, le Parlement prétendu européen déclencha par 448 voix, et nonobstant 48 abstentions, la procédure prévue à l’article 7 contre la Hongrie pour une violation putative de l’État de droit.

Quelques heures plus tôt, arrivé spécialement de Budapest, le Ministre-président de la Hongrie, Viktor Orban, n’eut qu’une petite dizaine de minutes pour se défendre devant un parterre de clampins peu représentatifs du fait d’une abstention élevée aux élections européennes. Le chef du gouvernement hongrois, lui, a été triomphalement réélu pour la deuxième fois consécutive avec la confiance massive de ses concitoyens qui furent nombreux à participer au scrutin. Ce si court temps de parole accordé à un authentique représentant du peuple ne surprend pas de la part de ce zoo illégitime qui ne sait que donner des leçons à la terre entière sans jamais se les appliquer.

La surprise de ce vote scandaleux surgit des rangs du Parti populaire européen (PPE), la coalition conservatrice à laquelle appartient le Fidesz. Si les élus de Forza Italia ! ont soutenu le dirigeant magyar à l’instar de leurs compatriotes de la Lega et des autres groupes eurosceptiques, soit un total de 177 voix, les eurodéputés du M5S ralliant le camp majoritaire, le PPE a étalé de profondes divisions. Par exemple, sur les dix-huit Les Républicains, dont le président Laurent Wauquiez tient dans les médiats une ligne dure sur l’immigration, seuls trois d’entre eux dont la sarközyste Nadine Morano ont défendu le gouvernement hongrois tandis que neuf illustres inconnus tels Tokia Saïfi, Jérôme Lavrilleux alias « Le chialeur du 20 heures » ou Alain Lamassoure, ont accepté la doxa immigrationniste. Enfin, huit autres ne prirent pas part au vote ou s’abstinrent. Il faut en nommer certains, réputés pour leurs convictions soi-disant de « droite » : Michèle Alliot-Marie, Brice Hortefeux, Rachida Dati et Geoffroy Didier, ancien animateur d’une « Droite forte » (seulement devant les caméras).

Pis, le chancelier conservateur, Sebastian Kurz, président semestriel de l’Union dite européenne, a ordonné à sa délégation conservatrice d’approuver le rapport gauchiste. Il sort ainsi de l’ambiguïté et prouve qu’il garde plus d’affinités avec la rombière de Berlin qu’avec le fringant dirigeant hongrois. L’Autrichien a tout bonnement enterré toute coopération néo-« austro-hongroise » avec le très surfait Groupe de Visegrad. L’attitude de Vienne démontre que le conservatisme actuel préfère se diluer dans le libéralisme et s’éloigne ainsi de l’innovation illibérale. Quant à Viktor Orban, malgré des prises de position pro-israéliennes et libre-échangistes remarquées, il prendra peut-être enfin conscience de l’ampleur de la collusion entre la « droite d’affaires » et l’égalitarisme cosmopolite.

Au même titre que les groupes gauchiste, socialiste, vert-régionaliste et centriste-libéral, le groupe PPE devient plus que jamais un foyer infectieux évident d’économisme bêlant et de droit-de-l’hommisme affligeant. Président de ce groupe à Bruxelles – Strasbourg, le Bavarois de la CSU Manfred Weber, par ailleurs candidat à la présidence de la Commission, avoue volontiers collaborer avec les anti-Européens. « Je me suis engagé durant cette période législative, rassure-t-il au Monde (du 11 septembre 2018), pour qu’aucune force d’extrême droite ne puisse atteindre un poste important [au sein de ce Parlement]. Le PPE a même voté pour des communistes afin de préserver ces postes. » En évoquant les représentants de l’« extrême droite », Weber estime que « ces gens sont des ennemis et ils ne doivent avoir aucun rôle dans les institutions de l’Union ». Quant au président du PPE, l’Alsacien Joseph Daul, il affirme en digne expert de la novlangue mondialiste que « l’Union européenne est basée sur la liberté, la démocratie, l’égalité, la liberté académique, l’État de droit, le respect des droits de l’homme et une société civile libre. Ce sont des valeurs inviolables. Le PPE ne fera aucun compromis, quelles que soient les appartenances politiques (dans Le Figaro du 12 septembre 2018) ». Par cette intervention hilarante s’est révélé un brillant comique, expert en haute-fumisterie !

Largement influencé par des penseurs anglo-saxons d’hier ou d’aujourd’hui comme Edmund Burke et Roger Scruton, le conservatisme continental de ce début du XXIe siècle et sa métastase politicienne, la fameuse « union des droites », contribuent eux aussi au désarmement intellectuel des Européens. Ils ne peuvent pas être des réponses viables aux enjeux fondamentaux du Vieux Continent. Ils incarnent un autre mal que les révolutionnaires traditionalistes communautaires doivent extirper au plus vite de l’opinion. Souhaitons donc que le vote du 12 septembre dernier accélère la décomposition des supposées « droites » européennes !

Bonjour chez vous !

Georges Feltin-Tracol

• « Chronique hebdomadaire du Village planétaire », n° 91, diffusée sur Radio-Libertés, le 21 septembre 2018.

lundi, 12 mars 2018

Qui se souvient de Juan Donoso Cortès?

« Qui se souvient de Juan Donoso Cortès ? » : c’est sur cette interrogation que Christophe Boutin introduit l’entrée « Donoso Cortès » dans l’excellent Dictionnaire du conservatisme dont il est à l’origine avec Frédéric Rouvillois et Olivier Dard.

Qui se souvient en effet de cet espagnol éclectique qui a partagé sa vie entre l’Espagne où il est né et la France où il est mort après quelques tribulations européennes ?

Juriste de formation, historien par passion, homme politique par devoir, diplomate autant par nature que par vocation (ambassadeur d’Espagne à Berlin puis à Paris), il restera auprès des érudits comme un formidable ciseleur de formules et un orateur au souffle puissant. Ne lui en faut-il pas d’ailleurs, pour énoncer son identité complète : Juan Francisco Maria de la Salud Donoso Cortès y Fernandez Canedo, marquis de Valdegamas. Ouf !

Tout au long d’une vie trépidante, il observe ses contemporains et les institutions qui les gouvernent. Certaines de ses observations sont des plus pertinentes, notamment lorsqu’il pose un regard aigu sur la société française : « Chez les peuples qui sont ingouvernables, le gouvernement prend nécessairement les formes républicaines ; c’est pourquoi la république subsiste et subsistera en France. »

Il souligne ce qui pour lui en est la cause : « Le grand crime du libéralisme, c’est d’avoir tellement détruit le tempérament de la société qu’elle ne peut rien supporter, ni le bien, ni le mal. »

Voilà qui en 2018 et entre deux grèves des services publics, rassurera les hommes politiques inquiets sur l’avenir de nos institutions. Encore que, à en croire Donoso, le président et ses ministres devraient s’interroger sur la réalité des pouvoirs qu’ils croient détenir : « Un des caractères de l’époque actuelle, c’est l’absence de toute légitimité. Les races gouvernantes ont perdu la faculté de gouverner ; les peuples la faculté d’être gouverné. Il y a donc dans la société absence forcée de gouvernement. »

Donoso souligne l’évolution perverse de la classe dirigeante devenue « une classe discutante » qui répugne à assumer son vrai rôle et de ce fait devient incapable de décider : « Il est de l’essence du libéralisme bourgeois de ne pas décider […], mais d’essayer, à la place de cette décision, d’entamer une discussion. »

N’est-ce pas ce qui pousse nos gouvernements, lorsqu’ils craignent de trancher, à créer ces commissions Théodule moquées par De Gaulle.

Il dénonce la complicité entre le pouvoir et la presse d’information accusée de dégoupiller ces grenades fumigènes destinées justement à enfumer l’opinion : « Le journalisme c’est le moyen le plus efficace inventé par les hommes pour cacher ce que tout le monde doit savoir… »

Et c’est ainsi que, pour Donoso Cortès, s’ouvre la voie à cette dérive des institutions qui conduit à faire entrer « l’esprit révolutionnaire dans le Parlement. »

Ce noble espagnol qui connaît l’Europe pour l’avoir sillonnée en différentes circonstances, devine les risques qui la guettent : « Je représente la tradition, par laquelle les nations demeurent dans toute l’étendue des siècles. Si ma voix à une quelconque autorité, Messieurs, ce n’est pas parce que c’est la mienne : c’est parce que c’est la voix de nos pères. »

JDC-cit.png

Donoso Cortès traverse des temps troublés dans lesquels révolutions, révoltes et pronunciamientos alimentent les chroniques et ne laissent guère d’options aux populations qui les subissent. Il en vient à considérer qu’en période de crise il ne reste plus qu’à choisir entre la dictature du poignard et celle du sabre. D’où sa conclusion « je choisis la dictature du sabre parce qu’elle est plus noble. » Et n’est-ce pas cette dictature du poignard que nous vivons quand, en ce début de troisième millénaire, nous assistons à ces morts politiques qui relèvent davantage d’une embuscade de ruffians que d’un duel entre gentilshommes.

Il perçoit dans les tendances politiques qui semblent se dégager les signes avant-coureurs « dun nouveau paganisme (qui) tombera dans un abîme plus profond et plus horrible encore. Celui qui doit lui river sur la tête le joug de ses impudiques et féroces insolences, s’agite déjà dans la fange des cloaques sociaux. »

Ne trouvez-vous pas quelque actualité à ces propos ?

Mais je vous prie d’excuser ma distraction. J’ai omis de vous préciser que ce monsieur est né en 1809 et mort en 1853.

Décidément comme l’affirmait le roi Salomon, il y a quelques années déjà, rien de nouveau sous le soleil.

mardi, 23 janvier 2018

Le vicomte de Bonald et le lugubre destin anglo-saxon

louis-bonald-barberis-620x330.jpg

Le vicomte de Bonald et le lugubre destin anglo-saxon

par Nicolas Bonnal

Ex: http://www.dedefensa.org

Nous sommes dominés par le monde anglo-américain depuis deux siècles, et sommes à la veille de la troisième guerre mondiale voulue par ses élites folles. Alors une petite synthèse.

J’ai glané ces citations sur archive.org, dans les dix-sept volumes de Bonald (1754-1838), cet unique défenseur de la Tradition (j’allais écrire bon guénonien : hyperboréenne) française. Je les distribue à mes lecteurs au petit bonheur.

A l’époque de Macron et de l’oligarchie mondialiste, ce rappel :

« Ceci nous ramène à la constitution de l'Angleterre, où il n'y a pas de corps de noblesse destinée à servir le pouvoir, mais un patriciat destiné à l'exercer. »

J’ai souvent cité ce surprenant passage des Mémoires d’Outre-tombe de Chateaubriand (3 L32 Chapitre 2) :

« Ainsi ces Anglais qui vivent à l'abri dans leur île, vont porter les révolutions chez les autres ; vous les trouvez mêlés dans les quatre parties du monde à des querelles qui ne les regardent pas : pour vendre une pièce de calicot, peu leur importe de plonger une nation dans toutes les calamités. »

On comprend enfin que le commerce américain ne prépare pas la paix mais la guerre. Bonald se montre ici d’accord avec les marxistes (comme souvent) en rappelant que l’Angleterre est toujours en guerre :

« L'Angleterre est en système habituel, je dirais presque naturel de guerre, ou du moins d'opposition, avec tous les peuples du monde, et le repos ne peut être pour elle qu'un état forcé et accidentel. Cet état d'opposition est totalement indépendant des dispositions personnelles et du caractère particulier de ceux qui la gouvernent : il tient à sa position insulaire, à sa constitution populaire, qui donne à sa politique un caractère inquiet et agresseur, et qui la place constamment dans le système d'accroissement, et jamais dans celui de repos et de stabilité; en sorte que, comme elle est continuellement agitée au dedans, on peut dire qu'elle entretient au dehors et dans le monde politique le mouvement perpétuel. »

LdB-cit57051.png

Sur le même inquiétant sujet Bonald ajoute, non sans quelque réminiscence de Thucydide (voyez livre premier, CXL et suivantes):

« Cette disposition à toujours s'étendre, et cette facilité à attaquer partout, ont, dans tous les temps, donné aux peuples dominateurs des mers, comme l'observe Montesquieu, un tour particulier d'esprit impérieux et arrogant, dont les Anglais ne sont pas exempts; en sorte que le caractère particulier de l'Anglais est la soif démesurée d'acquérir et la fureur de la cupidité, parce que le système politique de l'Angleterre est une tendance sans mesure à l'accroissement. »

Sanctions économiques et commerciales ? L’Angleterre les applique déjà :

« L'Angleterre n'attaque pas le territoire de tous les peuples; mais elle en attaque le commerce ou par la force ou par la ruse…

Au reste, les peuples commerçants ont tous plus ou moins de cet esprit envahisseur, comme tous les hommes qui font le commerce ont tous le désir de s'enrichir les uns aux dépens des autres. »

Bonald offre une belle comparaison psychologique entre les peuples agricoles qui ont disparu et les commerçants :

« Et il est peut-être vrai de dire que le commerce, qui peuple les cités, rapproche les hommes sans les réunir, et que l'agriculture, qui les isole dans les campagnes, les réunit sans les rapprocher. »

Et de conclure cruellement sur le destin colonial anglo-saxon :

« Ainsi le vol et l'intempérance, vices particuliers aux sauvages, sont très-communs chez les Anglais. Le peuple y est féroce jusque dans ses jeux; les voyageurs l'accusent d'un penchant extrême à la superstition, autres caractères des peuples sauvages… »

Si « le credo a été remplacé par le crédit » (Marx toujours), la superstition aujourd’hui c’est le fanatisme médiatique (voyez Macluhan encore et la galaxie Gutenberg). Ces peuples soi-disant libres sont toujours les plus conditionnés par la presse et leurs médias. « L’ineptie qui se fait respecter partout, il n’est plus permis d’en rire », écrit un Guy Debord toujours hautement inspiré.

LdB-cit2-40094.png

L’Angleterre, rappelle Bonald est aussi philosophe (« quelle race peu philosophique que ces Anglais », écrira Nietzsche dans Jenseits, §252), et sa philosophie a créé le bourgeois moderne, « le dernier homme », comme l’a bien vu Fukuyama (The end of history, chapter XVII) :

« On pourrait, avec plus de raison, représenter l'Angleterre exportant dans les autres États le philosophisme, dissolvant universel qu'elle nous a envoyé un peu brut à la vérité, mais que nous avons raffiné en France avec un si déplorable succès. »

Hélas, l’Angleterre est une puissance mimétique, disait René Girard, et Bonald avant lui :

« Les autres nations, et particulièrement la France, n'ont pas fait assez d'attention à cet engouement général que les Anglais ont eu l'art d'inspirer pour leurs mœurs, leurs usages, leur littérature, leur constitution. »

Bonald voit poindre le continent américain, qui sauvera les miséreux de Dickens d’une organisation sociale scandaleuse (combien de famines, de pendaisons, de déportations ?) :

« Dans l’état où se trouvent aujourd'hui les deux mondes, il en faudrait un troisième où pussent se réfugier tous les malheureux et tous les mécontents. L'Amérique, dans l'autre siècle, sauva peut-être l'Angleterre d'un bouleversement total. »

Bonald explique même l’excentricité britannique :

« Après les changements religieux et politiques arrivés en Angleterre sous Henri VIII, on remarqua dans cette île une prodigieuse quantité de fous, et il y a encore plus d'hommes singuliers que partout ailleurs. »

Les individus et même le pays peuvent rester sympathiques (William Morris, Chesterton, Tolkien, mes témoins de mariage…) :

« Heureusement pour l'Angleterre, elle a conservé de vieux sentiments, avec ou plutôt malgré ses institutions. »

Surtout, l’Angleterre ne défend que l’argent :

« Dans ce gouvernement, il est, dans les temps ordinaires, plus aisé au particulier de constituer en prison son débiteur, qu'au roi de faire arrêter un séditieux, et il est moins dangereux pour sa liberté personnelle d'ourdir une conspiration que d'endosser une lettre de change; c'est ce qu'on appelle la liberté publique. »

LdB-cit3-.png

Il faut dire que le roi là-bas n’est pas un monarque.

Le modèle social (Bonald écrit avant Dickens, il est contemporain du grand penseur incompris Godwin) reste ignominieux et humainement destructeur :

« Les fabriques et les manufactures qui entassent dans des lieux chauds et humides des enfants des deux sexes, altèrent les formes du corps et dépravent les âmes. La famille y gagne de l'argent, des infirmités et des vices ; et l'État une population qui vit dans les cabarets et meurt dans les hôpitaux. »

Le commerce n’enrichit pas forcément les nations, rappelle notre grand esprit :

« Le commerce fait la prospérité des États; on le dit : mais avant tout il veut la sienne; et toutes les usurpations y trouvent des fournisseurs, la contrebande des assureurs, et les finances des agioteurs, qui font hausser ou baisser les fonds publics dans leur intérêt, et jamais dans celui de l'État. »

La dépravation sociale, morale, mentale, y est totale (relisez Defoe, l’affreux de Quincey ou découvrez Hogarth sous un autre angle –le rake’s progress) :

« Dans les petites villes, les spectacles et les cafés, prodigieusement multipliés, et les cabarets dans les campagnes, dépravent et ruinent toutes les classes de la société, et troublent la paix et le bonheur des familles. Les tavernes et les liqueurs fortes sont, en Angleterre, une cause féconde de mendicité. »

Déficit commercial ? Perversion de modèle économique ? Dépendance aux importations ? Lisez Bonald sur l’Angleterre :

« Telle nation qu'on regarde comme la plus riche, l'Angleterre, par exemple, est, comme nation, réellement plus pauvre que bien d'autres, parce qu'elle est, comme nation, moins indépendante, et qu'elle a, plus que les nations continentales, besoin des autres peuples et du commerce qu'elle fait avec eux, sur eux, ou contre eux, pour subsister telle qu'elle est. »

LdB-cit4.png

Surtout pas de blocus, pas d’autarcie alors :

 « De là vient que la guerre la plus dangereuse qu'on lui ait faite, est la mesure qui l'excluait des ports de toute l'Europe. »

Bonald ne parle pas de la dette publique qui émerveille Marx (Capital, I, sixième partie) et atteint 200% du PNB pendant les guerres napoléoniennes !

Le bilan du miracle industriel célébré par tous les imbéciles depuis deux siècles ou plus :

« Qu'est-il résulté en Angleterre de l'extension prodigieuse donnée à l'industrie et au système manufacturier ? une population excessive, une immense quantité de prolétaires, une taxe des pauvres qui accable les propriétaires, une guerre interminable entre agriculture , qui veut vendre ses denrées à un haut prix pour atteindre le haut prix des frais de culture, et les fabricants qui voudraient les acheter à bon marché pour pouvoir baisser le prix de leurs salaires et soutenir la concurrence dans les marchés étrangers ; l'impossibilité à une famille distinguée de vivre à Londres conformément à son rang, même avec cent mille livres de rente ; tous les extrêmes de l'opulence et de la misère, et les malheurs dont ils menacent tous les Etats. »

Et c’est ce modèle qui a triomphé dans le monde ; il n’aurait plus manqué que cela…

lundi, 08 janvier 2018

Pitirim Sorokin Revisited

sorokin_4.jpg

Pitirim Sorokin Revisited

How one scholar predicted the West's deterioration into sexual libertinism

jeudi, 02 novembre 2017

Liberalismus vs. Konservativismus – Sozialismus

Hampel-98043004.jpg

Liberalismus vs. Konservativismus – Sozialismus

Ex: http://www.unwiderstehlich.org

Das 18. Jahrhundert ist das Zeitalter der „Aufklärung“. Aus der Gesamtheit der menschlichen Kräfte löst sich die Vernunft heraus und sucht ungebunden durch religiöse Glaubenssätze und staatlich-gesellschaftliche Überlieferungsmächte die Welt zu durchdringen und ihre „eigentlichen“ Gesetze zu erkennen. Überall waren Vorurteile zu beseitigen, jahrhundertelange Irrtümer und Dunkelheiten schienen sich aufzuhellen, in allen Ländern, in Holland wie in England, in Frankreich und in Deutschland regten sich kampflustig die Geister, um die religiösen und geistigen, schließlich auch die gesellschaftlichen und politischen Formen zu zerbrechen oder jedenfalls zu wandeln und den Erkenntnissen der „Vernunft“ anzupassen.

Einer der Begriffe, mit dem eine starke Richtung des 18. Jahrhunderts aufräumen zu müssen glaubte, war der des Staates. Man empfand den Staat als Hemmung der persönlichen Freiheit und als eine betrübliche Minderung des ursprünglichen Glücks, dessen sich der Mensch im Naturzustand erfreut.

Hampel2.jpg

Der Mensch werde frei geboren, jetzt sei er aber überall in Banden, so ließ sich Rousseau (1712 – 1778) vernehmen; das komme daher, dass der Staat seine Rechte überschritten habe; der Staat beruhe auf einem Vertrag der Menschen untereinander und habe nur dann Sinn, wenn er die Freiheit des einzelnen, sein menschliches Recht und Glück sichere. Hier fehlt jeder Sinn für die großen geschichtlichen Mächte, für die schöpferische Kraft der Gemeinschaft, für Hingabe und Opfer über das persönliche Sein hinaus; aber man darf nicht vergessen, welchen Staat die Aufklärer vor sich haben: den Absolutistischen!

Der absolutistische Staat ist ohne von Gott geschöpftes Recht nicht denkbar. Der westeuropäische und schließlich der deutsche Materialismus, als ein Ergebnis der Aufklärung, ist trotz zeitbedingter Einseitigkeit eine geschichtlich notwendige, revolutionäre Bewegung gegen das geistige Mittelalter. Der orientalische Jahveismus hat sich in Verbindung mit der platonischen Ideenlehre als spiritualistische Metaphysik über Europa gelagert, die geisteswissenschaftliche Forschung dogmatisch begrenzt und die wahre Naturforschung behindert. Fast 1500 Jahre lang wurde die vom heidnischen Griechentum eingeleitete wissenschaftliche Erforschung und Beobachtung der realen Wirklichkeit unterbrochen.

Der Liberalismus als Frucht dieses Materialismus entartete jedoch wegen seiner Einseitigkeit sehr rasch und mutierte zu einer asozialen und staatsverneinenden Idee.

„Der Liberalismus behauptet, dass er alles, was er tut, für das Volk tut. Aber gerade er schaltet das Volk aus und setzt ein Ich an die Stelle. Der Liberalismus ist der Ausdruck einer Gesellschaft, die nicht mehr Gemeinschaft ist. […] Es liegt im Triebe eines jeden, dass er Individuum sein möchte, auch wenn er keines ist. Jeder Mensch, der sich nicht mehr in der Gemeinschaft fühlt, ist irgendwie liberaler Mensch. Seine Allzumenschlichkeiten sind liberal. Und die Selbstliebe ist sein eigenster Bereich.“ (Arthur Moeller van den Bruck: „Das dritte Reich“; Ring-Verlag, Berlin 1926; S. 117 ff.)

Der scharfdenkende Analyst Francis Parker Yockey gelangt in seinem Opus Magnum „Chaos oder Imperium“ zu einem vernichtenden Urteil:

„Der Liberalismus kann nur negativ definiert werden. Er ist ausschließlich Kritik, keine lebende Idee. Ein großes Schlagwort ‘Freiheit’ ist ein Negativum. Es bedeutet in Wirklichkeit Freiheit von Autorität, d.h. Auflösung des Organismus. In seinen letzten Stadien erzeugt er sozialen Atomismus, mit dem nicht nur die Autorität des Staates, sondern auch die der Gesellschaft und der Familie bekämpft wird. Die Scheidung ist der Ehe gleichrangig, die Kinder den Eltern. Seine Haltung war immer widersprüchlich, er suchte immer einen Kompromiss. Aber bei einer Krise war der Liberalismus als solcher nie vertreten; seine Anhänger schlugen sich auf die eine oder die andere Seite eines revolutionären Kampfes, je nachdem wie konsequent ihr Liberalismus und wie stark seine feindselige Einstellung zur Autorität war.“ (Francis Parker Yockey: „Chaos oder Imperium“; Grabert Verlag, Tübingen 1976; S. 120 f.)

hampel3.jpg

Im 19. Jahrhundert führte das Aufbäumen gegen den mittelalterlichen Obrigkeitsstaat im Politischen, vom Liberalismus zum marxistischen Sozialismus, andererseits zur Gegenreaktion des Konservativismus.

Werner Sombart schreibt dazu:

„Es gehört zu den Erbschaften, die der Liberalismus in Deutschland dem Jahre 1848 verdankt, dass eine seiner hervorstechenden Charaktereigentümlichkeiten eine seltsame Furcht vor dem roten Gespenst ist. Freilich hat das Proletariat ihm selbst durch sein Verhalten dazu verholfen. Es ist bekannt, wie die bürgerliche Bewegung des Jahres 1848 in Deutschland zusammengeklappt wie ein Taschenmesser sich unter die preußischen Bajonette flüchtet in dem Augenblicke, als die „gens mal intentionés“, die bekannte, in jeder bürgerlichen Revolution vorhandene demokratische Unterströmung – siehe 1789 ff.! – sich bemerkbar zu machen beginnen. Da war es vorbei mit dem Bürgerstolz und dem Bürgertrotz; und es ist immer wieder damit vorbei gewesen, sobald auch nur von Ferne das Gespenst der sozialen Revolution am Horizonte auftauchte: siehe Sozialistengesetz! So war die Brücke zwischen der proletarischen Bewegung und der bürgerlichen Opposition frühzeitig schon geborsten, um bald ganz abgebrochen zu werden.“ (Werner Sombart: „Sozialismus und soziale Bewegung im neunzehnten Jahrhundert“; Verlag von Gustav Hischer in Jena, 1897; S. 37.)

Der Konservativismus ist immer auf die eine oder andere Art und Weise der Versuch das Rad der Geschichte zurückzudrehen. Er ist zutiefst reaktionär! Mag er sich auch in verschiedenster Form verkleiden, uneingestanden ist allen Konservativen das Ressentiment gegen die Aufklärung gemein. Anstatt mutig in die Geschichte voranzuschreiten und die immer neuen Problemstellungen zu bewältigen, herrscht die Sehnsucht nach „der guten alten Zeit“ vor, die in Wahrheit bedeutet in das geistige Mittelalter zurückzukehren. Zu christlicher Dogmatik, zu Scholastik, zu Spiritualismus und Wissenschaftsfeindlichkeit. Da sich das Rad der Zeit aber nicht zurückdrehen lässt und sich der Geist der Zeit, im Unterschied zum Zeitgeist, nicht aufhalten lässt, gehört die Zukunft dem Sozialismus. Einem Sozialismus der eine gerechte Gemeinschaftsordnung bedeutet.

hampel4.jpg

Selbst für einen so freien und genialen Geist wie Goethe war die unabdingbare Rückkoppelung des Einzelnen an die Gemeinschaft über jeden Zweifel erhaben.

„Im Grunde aber sind wir alle kollektive Wesen, wir mögen uns stellen, wie wir wollen. Denn wie weniges haben und sind wir, das wir im reinsten Sinne unser Eigentum nennen! Wir müssen alle empfangen und lernen, sowohl von denen, die vor uns waren, als von denen, die mit uns sind. Selbst das größte Genie würde nicht weit kommen, wenn es alles seinem eigenen Innern verdanken wollte. Das begreifen aber viele sehr gute Menschen nicht und tappen mit ihren Träumen von Originalität ein halbes Leben im Dunkeln. […] Und was ist denn überhaupt Gutes an uns, wenn es nicht die Kraft und Neigung ist, die Mittel der äußeren Welt an uns heranzuziehen und unseren höheren Zwecken dienstbar zu machen. Ich darf wohl von mir selber reden und bescheiden sagen, wie ich fühle. Es ist wahr, ich habe in meinem langen Leben mancherlei getan und zustande gebracht, dessen ich mich allenfalls rühmen könnte. Was hatte ich aber, wenn wir ehrlich sein wollen, das eigentlich mein war, als die Fähigkeit und Neigung, zu sehen und zu hören, zu unterscheiden und zu wählen, und das Gesehene und Gehörte mit einigem Geist zu beleben und mit einiger Geschicklichkeit wiederzugeben. Ich verdanke meine Werke keineswegs meiner eigenen Weisheit allein, sondern Tausenden von Dingen und Personen außer mir, die mir dazu das Material boten.“ (Johann Peter Eckermann: „Gespräche mit Goethe“; Berlin o. J.; Eintrag vom 17.2.1832, S. 520 ff.)

Der Sozialismus als Gemeinschaftsordnung setzt voraus, dass es einen Bewertungsmaßstab gibt, der die verschiedenen Rangstufen innerhalb der Ordnung festsetzt. Dieser Maßstab ist im Nationalstaat die Leistung des Einzelnen für sein Volk. Sozialismus hat also nichts mit Gleichmacherei zu tun. Sozialismus ist ein Gemeinschaftszustand, eine Gesellschaftsordnung, zu der alle Angehörigen des Volkes zählen. Es ist unmöglich Sozialismus in rein äußeren Staats- und Wirtschaftsformen erschöpfen zu wollen. Sozialismus setzt die Gemeinschaft eines Volkes voraus und diese wiederrum gleiche Vernunft, Einsicht und Haltung.

Der Sozialismus ist also im Wesentlichen keine wirtschaftliche Angelegenheit, sondern im Grunde allumfassende Gemeinschaftsgesinnung und Gemeinschaftstat aller Glieder eines Volkes.

samedi, 28 octobre 2017

Ein Ex-Linksintellektueller wird konservativ

greiner109_v-contentgross.jpg

Ein Ex-Linksintellektueller wird konservativ

Intellektuelle wie Ulrich Greiner haben sich schon immer als kritisch verstanden. Daher waren sie links zu Zeiten, wo der Mainstream noch konservativ war. Heute ist es andersherum.

Wieder einmal: Ein ehemaliger Linksintellektueller wird konservativ. Ulrich Greiner, 1945 geboren, war Feuilletonchef der Zeit und schreibt bis heute als Autor für sie. Er stand nie so weit links wie andere, die später konservativ oder rechts wurden. Und davon gibt es viele. Dass jemand vom Konservativen zum Linken wird, geschieht vergleichsweise selten, dass jemand vom Linken zum Konservativen wird, dagegen häufig. Viele dieser bei Linken verächtlich „Konvertiten“ genannten, haben Bücher geschrieben, in denen es u.a. um die Gründe für ihren Wandel geht. Ich selbst stand in meiner Jugend sehr viel weiter links als Greiner und habe kürzlich ein Buch über meine Wandlung zum Nationalliberalen geschrieben –  schon deshalb hat mich das Thema des Buches sehr interessiert. Und ich habe viele Stellen gefunden, wo ich Ausrufezeichen gesetzt habe.

Gegen Political Correctness

greinerheimatlos.jpgIntellektuelle wie Greiner haben sich schon immer als kritisch verstanden. Daher waren sie links zu Zeiten, wo der Mainstream noch konservativ war. Heute ist es andersherum. Die Linken und die Grünen, die dominanten Akteure der Mehrheitsparteien, die „kommentierende Klasse in den Medien“: „Sie alle fürchten, die Hoheit über den sogenannten Diskurs zu verlieren und die bislang unangefochtene Macht, die moralischen Standards des Öffentlichen zu bestimmen. Käme es dahin, ich würde es begrüßen.“ (S.7) So leitet Greiner sein Buch ein. Der Autor wendet sich dagegen, „dass jede Abweichung von der Mitte nach rechts mit dem Nazi-Vorwurf mundtot gemacht“ werde (S.9).

Dabei gebe es eine deutliche Asymmetrie zwischen der öffentlichen und der veröffentlichten Meinung, wie das Beispiel der Kommentierung von Merkels „Flüchtlingspolitik” zeige. Statt diese Politik darzustellen und kritisch zu erörtern, was eigentlich Aufgabe der Medien gewesen wäre, sahen sie ihre Mission darin, die Politik der Grenzöffnung zu unterstützen, indem sie ihre humanitäre Unabwendbarkeit darstellten, um „die vom Ansturm der Ereignisse überrollte Öffentlichkeit moralisch auf den richtigen Weg zu bringen“. (S. 17)

Generell würden in der öffentlichen Debatte die Begriffe „rechts“ und „rechtsextrem“ gleichgesetzt; „links“ sei das Richtige und „rechts“ das Verdammenswerte. Was in Wahrheit seltsam sei, wenn man sich das vom Sozialismus hinterlassene Desaster vor Augen halte (S. 25). Kommunismus und Sozialismus würden noch immer für letztlich humanitäre Ideen gehalten, während alles politisch Konservative unverzüglich und erfolgreich in die Nähe des Rechtsextremismus gerückt werde (S. 37 f.).

Ein Schlüsselerlebnis

Zum guten Ton in Deutschland und generell im linksintellektuellen Diskurs gehört die Versicherung, man dürfe Nationalsozialismus und Kommunismus nicht „gleichsetzen“, ja, nicht einmal „vergleichen“. Greiner beschreibt eine Diskussion, die er im Alter von 44 Jahren mit einem Historiker, einem Überlebenden der nationalsozialistischen Konzentrationslager, führte. Dieses Gespräch war für ihn ein Schlüsselerlebnis auf dem Weg zur Abwendung vom linken Gedankengut. Greiner war einer der vielen, die sich große Mühe gaben, nachzuweisen, warum der Kommunismus doch irgendwie besser sei als der Nationalsozialismus.

Das Argument, das er seinerzeit ins Feld führte, lautete: „Der Terror Stalins und Hitlers seien unbestreitbar gleich schrecklich gewesen. Der Nationalsozialismus jedoch habe es nie zu einer konsistenten Theorie gebracht, er habe sich zusammengeklaubt, was ideologisch herumlag und brauchbar erschien, und er habe es auch nicht vermocht, Geistesgrößen und Intellektuelle dauerhaft in seinen Bann zu ziehen. Der Kommunismus hingegen blicke auf eine bedeutende philosophische Ahnengalerie zurück, die wichtigsten Intellektuellen des Jahrhunderts seien ihm wenigstens zeitweise gefolgt. Es liege daran, so etwa schloss ich in meinem jugendlichen Eifer, dass diese Idee in einem faszinierenden theoretischen System gipfelte.“ (S. 31) Nach seinen Ausführungen blickte Greiners Gesprächspartner ihn mit einem milden ironischen Lächeln an und sagte „jenen vernichtenden Satz (sagte), der mir nie wieder aus dem Kopf gegangen ist: ‚Das ist ja das Schlimme.’“ (Hier möchte ich anmerken, dass ich jedem ein anderes Buch zu diesem Thema empfehlen möchte, das ich in diesen Tagen gelesen habe.
„Man wird sich vor diesen Rettern retten müssen“

Greiners Kritik gilt vor allem dem messianischen Anspruch von Grünen, die sich als die einzig wahren Retter der Menschheit und unseres Planeten aufspielen. Und er sieht die Gefahr, wenn Menschen einer solchen eschatologischen Theorie folgen, die, „weil sie auf Äußerste zielt, äußerste Mittel anzuwenden sich gezwungen sieht. Wenn es um die Rettung der Menschheit geht, sind Rücksichten nicht mehr angebracht. Man wird sich vor diesen Rettern retten müssen.“ (S. 32)

Es handelt sich dabei ganz offensichtlich um eine pseudoreligiöse Schuldideologie, denn nach Meinung der linksgrün Bewegten seien die Bewohner der westlichen Zivilisation unweigerlich an nahezu allem schuldig: an Hunger und Elend, an der Klimakatastrophe, an den Bürgerkriegen der Dritten Welt usw. Und es gehöre dazu, dass man sich selbst permanent schuldig fühle: „Jede Plastiktüte, in die ich am Gemüsestand unbedacht meine Champignons einfülle, ist eine Gefahr für die Weltmeere; jedem Becher Milch, den ich sorglos trinke, sind die umweltschädlichen Verdauungsgase einer Kuh vorausgegangen; jeder Atemzug, den ich unbewusst tue, verschlechtert die Klimabilanz.“ (S. 61 f.)

… dass auch der Präsident schlechte Brötchen essen soll

Greiner kritisiert den allgegenwärtigen Egalitarismus, der meist mit einer kleinlichen Missgunst verbunden sei. Eine Haltung, „die dann aus der Tatsache, dass sich der seinerzeitige Bundespräsident Christian Wulff die Brötchen von seinem Lieblingsbäcker in Hannover nach Berlin fahren ließ (so geschehen 2010) gerne einen Skandal macht. So weit ist der Gleichheitsgedanke heruntergekommen: dass der Präsident die gleichen schlechten Brötchen verzehren muss wie jeder beliebige Berliner.“ (S. 140) Die Gleichheitsideologie sucht die Schuld für Mängel nicht beim Individuum, sondern stets im Sozialen (S. 117.) Dies sei auch die Quelle für die Ideologie des allumfassenden, fürsorglichen Staates, der damit christliche und menschliche Tugenden aushöhle. Wenn man akzeptieren könne, „dass Ungleichheit zu den fundamentalen menschlichen Existenzialien zählt, gewönne die Tugend der Barmherzigkeit ihr altes Gewicht zurück.“ (S. 129).

Ein Schuss Antikapitalismus bleibt

All dem bislang Zitierten kann ich zustimmen. Und auch das offensive Bekenntnis des Autors zum Christentum ist mir sympathisch. Aber mir ist bei der Lektüre aufgefallen, dass beim Autor – und dies ist typisch auch für viele konservative Intellektuelle – ein Schuss Antikapitalismus geblieben ist. Der Antikapitalismus ist als identitätsstiftende Kraft unter Intellektuellen so ungeheuer stark, dass er sogar die Wandlung vom Linken zum Konservativen übersteht. Man merkt das, wenn der Autor „Globalisierung“ mit der Vorstellung verbindet, sie sei „der Kampfplatz weltumspannender Konzerne, deren Produkte bis ins letzte Schaufenster der Provinz vorgedrungen sind“ (S. 8).

Das ist die ästhetische Kapitalismuskritik, die sich an der Gleichartigkeit der Konsumgüter stört und dabei vergisst, wie sehr sich viele Menschen auf der Welt genau danach sehnen. Und der bei solcher Kritik vergisst, dass die kapitalistische Globalisierung gerade in den vergangenen Jahrzehnten Hunderte Millionen – etwa in China oder Indien – aus Hunger und Armut befreit hat. In dem Ressentiment gegen jenen „global agierenden Kapitalismus… dem alles gleich gültig ist, sofern nur profitabel“ (S. 73) oder in der Klage über die „Macht der global agierenden Konzerne“ (S. 75) kommt der bei Intellektuellen tief verwurzelte antikapitalistische Affekt zum Ausdruck.

Und doch merkt man bei Greiner auch in dieser Hinsicht ein Stückchen selbstkritischer Reflexion, das sich in einem vorsichtigen „?“ ausdrückt, das der Autor in nachfolgendem Satz in Klammern gesetzt hat: „Denn (natürlich?) finde ich die Abgründe zwischen Arm und Reich gespenstisch, die Gehälter ganz oben schwindelerregend und die Zunahme von Unwissenheit und Verwahrlosung ganz unten bedrückend.“ (S. 123). Dabei zeigt das Beispiel Chinas, wie gerade die steigende Zahl von Millionären und Milliardären und die steigende Ungleichheit einhergingen mit dem Aufstieg Hunderter Millionen aus bitterer Armut in die Mittelschicht – beides ist ein Ergebnis der kapitalistischen Globalisierung.

Ulrich Greiner, Heimatlos. Bekenntnisse eines Konservativen, Rowohlt Verlag, Hamburg 2017, 157 Seiten.

mercredi, 26 avril 2017

The French Intellectual Right An effort to put thinkers in their proper political categories

droite-hors-les-murs.jpg

The French Intellectual Right

An effort to put thinkers in their proper political categories

In the latest issue of The American Conservative, editor Scott McConnell presents a well-considered and superlatively researched article on why France, and perhaps no longer the U.S., is at “the epicenter of today’s fearsome battle between Western elites bent on protecting and expanding the well-entrenched policy of mass immigration and those who see this spreading influx as the ultimate threat to the West’s cultural heritage, not to say its internal tranquility.” France has brought forth an intelligentsia—and, in figures like Marine Le Pen, political leaders—whose focus is on “national culture and its survival.” What in the U.S. is an almost totally marginalized political fringe, paleoconservatives together with elements of the alt-right, might feel at home in contemporary France; while our “mainstream think-tank conservatism,” with its emphasis on “lowering taxes, cutting federal programs, and maintaining some kind of global military hegemony,” would seem irrelevant to the French intellectual right.

imatz-droite-gauche.jpgFor full disclosure, let me mention that at least one of Scott’s French contacts, Arnaud Imatz, who represents perfectly the kind of French intellectual he describes, is someone whom the author met through me. Arnaud and I have been friends and correspondents for over 30 years, and his understanding of the French nation and the enjeu social (social question) confronting his people make eminently good sense to Scott and me. Although I have focused on German more than French intellectual history, most of the authors and social critics whom Scott cites are for me familiar names. I agree with Scott that Éric Zemmour, a Moroccan Jew who has tried to revive the sense of French honor that he associates with the late General de Gaulle, illustrates the new identitarian French politics. So too does the iconoclastic novelist Michel Houellebecq, who, despite his shockingly erotic work, clearly loathes multiculturalism and despises French Islamophiles. Another figure in this Pleiades of intellectuals of the French right is Christophe Guilluy, who often sounds like the French Steve Bannon. In his books La France périphérique(2014) and Le crepuscule de la France d’en haut (2016), Guilluy comes to the defense of that 60 percent of the French population living on the “periphery,” that is, outside of metropolitan areas and the sprawling suburbs. These are the les Francais de souche,” the true indigenous French, whom the globalist elites treat like human waste while they cut production costs by bringing in cheap labor from the Muslim Third World.

Although those who speak for the French grunges (les ploucs) would like us to think that they stand beyond right and left, Scott is correct to assign these tribunes of the people to the historic right. Our friend Arnaud Imatz would disagree, and in his long book that I just finished reading, Droite/gauche: pour sortir de l’équivoque (2016), argues that the terms right and left no longer apply to contemporary French politics. Imatz says we are dealing with a “huge displacement” in which the historic French nation is being sacrificed on the altar of globalist financial interests and “human rights platitudes.” Scott appropriately points out that once the conversation turns to historic nations and native workforces, those who do the defending will inevitably be classified as being on the right. No matter how often Marine Le Pen calls for protecting the jobs of French workers, she will be characterized by Fox News as well as CNN as a figure of the “far right.” In contrast, Emmanuel Macron, the spokesman for multinational business interests and the candidate of former President Obama and the French Socialist Party, fits our establishment-conservative notion of a “centrist.” Although their right and our conservative establishment operate on different wavelengths, our Republican media understand that the French right is most decidedly on the right. Where else can one place a movement that worries first and foremost about national identity and the survival of a millennial civilization?

Scott might have added to his sketches of the figures of the French right a few more personalities who help illustrate his key point. Philippe de Villiers, Jean-Yves Gallou, and Jean-Pierre Chevènement are all veterans of French national politics who strongly represent and even prefigured the French nationalist politics described by Scott. All of them, like Marine, are EU critics and Eurosceptics and relentlessly critical of Muslim immigration into France. The former Sarkozy advisor Patrick Buisson is also worth studying because of his heroic efforts to cement together an alliance between French populists and the French establishment center-right. The Sarkozy center-right, out of which Buisson has emerged, looks very much like our conservative establishment; and not surprisingly, Buisson’s efforts have generally met with skepticism from the French populist right. Scott is correct, by the way, not to bring into his piece a longtime acquaintance of mine, Alain de Benoist, progenitor of the not very new Nouvelle Droite. Benoist has been active as a publicist since the 1960s but has moved about so fitfully in his political stances, from supporting French Algeria to being an identitarian multiculturalist hoping to turn Europe into a collection of independent ethnic groups from all over the planet, that it may be hard to associate him specifically with those tendencies that Scott discusses.

I would not have included in this commentary on the French populist, nationalist right either the French social commentator Alain Finkielkraut or the Sorbonne professor Pierre Manent. Manent may be described (and indeed has described himself) as a French disciple of Leo Strauss; he has cultivated close relations with American neoconservatives for many decades. Although he has written critically about Muslim immigration and the erosion of European identity, it is hard to view this political theorist as being in the same ideological boat with Zemmour, Gallou, and the Front National. Despite Finkielkraut’s enthusiasm for the anti-democrat Martin Heidegger, he too seems to be something of a liberal-democratic centrist, and perhaps one who is nostalgic for an older left. Finkielkraut has gained publicity by criticizing the practice of allowing Muslim girls to wear head coverings (foulards) to public schools. But he also opposes with almost equal vigor the association of Christian and other religious symbols from what from his perspective should be an immaculately secular French educational system. Finally Finkielkraut holds a globalist vision of France as the source of the “rights of man,” a vision that sounds very much like the neoconservatives’ concept of America as a universal “propositional nation.”

Manent and Finkielkraut, it may be argued, are holdovers from the 1980s, when there was a thriving sodality of French neoconservatives, a company to which I would also attach the names Jean-Marie Benoist, Guy Sorman, and Jean-Francois Revel. This sodality, which arose in the wake of the victories of Reagan and Thatcher and was irrigated with American foundation funds, is well on its way to dissolving. It has little to do with the more genuine or more serious French right that Scott has presented. This, bear in mind, is not a value judgment, but an effort to put people in the proper political categories.

Paul Gottfried is the author of Leo Strauss and the American Conservative Movement.

lundi, 20 mars 2017

Le slavophilisme: un romantisme conservateur russe

Vladimir_2_0.jpg

Le slavophilisme: un romantisme conservateur russe

Profondément influencé par l’idéalisme allemand, tout en s’enracinant dans l’histoire russe et la foi orthodoxe, le slavophilisme propose une solution originale et dialectique au dilemme romantique de la modernité. Par son rejet simultané du despotisme autoritaire et de l’individualisme capitaliste, cette utopie conservatrice serait riche d’enseignement pour une Russie aujourd’hui encore à la recherche d’une nouvelle voie.

Entre tradition et modernité, le XIXe siècle est pour la Russie un siècle de questionnements : la Russie est-elle un pays sans passé, excroissance orientale et arriérée de la civilisation européenne à laquelle elle doit s’assimiler pour enfin rentrer dans l’histoire, ou bien est-elle porteuse d’une civilisation propre, à mi-chemin entre Orient et Occident, qu’elle se doit de faire fleurir ?

C’est de ce questionnement que naît un mouvement effervescent et complexe, influencé par la modernité européenne, mais proclamant la richesse et la créativité du peuple russe. Les tableaux d’Ivanov, les symphonies de Glinka et les poèmes de Pouchkine, tous clament haut et fort la dignité de l’âme russe, porteuse d’un message à la fois universel et profondément enraciné. Le slavophilisme, qui s’épanouit de 1830 à 1860, est, de ce mouvement, la branche philosophique.

C’est par l’influence de l’idéalisme, mais surtout du romantisme allemand, lui-même naissant politiquement d’une opposition nationale et mystique à la France des Lumières, que les slavophiles construisirent leur rejet de l’Europe. Ainsi du même coup s’inspirent-ils d’un mouvement typiquement européen et rejettent-ils l’Occident. C’est donc à l’image du romantisme lui-même, « rejet moderne de la modernité » au « caractère fabuleusement contradictoire »1, que les slavophiles produisirent une idéologie originale : romantique, conservatrice, nationaliste, mais surtout profondément dialectique, mêlant désir de conservation et volonté d’émancipation du peuple et de l’individu.

La Russie comme solution à l’impasse moderne

Pour les slavophiles, le paradoxe entre inspiration occidentale et rejet de l’Occident n’est en réalité qu’apparent : le slavophilisme propose à chaque fois l’idée russe comme aboutissement de la recherche dialectique du romantisme occidental.

Ainsi, par exemple, à l’antinomie philosophique et épistémologique entre foi et raison, les slavophiles proposent une solution typiquement romantique d’union des contraires : ils reprennent et mènent à son aboutissement la critique, au nom de l’intuition intellectuelle et de la Révélation, du rationalisme hégélien par Schelling2. S’ils critiquent la raison instrumentale, lit de Procuste pour la psyché humaine, qui participe à l’éclatement moderne de la personnalité et qui ne peut appréhender substantiellement la réalité du monde, ils ne professent pas pour autant un mysticisme antirationaliste. Acceptant la raison instrumentale comme une des puissances de l’esprit, mais sans la considérer comme la plus grande, ils préconisent sa soumission à un ensemble surplombant. Mobilisant les Pères Grecs de l’Église (Maxime le Confesseur et Isaac le Syrien notamment), qui selon eux leur permettent de dépasser le rationalisme occidental dans lequel même Schelling reste empêtré, ils appellent à l’union de toutes les facultés humaines (analytiques, intuitives et sensitives) dans un « savoir intégral » sous l’égide unificatrice de la foi et de l’amour chrétien, véritable centre irradiant de la personnalité.

De manière analogue, ils proposent comme solution au dilemme fondamental du romantisme, entre individualisme et holisme, la commune paysanne russe. Rejetant l’Occident rationaliste tant dans son catholicisme despotique (« unité sans liberté ») que dans son protestantisme libéral et anomique (« liberté sans unité »), les slavophiles proposent comme solution à la problématique romantique l’orthodoxie russe, religion de liberté et communion fraternelle des hommes. Leur vision organiciste se veut éloignée du holisme catholique car ils souhaitent non pas l’étouffement, mais l’émancipation de la personne. Néanmoins, contrairement au capitalisme individualiste qui ne propose comme réalisation individuelle qu’un conformisme grégaire, ils imaginent la réalisation de la personnalité comme investissement de l’individu au service de la communauté. L’individu est pour eux une note de musique quand le collectif en est la symphonie. Atomisé, chaque individu est insignifiant, mais conjugués collectivement, tous s’élèvent harmonieusement, chaque note différente prenant une saveur plus riche et subtile de par son immersion dans l’ensemble symphonique.

Kireevsky.jpg

Ivan Kireievski

Cette recherche dialectique permet aux slavophiles d’être, malgré leur rejet de la modernité et de l’Europe, plus qu’un simple mouvement conservateur. Leur conservatisme, expression de la nostalgie utopique d’un âge perdu qu’il s’agit de retrouver dans le futur sous une forme nouvelle, est donc bien loin de ce que l’on entend souvent par ce terme, c’est-à-dire la défense de l’ordre social et des privilèges.

Tenant pour beaucoup d’une forme d’anarchisme chrétien, les slavophiles se font des critiques de l’État impérial bureaucratique qu’ils voient comme une puissance étrangère profondément déconnectée de la nation organique russe. Au mythe tsariste de la « Troisième Rome », ils préfèrent l’idéal des petites communautés paysannes autonomes. C’est aussi au nom du christianisme et de son principe d’égalité entre les hommes, qu’ils refusent l’analogie monarchique du berger (le roi) et du troupeau (les sujets), le seul berger pouvant n’être que Dieu lui-même. Mêlant orthodoxie et romantisme, c’est à un populisme chrétien qu’ils s’apparentent quand ils exigent l’abolition du servage pour libérer la nation du joug de la tyrannie et parlent de « souveraineté du peuple »3. Il ne faut pas se leurrer pour autant, leur anarchisme chrétien n’est en rien insurrectionnel, car méfiants vis-à-vis du politique et ayant en horreur la tabula rasa, ils pensent toute évolution comme devant être le produit organique de la société.

Messianisme russe : entre particularisme et universalisme

Profondément optimistes, les slavophiles pensent, à l’instar de Hegel, que chaque nation doit successivement jouer un rôle particulier dans l’avancée de l’humanité. Selon eux, c’est désormais au tour de la Russie, puissance jeune, fraîche, vigoureuse et organique, de donner l’impulsion qui permettrait l’accession de l’espèce humaine à un niveau de conscience supérieur. C’est d’ailleurs en cela que, parfois, ils ne rejettent pas unilatéralement la modernité européenne et qu’ils ne considèrent pas, à la différence de beaucoup de réactionnaires, que toute l’Europe est à rejeter. Au contraire, ils lui concèdent un certain rôle productif dans l’avancée de l’humanité, rôle qu’elle n’est plus en mesure d’accomplir et qu’elle doit donc de ce fait céder à un nouveau porteur de flambeau. En affirmant que la Russie peut représenter en elle-même l’humanité entière, en conférant à leur pays un rôle messianique, les slavophiles parviennent surtout à dépasser la contradiction entre l’universel et le particulier. Leur amour et leur combat pour la Russie devenant ainsi un combat pour l’ensemble du genre humain, leur nationalisme se transformant en humanisme universaliste.

Schelling.pngÀ la plainte de Schelling (ci-contre) contre une foi occidentale trop profondément infusée de rationalisme et faisant état de sa difficulté de créer une religion « pour soi-même » qui en soit épargnée, succède son appel à la Russie comme étant « destinée à quelque chose de grand ». Cette main tendue, les slavophiles la saisissent en se présentant comme ceux qui ont trouvé la solution au problème romantique : la Russie orthodoxe.

Néanmoins, force est de constater le caractère idéaliste de leur propos. La Russie, telle qu’elle existe au XIXe siècle, tient bien plus d’un despotisme classique que d’une solution au dilemme de la modernité et, bien souvent, les slavophiles eux-mêmes, peu exempts de contradictions, s’en rendent compte. Parfois, ils imputent les défauts de la Russie aux réformes modernisatrices de Pierre le Grand et, ce faisant, ils rejettent systématiquement l’Occident sous toutes ses formes et s’affirment comme essentiellement réactionnaires. D’autres fois, avec une disposition plus dialectique, ils estiment l’esprit de liberté de l’Europe capable de s’unir à la substance de l’orthodoxie russe, et promettent ainsi un nouvel âge d’or pour l’humanité.

En somme, tantôt la Russie est le remède unique au problème moderne exclusivement du fait de ses qualités organiques épargnées de l’influence nihiliste de l’Occident, tantôt elle en est la solution. Car en recueillant l’étincelle de liberté européenne, elle saura sortir de son archaïsme et de son particularisme médiéval pour devenir une synthèse universelle, à l’image du slavophilisme lui-même, qui ajoute à l’héritage multiséculaire de la philosophie slave et orthodoxe le meilleur du romantisme européen.

À cette hésitation devant la nécessité de rejeter ou non intégralement l’Europe, Dostoïevski, héritier du slavophilisme, tranche en faveur de la deuxième solution dans son célèbre Discours sur Pouchkine. Comme Pouchkine, qui sut s’inspirer de la littérature européenne tout en restant profondément russe, la Russie doit dépasser et sublimer la contribution de l’Europe à l’esprit humain, non pas la nier et la rejeter.

Notes

1Michael Löwy et Robert Sayre, Révolte et Mélancolie, Payot, 1992, p.7

2 Guy Planty-Bonjour, Hegel et la pensée philosophique en Russie, 1830-1917, Nijhoff, 1974, pp.122-125

3Alexandre RACU, « From Ecclesiology to Christian Populism. The Religious and Political Thought of Russian Slavophiles », South East European Journal of Political Science, Vol. II, n°1 & 2, 2014, p.39

Le slavophilisme: un romantisme conservateur russe

Vladimir_2_0.jpg

Le slavophilisme: un romantisme conservateur russe

Profondément influencé par l’idéalisme allemand, tout en s’enracinant dans l’histoire russe et la foi orthodoxe, le slavophilisme propose une solution originale et dialectique au dilemme romantique de la modernité. Par son rejet simultané du despotisme autoritaire et de l’individualisme capitaliste, cette utopie conservatrice serait riche d’enseignement pour une Russie aujourd’hui encore à la recherche d’une nouvelle voie.

Entre tradition et modernité, le XIXe siècle est pour la Russie un siècle de questionnements : la Russie est-elle un pays sans passé, excroissance orientale et arriérée de la civilisation européenne à laquelle elle doit s’assimiler pour enfin rentrer dans l’histoire, ou bien est-elle porteuse d’une civilisation propre, à mi-chemin entre Orient et Occident, qu’elle se doit de faire fleurir ?

C’est de ce questionnement que naît un mouvement effervescent et complexe, influencé par la modernité européenne, mais proclamant la richesse et la créativité du peuple russe. Les tableaux d’Ivanov, les symphonies de Glinka et les poèmes de Pouchkine, tous clament haut et fort la dignité de l’âme russe, porteuse d’un message à la fois universel et profondément enraciné. Le slavophilisme, qui s’épanouit de 1830 à 1860, est, de ce mouvement, la branche philosophique.

C’est par l’influence de l’idéalisme, mais surtout du romantisme allemand, lui-même naissant politiquement d’une opposition nationale et mystique à la France des Lumières, que les slavophiles construisirent leur rejet de l’Europe. Ainsi du même coup s’inspirent-ils d’un mouvement typiquement européen et rejettent-ils l’Occident. C’est donc à l’image du romantisme lui-même, « rejet moderne de la modernité » au « caractère fabuleusement contradictoire »1, que les slavophiles produisirent une idéologie originale : romantique, conservatrice, nationaliste, mais surtout profondément dialectique, mêlant désir de conservation et volonté d’émancipation du peuple et de l’individu.

La Russie comme solution à l’impasse moderne

Pour les slavophiles, le paradoxe entre inspiration occidentale et rejet de l’Occident n’est en réalité qu’apparent : le slavophilisme propose à chaque fois l’idée russe comme aboutissement de la recherche dialectique du romantisme occidental.

Ainsi, par exemple, à l’antinomie philosophique et épistémologique entre foi et raison, les slavophiles proposent une solution typiquement romantique d’union des contraires : ils reprennent et mènent à son aboutissement la critique, au nom de l’intuition intellectuelle et de la Révélation, du rationalisme hégélien par Schelling2. S’ils critiquent la raison instrumentale, lit de Procuste pour la psyché humaine, qui participe à l’éclatement moderne de la personnalité et qui ne peut appréhender substantiellement la réalité du monde, ils ne professent pas pour autant un mysticisme antirationaliste. Acceptant la raison instrumentale comme une des puissances de l’esprit, mais sans la considérer comme la plus grande, ils préconisent sa soumission à un ensemble surplombant. Mobilisant les Pères Grecs de l’Église (Maxime le Confesseur et Isaac le Syrien notamment), qui selon eux leur permettent de dépasser le rationalisme occidental dans lequel même Schelling reste empêtré, ils appellent à l’union de toutes les facultés humaines (analytiques, intuitives et sensitives) dans un « savoir intégral » sous l’égide unificatrice de la foi et de l’amour chrétien, véritable centre irradiant de la personnalité.

De manière analogue, ils proposent comme solution au dilemme fondamental du romantisme, entre individualisme et holisme, la commune paysanne russe. Rejetant l’Occident rationaliste tant dans son catholicisme despotique (« unité sans liberté ») que dans son protestantisme libéral et anomique (« liberté sans unité »), les slavophiles proposent comme solution à la problématique romantique l’orthodoxie russe, religion de liberté et communion fraternelle des hommes. Leur vision organiciste se veut éloignée du holisme catholique car ils souhaitent non pas l’étouffement, mais l’émancipation de la personne. Néanmoins, contrairement au capitalisme individualiste qui ne propose comme réalisation individuelle qu’un conformisme grégaire, ils imaginent la réalisation de la personnalité comme investissement de l’individu au service de la communauté. L’individu est pour eux une note de musique quand le collectif en est la symphonie. Atomisé, chaque individu est insignifiant, mais conjugués collectivement, tous s’élèvent harmonieusement, chaque note différente prenant une saveur plus riche et subtile de par son immersion dans l’ensemble symphonique.

Kireevsky.jpg

Ivan Kireievski

Cette recherche dialectique permet aux slavophiles d’être, malgré leur rejet de la modernité et de l’Europe, plus qu’un simple mouvement conservateur. Leur conservatisme, expression de la nostalgie utopique d’un âge perdu qu’il s’agit de retrouver dans le futur sous une forme nouvelle, est donc bien loin de ce que l’on entend souvent par ce terme, c’est-à-dire la défense de l’ordre social et des privilèges.

Tenant pour beaucoup d’une forme d’anarchisme chrétien, les slavophiles se font des critiques de l’État impérial bureaucratique qu’ils voient comme une puissance étrangère profondément déconnectée de la nation organique russe. Au mythe tsariste de la « Troisième Rome », ils préfèrent l’idéal des petites communautés paysannes autonomes. C’est aussi au nom du christianisme et de son principe d’égalité entre les hommes, qu’ils refusent l’analogie monarchique du berger (le roi) et du troupeau (les sujets), le seul berger pouvant n’être que Dieu lui-même. Mêlant orthodoxie et romantisme, c’est à un populisme chrétien qu’ils s’apparentent quand ils exigent l’abolition du servage pour libérer la nation du joug de la tyrannie et parlent de « souveraineté du peuple »3. Il ne faut pas se leurrer pour autant, leur anarchisme chrétien n’est en rien insurrectionnel, car méfiants vis-à-vis du politique et ayant en horreur la tabula rasa, ils pensent toute évolution comme devant être le produit organique de la société.

Messianisme russe : entre particularisme et universalisme

Profondément optimistes, les slavophiles pensent, à l’instar de Hegel, que chaque nation doit successivement jouer un rôle particulier dans l’avancée de l’humanité. Selon eux, c’est désormais au tour de la Russie, puissance jeune, fraîche, vigoureuse et organique, de donner l’impulsion qui permettrait l’accession de l’espèce humaine à un niveau de conscience supérieur. C’est d’ailleurs en cela que, parfois, ils ne rejettent pas unilatéralement la modernité européenne et qu’ils ne considèrent pas, à la différence de beaucoup de réactionnaires, que toute l’Europe est à rejeter. Au contraire, ils lui concèdent un certain rôle productif dans l’avancée de l’humanité, rôle qu’elle n’est plus en mesure d’accomplir et qu’elle doit donc de ce fait céder à un nouveau porteur de flambeau. En affirmant que la Russie peut représenter en elle-même l’humanité entière, en conférant à leur pays un rôle messianique, les slavophiles parviennent surtout à dépasser la contradiction entre l’universel et le particulier. Leur amour et leur combat pour la Russie devenant ainsi un combat pour l’ensemble du genre humain, leur nationalisme se transformant en humanisme universaliste.

Schelling.pngÀ la plainte de Schelling (ci-contre) contre une foi occidentale trop profondément infusée de rationalisme et faisant état de sa difficulté de créer une religion « pour soi-même » qui en soit épargnée, succède son appel à la Russie comme étant « destinée à quelque chose de grand ». Cette main tendue, les slavophiles la saisissent en se présentant comme ceux qui ont trouvé la solution au problème romantique : la Russie orthodoxe.

Néanmoins, force est de constater le caractère idéaliste de leur propos. La Russie, telle qu’elle existe au XIXe siècle, tient bien plus d’un despotisme classique que d’une solution au dilemme de la modernité et, bien souvent, les slavophiles eux-mêmes, peu exempts de contradictions, s’en rendent compte. Parfois, ils imputent les défauts de la Russie aux réformes modernisatrices de Pierre le Grand et, ce faisant, ils rejettent systématiquement l’Occident sous toutes ses formes et s’affirment comme essentiellement réactionnaires. D’autres fois, avec une disposition plus dialectique, ils estiment l’esprit de liberté de l’Europe capable de s’unir à la substance de l’orthodoxie russe, et promettent ainsi un nouvel âge d’or pour l’humanité.

En somme, tantôt la Russie est le remède unique au problème moderne exclusivement du fait de ses qualités organiques épargnées de l’influence nihiliste de l’Occident, tantôt elle en est la solution. Car en recueillant l’étincelle de liberté européenne, elle saura sortir de son archaïsme et de son particularisme médiéval pour devenir une synthèse universelle, à l’image du slavophilisme lui-même, qui ajoute à l’héritage multiséculaire de la philosophie slave et orthodoxe le meilleur du romantisme européen.

À cette hésitation devant la nécessité de rejeter ou non intégralement l’Europe, Dostoïevski, héritier du slavophilisme, tranche en faveur de la deuxième solution dans son célèbre Discours sur Pouchkine. Comme Pouchkine, qui sut s’inspirer de la littérature européenne tout en restant profondément russe, la Russie doit dépasser et sublimer la contribution de l’Europe à l’esprit humain, non pas la nier et la rejeter.

Notes

1Michael Löwy et Robert Sayre, Révolte et Mélancolie, Payot, 1992, p.7

2 Guy Planty-Bonjour, Hegel et la pensée philosophique en Russie, 1830-1917, Nijhoff, 1974, pp.122-125

3Alexandre RACU, « From Ecclesiology to Christian Populism. The Religious and Political Thought of Russian Slavophiles », South East European Journal of Political Science, Vol. II, n°1 & 2, 2014, p.39

mercredi, 22 février 2017

A Review of The Great Purge: The Deformation of the Conservative Movement

greatpurge.jpg

Where Conservatism Went Wrong:
A Review of The Great Purge: The Deformation of the Conservative Movement

Review:

Paul E. Gottfried & Richard B. Spencer (eds.)
The Great Purge: The Deformation of the Conservative Movement [2]
Arlington, Va.: Washington Summit Publishers, 2015

All political movements need a history, and such histories, if well-constructed, almost always coalesce into myth. Once mythologized, a movement’s past can inform its present members about its reason for being, its need for continuing, and its plans for the future. And this can be accomplished quickly – and without the need for study or research – in the form of what Edmund Burke called “prejudice.” “Prejudice,” Burke says [3], “is of ready application in the emergency; it previously engages the mind in a steady course of wisdom and virtue, and does not leave the man hesitating in the moment of decision, skeptical, puzzled, and unresolved.”

Prejudice is a time-saver, in other words, and it puts everyone on the same page. These are two invaluable things for any movement which aims to effect political change. For those who wish to participate in any of the various factions of the Alt Right and learn its history and myth, they do not need to go much farther than The Great Purge: The Deformation of the Conservative Movement.

Edited by Paul Gottfried of the H. L. Menken Club and Richard Spencer of Radix Journal, The Great Purge discusses the march of the once-mighty American conservative movement towards the abject irrelevance it faces today. This took about fifty years, but the villains of this inquisition managed to purge conservatism of its conservatives and replace them with a globalist elite which kowtows to political correctness. The villains, of course, are National Review founder and publisher William F. Buckley (an unflattering photo of whom graces the book’s cover) and a cabal of refugees from the Left known as “neoconservatives.” The Great Purge, as Spencer tells us, is less a “full chronicling of these purges,” and more a “phenomenological history of conservatism. It seeks to understand how its ideology . . . functioned within its historic context and how it responded to power, shifting conceptions of authority, and societal changes.”

prof-paul-edward-gottfried.jpg

The book presents seven essays, with a foreword by Spencer and an afterward by VDARE.com founder and former National Review writer Peter Brimelow. In between, we have essays from established Dissident Right luminaries such as Gottfried, William Regnery, and John Derbyshire. Sam Francis, perhaps one of the godfathers of the Alt Right, who passed away in 2005, contributes a comprehensive and quite useful philosophical treatise on how mainstream conservatism devolved into the toothless friend of the Left it has become today. Rounding out the remainder is American Revolutionary Vanguard founder Keith Preston, professor and writer Lee Congdon, and independent author and scholar James Kalb.

So, according to myth, William F. Buckley founded his conservative magazine National Review in the mid-1950s and revitalized a flagging conservative ideology. At the time, liberalism in its various forms enjoyed near-complete hegemony in academia, enough to prompt scholar Lionel Trilling by mid-century to announce that conservatism, at least as it had been embodied by what we now call the Old Right, was dead. Buckley, along with other conservative thinkers such as Russell Kirk and popular authors like Ayn Rand, proved that reports of conservatism’s death were a tad overstated. Thanks to Buckley, conservatism now had the intellectual heft to resist the Left, both foreign and domestic. As Spencer describes it, this entailed promoting free-market capitalism over Soviet Communism, erecting the Christian West as a bulwark against Soviet atheism, and pushing for an aggressive foreign policy both to thwart Soviet militarism and promote the interests of Israel. The New Right was born.

Enter the neocons. Disenchanted by the manifest failures of Communism, these former Leftists, led by Irving Kristol and Norman Podhoretz, began testing the waters in conservative circles by the 1970s. The neocons shared much of the New Right’s anti-Soviet belligerence and loyalty towards Israel. Having given up on the New Deal and other big-government initiatives, the neocons were equally uncomfortable with free-market capitalism. Sam Francis quotes Irving Kristol at length, describing how the welfare state should not be eradicated, but altered to create a “social insurance state.”

Most importantly, the neocons promoted a Wilsonian “global and cosmopolitan world order” which sought to greatly increase America’s role in foreign affairs, often through military interventionism. In particular, democracy was the great talisman which could civilize the world – whether the world wanted to be civilized or not. Bolstered by their faith in the Democratic Peace Theory, which posits that democracies do not wage war upon each other, the neocons transferred the messianic fervor of Communism to democratization and never looked back. Lee Congdon’s entire essay. “Wars to End War,” rails against such “morality-driven foreign policy” and how it co-opted conservatism almost completely. “Pluralism, (human) rights, and democracy,” as stated by Charles Krauthammer, became something of a rallying cry for the neocons. Against such high-minded egalitarianism, which opened the door for feminism, gay rights, race-mixing, and other by-products of democratic freedom, the traditional conservative arguments began to crumble.

Congdon quotes Pat Buchanan as defending true conservatism when he wrote in 2006 that America is bound together by “the bonds of history and memory, tradition and custom, language and literature, birth and faith, blood and soil.” This is an outright rejection of the neocon claim of America being a “proposition nation” in which citizens are “bound by ideals that move us beyond our backgrounds,” to quote George W. Bush from his first inaugural address. Essentially, if you believed in putting America first, or had no interest in foreign wars, or took the libertarian ideal of limited government seriously, or (most importantly) professed a tribal or familial fealty to the white race, then you had no place among the neocons or in the New Right.

And there to police you and expunge you into the wilderness, if need be, was none other than Mr. Buckley himself.

Both Paul Gottfried and William Regnery provide first-hand accounts of the purges, as well as some historical perspective on them. For example, according to Gottfried, Buckley banished the John Birch Society from respectable conservatism in the 1960s not because of anti-Semitism, but because the Birchers expressed insufficient hawkishness against the North Vietnamese and in the Cold War in general. This point is echoed later in the volume by Keith Preston. It seems that any anti-Semitic aspect in the early victims of the purge was purely incidental.

richspencer.jpg

That didn’t remain the case, of course. What I find most striking and ironic about The Great Purge is that the “racist” infractions of many of the purge victims were so slight, so indirect, and so buried in one’s past that to summarily expurgate a person on those grounds required almost Soviet levels of behind-the-scenes machinations and ruthlessness. Gottfried explains that his offense was to merely assume a leadership role in the H.L. Menken Club, which gives a platform to people “who stress hereditary cognitive differences.” For this, the Intercollegiate Studies Institute (ISI) severed all ties with him. Another example is Joe Sobran, who was labeled an anti-Semite by Buckley and banished from the National Review in the late 1980s because, as Gottfried explains, Sobran “noticed the shifting meaning of ‘anti-Semite,’ from someone who hates Jews to someone who certain Jews in high places don’t like.”

William Regnery relates how he had been banished from the ISI as well, an organization to which his grandfather, father, and uncles had very close ties for many years. Regnery’s offense? He spoke at an American Renaissance study group in 2005 and promoted “building a sense of racial unity.” For this, he faced an anonymous charge from ISI and was tried among his peers, only one of whom voted to keep him on. Seventeen voted to expel him, and expelled he was.

Another person who pops up a lot in The Great Purge is Jason Richwine, a junior researcher who lost his job at the Heritage Foundation in 2013. It was discovered that his approved doctoral thesis from years earlier contained a fully supported statistic which pointed to the lower than average IQ of many immigrant groups. For this, and for fear of causing too much consternation among Leftist elites, the Heritage Foundation determined that Richwine had to go, his permanently sullied reputation notwithstanding. Certainly, mainstream conservatives know how and when to eat their own – unlike the Left, of course. As Regnery aptly points out, “Media Matters would never have cashiered a researcher on the strength of conservative ire.”

This only cracks the surface of the damage the Bill Buckley mentality has done to the Right over the years. John Derbyshire and Peter Brimelow relate how their more deliberate infractions got them evicted from the movement. Keith Preston describes how, despite the New Right’s professed desire to limit government, it did absolutely nothing to stop its near-exponential growth. In The Great Purge, Buckley and his epigones are called nearly every name in the book, from cowardly to cannibalistic, yet Regnery attributes much of this betrayal to something a little more mundane: complacency. Buckley and his people were simply unwilling to give up their cushy lifestyles in order to combat the Left in any meaningful way. As a result, they put tight leashes on anyone who did.

Perhaps the biggest surprise in this volume is the thirty-five page essay from Sam Francis, which was written back in 1986. Francis, who suffered his own purge from The Washington Times in the 1990s thanks to Dinesh D’Souza, provides a philosophical vocabulary to explain the fall of conservatism in America. It was the slow usurpation of the Old Right, in other words “traditionalist and bourgeois ideologies, centering on the individual as moral agent, citizen, and economic actor” by a “managerial elite” which did in conservatism. This “managerial humanism,” according to Francis, espoused

a collectivist view of the state and economy and advocated a highly centralized regime largely unrestrained by traditional legal, constitutional, and political barriers. It rejected or regarded as backward, repressive, or obsolete the institutions and values of traditional and bourgeois society – its loyalties to the local community, traditional religion and moral beliefs, the family and social and political differentiation based on class, status, and property – and it articulated an ideal of man “liberated” from such constraints and re-educated or redesigned into a cosmopolitan participant in the mass state economy of the managerial system.

This certainly is an apt description of the Left, and as more and more neocons joined the conservative movement, the more apparent it became that they were bringing this managerial humanism along with them. This cultural shift, of course, had deleterious effects across the board for the Right, not least of which was separating it from its stated purpose and weakening its resolve to combat change. In characteristic form, Francis ends his essay with a prediction, this one quite dire:

If neoconservative co-optation and the dynamics of the continuing managerial revolution deflect the American Right from [its] goal, the result will not be the renaissance of America and the West but the continuation and eventual fulfillment of the goals of their most ancient enemies.

If The Great Purge has any flaws, it’s of omission, which isn’t really a flaw since Spencer copped to it in his Foreword. This book is not a history, but rather a collection of reminiscences and musings on the state of the Right. So, it’s not surprising that many things are left out. Still, I wish more detail had been provided in places. It is possible, for example, that there was more to the Sobran affair than what Gottfried and others provide. Sobran’s split with Buckley may have spoken as much to Buckley’s sincere philo-Semitism and his desire not to appear anti-Semitic as it did to Sobran’s desire (or need) to speak out against Israel. The whole thorny issue of whether or not this constitutes anti-Semitism was covered thoroughly (and perhaps ad nauseum) in In Search of Anti-Semitism [4], Buckley’s 1992 recounting of the affair. But it would have been nice to hear a different perspective from one who was around back then.

Further, The Great Purge seems to let Buckley off the hook for not banishing the John Birch Society because of anti-Semitism, yet fails to mention (at least in my reading) any mention of Buckley’s early purge of writers from The American Mercury, which was, in Buckley’s words, “anti-Semitic.” Therefore, Buckley showed his philo-Semitic stripes early on, and that may have informed some of his attitude vis-a-vis the John Birch Society.

The Jewish Question in general is also never explored. While not absolutely necessary to the subject, I’m sure it would have been interesting at the very least, given how eighty to ninety percent of the neoconservatives named in the book are obviously Jewish. Really, it’s impossible not to notice the nigh-homogeneous ethnic makeup of the neocons who appear over and over in The Great Purge like a gang of irrepressible supervillains. Such a list renders parenthesis-echoing utterly superfluous: Irving Kristol, Norman Podheretz, Charles Krauthammer, David Frum, Daniel Bell, Nathan Glazer, Seymour Lipset, Ben Wattenberg, Elliott Abrams, Michael Ledeen, Max Boot, David Gerlenter, Allen Weinstein, William Kristol, Robert Kagan, and Paul Wolfowitz.

You could practically host a baseball game with such a lineup. And is it all a huge coincidence? Well, I guess we’ll just have to wait for the sequel to find out.

In the meantime, however, The Great Purge does a magnificent job of myth-making for the Alt Right. It spells out our origins and purpose, and describes the challenges and betrayals the older generation of conservatives had to face while remaining true to the nationalist, traditionalist, and racialist ideals which made Western civilization great to begin with. Most importantly, The Great Purge shows what happens when you give up on winning and instead compromise with the enemy. You eventually become him. And at no point will your pettiness and spite become more apparent than when you turn on your own.

Article printed from Counter-Currents Publishing: http://www.counter-currents.com

URL to article: http://www.counter-currents.com/2017/02/where-conservatism-went-wrong/

URLs in this post:

[1] Image: https://www.counter-currents.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/2-20-17-1.jpg

[2] The Great Purge: The Deformation of the Conservative Movement: http://amzn.to/2meCuPd

[3] says: https://books.google.co.in/books?id=92AIAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA130&lpg=PA130&dq=%22and+does+not+leave+the+man+hesitating+in+the+moment+of+decision%22&source=bl&ots=OGHbkM9vXL&sig=Ghby2bcwjX2pVS70u5d-hm4ouMc&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjU6p2Y5p7SAhXG1RQKHVPkD0MQ6AEIMTAG#v=onepage&q=%22and%20does%20not%20leave%20the%20man%20hesitating%20in%20the%20moment%20of%20decision%22&f=false

[4] In Search of Anti-Semitism: http://amzn.to/2kEivgE

dimanche, 19 février 2017

Louis de Bonald : le sacre du social

louis-bonald-barberis-620x330.jpg

Louis de Bonald : le sacre du social

 

« Vivre ensemble », « faire société », « rester unis ». Voilà des expressions dont la répétition a rongé le sens. Défenseur d’une unité politique fondée sur le droit naturel, Louis de Bonald prôna cette réconciliation totale du peuple de France. Posant le primat du social sur l’individu, du commun sur le particulier, il eut pour exigence la conservation du caractère sacré des rapports sociaux.

 

C’est un immortel dont le nom fut englouti par le génie maistrien. Écrivain prolifique et méthodique, ardent défenseur de la tradition catholique qu’il sentait menacée par les assauts libéraux de la Révolution, Louis de Bonald fut également maire de Millau, député de l’Aveyron, nommé au Conseil royal de l’Instruction publique par Louis XVIII. Il entra à l’Académie française en 1816. Considéré par Durkheim comme précurseur de la sociologie, le vicomte n’eut de cesse que de relier la théologie politique avec une compréhension des rapports sociaux. Antidémocrate convaincu, il élabora un système visant l’unité politique et théologique du social fondé dans les organes les plus naturels des individus : la famille et la religion.

Bonald pense la famille comme le socle primordial et nécessaire de la société. En 1800, celui qui considère que « ce sont les livres qui ont fait les révolutions »  publie son Essai analytique sur les lois naturelles de l’ordre social. Deux ans plus tard, il écrit Le divorce considéré au ХІХe siècle où est souligné le rôle essentiel de la famille dans la totalité d’un corps social hiérarchisé et justifié par Dieu. Étonnement proche de certaines lignes du futur Marx, il compare la famille à une société composée de ses propres rapports politiques, de sa tessiture sociale, de ses interactions élémentaires. La famille est et fait société. Dans la sphère biologique qui la fixe, le père fait office de monarque bienveillant garant de l’autorité sur l’enfant défini par sa faiblesse et sa vulnérabilité. Père, mère et enfants sont entraînés dans des rapports et des fonctions strictement inégaux, cette inégalité étant un donné inamovible qui ne saurait être contractualisé à l’image d’un rapport marchand librement consenti. Il en va de même pour les frères et sœurs, l’aîné ne pouvant se confondre avec un cadet qui ne dispose donc pas du droit d’aînesse. En tant que présupposé naturel, la famille ne peut être le lieu d’un ajustement consenti des rôles et des places.

Comme système, la famille est une chose entièrement formée qui ne saurait être une somme de parties indépendantes cherchant concurrentiellement à « maximiser leur utilité ». Fondée sur une inégalité qui la dépasse tout en la caractérisant, sa dissolution est jugée impossible. Bonald écrit : « le père et la mère qui font divorce, sont donc réellement deux forts qui s’arrangent pour dépouiller un faible, et l’État qui y consent, est complice de leur brigandage. […] Le mariage est donc indissoluble, sous le rapport domestique et public de société. » C’est dans cette volonté de conserver l’unité politique que le futur pair de France, alors élu à la Chambre, donne son nom à la loi du 8 mai 1816 qui aboli le divorce. Le divorce, bien plus qu’une évolution dans les rapports familiaux, est ce « poison » amené par une Révolution qui porte en elle la séparation des corps sociaux dont la famille est le répondant. Ne devant être dissoute sous aucun prétexte et constituant un vecteur d’unité originaire, c’est de la famille que la pensée bonaldienne tire son appui et sa possibilité.

 

Une « sociologie » sacrée

Admiré par Comte (qui forge le terme de « sociologie »), consacré par Balzac pour avoir élaboré un système englobant les mécanismes sociaux, Louis de Bonald est un noble précurseur de cette « science de la société » qualifiée aujourd’hui de sociologie. Noyé dans une époque où le jacobinisme semble encore chercher sa forme, Bonald entend revenir à la tradition d’une manière inédite en convoquant la réflexion sociale. Il élabore une véritable théologie sociale enchâssée dans la vérité révélée du catholicisme. Comme le note le sociologue Patrick Cingolani, Bonald se méfie de l’indétermination démocratique tirée du « libre examen » du protestantisme, entraînant discorde et scepticisme. Défenseur d’un principe holistique, le vicomte pense à rebours de l’idée des Lumières selon laquelle les droits de la société résultent d’une libre entente entre les individus. C’est à la société de faire l’homme, non l’inverse. Plutôt que de refonder la société, la Révolution l’a donc détruite : il n’existe plus de grand corps sacré de la communauté, uniquement des individus dispersés.

Le Millavois pense donc l’homme comme intégralement relié à Dieu dans lequel il fonde positivement sa légitimité spirituelle et sociale. L’individu n’a pour droits que ses devoirs, qui sont envers toute la société, et donc envers Dieu dans lequel cette dernière se confond. Dieu, c’est le social total, car l’homme ne doit rien à l’homme et doit tout à Dieu. Sans le pouvoir de ce dernier, la notion même de devoir s’éteint, annulant du même geste la possibilité d’existence de la société. L’auteur de Théorie du pouvoir politique et religieux pense les lois religieuses, celles qui constituent la religion publique, comme devant « être un rapport nécessaire dérivé de la nature des êtres sociaux ». Dans son bel article Totalité sociale et hiérarchie, Jean-Yves Pranchère souligne la manière dont la vision du social chez Bonald se dissout dans le sacré jusqu’à élaborer une sociologie trinitaire : « la théologie serait en un premier sens une sociologie de la religion et des rapports sociaux qui constituent l’Église ; en un second sens, elle serait une sociologie des rapports sociaux de l’Église avec Dieu ; en un dernier sens, elle serait la sociologie des rapports sociaux qu’entretiennent entre elles les personnes divines. » Les lois sociales d’ici-bas sont analogues à celles reliant les hypostases du Très-Haut, et c’est pour cela qu’elles cherchent naturellement à se conserver.

L’utilité sociale d’une théologie politique

 

Ce sacre du social, l’auteur gallican entend l’encastrer dans la politique. Les hommes, ne pouvant être entièrement raisonnables, ne peuvent s’entendre sur un principe fondateur de la société. L’individu, limité, fait défaut. La légitimité du pouvoir doit donc nécessairement se trouver en dehors de lui. Celui qui traite la « politique en théologien, et la religion en politique » replie donc l’intelligence politique sur la grande Histoire : la raison doit recourir à la tradition, à l’hérédité validée par Dieu. Dans un ouvrage au titre saillant, Législation primitive, considérée dans les derniers temps par les seules lumières de la raison, il écrit : « Une fois révélées à l’homme, par la parole, les lois sont fixées par l’écriture, par les nations, et elles deviennent ainsi une règle universelle, publique et invariable, extérieure, une loi, qu’en aucun temps, aucun lieu, personne ne peut ignorer, oublier, dissimuler, altérer ». Et cet usage de la tradition n’a pour but que d’assurer la tranquillité du Royaume, car « une société constituée doit se conserver et non conquérir ; car la constitution est un principe de conservation, et la conquête un principe de destruction. »

L’homme est un un être culturel par nature parce qu’il toujours vécu par Dieu. Son isolement est une illusion et l’état de nature est réductible à un état social. Le pouvoir qui s’exerce dans la vie de la cité n’a nullement sa source dans le cœur libéré des individus, mais préexiste à la société. Dans son étude sur Bossuet, Bonald note : « Le pouvoir absolu est un pouvoir indépendant des sujets, le pouvoir arbitraire est un pouvoir indépendant des lois. » « Omnis potestas a deo, sed per populum », nous dit Paul. Avant de s’exercer, le pouvoir fonde, il constitue. Ce caractère utilitaire de la vérité catholique donne à Bonald une vision progressive de l’histoire. Dans sa récente étude, Louis de Bonald : Ordre et pouvoir entre subversion et providence, Giorgio Barberis insiste sur ce point. Chez Bonald, dit-il en le citant, « c’est la connaissance de la vérité qui détermine aussi bien le progrès de la raison humaine que le développement de la civilisation. La connaissance de la vérité est directement proportionnelle à la situation globale d’un système social, tandis que chez l’homme elle dépend de l’âge, de la culture ou de l’éducation de chacun. Il y a un progrès effectif dans la connaissance du Vrai et dans le développement de la société. La vérité chrétienne se réalise, se révèle dans le temps. Le christianisme n’est lui-même « qu’un long développement de la vérité » ».

Accédant à Dieu par la fonction sociale, jugeant la vérité catholique sur son utilité collective, Bonald est à la fois critique et héritier des Lumières. Se distinguant nettement de Joseph de Maistre par une vision de l’histoire qui quitte la berge du tragique, Bonald conserve l’optimisme d’un retour durable à l’Ancien Régime. Dans Un philosophe face à la Révolution, Robert Spaemann décrira Bonald comme un fonctionnaliste accomplissant de manière retournée la pensée révolutionnaire. Sa réduction positive de Dieu à une fonction conservatrice de la société anticipe déjà les postures maurrassiennes.

lundi, 02 janvier 2017

2016 : la droitisation du paysage politique

De tous ces scrutins, il est possible de tirer un certain nombre d'enseignements. Les idées s'affichant sans complexe de droite ne font pas à elles-seules la victoire (dans un référendum des courants disparates peuvent converger) ; de même, elles ne rassemblent pas encore une majorité absolue de suffrages (d'où l'échec du FPÖ en Autriche tandis que la victoire du ticket Trump-Pence, avec une minorité de suffrage populaires s'explique par la structure fédérale des États-Unis). Mais, ce sont bien les idées de la droite ontologique (et non seulement situationnelle), d'une droite qui ne cache pas son anti-modernisme, qui progressent et repoussent vers la gauche du spectre politique les idées qui occupaient son espace électoral ; ce que j'ai proposé d'appeler le «mouvement dextrogyre» (ou «dextrisme»). 

Qu'elle l'emporte ou échoue in extremis, 2016 a vu se concrétiser la déferlante «dextriste». Son ressort électoral est le populisme. Avec des caractéristiques propres à chaque pays, celui-ci consiste dans la valorisation de ce qui vient du peuple (angle social) et de ce que fait le peuple (angle démocratique). Il dénonce la distorsion entre le peuple et les élites ; il revendique donc l'exercice de la démocratie directe contre celle représentative. Politiquement, le populisme entend agir pour la protection de celui qui, dans une relation d'altérité, est le plus faible (défense de la main d'œuvre nationale contre la concurrence déloyale, sauvegarde de la dignité de la personne contre sa chosification). Doctrinalement, il se fait le défenseur de l'identité du corps social en tant qu'il est un tout (la nation) contre la juxtaposition d'identités partielles (les communautarismes) ; il affirme que les corps sociaux (comme la famille) existent en eux-mêmes et donc que la volonté des personnes (le mariage, par exemple) serve à s'y inscrire et non à les créer artificiellement. Il existe donc, dans le vote populiste, un double aspect patrimonial portant sur le niveau de vie (aspect matériel) mais surtout sur le mode de vie (aspect culturel). Le vote populiste, c'est la révolte des classes populaires oubliées et des classes moyennes qui se paupérisent (la «France périphérique» ou l' «Amérique du milieu») contre les métropoles mondialisées et multiculturelles. Au final, le populisme est un anxiolytique: il est l'anti-syndrome de Stockholm. 

Outre qu'elle est susceptible de varier en fonction des circonstances nationales, l'idéologie politique portée par le «mouvement dextrogyre» n'est sans doute pas encore parfaitement explicite et homogène. Mais, plusieurs traits caractéristiques peuvent être dégagés. Elle est une combinaison des facteurs suivants: 

- l'idenditarisme (par opposition au multiculturalisme): hostilité envers l'immigration considérée comme un facteur de déstabilisation culturelle et de désagrégation sociale, affirmation des racines chrétiennes des nations occidentales vis-à-vis de l'islamisme mais aussi du laïcisme ; 

- le souverainisme (par opposition au mondialisme): revendication de pouvoir disposer de son destin (contrôle des frontières), de déterminer son avenir (contrôle du pouvoir normatif) ; «Take back control» fut le slogan des partisans du Brexit ; 

- le subsidiarisme (par opposition tant au libéralisme qu'au socialisme): rejet tant de la loi de la jungle libérale (travail du dimanche) que de l'égalitarisme socialiste (assistanat) ; préconisation d'un État fort (susceptible d'exercer un protectionnisme douanier) mais limité dans ses domaines d'intervention (baisse des prélèvements obligatoires pesant sur les familles et les entreprises, défense des libertés pour les corps sociaux comme les institutions scolaires et universitaires) ; acceptation d'une société avec marché (où seuls certains biens sont échangeables) et non d'une société de marché (où celui-ci devient la méthode d'analyse de l'ensemble des phénomènes sociaux) ; 

- le conservatisme (par opposition au progressisme): affirmation de l'enracinement des personnes individuelles et collectives dans une histoire et des traditions ; il ne consiste donc pas en une simple volonté de maintenir l'ordre établi et en un frein au progressisme mais en une réaction aux différentes manifestations de la modernité, aussi bien l'individualisme que le matérialisme (d'où son insistance dans le combat pro-vie). 

La France n'échappe pas au «mouvement dextrogyre». Les sondages annoncent un nouveau «21-avril» opposant François Fillon à Marie Le Pen tandis que toute une partie des ténors de la gauche s'affiche désormais social-libérale (Manuel Valls, Emmanuel Macron). Cependant, les partis font encore de la résistance: la recomposition du spectre politique tarde encore et aucun des actuels candidats à la présidentielle ne semble avoir compris le contenu idéologique porté par le «dextrisme». Marine Le Pen cultive le souverainisme mais bascule vers une forme d'étatisme. François Fillon préconise les libertés économiques mais néglige la question identitaire. Tous deux s'adonnent au libéralisme sociétal même s'ils essaient de le mâtiner de marqueurs conservateurs (uniforme à l'école pour l'un, abrogation de la loi Taubira remplacée par un PACS amélioré pour l'autre). Faisant preuve d'une incohérence doctrinale (sous prétexte d'attirer à eux différents segments électoraux), ils ne satisfont donc pas entièrement leur électorat «droitier» qui est, en partie, susceptible de basculer de l'un à l'autre. À moins, chose possible mais difficilement réalisable dans l'état actuel des choses, qu'une meilleure offre politique ne se présente à lui…"

Extrait de: Source et auteur

dimanche, 02 octobre 2016

Die Entleerung des Konservatismus

auguste-comte-3mmmm.jpg

Die Entleerung des Konservatismus

von Carlos Wefers Verástegui
Ex: http://www.blauenarzisse.de

Carlos Wefers Verástegui bohrt mal wieder ein besonders dickes Brett und beschäftigt sich mit Auguste Comte, dem Positivismus sowie der drohenden Entleerung des Konservatismus.

Dass eine Weltanschauung „wissenschaftlich“ sein könnte, wie das seinerzeit der Sozialismus von sich behauptete, glaubt heute niemand mehr. In unserem „nachideologischen Zeitalter“ verhalten sich Wissenschaft und Weltanschauung zueinander wie Wasser und Öl. Anders steht es natürlich mit der wissenschaftlichen Untermauerung von Weltanschauungen. Hier, in diesem besonderen Fall, bedeutet „Wissenschaft“ nämlich etwas ganz anderes als „Forschung betreiben um seiner selbst willen“.

Wissenschaft als Ideologie

Anstatt sich von der Tatsachenwelt und ihren Wissensinhalten leiten zu lassen, wie es die nüchterne Wissenschaft eben aus Gründen der Wissenschaftlichkeit fordert, ist die mit der Weltanschauung verbundene Wissenschaft bestrebt, es genau anders herum zu tun: Die durch die Wissensinhalte des Erfahrungsstoffs gesicherte Welterkenntnis soll dazu dienen, in die Tatsachenwelt einzugreifen, sie zu beeinflussen, zu leiten, zu verändern oder umzubauen. Der von Nietzsche aller Wissenschaft unterstellte „Wille zur Macht“ ist bei der nüchternen Wissenschaft bloß der Aufgabensteller bzw. Auftraggeber in Form einer außerwissenschaftlichen Motivation. Bei der weltanschaulich eingefärbten Wissenschaft – der „wissenschaftlichen Weltanschauung“ – ist der „Wille zur Macht“ ein Grundtrieb und überhaupt das Forschungsmotiv schlechthin.

Der „Positivismus“ Auguste Comtes (17981857) zeigt, dass die „wissenschaftliche Weltanschauung“, also Wissenschaft als Ideologie, längst Realität ist. Wissenschaftsgeschichtlich, noch mehr aber ideologiegeschichtlich, ist dabei wichtig zu wissen, dass die „wissenschaftliche Weltanschauung“ Comtes von vornherein in einem inzestuösen Verhältnis zum „wissenschaftlichen“ Sozialismus stand: sie ist sowohl sein älterer Bruder als auch dessen Mitvater: Seit den Tagen des gemeinsamen Stammvaters, Claude-​Henri Graf von Saint-​Simon, bedingen und durchdringen sich Positivismus und Sozialismus nämlich gegenseitig. Diese Wechselbeziehung ist nachweisbar bei so unterschiedlich gearteten Denkern wie Karl Marx, den französischen Soziologen, namentlich Emil Durkheim und seinen Schülern, dem amerikanischen Ökonomen Thorstein B. Veblen – dessen Ideen die „technokratische Bewegung“ in den USA inspirierte –, Lenin sowie den „Ingenieur“ der europäischen Integration, Jean Monnet.

„Positive Politik“ als Gesellschaftsregelung

Der Positivismus Comtes vereinigte ganz bewusst von Anfang an Gegensätzliches: Tradition und Revolution sollten sich in einer entwicklungsfähigen Synthese die Waage halten und gegenseitig vervollständigen. Zu diesem Zweck mussten beide soziale Sprengstoffe entschärft werden. Aus „Tradition“ machte Comte kurzerhand „Ordnung“, d.h. „Struktur“, „Statik“, die „Revolution“ wurde von ihm zu „Fortschritt“, zur gesellschaftlichen Dynamik umfunktioniert.

Innerhalb einer die Französische Revolution fortsetzenden Epoche, die von Comte als eine „kritische“ empfunden wurde, erschien ihm sein „Positivismus“ die einzig gangbare Möglichkeit, die Gesellschaft aus revolutionärem Chaos und intellektueller Anarchie zu befreien und neu zu organisieren. Es ging ihm vornehmlich darum, eine gesellschaftliche Ordnung herzustellen, die mit dem von Wirtschaft und Wissenschaft bewirkten gesellschaftlichen Fortschritt vereinbar war. Zu diesem Behuf erfand er die „Soziologie“, deren Selbstverständnis von nun an das einer „Krisenwissenschaft“ sein sollte: Geboren aus der Krise sollte sie wissenschaftlich eine definitive Antwort auf diese geben. Die „alte“ Politik hatte bei dieser Aufgabe versagt, die wissenschaftlich begründete „positive Politik“ sollte sie ablösen. „Wissenschaftlich begründet“ heißt im Sinne von Comte, „voir por prévoir“ – sehen [was ist] um vorauszuschauen [was kommen wird]. Die „positive Politik“ bestand folglich in der wissenschaftlichen Erfassung und Beherrschung der gesellschaftlichen Tatsachen, also in Gesellschaftsregelung.

Objektivität und Vernunft anstatt Affektgeladenheit

Zur Zeit seiner geistigen Reife überwogen bei Comte die Ordnungsvorstellungen der französischen Traditionalisten Louis de Bonald und Joseph de Maistre. Comte selbst bewerkstelligte die Umwandlung des traditionalistischen Ordnungsdenkens in „Positivismus“. Diese Umwandlung, die in Deutschland ihre Parallele findet in der Umwandlung der Hegelschen Ideal-​Dialektik in eine Real-​Dialektik durch Marx, trägt einer Sachlogik Rechnung, die den Konservatismus immer dort überfällt, wo Geist, Metaphysik, Idealismus, Gottglaube, Leidenschaft, Phantasie und Liebe chirurgisch aus ihm entfernt wurden. Sobald man den Konservatismus nämlich seiner ureigensten Werte und Affektverbundenheiten entkleidet, zerfällt er zu „Positivismus“– in Schicksal, dass sich seit Comte unzählige Male im konservativen Lager wiederholt hat.

ACpol9782228890236.jpgDer Linken galten Comtismus und Positivismus als eine Abart des Konservatismus, der „Szientismus“ war für sie „reaktionär“. Konservative witterten in ihm ein sozialrevolutionäres Ferment. Dieses Janusgesicht, mal konservativ bzw. reaktionär, mal sozialrevolutionär zu sein, ist ganz charakteristisch für den Positivismus. Das hat aber nichts mit der Dialektik des Konservatismus zu tun, der in fortlaufender Auseinandersetzung mit der „fortschrittlichen“ Gegenwart dahin tendiert, revolutionär zu werden. Selbst innerhalb zeitbedingter äußerer Wandlungen behält der Konservatismus sein ihm eigenes Pathos. Und gerade diesem Pathos stellt der Positivismus sein Ethos entgegen: Der Positivismus ist grundsätzlich „sachlich“ und „tatsachenorientiert“, im Gegensatz zu jeglicher Affektgeladenheit ist er objektiv. Überhaupt sind den Positivisten Objektivität und Vernunft einerlei, Vernunft besteht für sie darin, mit der Zeit zu gehen, und nicht etwa zurück – oder nach oben, gen Himmel –, nicht ins eigene Herz, sondern nur vorwärts zu schauen.

Gegen Sentimentalismus und Ideologie?

Der Einbruch des Positivismus in den Konservatismus droht überall da, wo Fragen der „Organisation“ und der technisch-​technologischen Regelung in den Vordergrund treten. Der Positivismus, der sich anschickt, sich aus dem Konservatismus herauszuschälen, verlangt immer eine ihm sehr gelegene Entscheidung zwischen „Ideologie“ und „Vernunft“, d.h. der Vernunft des Positivismus. Für den Organisator und den allein den Erfolg anvisierenden Sachverständigen haben Ideologie „immer nur die Andren“, und selbst der Konservatismus, für den er doch zu kämpfen meint, ist für ihn, wenn nicht selbst schon „Ideologie“, so doch durch Ideologeme sowie alle Art von „Sentimentalismen“ stark verunreinigt.

Er hingegen bemüht sich in perfekter positivistischer Reinlichkeit und Leidenschaftslosigkeit um die Lösung praktischer Problem, woraus sich schnell bei ihm die Überzeugung ergibt, diese seien wichtiger als Grundsatzfragen. Ganz charakteristisch werden diese mal als „Romantik“, mal als „Reaktion“ abgetan. Immer handelt es sich bei ihnen für den Positivisten um unnütze Energie– und Zeitvergeudung. Ironischerweise leistet aber gerade diese durch den Willen zur Macht bezeichnete Sichtweise einer Gesinnung der Anpassung und Fügsamkeit Vorschub. Eine solche ist aber mit dem Konservatismus, der alles andre als ein ideologischer Anstrich und auch keine bloße Weltanschauung, sondern eine geistige Lebensform ist, nicht zu vereinbaren.

samedi, 17 septembre 2016

Le Vicomte de Bonald et la Tradition bafouée

louis-bonald-barberis.jpg

Le Vicomte de Bonald et la Tradition bafouée

par Nicolas Bonnal

Ex: http://www.dedefensa.org

Le vicomte de Bonald est certainement plus que Maurras le fondateur de la révolution conservatrice en France, le théoricien de la restauration intelligente. Point compromis par les excès verbaux du journalisme, il n’a pas non plus le fondamentalisme un peu vain de Joseph de Maistre, beaucoup plus à la mode. Il lui a manqué sans doute un vulgarisateur reconnu pour déplier les recoins de sa vaste et encyclopédique pensée, et en dérouler les fils de la subtile simplicité., archive.org m’a permis de lire ou de relire les dix-sept volumes de ses œuvres complètes. Je me contente de donner à mes lecteurs un avant-goût de son style et de son esprit car ce théoricien présumé obscur et peu frondeur est un régal pour les sens et la sensibilité. J’en laisse juges mes lecteurs en les invitant à partager les réflexions de ce grand esprit toujours ignoré et jamais oublié.

Et pour écrire comme Céline, je lui trouve un succulent génie libertarien pour le coup moi au vicomte. Mécanisation, bureaucratie, fiscalité, sans oublier les beaux esprits. Futur et Fin de ce monde.

Voyez cette première phrase qui résume en deux lignes de concision efficiente toute l’entropie de ce monde dit moderne :

« En France, on a substitué moralité à morale, en Allemagne, religiosité à religion; partout, honnêteté à vertu. C’est à peu près la même chose que le crédit substitué à la propriété. »

LB-1.jpg« ... Ceci nous ramène à la constitution de l’Angleterre, où il n’y a pas de corps de noblesse destinée à servir le pouvoir, mais un patriciat destiné à l’exercer. »

« Que s’est-il donc passé dans la société, qu’on ne puisse plus faire aller qu’à force de bras une machine démontée qui allait autrefois toute seule, sans bruit et sans effort ? »

« Ils deviennent crédules en cessant d’être croyants, comme ils deviennent esclaves dès qu’ils cessent d’être sujets. »

« Il y a des hommes qui, par leurs sentiments, appartiennent au temps passé, et par leurs pensées à l’avenir. Ceux-là trouvent difficilement leur place dans le présent. »

« J’aime, dans un Etat, une constitution qui se soutienne toute seule, et qu’il ne faille pas toujours défendre et toujours conserver. »

« La société finit, elle n’a plus d’avenir à attendre, parce qu’elle n’a plus de passé à rappeler, et que l’avenir ne doit être que la combinaison du passé et du présent. »

« Rome : quand la démocratie eut pris le dessus, cette société chercha un chef, comme elles le cherchent toutes, et ne rencontra que des tyrans. Ce peuple, admirable dans ses premiers temps, fait pitié sous ses tribuns, horreur sous ses triumvirs, et, soumis à ses empereurs, n’excite plus que mépris et dégoût. »

« Le tutoiement s’est retranché dans la famille ; et après avoir tutoyé tout le monde, on ne tutoie plus que ses père et mère. Cet usage met toute la maison à l’aise : il dispense les parents d’autorité et les enfants de respect. »

« L’Etat qui prend trop sur les hommes et les propriétés de la famille, est un dissipateur qui dévore ses capitaux. »

« Je crois qu’il ne faudrait pas aujourd’hui d’impôt foncier chez un peuple agricole, mais seulement des impôts indirects. L’Etat qui impose la terre, prend sur son capital ; quand il impose les consommations, il vit de son revenu. »

« Partout où il y a beaucoup de machines pour remplacer les hommes, il y aura beaucoup d’hommes qui ne seront que des machines. »

« La disposition à inventer des machines qui exécutent le plus de travail possible avec le moins de dépense d’intelligence de la part de l’ouvrier, s’est étendue aux choses morales. »

« Le juge lui-même, au criminel, est une machine qui ouvre un livre, et marque du doigt la même peine pour des crimes souvent fort inégaux ; et les bureaux ne sont aussi que des machines d’administration. »

« L’école de Bonaparte a pu former quelques administrateurs, mais elle ne pouvait pas faire des hommes d’Etat. »

« Bonaparte avait été obligé d’employer une force excessive dans son administration, parce qu’il n’y en avait aucune dans sa constitution. »

« Les sauvages ne détruiront que la récolte d’une année, les beaux esprits m’enlèvent la propriété même du fonds. Les uns insultent mon cadavre, les autres poursuivent ma mémoire ; je ne vois de progrès que dans les moyens de nuire, et le plus sauvage est celui qui fait le plus de mal. »

« Toute la science de la politique se réduit aujourd’hui à la statistique : c’est le triomphe et le chef-d’oeuvre du petit esprit. On sait au juste (et j’en ai vu faire la question officielle) combien dans un pays les poules font d’oeufs, et l’on connaît à fonds la matière imposable. Ce qu’on connaît le moins sont les hommes ; et ce qu’on a tout à fait perdu de vue, sont les principes qui fondent et maintiennent les sociétés. »

« L’art de l’administration a tué la science du gouvernement. »

LB-2.png« Les philosophes qui se sont élevés avec tant d’amertume contre ce qu’ils ont appelé des préjugés, auraient dû commencer par se défaire de la langue elle-même dans laquelle ils écrivaient ; car elle est le premier de nos préjugés, et il renferme tous les autres. »

« Ce n’est pas le peuple occupé qui réclame la souveraineté, c’est le peuple oisif qui veut faire le peuple occupé souverain malgré lui, pour gouverner sous son nom et vivre à ses dépens. »

« Dans le dernier âge, où les intérêts sont plus compliqués, les passions plus artificieuses et les esprits plus raffinés, le crime est un art et presque une profession, et la fonction de le découvrir et de le juger doit être une étude. »

« Toute passion qui n’est pas celle de l’argent des honneurs ou des plaisirs, s’appelle aujourd’hui fanatisme et exagération. »

« L’excès des impôts transporte chez les peuples chrétiens l’esclavage tel qu’il existait chez les anciens ; car l’esclavage n’est, à le bien prendre, que le travail fait tout entier au profit d’un autre. »

« Les petits talents comme les petites tailles se haussent pour paraître grands ; ils sont taquins et susceptibles, et craignent toujours de n’être pas aperçus. »

Nicolas Bonnal