Ok

En poursuivant votre navigation sur ce site, vous acceptez l'utilisation de cookies. Ces derniers assurent le bon fonctionnement de nos services. En savoir plus.

mardi, 27 septembre 2011

Summer 1942, Winter 2010: An Exchange

Summer 1942, Winter 2010: An Exchange

By Michael O'Meara

Ex: http://www.counter-currents.com/

In the Summer of 1942 — while the Germans were at the peak of their powers, totally unaware of the approaching fire storm that would turn their native land into an inferno — the philosopher Martin Heidegger wrote (for a forth-coming lecture course at Freiberg) the following lines, which I take from the English translation known as Hölderlin’s Hymn “The Ister”:[1]

“The Anglo-Saxon world of Americanism” — Heidegger noted in an aside to his nationalist/ontological examination of his beloved Hölderlin – “has resolved to annihilate Europe, that is, the homeland, and that means: [it has resolved to annihilate] the commencement of the Western world.”

In annihilating the commencement (the origins or breakout of European being) – and thus in annihilating the people whose blood flowed in American veins — New World Europeans, unknowingly, destroyed the essence of their own being — by disowning their origins – denigrating the source of their life-form, denying themselves, thus, the possibility of a future.

“Whatever has commencement is indestructible.”

Americans destined their self-destruction by warring on their commencement – by severing the root of their being.

But Europe — this unique synergy of blood and spirit — cannot be killed, for her essence, Heidegger tells us, is the “commencement” — the original — the enowning — the perpetual grounding and re-asserting of being.

Europe thus always inevitably rises again and again — like she and her bull from under the waters, which sweep over her, as she undauntedly plunges into what is coming.

Her last stand is consequently always her first stand — another commencement — as she advances to her origins — enowning the uncorrupted being of her beginning – as she authenticates herself in the fullness of a future which enables her to begin over and over.

* * *

The opposite holds as well.

America’s annihilation of her commencement revealed her own inherent lack of commencement.

From the start, her project was to reject her European origins — to disown the being that made her who she was — as her Low Church settlers pursued the metaphor of Two Worlds, Old and New.

For Heidegger, America’s “entry into this planetary war is not [her] entry into history; rather, it is already, the ultimate American act of American ahistoricality and self-devastation.”

For having emerged, immaculately conceived, from the jeremiad of her Puritan Errand, America defined herself in rejection of her past, in rejection of her origins, in rejection of her most fundamental ontological ground — as she looked westward, toward the evening sun and the ever-expanding frontier of her rootless, fleeting future, mythically legitimated in the name of an ‘American Dream’ conjured up from the Protestant ethic and the spirit of capitalism.

Americans, the preeminent rational, rootless, uniform homo oeconomics, never bothered looking ahead because they never looked back. Past and future, root and branch – all pulled up and cut down.

No memory, no past, no meaning.

In the name of progress — which Friedrick Engels imagined as a ‘cruel chariot riding over mounds of broken bodies’ – American being is dissolved in her hurly-burly advance toward the blackening abyss.

Yet however it is spun, it was from Europe’s womb that Americans entered the world and only in affirming the European being of their Motherland and Fatherhood was there the possibility of taking root in their “New” World – without succumbing to the barbarians and fellaheen outside the Mother-soil and Father-Culture.

Instead, America’s founders set out to reject their mother. They called her Egyptian or Babylonian — and took their identity – as the ‘elect’, the ‘chosen’, the ‘light to nations’ — from the desert nomads of the Old Testament — alien to the great forests of our Northern lands — envious of our blue-eye, fair-hair girls – repelled by the great-vaulted heights of our Gothic Cathedrals.

The abandonment of their original and only being set Americans up as the perpetual fixers of world-improvement — ideological champions of consummate meaninglessness – nihilism’s first great ‘nation’.

* * *

While Heidegger was preparing his lecture, tens of thousands of tanks, trucks, and artillery pieces started making their way from Detroit to Murmansk, and then to the Germans’ Eastern front.

A short time later, the fires began to fall from the sky — the fires bearing the curse of Cromwell and the scorched-earth convictions of Sherman — the fires that turned German families into cinders, along with their great churches, their palatial museums, their densely packed, sparkling-clean working-class quarters, their ancient libraries and cutting-edge laboratories.

The forest that took a thousand years to become itself perishes in a night of phosphorous flames.

It would be a long time — it hasn’t come yet — before the Germans — the People of the Center — the center of Europe’s being — rise again from the rubble, this time more spiritual than material.

* * *

Heidegger could know little of the apocalyptic storm that was about to destroy his Europe.

But did he at least suspect that the Führer had blundered Germany into a war she could not win?  That not just Germany, but the Europe opposing the Anglo-American forces of Mammon would also be destroyed?

* * *

“The concealed spirit of the commencement in the West will not even have the look of contempt for this trial of self-devastation without commencement, but will await its stellar hour from out of the releasement and tranquility that belong to the commencement.”

An awakened, recommencing Europe promises, thus, to repudiate America’s betrayal of herself — America, this foolish European idea steeped in Enlightenment hubris, which is to be forgotten (as a family skeleton), once Europe reasserts herself.

In 1942, though, Heidegger did not know that Europeans, even Germans, would soon betray themselves to the Americans, as the Churchills, Adenauers, Blums — Europe’s lickspittle — rose to the top of the postwar Yankee pyramid designed to crush every idea of nation, culture, and destiny.

That’s Europe’s tragedy.

* * *

Once Europe awakes – it will one day – she will re-affirm and re-assert herself – no longer distracted by America’s glitter and tinsel, no longer intimidated by her hydrogen bomb and guided missiles – seeing clearly, at last, that this entertainment worthy of Hollywood conceals an immense emptiness — her endless exercises in consummate meaninglessness.

Incapable therefore of beginning again, having denied herself a commencement, the bad idea that America has become is likely, in the coming age of fire and steel, to disintegrate into her disparate parts.

At that moment, white Americans will be called on, as New World Europeans, to assert their “right” to a homeland in North America — so that there, they will have a place at last to be who they are.

If they should succeed in this seemingly unrealizable fortune, they will found the American nation(s) for the first time – not as the universal simulacrum Masons and deists concocted in 1776 — but as the blood-pulse of Europe’s American destiny.

“We only half-think what is historical in history, that is, we do not think it at all, if we calculate history and its magnitude in terms of the length . . . of what has been, rather than awaiting that which is coming and futural.”

Commencement, as such, is “that which is coming and futural” — that which is the “historical in history” — that which goes very far back and is carried forward into every distant, unfolding future – like Pickett’s failed infantry charge at Gettysburg that Faulkner tells us is to be tried again and again until it succeeds.

* * *

“We stand at the beginning of historicality proper, that is, of action in the realm of the essential, only when we are able to wait for what is to be destined of one’s own.”

“One’s own” — this assertion of ourselves — Heidegger contends, will only come if we defy conformity, convention, and unnatural conditioning to realize the European being, whose destiny is ours alone.

At that moment, if we should succeed in standing upright, in the way our ancestors did, we will reach ahead and beyond to what is begun through every futuristic affirmation of who we European-Americans are.

This reaching, though, will be no ‘actionless or thoughtless letting things come and go . . . [but] a standing that has already leapt ahead, a standing within what is indestructible (to whose neighborhood desolation belongs, like a valley to a mountain).”

For desolation there will be — in this struggle awaiting our kind – in this destined future defiantly holding out a greatness that does not break as it bends in the storm — a greatness certain to come with the founding of a European nation in North America – a greatness I often fear that we no longer have in ourselves and that needs thus to be evoked in the fiery warrior rites that once commemorated the ancient Aryan sky gods, however far away or fictitious they have become.

–Winter 2010

 Note

1. Martin Heidegger, Hölderlin’s Hymn ‘The Ister’, trans W. McNeill and J. Davis (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1996), p. 54ff.


Article printed from Counter-Currents Publishing: http://www.counter-currents.com

URL to article: http://www.counter-currents.com/2011/09/summer-1942-winter-2010-an-exchange/

00:10 Publié dans Philosophie | Lien permanent | Commentaires (4) | Tags : philosophie, années 40, martin heidegger | |  del.icio.us | | Digg! Digg |  Facebook

Clausewitz como pensador politico

Clausewitz como pensador politico

Por Sergio Prince C.

http://geviert.wordpress.com/

Los estudios sobre Clausewitz son abundantes en cantidad y calidad, por lo tanto, es aventurado escribir sobre este maestro de la estrategia y no caer en repeticiones y lugares comunes. Entre los más destacados estudiosos, podemos citar a Peter Paret, Profesor de Historia en la Universidad de Stanford y autor de una amplia gama de trabajos sobre temas militares y estratégico, entre los que destaca su trabajo titulado Clausewitz and the State (Paret, 1979); Michael Howard, historiador de la Universidad de Oxford (Howard, 1983) y Bernard Brodie, profesor de Ciencia Política en la Universidad de California, autor de varias obras de gran influencia en el pensamiento estratégico moderno. En el año 2005, se realizó una renovada  reflexión sobre Clausewitz en el congreso Clausewitz in the 21st Century organizado por la Universidad de Oxford, cuyos resultados fueron publicados el año 2007 (Strachan & Herberg – Rothe, 2007). En lo que va corrido de 2010, han aparecido cientos de trabajos que tratan de Clausewitz o que, a partir de él, estudian el fenómeno de la guerra y las relaciones internacionales. Así, Castro se ocupa de la guerra, la vida y la muerte reflexionando sobre Clausewitz a partir del psicoanálisis (Castro, 2010), Kaldor evalúa la vigencia de Clausewitz en tiempos de globalización (Kaldo, 2010), Sibertin-Blanc y  Richter (2010) visualizan a Deleuze y Guattari como lectores de Clausewitz (Sibertin-Blanc & Richter, 2010), Guha realiza un estudio sobre la guerra desde Clausewitz a la guerra de redes del siglo XXI (Guha, 2010) y Diniz realiza una comparación epistemológica entre Clausewitz y Keegan (Diniz, 2010), entre otras tantas obras que se pueden mencionar.

Ante este panorama y sin pretender erudición alguna, ruego al lector que disculpe los vacíos bibliográficos que puedan existir, pero ellos son de mi absoluta responsabilidad y resultado de las limitaciones propias de mi investigación. En esta sección, discutiré el alcance del dictum clausewitziano ‘la guerra es la continuación de la política por otros medios’. Mostraré que: 1.- Que el pensamiento del estratega prusiano va más allá de lo meramente militar y tiene una dimensión política; 2.- Qué esta dimensión se reconoce fundamentalmente a partir de de un documento elaborado por Clausewitz en febrero de 1812 y 3.- Que desde esta dimensión se puede entender con claridad la relación política-guerra absoluta en la cual se abre la posibilidad de afirmar que la política es continuación de la guerra por otros medios en una situación extrema.

Desde esta podemos decir que su afirmación sólo intenta separar lo político de lo estratégico y no indica compromiso alguno con la ontología ni la epistemología de la guerra en sí. La afirmación se puede entender como operacional- metodológica, sin considerar ningún compromiso existencial. En otras palabras, quiero mostrar que el dictum tiene un alcance limitado a la relación de lo político-militar y no pretende involucrarse en asuntos ontológicos. Entonces, me pregunto cuál es la relevancia de la sentencia de Clausewitz. En que ámbitos del conocimiento tiene mayor impacto ¿En la filosofía? ¿En la política? ¿En la estrategia? Como ya hemos insinuado, la lectura filosófica de esta frase se puede hacer desde, al menos, tres dimensiones. La ontológica, la epistemológica y la metodológica. Si nos preguntamos por la existencia de la guerra como continuación de la política, no es lo mismo que si nos preguntamos qué quiere decir esta afirmación, cómo sabemos lo que quiere decir y bajo qué condiciones cambiaríamos de opinión. Tampoco sería lo mismo que preguntarse cómo la guerra llega a ser la continuación de la política por otros medios. Las tres aproximaciones filosóficas demandan distintos tipos de respuestas. Ahora bien ¿Qué quiso decir Clausewitz con lo que dijo?

Antes de comenzar, creo que es necesario recordar que, para el año 1812, Clausewitz bajo las órdenes de Scharnhorst y Gneisenau, junto con sus colaboradores Boyen y Grolmann, eran parte activa del proceso de reformas militares  encaminadas a la formación de un ejército nacional. Pese a la reducción de tropas decretadas por Napoleón, los reformadores lograron implementar un sistema de reservistas por medio de la aplicación del sistema Krümper (adiestramiento rápido). Del mismo modo, establecieron un sistema de ascensos por mérito, prohibieron los castigos corporales y fundaron la Academia de Guerra. Estas actividades de orden castrense tendrían una enorme repercusión política, como veremos más adelante. Fue en febrero de este mismo año, en un documento llamado el Memorándum-Confesión, que  Clausewitz devela su genio como pensador político declarándose partidario de la lucha existencial contra Napoleón ya fuese a) como reacción espontánea del corazón y voz del sentimiento o b) Por motivos de razón política, que no se deja afectar por el miedo y que conduce a la conciencia de que Napoleón es el enemigo irreconciliable de Prusia, y que tampoco se dejará reconciliar por la sumisión o c) a base de un cálculo de la situación militar, cuya última y realmente desesperada esperanza es una sublevación popular armada. (Clausewitz C. V., 1966) (Schmitt, 1969, pág. 6).

 

El carácter peculiar de la enemistad existencial (política) que manifiesta Clausewitz contra Napoleón es lo que, en opinión de Schmitt, lo transforma en un  pensador político: “Como enemigo de Napoleón, Clausewitz llegó a ser el creador de una teoría política de la guerra. Dice Schmitt que lo fundamental de este documento es la respuesta a una pregunta clara: ¿Quién es el verdadero enemigo de Prusia? La respuesta, cuidadosamente pensada y reflexionada en toda su problemática, es: Napoleón, emperador de los franceses (Schmitt, 1969). Esta identificación certera del enemigo es una declaración política ya que coincide con lo esencialmente político: la identificación de quiénes son amigos y quiénes los enemigos. Mirando desde tal perspectiva, en esta declaración, Clausewitz realiza una confesión puramente política. Esta idea sobre el carácter político de la declaración del estratega se refuerza al momento de referirse a temas económicos y de la bancarrota económico-social que amenazaba a su patria debido a las acciones del Corso:

En su segunda confesión — que se refiere a la razón no afectada por el miedo — Clausewitz habla de la economía, que califica como “el principio vital más común de nuestra constitución social”. Recuerda la penosa situación económica que se derivó del bloqueo continental, el cataclismo que amenaza y que sería “una verdadera bancarrota, es decir, una bancarrota multiplicada de cada uno contra cada uno”, y que no se podría “comparar con una bancarrota estatal corriente”. La situación económica es la consecuencia de las medidas de un “general victorioso desde el Ebro hasta el Niemen” (Schmitt, 1969).

Quisiera agregar al comentario schmittiano un hecho que me parece relevante. En febrero de 1812, Federico Guillermo III había firmado un acuerdo con Napoleón por medio del cual le brindaba el apoyo de Prusia a Francia. La petición de Clausewitz resultaba altamente impertinente, en especial, por el carácter eminentemente político de esta. Tiempo después de escribir el memorándum, Clausewitz solicitó la baja del ejército y se dirigió, clandestinamente, a Rusia para apoyar al Zar en contra de Prusia con la esperanza de que el ejército zarista liberara a su patria del yugo francés. Estos son actos eminentemente políticos y refuerzan el carácter existencial de la lucha contra Napoleón a la que llama el estratega prusiano. Su viaje clandestino es otra declaración eminentemente política que va más allá de la fuerza de cualquier escrito. Clausewitz llevó el carácter político de sus confesiones a la práctica, aunque esto implicara luchar en contra sus camaradas de armas.

Otro rasgo que caracteriza el pensamiento puramente político de Clausewitz es su interés por la guerrilla española de 1808. La guerra de guerrillas es la guerra política por excelencia, el evento en donde con más claridad se aprecia que la política es la continuación de la guerra por otros medios ya que es una lucha existencial en donde se desata la violencia originaria justo después de reconocer y declarar al enemigo. Los guerrilleros españoles iniciaron una lucha en su patria chica mientras su rey no declaraba a su enemigo, no sabía quién era el enemigo. Al igual que el rey Federico Guillermo III el monarca español se debatía en un país dividido por la simpatía que su elite afrancesada sentía por Napoleón. Los guerrilleros con el mismo sentimiento de Clausewitz se preguntaron ¿Quién es el verdadero enemigo de España? Napoleón, emperador de los franceses respondieron y, con una decisión política sin igual y ajena a los monarcas, emprendieron una lucha existencial en contra del Corso. Los españoles estaban en condiciones de afirmar que por motivos de razón política – que no se deja afectar por el miedo – Napoleón era el enemigo irreconciliable de España. Esta es una declaración política soberana por que el redactor del texto declara al enemigo lo que llevara al fin a la incomprensión de los movimientos guerrilleros que incluso impulsaron la independencia de América. Pero el interés en la guerrilla no fue sólo de Clausewitz. Prusia recepcionó el espíritu guerrillero y lo transformo en norma jurídica.

A pesar que durante el siglo XIX el ejército prusiano-alemán era el más reputado del mundo su reputación se basaba en el hecho de ser un ejército regular que derrotaba a otros ejércitos regulares. Su primer encuentro con fuerzas “irregulares” ocurrió en la guerra franco-prusiana de 1870/1871, en territorio francés, cuando enfrentaron a un equipo de francotiradores. Lo “regular” primaba en el pensamiento militar. Por esta razón, el documento prusiano del 21 de abril de 1813 tiene una singular importancia (para Schmitt este documento es una especie de Carta Magna de la Guerrilla). El Landsturm establece que cada ciudadano está obligado a oponerse con toda clase de armas al invasor:

Hachas, herramientas de labranza, guadañas y escopetas se recomiendan en forma especial (en el § 43). Cada prusiano está obligado a no obedecer ninguna disposición del enemigo, y por el contrario, a causarle daño con todos los medios que se hallen a su alcance. Nadie debe obedecer al enemigo, ni siquiera cuando este trate de restablecer el orden público por que a través de ello se facilitan las operaciones militares del enemigo. Se dice expresamente que “los excesos de los malvivientes descontrolados” resultan menos adversos que una situación en la cual el enemigo puede disponer libremente de todas las tropas. Se garantizan represalias y terror instrumentado en defensa de los guerrilleros y se amenaza al enemigo con estas medidas (Schmitt, 2007b).

En Prusia no se llego a concretar una guerra de guerrillas contra Napoleón y el edicto fue modificado el 17 de julio de 1813. Corta vida, muy corta. Entonces, ¿cuál es la importancia de este edicto?           Es un documento oficial que legitima la guerrilla ante un grupo de intelectuales y militares extraordinariamente cultos – según la expresión de Schmitt – entre los que se contaba el filósofo Johann Gottlieb Fichte, Scharnhorst, Gneisenau y Clausewitz. El compromiso de este último con la guerrilla política y revolucionaria no fue menor. Relata el jurista de Plettenberg que el primer contacto con esta la tuvo a través de los planes insurreccionales prusianos de los años 1808 al 1813, luego fue conferencista entre 1810 a 1811 sobre la “guerra a pequeña escala” en la Escuela General de Guerra en Berlín. Se dice que fue uno de los especialistas militares más destacados de esta clase de guerra y no sólo en el sentido profesional: “para él, al igual que los demás reformadores de su círculo, la guerra de guerrillas se convirtió “de modo principal en una cuestión eminentemente política de carácter directamente revolucionario”. Citando al historiador militar Werner Hahlweg (1912–1989), Schmitt dice que la aceptación de la idea del pueblo en armas, insurrección, guerra revolucionaria, resistencia y sublevación frente al orden constituido todo eso es una gran novedad para Prusia, algo ‘peligroso’, algo que parecía caer fuera  de la esfera del Estado basado en el Derecho” (Schmitt, 2007b, pág. 28).

Otro aspecto que nos permite observar el carácter político del pensamiento de Clausewitz es la diferencia entre la enemistad ideológica de Fichte contra Napoleón y la enemistad política del estratega prusiano. Esto nos permite comprender al pensador político en su autonomía y en su carácter particular (Schmitt, 1969). A partir de 1807 aparece en la escena el gran enemigo de Fichte: Napoleón. Toda la enemistad que puede sentir un filósofo revolucionario se concentra ahora en Fichte contra el emperador francés tomando forma concreta. Fichte es el verdadero filósofo de la enemistad contra Napoleón. Se puede incluso decir que lo es en su mismísima existencia como filósofo. Su comportamiento frente a Napoleón es el caso paradigmático de una clase muy precisa de enemistad. Su enemigo Napoleón, el tirano, el opresor y déspota, el hombre que fundaría una nueva religión si no tuviera otro pretexto para subyugar el mundo, este enemigo es su propia pregunta como figura, un no-yo creado por su propio yo como contra-imagen de auto-enajenación ideológica. El impulso nacional-revolucionario de Fichte generó una amplia literatura, sin embargo, no llegó a penetrar en la conciencia de los alemanes. La idea de una legitimidad nacional-revolucionaria se disipó, cuando Napoleón estaba vencido y ya no había un enemigo en el campo de batalla. A pesar de esto, el breve contacto con el espíritu nacional-revolucionario, concentrado en los reformadores militares prusianos de 1807 a 1812, les llamó a tomar una decisión transcendental contra Napoleón e inspirar el documento político redactado por Clausewitz con la ayuda de Boyer (Schmitt, 1969).

Aunque Fichte con sus Discursos a la Nación Alemana puede ser considerado el padrino del Memorándum-Confesión clusewitziano de 1812 en este documento los reformadores del ejército prusiano se guiaron sólo por consideraciones políticas. No eran ni fundadores de religiones, ni teólogos; tampoco eran ideólogos ni utopistas. El libro De la guerra (Clausewitz C. V., On War, 1976) no fue escrito por un filósofo, sino por un oficial del Estado Mayor. Cualquier político inteligente puede leer, comprender y practicar este libro sin saber nada de Fichte y de su filosofía. La autonomía de las categorías de lo político – según Schmitt – se hace evidente: en el caso de Clausewitz las categorías políticas se imponen en toda su pureza, libres de todas las propagaciones ideológicas y utópicas del genial Fichte. Por su parte, el sociólogo francés Julien Freund demuestra que la teoría de la guerra como continuación de la política consigue que la guerra meramente militar se deje limitar encajándola en la realidad de lo político. Enemistad y guerra son inevitables. Lo que importa en su delimitación. Hay que evitar el desencadenamiento inhumano de los medios de destrucción que proporciona el progreso científico. Según Freund, el objeto de la lucha política no es la destrucción del enemigo, sino arrebatarle el poder. También Clausewitz entiende la llamada “batalla de destrucción” como una competición de fuerzas, entre dos ejércitos organizados, lo cual no indica la destrucción de una parte de la humanidad por la otra (Freund, 1968, págs. 746 – 752). En otras palabras Clausewitz no pensaba en una guerra de aniquilación sino que en una guerra limitada, encajada por lo político, una guerra política llevada adelante por otros medios. En resumen, Clausewitz puede ser considerado tanto un pensador estratégico como tanto como político. La evidencia de este hecho nos la brinda el Manifiesto- Confesión de febrero de 1812 recogido por Carl Schmitt (Clausewitz C. V., 1966).De aquí se desprende su interés por la guerrilla española de 1808 – 1813 así como las diferencias de su pensamiento con las del filósofo Fichte. Esta distinción corrobora el carácter político de su pensamiento que se expresa claramente cuando afirma que existe al menos un  tipo de guerra, la absoluta, en la cual hay coincidencia entre el objetivo propiamente militar y la meta política. Es en este momento en el que la guerra puede usurpar  el lugar de la política. Si esto llegara a ocurrir, podríamos afirmar que al menos existe una circunstancia bajo la cual la política es la continuación de la guerra por otros medios.

Guy Debord, Georges Laffly, Léon Bloy, de belles connexions

Guy Debord, Georges Laffly, Léon Bloy, de belles connexions

Ex: http://ungraindesable.hautetfort.com/

Guy DebordLecture d'un numéro d'Archives et Documents Situationnistes (N°3). Si le premier numéro m'avait déçu, j'avais dû y consacrer un petit article sur ce blog, celui-ci regorge de notes, lettres inédites et quelques fois étonnantes ; ainsi ce commentaire de Ricardo Paseyro sur Debord  d'où j'ai extrait les passages les plus passionnants
"Comme Guy le prévoyait, nous avons disséqué l'Establishment, et vérifié nos goûts respectifs : ils coincidaient -et nos éthiques aussi ; nous détestions les arrivistes, les pédants, les avares , les plagiaires...Entre nous, il n'y aura jamais le moindre malentendu.
Autant Guy méprisait les sots et la pacotille, autant son esprit ouvert appréciait les excellents auteurs situés aux antipodes de lui. Quand Georges Laffly  hésita à lui adresser son livre, mes écrivains politiques ,je le transmis à Debord .Il en résulta , le 12mars  1993 une lettre singulière qui étonnera peut- être les sectaires.  En voici des fragments :
<<Cher Ricardo ,
J 'ai lu avec beaucoup d'intérêt le livre de votre ami Georges  Laffly , les catholiques extrémistes  sont les seuls qui me paraissent sympathiques , Léon Bloy notamment. Cest un livre comme on en rencontre très peu : il a un air de parfaite sincérité .>> Il s'explique :<<...Du point de vue de l'auteur  je considère comme cohérent qu' il attribue tant de malheurs à la disparition de  Dieu ; e t je ne dirai certes pas improbable que tout finisse par  quelque abominable "meilleur  des  mondes". Mais enfin nous sommes  embarqués.N'était-il pas dans notre essence d'être imprudents ?">>

Superbe chute , ä laquelle Debord ajoute  une douzaine de lignes relatives à lui_ même ,(...)Ni pessimiste ni optimiste : clairvoyant ,il ressentait le poids à peine supportable de la vie actuelle ,plus chaotique chague matin .Excédé un jour par le bruit et l'inconfort  de Paris,que je voulais fuir,Guy déclara ma plainte vaine, car toutes les métropoles sécrètent maintenant à peu près les mêmes foules hybrides, le même "urbanisme" démentiel, les mêmes moeurs et usages: impossible d'échapper à l'uniformité. (...)"

Retrouvé dans ma bibliothèque ce petit livre de Georges Laffly mais le vrai  "Mes livres politiques". Sur Wikipédia on précise bien que "Ce livre évoque plusieurs auteurs dont Guy Debord qui lut le livre en 1993 et en parle dans une lettre à Ricardo Paseyro (cf. Correspondance, volume 7, Fayard, 2008, page 397)." Dans Rivarol le critique PL Moudenc avait même rendu compte des Mémoires politiques et littéraires, de Ricardo Paseyro . Je vous recommande ce savoureux livre de Laffly d'une grande liberté intellectuelle.


Robert Steuckers, n'en déplaise à Christophe Bourseiller, a bien raison :  on ne peut enfermer Debord dans"le cadre restreint et désuet  d'un gauchisme pieux et bon teint." .
Dans un texte intiulé "La planète malade" qui est aussi le titre d'un de ces livres, Guy Debord avait très bien analysé le thème de la pollution et de sa représentation. Ce texte commence ainsi :


"La <<pollution >> est aujourd'hui a la mode, exactement de la même maniere que la révolution : elle s'empare de toute la vie de la société, et elle est representée llusoirement dans le spectacle. Elleest bavardage assommant dans une pléthore d'ecrits et de discours erronés et mystificateurs, et elle prend tout le monde a la gorge dans les faits. Elle s'expose partout en tant qu'idéologie, et elle gagne du terrain en tant que processus reel.
Ces deux mouvements antagonistes, le stade suprême de la production marchande et le projet de sa négation totale, également riches de contradictions en eux-mêmes, grandissent ensemble. Ils sont les deux cotés par lesquels se manifeste un même moment historique longtemps attendu, et souvent prevu sous des figures partielles inadequates : l'impossibilité de la continuation du fonctionnement du capitalisme.
L'époque qui a tous les moyens techniques d'altérer absolument les conditions de vie sur toute la Terre est egalement l'epoque qui, par le meme developpement technique et scientifique separe, dispose de tous les moyens de controle et de prevision mathematiquement indubitable pour mesurer exactement par avance ou ène - et vers quelle date - la croissance automatique des forces productives
alienees de la societe de classes : c'est a dire pour mesurer la dégradation rapide des conditions memes de la survie, au sens le plus géneral et le plus trivial du terme."

00:05 Publié dans Philosophie | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0) | Tags : philosophie, spectacle, situationnisme, guy debord | |  del.icio.us | | Digg! Digg |  Facebook

lundi, 26 septembre 2011

Remembering Martin Heidegger

Remembering Martin Heidegger:
September 26, 1889–May 26, 1976

by Greg Johnson

Ex: http://www.counter-currents.com/

Martin Heidegger is one of the giants of twentieth-century philosophy, both in terms of the depth and originality of his ideas and the breadth of his influence in philosophy, theology, the human sciences, and culture in general.

Heidegger was born on September 26, 1889, in the town of Meßkirch in the district of Sigmaringen in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. He died on May 26, 1976 in Freiburg and was buried in Meßkirch.

Heidegger was from a lower-class Catholic family. His family was too poor to send him to university, so he enrolled in a Jesuit seminary. But Heidegger was soon rejected by the Jesuits due to a heart condition. He then studied theology at the University of Freiburg from 1909–1911, after which time he switched his focus to philosophy. Eventually Heidegger broke entirely with Christianity.

In 1914 Heidegger defended his doctoral dissertation. In 1916, he defended his habilitation dissertation, which entitled him to teach in a German university. During the First World War, Heidegger was spared front duty because of his heart condition.

From 1919 to 1923, Heidegger was the salaried research assistant of Edmund Husserl at the University of Freiburg. Husserl, who was a Jewish convert to Lutheranism, was the founder of the phenomenological movement [2] in German philosophy, and Heidegger was to become his most illustrious student.

In 1923, Heidegger was appointed assistant professor of philosophy at the University of Marburg. There his intense and penetrating engagement with the history of philosophy quickly became known throughout Europe, and students flocked to his lectures, including Hans-Georg Gadamer, who became Heidegger’s most eminent student, as well as such Jewish thinkers as Leo Strauss, Hannah Arendt, and Hans Jonas. In 1927, Heidegger published his magnum opus, Being and Time [3], the foundation of his world-wide fame. In 1928, Husserl retired from the University of Freiburg, and Heidegger returned to replace him, remaining in Freiburg for the rest of his academic career.

Heidegger was elected rector of the University of Freiburg on April 21, 1933. Heidegger joined the ruling National Socialist German Workers Party on May 1, 1933. In his inaugural address as rector on May 27, 1933, and in political speeches and articles from the same period, he expressed his support for the NSDAP and Adolf Hitler. Heidegger resigned as rector in April 1934, but he remained a member of the NSDAP until 1945. After the Second World War, the French occupation authorities banned Heidegger from teaching. In 1949, he was officially “de-Nazified” without penalty. He began teaching again in the 1950–51 academic year. He continued to teach until 1967.

A whole academic industry has grown up around the question of Heidegger and National Socialism. It  truly is an embarrassment to the post-WW II intellectual consensus that arguably the greatest philosopher of the twentieth century was a National Socialist. But the truth is that Heidegger was never a particularly good National Socialist.

Yes, Heidegger belonged intellectually to the “Conservative Revolutionary” milieu. Yes, he thought that the NSDAP was the best political option available for Germany. But Heidegger’s view of the meaning of National Socialism was rather unorthodox.

Heidegger viewed the National Socialist revolution as the self-assertion of a historically-defined people, the Germans, who wished to regain control of their destiny from an emerging global-technological-materialistic system represented by both Soviet communism and Anglo-Saxon capitalism. This revolt against leveling, homogenizing globalism was, in Heidegger’s words, “the inner truth and greatness” of National Socialism. From this point of view, the NSDAP’s biological racism and anti-Semitism seemed to be not only philosophically naive and superficial but also political distractions.

Heidegger knew that Jews were not Germans, and that Jews were major promoters of the system he rejected. He was glad to see their power broken, but he also had cordial relationships with many Jewish students, including extramarital affairs with Hannah Arendt and Elisabeth Blochmann (who was half-Jewish).

In the end, Heidegger believed that the Third Reich failed to free itself and Europe from the pincers of Soviet and Anglo-Saxon materialism. The necessities of re-armament and war forced a rapprochement with big business and heavy industry, thus Germany fell into the trammels of global technological materialism even as she tried to resist it.

Heidegger was not, however, a Luddite. He was not opposed to technology per se, but to what he called the “essence” of technology, which is not technology itself, but a way of seeing ourselves and the world: the world as a stockpile of resources available for human use, a world in which there are no limits, in principle, to human knowledge or power. This worldview is incompatible with any sort of mystery, including the mystery of our origins or destiny. It is a denial of human differentiation — the differentiation that comes from multiple roots and multiple destinies.

Yet, as Heidegger slyly pointed out, the very idea we can understand and control everything is not something we can understand or control. We don’t understand why we think we can understand everything. And we are literally enthralled by the idea that we can control everything. But once we recognize this, the spell is broken; we are free to return to who we always-already are and destined to be.

But on Heidegger’s own terms, it is still possible to combine a technological civilization with an archaic value system, to reject the essence of technology and affirm rootedness and differentiation. This is what Guillaume Faye calls “archeofuturism.”

Ultimately, Heidegger’s philosophy — particularly his account of human being in time, his fundamental ontology, his account of the history of the West, and his critique of modernity and technology — is of greater significance to the project of the North American New Right than his connection with National Socialism. It is a measure of the embryonic nature of our movement that we just beginning to deal with his work. Heidegger is widely cited [5] in our pages. But so far, we have published only the following pieces related to Heidegger:

There is also some discussion of Heidegger in Trevor Lynch’s review essay [12] on Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight.

When we commemorate Heidegger’s birthday again next year, I hope this list will have grown considerably.

Heidegger is a notoriously difficult stylist. But he was a brilliant lecturer, and his lecture courses are far more accessible than the works he prepared for publication. There are two useful anthologies of Heidegger’s basic writings: Basic Writings [13], ed. David Farrell Krell and The Heidegger Reader [14], ed. Günther Figal.

Eventually, every reader of Heidegger will have to conquer Being and Time [3], but a useful preparation for reading Being and Time is the contemporary lecture course History of the Concept of Time: Prolegomena [15]. Being and Time was never finished, but one can get a sense of how the book would have been completed by reading another highly lucid lecture course, The Basic Problems of Phenomenology [16].

Other essential lecture courses are Introduction to Metaphysics [17] and Nietzsche, which comprises four lecture courses (plus supplemental essays). Originally published in English in four volumes, the Nietzsche lectures are now available in two large paperbacks: Nietzsche: Vols. 1 and 2 [18] and Nietzsche: Vols. 3 and 4 [19].

There is an immense secondary literature on Heidegger, but most of it is no more accessible than Heidegger himself. The best biography is Rüdiger Safranski, Martin Heidegger: Between Good and Evil [20]. Another highly interesting biographical work is Heinrich Wiegand Petzet, Encounters and Dialogues with Martin Heidegger, 1929-1976 [21], which gives a vivid sense of the highly cultivated people in Heidegger’s generally right-wing and National Socialist milieu.

As for Heidegger’s philosophy, Richard Polt’s Heidegger: An Introduction [22] is a lucid overview of the whole range and development of Heidegger’s thought. Julian Young is another very lucid expositor. He is the author of three books on Heidegger: Heidegger’s Later Philosophy [23], Heidegger’s Philosophy of Art [24], and Heidegger, Philosophy, Nazism [25]. I highly recommend them all.

 


Article printed from Counter-Currents Publishing: http://www.counter-currents.com

URL to article: http://www.counter-currents.com/2011/09/remembering-martin-heidegger/

17:36 Publié dans Hommages, Philosophie | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0) | Tags : philosophie, martin heidegger, allemagne, hommage | |  del.icio.us | | Digg! Digg |  Facebook

Guerra y Estado

Guerra y Estado

Por Sergio Prince C.

http://geviert.wordpress.com/

Schmitt comparte con Hegel algunos aspectos fundamentales de la teoría del Estado, los que resultan de suma importancia al momento de estudiar la relación de la guerra con lo político. En general, las convergencias se dan en torno a la ética del Estado y a la importancia que ambos asignan al ius publicum europaeum y se pueden apreciar entre  los siguientes documentos:

a] la conferencia dictada por Schmitt en 1929, titulada en alemán Staatsethik und pluralistischer Staat [El Estado ético y el Estado pluralista] (Schmitt, 1999) que dice relación con la importancia que ambos autores asignan a la ética en el Estado y las obras de Hegel «La Filosofía del derecho» (Hegel, 2009) y  «La Constitucion de Alemania» (Hegel, 1972),

b] la obra del mismo Schmitt «El nomos de la tierra» (Schmitt, 2002) , donde el autor lleva a cabo su proyecto de reconstrucción del orden juridico estatal e interestatal de la Europa Moderna y la ya citada« Filosofía del derecho» (Hegel, 2009).

En [a],  la Conferencia de 1929, encontramos al menos dos coincidencias:

[1] Schmitt coincide con Hegel en el carácter ético del Estado. Dice nuestro autor:

El acto propio del Estado consiste en determinar la situación concreta, en el seno de la cual sólo puede estar en vigor, en un plano general, normas morales y jurídicas. En efecto, toda norma presupone una situación normal. No hay norma en vigoren el vacío, en una situación a – normal [con respecto a la norma]. Si el Estado «pone las condiciones exteriores de la vida ética», esto quiere decir que crea la situación normal (Kervégan, 2007, pág. 157).

En otras palabras, ambos autores estiman que el Estado es el requisito fundamental para que exista la vida ética a nivel jurídico – político y a nivel particular: la familia y la sociedad civil. Si bien es cierto que hay que buscar la raíces del Estado en estas instituciones, las dos son histórica y empíricamente posteriores a él, pues sólo la existencia del Estado permite que se diferencien  dos entidades éticas sin causar la disolución de la unidad política.

 

[2] Otra coincidencia entre el filósofo y el jurista  es que este último, haciendo uso del lenguaje hegeliano, se refiere al Estado  como “el divino terrestre”, el “Reino de la razón objetiva y la eticidad”, “la unidad monista del universum” y “los problemas que conciernen al Espíritu Objetivo”. Por otra parte, Schmitt cita de modo casi idéntico ciertas fórmulas de «La Constitución de Alemania» (Hegel, 1972) donde el filósofo de Jena opone al desorden político del Imperio alemán un Estado fuerte. Para Schmitt, la situación alemana al finalizar la República de Weimar es idéntica a la vivida por Hegel con el derrumbe del Sacro Imperio Romano Germano (Kervégan, 2007).

En [b],  «El Nomos de la Tierra», encontramos al menos una coincidencia:

[1] Schmitt reconoce a la FD como un monumento grandioso, como la expresión conceptual más elaborada de la forma – Estado y del derecho interestatal propio de este período de la historia. Este Estado ha actuado, al menos en el suelo europeo, como el portador del progreso en el sentido de una creciente racionalización y acotación de la guerra. Comenta Kervégan que, en el fondo, se trata de reconocer al Estado moderno “el mérito absoluto de haber asegurado la paz exterior e interior, gracias al monopolio que conquistó sobre el espacio político” (Schmitt, 2002, págs. 136-137) (Kervégan, 2007, págs. 159-160).

En resumen, hasta aquí, las coincidencias entre Schmitt y Hegel son 1] que ambos piensan en el Estado como una entidad fundamentalmente ética, 2] que ambos viven épocas similares, tiempos de desorden político que los hace pensar que la era del Estado y de la europäische Staatlichkeit [legislación europea] habían llegado a su fin y 3] ambos reconocen al Estado haber aportado a la paz. Para nuestro análisis, esto indica que, si la guerra es fundamento de lo político-jurídico, entonces es la guerra la creadora de la entidad ética fundamental, en el seno de la cual se configuran la familia y la sociedad civil como espacios éticos primordiales para la ordenación de la paz. Revisemos estas conclusiones provisorias.

Para Schmitt (Schmitt, 2006, pág. 64), la guerra es el horizonte de lo político, “es el presupuesto que está siempre dado como posibilidad real, que determina de una manera peculiar la acción y el pensamiento humanos, originando así una conducta específicamente política”. Por su parte, para Hegel la guerra es:

[1] La determinación del Estado que, por medio de la fuerza, acalla las divisiones e intereses particulares.

[2] Un medio que permite al Estado develarse y desempeñar de modo óptimo su función.

[2.1] La configuración que permite el predominio del Estado sobre la sociedad, la particularidad y la diversidad.

[2.2] La ordenación que une las esferas particulares en la unidad del Estado.

[2.3] La representación que afirma la naturaleza del Estado y del patriotismo exigiendo y obteniendo del individuo el sacrificio de lo que, en tiempos de paz, parecía constituir la esencia misma de su existencia: la familia, su propiedad, sus opiniones, su vida.

 

Escribe Hegel en FD §324: “Se hace un cálculo  muy equivocado cuando, en la exigencia de este sacrificio, el Estado es considerado sólo como Sociedad Civil, y como su fin último es solamente tenida en cuenta la garantía de la vida y la propiedad de los individuos; puesto que esa garantía no se obtiene con el sacrificio de lo que debe ser garantido, sino al contrario.”. “De este modo, aunque la guerra trae consigo la inseguridad de la propiedad y de la existencia, es una inseguridad saludable, conectada con la vida y el movimiento. La inseguridad y la muerte son desde luego necesarias, pero en el Estado se vuelven morales al ser libremente escogidas” (Hegel, 2009, pág. 264) (Hassner, 2006):

“La guerra […], constituye el momento en el cual la idealidad de lo particular alcanza su derecho y se convierte en realidad; ella consigue su más elevado sentido en que, por su intermedio, como ya lo he explicado en otro lugar “la salud ética de los pueblos se mantiene en su equilibrio frente al fortalecimiento de las determinaciones finitas del mismo modo que el viento preserva al mar de la putrefacción, a la cual la reduciría una durable  o más aún,  perpetua quietud.”

Ahora bien, toda esta vitalidad ética, este dinamismo que manifiesta la guerra no se reduce a la positividad de la igualdad consigo misma sino que se realiza, se objetiva en la enemistad, ante la presencia del enemigo. Esto como resultado de la soberanía que aparece, en primer lugar, como una relación de exclusión frente al otro, al extraño. La soberanía, la independencia es un ser para sí excluyente. Veamos brevemente cuál es la tesis de Carl Schmitt  sobre la enemistad. Primero, definamos antítesis  amigo-enemigo y, luego, revisemos algunas características de esta.

[1] La antítesis amigo-enemigo es una categoría conceptual, concreta y existencial de lo político. Sin enemigos no hay guerra, no hay política, no hay Estado, no hay Derecho. En palabras de Kervégan, para Schmitt “el enemigo es una determinación especulativa, la figura exteriorizada de la negatividad constitutiva de la identidad consigo positiva de la vida ética.” Así, la soberanía del Estado aparece como una relación de exclusión frente a otros Estados (Kervégan, 2007, pág. 161).

A la antítesis amigo-enemigo se pueden asignar muchas características pero, siguiendo a Herrero López, destaco tres de las más relevantes para mi investigación:

[1] El Enemigo «es el otro público», es otro extranjero, algo distinto y extraño con  quien se puede llegar a pelear una guerra. ¿Qué significa este otro? Resumiendo a Schmitt, responde Herrero López: Enemigo  es más que el sujeto individual, se refiere a la totalidad de los hombres que luchan por su vida. El enemigo privado es aquel que sólo me afecta “a mí”. Por el contrario, el otro público es el que afecta a toda la comunidad, al pueblo en su conjunto y sólo al final me molesta personalmente.

[2] El enemigo es hostis no inimicus. Esta es la distinción que introduce Schmitt para señalar el matiz enunciado supra [1]. Para hacerla, se funda en Platón, en los evangelios de Mateo (5, 44) y Lucas (6,27) y en el diccionario de latín Forcellini Lexicon totius Latinitatis. Platón, llama guerra sólo a aquella que se lucha entre helenos y bárbaros, entre griegos y extranjeros. Por su parte, los evangelios dicen “diligite inimicos vestros” pero no dicen “diligite hostis vestros”, lo que indica a Schmitt que existe una clara distinción entre inimicus y hostis. Como ejemplo, cita la lucha entre el cristianismo y el Islam diciendo que no se puede entregar Europa por amor a los sarracenos y que sólo en el ámbito individual tiene sentido el amor al enemigo. No se puede amar a quien amenaza destruir al propio pueblo, por lo tanto, en opinión de Schmitt, la sentencia bíblica no afecta al enemigo político. Ahora bien, consultando el diccionario Forcellini, Schmitt se encuentra con la definición de hostis que versa como sigue: “Hostis  is est cum quo publice Bellum habemus […] in quo ab inimico differt, qui est is, quoqum habemus privata odia.Dstingui etiam sic possunt in inimicus sit qui nos odit: hostis qui oppungat” (Herrero López, 1997).

[3] El hostis supone una enemistad pública y existencial que incluye la posibilidad extrema de su aniquilación física, de su muerte. Al concepto de enemigo y residiendo en el ámbito de lo real, corresponde la eventualidad de un combate. La guerra es el combate armado entre unidades políticas organizadas; la guerra civil es el combate armado en el interior de una unidad. Lo esencial en el concepto de “arma” es que se trata de un medio para provocar la muerte física de seres humanos. Al igual que la palabra “enemigo”, la palabra “combate” debe ser entendida aquí en su originalidad primitiva esencial. Los conceptos de amigo, enemigo y combate reciben su sentido concreto por el hecho de que se relacionan, especialmente, con la posibilidad real de la muerte física y mantienen esa relación. La guerra proviene de la enemistad puesto que ésta es la negación esencial de otro ser. La guerra es solamente la enemistad hecha real del modo más manifiesto. No tiene por qué ser algo cotidiano, algo normal; ni tampoco tiene por qué ser percibido como algo ideal o deseable. Pero debe estar presente como posibilidad real si el concepto de enemigo ha de tener significado (Schmitt, 2006).

Ya hemos dicho que Schmitt y Hegel piensan en el Estado como una entidad fundamentalmente ética creada por la guerra. Aún más, la guerra es el atributo que afirma la naturaleza del Estado exigiendo y obteniendo del individuo el sacrificio de lo que en tiempos de paz parecía constituir la esencia misma de su vida En otros términos el Estado, como espacio ético, requiere del valor militar para su consolidación y su defensa, lo que implica el enfrentar a un enemigo que tiene la intención y la posibilidad real de causarle la muerte.

Guerra, ética y  Estado

Más allá de las circunstancias y los acontecimientos que provocan la guerra, esta sobrelleva una necesidad que le confiere una grandeza ética. Dice Kervégan que la guerra hace accidental y material lo que es en sí y para sí accidental y material: la vida, la libertad, la propiedad, aquello que en la paz tiene mayor valía a los ojos de los individuos-ciudadanos. La guerra es la penosa advertencia de la verdad cardinal de la ética hegeliana del Estado: la supervivencia de éste es la condición de existencia toda otra disposición ética. La guerra hace insubstancial la frivolidad y la trivialidad. La guerra, por todos los sacrificios que impone, ilustra la sumisión positiva, racional, práctica y reflexiva de lo finito a lo infinito, de lo contingente a lo necesario, de lo particular a lo universal (Kervégan, 2007).

Asimismo, “porque el sacrificio por la individualidad del Estado consiste en la relación sustancial de todos y es, por lo tanto, un deber general, al mismo tiempo como un aspecto de la idealidad, frente a la realidad de la existencia particular y le es consagrada una clase propia: el valor militar. Ahora bien, para que llege a existir esta clase, para que existan ejércitos permanentes, se deben argumentar – las razones, las consideraciones de las ventajas y las desventajas, los aspectos exteriores e interiores como los gastos con sus consecuencias, los mayores impuestos-,  muy respetuosamente ante la conciencia de la Sociedad Civil.  (Hegel, 2009, págs. 265-266) (§ 325-326).

Es clara la relación entre valor militar y sociedad civil. Son un devenir dialéctico de la configuración y la reconfiguración permanente del Estado ante el espectro de la guerra presente en su horizonte. Pero ¿qué es el valor militar, cuáles son sus contenidos? Escribe Hegel que el valor militar es  por sí “una virtud formal, porque es la más elevada abstracción de la libertad de todos los fines, bienes, satisfacciones y vida particulares; pero esa negación existe en un modo extrínsecamente real y su manifestación como cumplimiento no es en sí misma de naturaleza espiritual: es interna disposición de ánimo, éste o aquel motivo; su resultado real no puede ser para sí, sino únicamente para los demás (Hegel, 2009, pág. 266) (§ 327). En otros términos, podemos decir que las principales características del valor militar son, al menos, cuatro. A saber, carácter axiológico, moralista, contingente y filantrópico:

[1] Carácter axiológico: Una virtud formal.

[2] Carácter moralista: Es la más elevada abstracción de la libertad

[3] Carácter contingente: No es de naturaleza espiritual

[4] Carácter filantrópico: Su resultado es para los demás

Siguiendo esta línea argumentativa, Hegel dirá que el contenido del valor militar, como disposición de ánimo, se encuentra en la Soberanía., es decir, por medio de la acción y la entrega voluntaria de la realidad personal la Soberanía es obra del fin último del valor militar. Este encierra el rigor de las cuatro grandes antítesis:

[1]  entrega – libertad. La entrega misma pero como existencia  de la libertad.

[2]  independencia – servicio. La independencia máxima del ser por sí cuya existencia es realidad, a la vez en el mecanismo de su orden exterior y del servicio

[3]  obediencia – decisión. La obediencia y el abandono total de la opinión y del razonamiento particular, por lo tanto, la ausencia de un espíritu propio; la presencia instantánea, bastante intensa y comprensiva del espíritu y de la decisión,

[4]  hostilidad – bondad. El obrar más hostil y personal contra los individuos, en la disposición plenamente indiferente, más bien buena, hacia ellos en cuanto individuos.

Comenta Hegel que arriesgar la vida es algo más que sólo temer la muerte pero, por esto mismo, arriesgar la vida es mera negación y no tiene ni determinación ni valor por sí. Sólo lo positivo, el fin y el contenido de este acto proporciona a este al valor militar ya que ladrones y homicidas también arriesgan la vida con su propio fin delictuoso, lo que es un acto de coraje pero carece de sentido. Ahora bien, el valor militar ha llegado a serlo en su sentido más abstracto ya que el uso de armas de fuego, de la artillería no permite que se manifieste el valor individual, sino que permite la demostración del valor por parte de una totalidad (Hegel, 2009).

El Estado, como espacio ético, requiere del valor militar para su consolidación y su defensa, lo que implica enfrentar a un enemigo que tiene la intención y la posibilidad real de causarle la muerte. Pero arriesgar la vida es un acto valioso dependiendo del objetivo así como la definición y las características del valor militar nos muestran que este existe en una tensión dialéctica ante el horizonte siempre actualizable de la guerra que viven la familia, la Sociedad Civil y el Estado. En otros términos, el valor militar sólo cobra sentido en la objetivación del todo jurídico-político, en su relación dialéctica con la Sociedad Civil. No es una virtud fuera de esta.

Conclusión

La unidad de pensamientos entre algunos escritos de Hegel y el pensamiento de Schmitt nos da señales de una unidad intelectual entre los dos filósofos tudescos, la que nos permitió realizar nuestro estudio del Valor Militar utilizando a Schmitt como un apoyo interpretativo de lo dicho por Hegel en la Filosofía del Derecho. Ambos dan señales claras de entender una relación clara entre guerra, política y Estado. Aún más, para estos autores, la guerra es el atributo que afirma la naturaleza del Estado exigiendo y obteniendo del individuo el sacrificio de lo que en tiempos de paz parecía constituir la esencia misma de su vida. En otros términos, el Estado, como espacio ético, requiere del valor militar para su consolidación y su defensa, lo que implica enfrentar a un enemigo que tiene la intención y la posibilidad real de causarle la muerte.

El Estado, como espacio ético, requiere del valor militar para su consolidación y su defensa, lo que involucra necesariamente enfrentar a un enemigo que tiene la intención y la posibilidad real de causarle la muerte, pero arriesgar la vida es un acto valioso dependiendo del objetivo así como la definición y las características del valor militar nos muestran que este existe en una tensión dialéctica ante el horizonte siempre actualizable de la guerra que viven la familia, la Sociedad Civil y el Estado.

Como ya hemos dicho, el valor militar sólo cobra sentido en la objetivación del todo jurídico-político, en su relación dialéctica con la Sociedad Civil. No es una virtud fuera de esta. Se sigue que el valor militar es una virtud abstracta propia del estamento militar, de las Fuerzas Armadas que tienen a cargo la Defensa del Estado. Se trata de una determinación propia de un cuerpo de profesionales que se manifiesta sólo en circunstancias extraordinarias, cuando está en peligro la existencia misma del Estado. La valentía militar es necesaria pero no es de naturaleza espiritual. Sin embargo, se caracteriza por lo que podríamos llamar altas virtudes espirituales en los ámbitos axiológico, moral, contingente y filantrópico.

Finalmente, son dignas de destacar las antítesis que componen la naturaleza del valor militar. Estas podrían llamarse con toda libertad, virtudes del soldado: la entrega, el servicio, la obediencia y la bondad. Todo en una tensión dialéctica que requiere de la inteligencia para poder equilibrarlas dentro de sus opuestos y así cumplir con su objetivo: defender la Soberanía de Chile.

Trabajos Citados

Hassner, P. (2006). George W. F. Hegel [1770-1831]. En L. Strauss, & J. Cropsey, Historia de la filosofía política (págs. 689-715). México: Fondo de Cutura Económica.

Hegel, G. (2009). Filosofía del derecho (1 ed., Vol. 1). (Á. Mendoza de Montero, Trad.) Buenos Aires, Argentina: Claridad.

Hegel, G. (1972). La Constitución de Alemania (1ª ed., Vol. 1). (D. Negro Pavon, Trad.) Madrid, España: Aguilar S.A.

Herrero López, M. (1997). ElNnomos y lo político: La filosofía Política de Carl Schmitt. Navarra: EUNSA.

Kervégan, J. F. (2007). Hegel, carl Schmitt. Lo político entre especulación y posotividad. Madrid: Escolar y Mayo.

Schmitt, C. (2006). El concepto de lo político. Madrid: Alianza Editorial.

Schmitt, C. (2002). El nomos de la tierra en el Derecho de Gentes del Ius Publicum Europaeum (1 ed., Vol. 1). (J. L. Moreneo Pérez, Ed., & D. S. Thou, Trad.) Granada, España: Editorial Comares S.L.

Schmitt, C. (1999). Ethic of State and Pluratistic State. En C. Mouffe, & C. Mouffe (Ed.), The Challenge of Carl Schmitt (Inglesa ed., Vol. 1, págs. 195 – 208). Londres, Inglaterra: Verso.

Life Styles: Native and Imposed

Life Styles: Native and Imposed

By Kevin Beary

http://www.counter-currents.com/

For decades now, African American leaders have been calling for a formal United States apology for the American role in the slave trade, with some even demanding reparations. Indian tribes proclaim their tax-exempt status as something they are owed for a legacy of persecution by the United States. Mexican Americans in the southwest United States seek to incorporate this region, including California, into Mexico, or even to set up an independent nation, Aztlan, that will recreate the glories of the Aztec empire, destroyed centuries ago by the imperialistic Spaniards.

That we live in an age of grievance and victimhood is not news. But did these peoples — these Mexican-Americans, these Native Americans, these African-Americans — really lose more than they gained in their confrontation with the West? Were they robbed of nobility, and coarsened? Or did White subjugation force them to shed savagery and barbarousness, and bring them, however unwillingly, into civilized humanity?

Today our children our being taught that the people who lived in the pre-Columbian Western Hemisphere were not “merciless Indian savages” (as Jefferson calls them in the Declaration of Independence), many of whom delighted in torture and cannibalism, but rather spiritually enlightened “native Americans” whose wise and peaceful nobility was rudely destroyed by invading European barbarians; that the Aztecs were not practitioners of human sacrifice and cannibalism on a scale so vast that the mind of the 20th-century American can hardly comprehend it, but rather defenders of an advanced civilization that was destroyed by brutal Spanish conquistadores; and that Africans were not uncultured slave traders and cannibals, but unappreciated builders of great empires.

But just how did these peoples live before they came into contact with Europeans? Although historical myth is ever more rapidly replacing factual history, not only in popular culture but also in our schools and universities, we may still find accurate historical accounts buried in larger libraries or in used book stores.

Aztec Civilization

In his famous work, The Conquest of New Spain, Bernal Diaz del Castillo describes the march on Mexico with his captain, Hernan Cortés, in 1519. The Spanish forces set out from the Gulf of Mexico, and one of the first towns they visited was Cempoala, situated near the coast, where Cortés told the chiefs that “they would have to abandon their idols which they mistakenly believed in and worshipped, and sacrifice no more souls to them.” As Diaz relates:

Every day they sacrificed before our eyes three, four, or five Indians, whose hearts were offered to those idols, and whose blood was plastered on the walls. The feet, arms, and legs of their victims were cut off and eaten, just as we eat beef from the butcher’s in our country. I even believe that they sold it in the tianguez or markets.

Of their stay in Tenochtitlan, the present-day Mexico City and the heart of the Aztec empire, Diaz writes that Emperor Montezuma’s servants prepared for their master

more than thirty dishes cooked in their native style. . . . I have heard that they used to cook him the flesh of young boys. But as he had such a variety of dishes, made of so many different ingredients, we could not tell whether a dish was of human flesh or anything else. . . . I know for certain, however, that after our Captain spoke against the sacrifice of human beings and the eating of their flesh, Montezuma ordered that it should no longer be served to him.

In renouncing cannibalism, was Montezuma cooperating in the destruction of his Aztec “cultural roots,” or was he aiding a victory of civilized custom over barbaric?

A few pages later, Diaz provides a detailed description of

the manner of their [that is, the Aztecs'] sacrifices. They strike open the wretched Indian’s chest with flint knives and hastily tear out the palpitating heart which, with the blood, they present to the idols in whose name they have performed the sacrifice. Then they cut off the arms, thighs, and head, eating the arms and thighs at their ceremonial banquets. The head they hang up on a beam, and the body of the sacrificed man is not eaten but given to the beasts of prey.

Diaz also describes the great market of Tenochtitlan, and its

dealers in gold, silver, and precious stones, feather, cloaks, and embroidered goods, and male and female slaves who are also sold there. They bring as many slaves to be sold in that market as the Portuguese bring Negroes from Guinea. Some are brought there attached to long poles by means of collars round their necks to prevent them from escaping, but others are left loose.

Following the ceremony in which humans are sacrificed to their gods, high-ranking Aztecs eat the flesh of the victims. A Spanish witness commented:

This figure demonstrates the abominable thing that the Indians did on the day they sacrificed to their idols. After [the sacrifice] they placed many large earthen cooking jars of that human meat in front of their idol they called Mictlantecutli, which means lord of the place of the dead, as it is mentioned in other parts [of this book]. And they gave and distributed it to the notables and overseers, and to those who served in the temple of the demon, whom they called tlamacazqui [priests]. And these [persons] distributed among their friends and families that [flesh] and these [persons] which they had given [to the god as a human victim]. They say it tasted like pork meat tastes now. And for this reason pork is very desirable among them.

Plainly it was the Spanish who stamped out human sacrifice and cannibalism among the people of pre-Cortesian Mexico. As for slavery, it is as obvious that the Europeans did not introduce it to the New World as it is that they eradicated it, albeit not immediately. Moreover, the moral impulse to end slavery came from the West, specifically out of England. Had the Aztecs, Indians, and Africans been left to their own devices, slavery might well have endured in North and South America, as it does in parts of present-day Africa.

North American Natives

In his epic work France and England in North America, the great American historian Francis Parkman describes the early 17th-century recreational and culinary habits of the Iroquois Indians (also known as the Five Nations, from whom, some will have it, the United States derived elements of its Constitution). He tells that the Iroquois, along with other tribes of northeastern United States and Canada, “were undergoing that process of extermination, absorption, or expatriation, which, as there is reason to believe, had for many generations formed the gloomy and meaningless history of the greater part of this continent.” Parkman describes an attack by the Iroquois on an Algonquin hunting party, late in the autumn of 1641, and the Iroquois’ treatment of their prisoners and victims:

They bound the prisoners hand and foot, rekindled the fire, slung the kettles, cut the bodies of the slain to pieces, and boiled and devoured them before the eyes of the wretched survivors. “In a word,” says the narrator [that is, the Algonquin woman who escaped to tell the tale], “they ate men with as much appetite and more pleasure than hunters eat a boar or a stag . . .”

The conquerors feasted in the lodge till nearly daybreak . . . then began their march homeward with their prisoners. Among these were three women, of whom the narrator was one, who had each a child of a few weeks or months old. At the first halt, their captors took the infants from them, tied them to wooden spits, placed them to die slowly before a fire, and feasted on them before the eyes of the agonized mothers, whose shrieks, supplications, and frantic efforts to break the cords that bound them were met with mockery and laughter . . .

The Iroquois arrived at their village with their prisoners, whose torture was

designed to cause all possible suffering without touching life. It consisted in blows with sticks and cudgels, gashing their limbs with knives, cutting off their fingers with clam-shells, scorching them with firebrands, and other indescribable torments. The women were stripped naked, and forced to dance to the singing of the male prisoners, amid the applause and laughter of the crowd . . .

On the following morning, they were placed on a large scaffold, in sight of the whole population. It was a gala-day. Young and old were gathered from far and near. Some mounted the scaffold, and scorched them with torches and firebrands; while the children, standing beneath the bark platform, applied fire to the feet of the prisoners between the crevices. . . . The stoicism of one of the warriors enraged his captors beyond measure . . . they fell upon him with redoubled fury, till their knives and firebrands left in him no semblance of humanity. He was defiant to the last, and when death came to his relief, they tore out his heart and devoured it; then hacked him in pieces, and made their feast of triumph on his mangled limbs.

All the men and all the old women of the party were put to death in a similar manner, though but few displayed the same amazing fortitude. The younger women, of whom there were about thirty, after passing their ordeal of torture, were permitted to live; and, disfigured as they were, were distributed among the several villages, as concubines or slaves to the Iroquois warriors. Of this number were the narrator and her companion, who . . . escaped at night into the forest . . .

Of the above account, Parkman writes: “Revolting as it is, it is necessary to recount it. Suffice it to say, that it is sustained by the whole body of contemporary evidence in regard to the practices of the Iroquois and some of the neighboring tribes.”

The “large scaffold” on which the prisoners were placed, is elsewhere in his narrative referred to by Parkman as the Indians’ “torture-scaffolds of bark,” the Indian equivalent of the European theatrical stage, while the tortures performed by the Indians on their neighbors — and on the odd missionary who happened to fall their way — were the noble savages’ equivalent of the European stage play.

If the descendants of the New England tribes now devote their time to selling tax-free cigarettes, running roulette wheels, or dealing out black jack hands, rather than to the capture, torture, and consumption of their neighboring tribesmen, should we not give thanks to those brave Jesuits who sacrificed all to redeem these “native Americans”?

Native Africans

What kind of life did the African live in his native land, before he was brought to America and introduced to Western civilization? That slavery was widely practiced in Africa before the coming of the white man is beyond dispute. But what sort of indigenous civilization did the African enjoy?

In A Slaver’s Log Book, which chronicles the author’s experiences in Africa during the 1820s and 1830s, Captain Theophilus Conneau (or Canot) describes a tribal victory celebration in a town he visited after an attack by a neighboring tribe:

On invading the town, some of the warriors had found in the Chief’s house several jars of rum, and now the bottle went round with astonishing rapidity. The ferocious and savage dance was then suggested. The war bells and horns had sounded the arrival of the female warriors, who on the storming of a town generally make their entry in time to participate in the division of the human flesh; and as the dead and wounded were ready for the knife, in they came like furies and in the obscene perfect state of nakedness, performed the victorious dance which for its cruelties and barbarities has no parallel.

Some twenty-five in number made their appearance with their faces and naked bodies besmeared with chalk and red paint. Each one bore a trophy of their cannibal nature. The matron or leader . . . bore an infant babe newly torn from its mother’s womb and which she tossed high in the air, receiving it on the point of her knife. Other Medeas followed, all bearing some mutilated member of the human frame.

Rum, powder, and blood, a mixture drunk with avidity by these Bacchantes, had rendered them drunk, and the brutal dance had intoxicated them to madness. Each was armed also with some tormenting instrument, and not content with the butchering outside of the town of the fugitive women, they now surrounded the pile of the wounded prisoners, long kept in suspense for the coup de grâce. A ring was formed by the two-legged tigresses, and accompanied by hideous yells and encouraging cry of the men, the round dance began. The velocity of the whirling soon broke the hideous circle, when each one fell on his victims and the massacre began. Men and women fell to dispatching the groaning wounded with the most disgusting cruelties.

I have seen the tiger pounce on the inoffensive gazelle and in its natural propensity of love of blood, strangle its victim, satiate its thirst, and often abandon the dead animal. But not so with these female cannibals. The living and dying had to endure a tormenting and barbarous mutilation, the women showing more cannibal nature in the dissection of the dead than the stronger sex. The coup de grâce was given by the men, but in one instance the victim survived a few minutes when one of those female furies tormented the agony of the dying man by prostrating herself on his body and there acting the beast of double backs.

The matron, commander of these anthrophagies, with her fifty years and corpulous body, led the cruelties on by her example. The unborn babe had been put aside for a bonne bouche, and now adorned with a string of men’s genital parts, she was collecting into a gourd the brains of the decapitated bodies. While the disgusting operating went on, the men carved the solid flesh from the limbs of the dead, throwing the entrails aside.

About noon the butchering was at an end, and a general barbecuing took place. The smell of human flesh, so disgusting to civilized man, was to them the pleasing odor so peculiarly agreeable to a gastronomer …

The barbecuing over, an anthrophagous repast took place, when the superabundant preserved flesh was packed up in plantain leaves to be sent into the Interior for the warriors’ friends. I am silent on the further cruelties that were practiced this day on the unfortunate infirm and wounded that the different scouting parties brought in during the day, supposing the reader to be sick enough at heart at the above representation.

Vanishing History

This is the history that has been handed down to us by men who either were present when the recorded events took place — that is, Diaz and Conneau — or who had access to period documents — that is, Parkman. But this factual history has suffered greatly at the hands of politically correct myth-mongers. The books themselves are disappearing from the shelves: Conneau’s book has been out of print for nearly a generation; perhaps Diaz’s and Parkman’s will follow in the next 20 years. In its place, the most absurd historical fantasies are substituted. As the seemingly inexorable forces of political correctness grind on, we may be left with as much knowledge of our true history as Orwell’s Winston Smith had of his.

Were it not for their subjugation by Europeans, Mexicans would perhaps have continued to practice the Aztec traditions of slavery, human sacrifice, and cannibalism; many American Indians would probably still be living their sad and perilous life of nomadism, subsistence farming, and warfare; and Africans would likely be expiring in even greater numbers on the fields of mayhem and slaughter (as the world has noted to its horror in Rwanda, Liberia and Congo), when not being bought and sold as slaves (as still is done in Sudan and Mauritania).

In his 1965 work, The Course of Empire: The Arabs and their Successors, the sagacious Glubb Pasha wrote in defense of Western colonialism:

Foreign military conquest has not only enabled backward people to acquire the skills and the culture of the conquerors, but it has often administered a salutary shock to the lethargic mentality of the inhabitants, among whom the desire to rise to equality with the foreigners has roused a new spirit of energy. . . . Britain has permeated Asia and Africa with her ideas of government, of law and of ordered civilization. The men of races who less than a hundred years ago were naked are now lawyers, doctors and statesmen on the stage of the world.

But if the present trend of denigrating the West’s mission civilisatrice continues, the achievements of that great civilizing venture might well be squandered and lost forever. If we permit inhumane customs and mores to reassert themselves, the ultimate dissolution of the West itself is not an impossibility. In his famous poem “White Man’s Burden,” Rudyard Kipling eloquently spelled out the fate of a culture that loses faith in itself and its mission:

And when your goal is nearest
The end for others sought,
Watch Sloth and heathen Folly
Turn all your hope to naught.

Journal of Historical Review 17, no. 3 (May–June 1998), 7–11.

Online source: http://library.flawlesslogic.com/lifestyles.htm [2]


Article printed from Counter-Currents Publishing: http://www.counter-currents.com

vendredi, 23 septembre 2011

Révolte, irrationnel, cosmicité et... pseudo-antisémitisme

Archives de SYNERGIES EUROPEENNES - 1987

Révolte, irrationnel, cosmicité et... pseudo-antisémitisme

par Michel FROISSARD

Ex: http://vouloir.hautetfort.com/

[Pour Matthes, Mattheus et Bergfleth, la philosophie doit se replonger dans l'élémentaire de la vie et de la mort et quitter le petit monde politisé dans lequel les tenants de l'École de Francfort et Habermas avaient voulu l'enfermer. Le jeu d'ombre de cette photographie expressionniste de Frantisek Drtikol exprime bien l'émergence d'une féminité élémentaire où se mêlent désirs érotiques et engouements pour les puissances de le physis. Le mélange d'érotisme et de thanatomanie se répère dans les sculptures tombales. La photographe Isolde Ohlbaum a consacré un ouvrage illustré à cet art des cimetières (Denn alle Lust will Ewigkeit : Erotische Skulpturen auf europäischen Friedhöfen, Greno, Nördlingen). Plus bas, une photographie tirée de ce livre.]

Contre les pensées pétrifiées, il faut recourir à la révolte, disent les animateurs de la maison d'éditions Matthes & Seitz de Munich, éditrice des textes les plus rebelles de RFA et propagatrice de la pensée d'un Bataille et d'un Artaud, d'un Drieu et d'un Dumézil, d'un Leiris et d'un Baudrillard. Attentifs au message de cette inclassable pensée française, rétive à toute classification idéologique, Matthes, Mattheus et Bergfleth, principales figures de ce renouveau, si impertinent pour le conformisme de la RFA, estiment que c'est par ce détour parisien que la pensée allemande prendra une cure de jouvence. Mattheus et Matthes avaient, fin 1985, publié une anthologie de textes rebelles qu'ils avaient intitulée d'une phrase-confession, inspirée de Genet : “Ich gestatte mir die Revolte” (Je me permets la révolte...). Leur révolte, écrit l'essayiste hongrois Laszlo Földényi, dans une revue de Budapest, n'a rien de politique ; elle ne se réfère pas à telle ou telle révolution politique concrète ni à l'aventure soixante-huitarde ni à de quelconques barricades d'étudiants ; elle se niche dans un héritage culturel forcément marginal aujourd'hui, où notre univers est club-méditerranisé, elle campe dans de belles-lettres qui avivent les esprits hautains, s'adressent à des cerveaux choisis.

Une révolte à dimensions cosmiques

Ces derniers, eux, doivent se réjouir d'une anthologie où Hamann et Hebbel sont voisins de Céline et de Bataille, et où tous ces esprits éternels conjuguent leur puissance pour dissoudre les pétrifications, pour sauver la culture de ce que Friedrich Schlegel nommait la « mélasse de l'humanisme » (Sirup des Humanismus). “Révolte”, ici, n'implique aucune démonstration de puissance politique, de force paramilitaire et/ou révolutionnaire, note Földényi, mais, au contraire, une retenue avisée de puissance, dans le sens où Mattheus et Matthes nous enseignent à nous préparer à l'inéluctable, la mort, pour jouir plus intensément de la vie ; de renoncer aux pensées unilatérales : « L'extrémisme politique institutionalisé transforme souvent l'État en maison d'arrêt : c'est là la forme déclinante de la radicalité... ».

Les réflexions cosmiques d'un Bataille, les outrances céliniennes recèlent davantage de potentialités philosophiques, affirment Matthes et Mattheus, que les programmes revendicateurs, que les spéculations strictement sociologiques qui se sont posés comme objets de philosophie dans l'Allemagne de ces 3 ou 4 dernières décennies. Contrairement à Camus, moraliste, et aux exégètes de l'École de Francfort, Matthes, Mattheus et Bergfleth pensent que la “Révolte”, moteur de toute originalité de pensée, ne vise pas à l'instauration d'un Bien pré-défini et que l'activité humaine ne se résume pas à un processus sociologique de production et de reproduction ; elle indique bien plutôt cette “Révolte” à dimensions cosmiques, l'expression des outrances les plus violentes et les plus audacieuses de l'âme humaine qu'aucune codification de moralistes étriqués et qu'aucun utilitarisme calculateur ne pourront jamais appréhender dans leur totalité, dans leur profusion cosmique et tellurique.

La “Révolte” comme force innée

La raison des philosophes et des idéologues n'est qu'un moyen pratique et commode pour affronter une quotidienneté sans reliefs importants. Dans une lettre du peintre André Masson, reproduite dans l'anthologie de Matthes et Mattheus, on trouve une réflexion qui rejoint la préoccupation du groupe éditorial munichois : aucun enthousiasme révolutionnaire n'est valable, s'il ne met pas à l'avant-plan les secrets et les mystères de la vie et de la mort. C'est pourquoi l'attitude “Révolte” détient une supériorité intrinsèque par rapport au phénomène “révolution” qui, lui, est limité dans un espace-temps : il commence et il se termine et, entre ces 2 points, une stratégie et une tactique ponctuelles s'élaborent.

La “Révolte”, elle, est “primitive” et “a-dialectique” ; elle fait irruption à des moments intenses et retourne aussitôt vers un fonds cosmo-tellurique d'où, récurrente, elle provient, revient et retourne. La “Révolte” est un principe constant, qu'une personnalité porte en elle ; elle est un sentiment, une attitude, une présence, une rébellion. La plupart des hommes, faibles et affaiblis par nombre de conformismes, oublient ce principe et obéissent aux “ordres pétrifiés” ou remplacent cette force innée par une caricature : la dialectique oppositionnelle.

Et si le dialecticien politisé croit à un “télos” bonheurisant, sans plus ni projets ni soucis, réalisable dans la quotidienneté, le “révolté”, être d'essence supérieure, sait la fragilité de l'existence humaine, et, dans la tension qu'implique ce savoir tragique, s'efforce de créer, non nécessairement une œuvre d'art, mais un ordre nouveau des choses de la vie, frappé du sceau de l'aventureux. Avec le romantique Novalis, Matthes et Mattheus croient à la créativité de ce rassemblement de forces que l'homme, conscient de sa fragilité, est capable de déployer.

Retour à l'irrationnel ?

[Sculpture érotique d'une tombe. Photographie d'I. Ohlbaum. « Tout désir veut l'éternité » : tel est le titre de son superbe recueil de photographies, renvoyant à ce fameux vers de Nietzsche : « Doch alle Lust will Ewigkeit – will tiefe, tiefe Ewigkeit ! » (Also sprach Zarathustra)]

Témoignent de cette créativité foisonnante toutes les poésies, toutes les œuvres, toutes les pensées imperméables aux simplifications politiciennes. C'est précisément dans cette “zone imperméable” que la philosophie ouest-allemande doit retourner, doit aller se ressourcer, afin de briser le cercle vicieux où elle s'enferre, avec pour piètre résultat un affrontement Aufklärung-Gegenaufklärung, où l'Aufklärung adornien donne le ton, béni par les prêtres inquisiteurs du journalisme. Pour Matthes et Mattheus, tout prosélytisme est inutile et rien ne les poussera jamais à adopter cette répugnante praxis. La “Révolte” échappe à l'alternative commode “rationalisme-irrationalisme”, comme elle échappe aux notions de Bien et de Mal et se fiche de tout establishment.

Le carnaval soixante-huitard n'a conduit à aucun bouleversement majeur, comme l'avait si bien prévu Marcel Jouhandeau, criant aux étudiants qui manifestaient sous son balcon : « Foutez-moi le camp ! Dans dix ans, vous serez tous notaires ! ». La tentation politicienne mène à tous les compromis et à l'étouffement des créativités. L'objectif de Matthes et Mattheus, c'est de recréer un climat, où la “Révolte” intérieure, son “oui-non” créateur, puisse redonner le ton. Un “oui” au flot du devenir, aux grouillements du fonds de l'âme et à la violence puissante des instincts et un “non” aux pétrifications, aux modèles tout faits. C'est au départ de cet arrière-plan que se développe, à Munich, l'initiative éditoriale de Matthes. Ce dernier précise son propos dans une entrevue accordée à Rolf Grimminger  :

« Le traumatisme des intellectuels allemands, c'est “l'irrationalisme”. Le concept “irrationalisme” a dégénéré en un terme passe-partout, comme le mot “fascisme” ; il ne signifie plus rien d'autre qu'une phobie, que j'aimerais, moi, baptiser de “complexe de l'irrationalisme”. Je pose alors la question de savoir dans quelle mesure la raison est si sûre d'elle-même quand elle affronte son adversaire, aujourd'hui, avec une telle véhémence d'exorciste. Fébrile, la raison diffame tout ce qui lui apparaît incommensurable et sa diffamation use des vocables “non-sens”, “folie”, “anormalité”, “perversion”, bref le “mal” qu'il s'agit d'exclure.

Par cette exclusion, on exclut l'homme lui-même : tel est mon argument personnel. La raison n'est et n'a jamais été une valeur en soi ; il lui manque toute espèce de souveraineté ; elle est et reste un pur moyen pratique. L'homme, pour moi, est certes un animal doté de raison, mais il n'est pas assermenté à la raison et ses potentialités et ses aspirations ne s'épuisent pas dans la raison. Et celui qui affirme le contraire, ne peut avoir pour idéal que le camp de travail » (Die Ordnung, das Chaos und die Kunst, Suhrkamp, Frankfurt/M., 1986, p. 253).

En France : la Cité ; en Allemagne : la Raison

Le lecteur français, en prenant acte de tels propos, ne percevra pas immédiatement où se situe le “scandale”... En France, la polémique tourne autour des notions d'universalisme et de cosmopolitisme, d'une part, et d'enracinement et d'identité, d'autre part. BHL parie pour Jérusalem et la Loi, qui transcendent les identités “limitantes”, tandis qu'un Gérald Hervé, condamné au silence absolu par les critiques, parie pour Rome, Athènes et les paganités politiques (in : Le mensonge de Socrate ou la question juive, L'Âge d'Homme, 1984). Dans la querelle actuelle qui oppose philo-européens et philo-sémites (car tel est, finalement, qu'on le veuille ou non, le clivage), le débat français a pour objet premier la Cité et celui de la citoyenneté-nationalité), tandis que le débat allemand a la question plus abstraite de la raison.

La Raison, que dénoncent Bergfleth et Matthes, est, en RFA, l'idole érigée dans notre après-guerre par les vainqueurs américains et aussi la gardienne conceptuelle d'une orthodoxie et la garante d'un culpabilisme absolu. Pour provoquer l'establishment assis sur ce culte de la raison, établi par l'École de Francfort, et ce philo-sémitisme obligé, soustrait d'office à toute critique, Bergfleth écrit, au grand scandale des bien-pensants :

« La judéité des Lumières (aufklärerisches Judentum) ne peut, en règle générale, appréhender le sens de la spécificité allemande, des nostalgies romantiques, du lien avec la nature, du souvenir indéracinable du passé païen germanique... ».

Ou, plus loin :

« Ainsi, une nouvelle Aufklärung a généré un non-homme, un Allemand qui a l'autorisation d'être Européen (CEE, ndlr), Américain, Juif ou autre chose, mais jamais lui-même. Grâce à cette rééducation perpétrée par la gauche, rééducation qui complète définitivement sa défaite militaire, ce non-homme est devenu travailleur immigré dans son propre pays, un immigré qui reçoit son pain de grâce culturel des seigneurs cyniques de l'intelligentsia de gauche, véritable mafia maniant l'idéologie des Lumières ».
 

L'inévitable reproche d'antisémitisme

Plus pamphlétaire que Gérald Hervé, moins historien, Bergfleth provoque, en toute conscience de cause, le misérable Zeitgeist ouest-allemand ; il brise allègrement les tabous les plus vénérés des intellectuels, éduqués sous la houlette de Benjamin et d'Adorno et de leurs nombreux disciples. Son complice Matthes, qui ne renie nullement ce que Benjamin et Adorno lui ont apporté, estime que si ce philo-sémitisme est absolu et exclut, parce qu'il est asséné en overdose, des potentialités intellectuelles, philosophiques, culturelles et humaines, il limite la liberté, occulte des forces sous-jacentes que le philosophe a le devoir de déceler et de montrer au grand jour. Une telle attitude n'est pas assimilable à l'anti-sémitisme militant habituel, pense Matthes : la critique d'une pensée issue de la théologie judaïque est parfaitement légitime. Cette critique n'exclut pas d'office ce que la théologie et le prophétisme judaïques ont apporté à la culture humaine ; elle a pour objectif essentiel de ne laisser aucune culture, aucun héritage, en marge des spéculations contemporaines.

La philosophie ne consiste pas à répéter une vérité sue, déjà révélée, à encenser une idole conceptuelle par des psaumes syllogistiques, mais de rechercher au-delà de la connaissance “ce que la connaissance cache”, c'est-à-dire d'explorer sans cesse, dans une quête sans fin, le fond extra-philosophique, concret, tangible, tellurique, l'humus prolifique, la profusion infinie faite d'antagonismes, qui précèdent et déterminent toutes les idées. Où est l'anti-sémitisme propagandiste dans une telle démarche, à l'œuvre depuis les Grecs pré-socratiques ? Peut-on sérieusement parler, ici, d'anti-sémitisme ? Ce simple questionner philosophique qui interroge l'au-delà des concepts ne saurait être criminalisé, et s'il est criminalisé et marqué du stigmate de l'anti-sémitisme, ceux qui le criminalisent. sont ridicules et sans avenir fecond.

Les aphorismes de Mattheus

Criminaliser les irrationalismes, cela a été une marotte de l'après-guerre philosophique allemand, sous prétexte d'anti-fascisme. En France, il restait des espaces de pensée irrationaliste, en prise sur la littérature, avec Artaud, Bataille, Genet, etc. C'est le détour parisien que s'est choisi Bernd Mattheus, éditeur allemand d'Artaud et biographe de Bataille, pour circonvenir les interdits de l'intelligentsia allemande. Celle-ci, dans son dernier ouvrage, Heftige Stille (Matthes & Seitz, 1986), n'est pas attaquée de front, à quelques exceptions près ; le style de vie cool, soft, banalisé, consumériste, anhistorique, flasque, rose-bonbon, empli de bruits de super-marchés, de tiroirs-caisses électroniques, qu'indirectement et malgré la critique marcusienne de l'unidimensionalité, la philosophie francfortiste de la raison a généré en RFA, est battu en brèche par des aphorismes pointus, inspirés des moralistes français, qui narguent perfidement les êtres aseptisés, purgés de leur germanité, qui ont totalement (totalitairement ?) assimilé au thinking packet franfortiste, comme ils ingurgitent les lunch packets de Mac Donald.

Laissons la parole à Mattheus :

« Ô combien ennuyeux l'homme qui n'a plus aucune contradiction » (p. 102).

« Ne jamais perdre de vue la lutte contre la pollution de notre intériorité » (p. 123).

« Le désenchantement rationaliste du monde, c'est, d'après Ludwig Klages, la triste facette du travail de l'intellect humain. Pour déréaliser le monde, on peut se servir soit de la ratio soit de la folie. Mais chacune de ces deux voies indique que l'homme ne peut supporter le monde réel tel quel et cherche à s'en débarrasser. Si l'on juge ces deux voies d'après la situation dans laquelle évoluent les sujets qui leur sont livrés, la déréalisation semble plutôt accentuer les souffrances et le désespoir ; d'où le dilemme : soit bêtifié et heureux soit fou et malheureux (Ernst Jünger) » (p. 166).

« Les systèmes libéraux n'ont nul besoin de censure ; la sélection des “biens culturels” se fait aux caisses des magasins et cette sélection-là est bien plus rigoureuse que ne le serait n'importe quelle sélection politique » (p. 183-4).

« Pourquoi Artaud, pourquoi Bataille ? Parce que j'apprécie l'ivresse lucide » (p. 257).

Une stratégie de l'attention

Disloquer les certitudes francfortistes, et le “prêt-à-penser” médiatique qu'elles ont généré, passe par un plongeon dans l'extra-philosophique et par ce style aphoristique de La Rochefoucauld, déjà préconisé par Nietzsche. Prendre connaissance, dans l'espace linguistique francophone, du travail de Bergfleth, Matthes et Mattheus, et s'habituer au climat qu'ils contribuent à créer à l'aide de productions philosophiques françaises, c'est travailler à la constitution d'un axe franco-allemand autrement plus efficace et porteur d'histoire que la ridicule collaboration militaire dans le cadre de l'OTAN, où les dés sont de toute façon pipés, puisque l'Allemagne et son armée n'ont aucun statut de souveraineté. De notre part, l'initiative de Bergfleth, Matthes et Mattheus, doit conduire à une efficace stratégie de l'attention.

♦ Bernd Mattheus, Axel Matthes (Hrsg.), Ich gestatte mir die Revolte, Matthes & Seitz, München, 1985, 397 S., 22

♦ Laszlo FÖLDENYI, article paru à Budapest, reproduit dans le catalogue 1986 de la maison Matthes & Seitz.

Michel Froissard, Vouloir n°40-42, 1987.

dimanche, 18 septembre 2011

Oswald Spengler et l’âge des “Césars”

Max OTTE:

Oswald Spengler et l’âge des “Césars”

 

Fonctionnaires globaux, négociants libre-échangistes, milliardaires: les questions essentielles posées par Spengler et ses sombres prophéties sont d’une étonnante actualité!

 

spenglerosw.jpgIl y a 75 ans, le 8 mai 1936, Oswald Spengler, philosophe des cultures et esprit universel, est mort. Si l’on lit aujourd’hui les pronostics qu’il a formulés en 1918 pour la fin du 20ème siècle, on est frappé de découvrir ce que ce penseur isolé a entrevu, seul, dans son cabinet d’études, alors que le siècle venait à peine de commencer et que l’Allemagne était encore un sujet souverain sur l’échiquier mondial et dans l’histoire vivante, qui était en train de se faire.

 

L’épopée monumentale de Spengler, son “Déclin de l’Occident”, dont le premier volume était paru en 1918, a fait d’edmblée de ce savant isolé et sans chaire une célébrité internationale. Malgré le titre du livre, qui est clair mais peut aisément induire en erreur, Spengler ne se préoccupait pas seulement du déclin de l’Occident. Plus précisément, il analysait les dernières étapes de la civilisation occidentale et réfléchissait à son “accomplissement”; selon lui, cet “accomplissement” aurait lieu dans le futur. C’est pourquoi il a développé une théorie grandiose sur le devenir de la culture, de l’histoire, de l’art et des sciences.

 

Pour élaborer cette théorie, il rompt avec le schéma classique qui divise le temps historique entre une antiquité, un moyen âge et des temps modernes et veut inaugurer rien moins qu’une “révolution copernicienne” dans les sciences historiques. Les cultures, pour Spengler, sont des organismes supra-personnels, nés d’idées matricielles et primordiales (“Urideen”) auxquelles ils demeurent fidèles dans toutes leurs formes et expressions, que ce soit en art, en diplomatie, en politique ou en économie. Mais lorsque le temps de ces organismes est révolu, ceux-ci se figent, se rigidifient et tombent en déliquescence.

 

Sur le plan de sa conception de la science, Spengler se réclame de Goethe: “Une forme forgée/façonnée (“geprägt”), qui se développe en vivant” (“Geprägte Form, die lebend sich entwickelt”). Dans le germe d’une plante se trouve déjà tout le devenir ultérieur de cette plante: selon la même analogie, l’ “Uridee” (l’idée matricielle et primordiale) de la culture occidentale a émergé il y a mille ans en Europe; celle de la culture antique, il y a environ trois mille ans dans l’espace méditerranéen. Toutes les cultures ont un passé ancien, primordial, qui est villageois et religieux, puis elle développent l’équivalent de notre gothique, de notre renaissance, de notre baroque et de nos époques tardives et (hyper)-urbanisées; ces dernières époques, Spengler les qualifie de “civilisation”. Le symbole originel (“Ursymbol”) de la culture occidentale est pour Spengler la dynamique illimitée des forces, des puissances et de l’espace, comme on le perçoit dans les cathédrales gothiques, dans le calcul différentiel, dans l’imprimerie, dans les symphonies de Beethoven, dans les armes capables de frapper loin et dans les explorations et conquêtes des Vikings. La culture chinoise a, elle aussi, construit des navires capables d’affronter la haute mer ainsi que la poudre à canon, mais elle avait une autre “âme”. L’idée matricielle et primordiale de la Chine, c’est pour Spengler, le “sentier” (“der Pfad”). Jamais la culture chinoise n’a imaginé de conquérir la planète.

 

Dans toutes les cultures, on trouve la juxtaposition d’une volonté de puissance et d’un espace spirituel et religieux, qui se repère d’abord dans l’opposition entre aristocratie et hiérocratie (entre la classe aristocratique et les prêtres), ensuite dans l’opposition politique/économie ou celle qu’il y a entre philosophie et sciences. Et, en fin de compte, au moment où elles atteignent leur point d’accomplissement, les civilisations sombrent dans ce que Spengler appelle la “Spätzeit”, l’ “ère tardive”, où règne une “seconde religiosité” (“eine zweite Religiosität”). Les masses sortent alors du flux de l’histoire et se vautrent dans le cycle répétitif et éternel de la nature: elles ne mènent plus qu’une existence simple.

 

La “Spätzeit” des masses scelle aussi la fin de la démocratie, elle-même phase tardive dans toutes les cultures. C’est à ce moment-là que commence l’ère du césarisme. Il n’y a alors “plus de problèmes politiques. On se débrouille avec les situations et les pouvoirs qui sont en place (...). Déjà au temps de César les strates convenables et honnêtes de la population ne se préoccupaient plus des élections. (...) A la place des armées permanentes, on a vu apparaître progressivement des armées de métier (...). A la place des millions, on a à nouveau eu affaire aux “centaines de milliers” (...)”. Pourtant, Spengler est très éloigné de toute position déterministe: “A la surface des événements mondiaux règne toutefois l’imprévu (...). Personne n’avait pu envisager l’émergence de Mohammed et le déferlement de l’islam et personne n’avait prévu, à la chute de Robespierre, l’avènement de Napoléon”.

 

La guerre dans la phase finale de la civilisation occidentale

 

La vie d’Oswald Spengler peut se raconter en peu de mots: né en 1880 à Blankenburg dans le Harz, il a eu une enfance malheureuse; le mariage de ses parents n’avait pas été un mariage heureux: il n’a généré que problèmes; trop de femmes difficiles dans une famille où il était le seul garçon; il a fréquenté les “Fondations Francke” à Halle; il n’avait pas d’amis: il lisait, il méditait, il élaborait ses visions. Il était loin du monde. Ses études couvrent un vaste champs d’investigation: il voulait devenir professeur et a abordé la physique, les sciences de la nature, la philosophie, l’histoire... Et était aussi un autodidacte accompli. “Il n’y avait aucune personnalité à laquelle je pouvais me référer”. Il ne fréquentait que rarement les salles de conférence ou de cours. Il a abandonné la carrière d’enseignant dès qu’un héritage lui a permis de mener une existence indépendante et modeste. Il n’eut que de très rares amis et levait de temps à autre une fille dans la rue. On ne s’étonnera dès lors pas que Spengler ait choisi comme deuxième mentor, après Goethe, ce célibataire ultra-sensible que fut Friedrich Nietzsche. Celui-ci exercera une profonde influence sur l’auteur du “déclin de l’Occident”: “De Goethe , j’ai repris la méthode; de Nietzsche, les questions”.

 

L’influence politique de Spengler ne s’est déployée que sur peu d’années. Dans “Preussentum und Sozialismus” (“Prussianité et socialisme”), un livre paru en 1919, il esquisse la différence qui existe entre l’esprit allemand et l’esprit anglais, une différence qui s’avère fondamentale pour comprendre la “phase tardive” du monde occidental. Pour Spengler, il faut le rappeler, les cultures n’ont rien d’homogène: partout, en leur sein, on repère une dialectique entre forces et contre-forces, lequelles sont toujours suscitées par la volonté de puissance que manifeste toute forme de vie. Pour Spengler, ce qui est spécifiquement allemand, ou prussien, ce sont les idées de communauté, de devoir et de solidarité, assorties du primat du politique; ces idées ont été façonnées, au fil du temps, par les Chevaliers de l’Ordre Teutonique, qui colonisèrent l’espace prussien au moyen âge. Ce qui est spécifiquement anglais, c’est le primat de la richesse matérielle, c’est la liberté de rafler du butin et c’est l’idéal du Non-Etat, inspiré par les Vikings et les pirates de la Manche.

 

“C’est ainsi que s’opposent aujourd’hui deux grands principes économiques: le Viking a donné à terme le libre-échangiste; le Chevalier teutonique a donné le fonctionnaire administratif. Il n’y a pas de réconciliation possible entre ces deux attitudes et toutes deux ne reconnaissent aucune limite à leur volonté, elles ne croiront avoir atteint leur but que lorsque le monde entier sera soumis à leur idée; il y aura donc la guerre jusqu’à ce que l’une de ces deux idées aura totalement vaincu”. Cette opposition irréconciliable implique de poser la question décisive: laquelle de ces deux idées dominera la phase finale de la civilisation occidentale? “L’économie planétaire prendra-t-elle la forme d’une exploitation générale et totale de la planète ou impliquera-t-elle l’organisation totale du monde? Les Césars de cet imperium futur seront-ils des milliardaires ou des fonctionnaires globaux? (...) la population du monde sera-t-elle l’objet de la politique de trusts ou l’objet de la politique d’hommes, tels qu’ils sont évoqués à la fin du second Faust de Goethe?”.

 

Lorsque, armés du savoir dont nous disposons aujourd’hui, nous jetons un regard rétrospectif sur ces questions soulevées jadis par Spengler, lorsque nous constatons que les lobbies imposent des lois, pour qu’elles servent leurs propres intérêts économiques, lorsque nous voyons les hommes politiques entrer au service de consortiums, lorsque des fonds quelconques, de pension ou de logement, avides comme des sauterelles affamées, ruinent des pans entiers de l’industrie, lorsque nous constatons que le patrimoine génétique se voit désormais privatisé et, enfin, lorsque toutes les initiatives publiques se réduisent comme peau de chagrin, les questions posées par Spengler regagnent une formidable pertinence et accusent une cruelle actualité. En effet, les nouveaux dominateurs du monde sont des milliardaires et les hommes politiques ne sont plus que des pions ou des figures marginalisées.

 

Spengler a rejeté les propositions de Goebbels

 

Spengler espérait que le Reich allemand allait retrouver sa vigueur et sa fonction, comme l’atteste son écrit de 1924, “Neubau des Deutschen Reiches” (= “Pour une reconstruction du Reich allemand”). Dans cet écrit, il exprimait son désir de voir “la partie la plus valable du monde allemand des travailleurs s’unir aux meilleurs porteurs du sentiment d’Etat vieux-prussien (...) pour réaliser ensemble une démocratisation au sens prussien du terme, en soudant leurs efforts communs par une adhésion déterminée au sentiment du devoir”. Spengler utilise souvent le terme “Rasse” (= “race”) dans cet écrit. Mais ce terme, chez lui, signifie “mode de comportement avéré, qui va de soi sans remise en question aucune”; en fait, c’est ce que nous appelerions aujourd’hui une “culture d’organisation” (“Organisationskultur”). Spengler rejetait nettement la théorie folciste (= “völkisch”) de la race. Lorsqu’il parlait de “race”, il entendait “la race que l’on possédait, et non pas la race à laquelle on appartient. La première relève de l’éthique, la seconde de la zoologie”.

 

A la fin des années 20, Spengler se retire du monde et adopte la vie du savant sans chaire. Il ne reprendra la parole qu’en 1933, en publiant “Jahre der Entscheidung” (= “Années décisives”). En quelques mois, le livre atteint les ventes exceptionnelles de 160.000 exemplaires. On le considère à juste titre comme le manifeste de la résistance conservatrice.

 

Spengler lance un avertissement: “Nous ne vivons pas une époque où il y a lieu de s’enthousiasmer ou de triompher (...). Des fanatiques exagèrent des idées justes au point de procéder à la propre annulation de celles-ci. Ce qui promettait grandeur au départ, se termine en tragédie ou en comédie”. Goebbels a demandé à Spengler de collaborer à ses publications: il refuse. Il s’enfonce dans la solitude. Il avait déjà conçu un second volume aux “Années décisives” mais il ne le couche pas sur le papier car, dit-il, “je n’écris pas pour me faire interdire”.

 

Au début du 21ème siècle, l’esprit viking semble avoir définitivement triompher de l’esprit d’ordre. Le monde entier et ses patrimoines culturels sont de plus en plus considérés comme des propriétés privées. La conscience du devoir, la conscience d’appartenir à une histoire, les multiples formes de loyauté, le sens de la communauté, le sentiment d’appartenir à un Etat sont houspillés hors des coeurs et des esprits au bénéfice d’une liberté que l’on pose comme sans limites, comme dépourvue d’histoire et uniquement vouée à la jouissance. La politique est devenue une marchandise que l’on achète. Le savoir de l’humanité est entreposé sur le site “Google”, qui s’en est généralement emparé de manière illégitime; la conquête de l’espace n’est plus qu’un amusement privé.

 

Mais: “Le temps n’autorise pas qu’on le retourne; il n’y aurait d’ailleurs aucune sagesse dans un quelconque retournement du temps comme il n’y a pas de renoncement qui serait indice d’intelligence. Nous sommes nés à cette époque-ci et nous devons courageusement emprunter le chemin qui nous a été tracé (...). Il faut se maintenir, tenir bon, comme ce soldat romain, dont on a retrouvé les ossements devant une porte de Pompéi; cet homme est mort, parce qu’au moment de l’éruption du Vésuve, on n’a pas pensé à le relever. Ça, c’est de la grandeur. Cette fin honnête est la seule chose qu’on ne peut pas retirer à un homme”.

 

Et nous? Nous qui croyons à l’Etat et au sens de la communauté, nous qui sentons au-dessus de nous la présence d’un ciel étoilé et au-dedans de nous la présence de la loi morale, nous qui aimons les symphonies de Beethoven et les paysages de Caspar David Friedrich, va-t-on nous octroyer une fin digne? On peut le supposer. S’il doit en être ainsi, qu’il en soit ainsi.

 

Max OTTE.

(article paru dans “Junge Freiheit”, Berlin, n°19/2011 – http://www.jungefreiheit.de/ ).

 

Max Otte est professeur d’économie (économie de l’entreprise) à Worms en Allemagne. Dans son ouvrage “Der Crash kommt” (= “Le crash arrive”), il a annoncé très exactement, dès 2006, l’éclatement de la crise financière qui nous a frappés en 2008 et dont les conséquences sont loin d’avoir été éliminées.

samedi, 17 septembre 2011

Ludwig Klages: métaphysicien du paganisme

Baal MÜLLER:

Ludwig Klages: métaphysicien du paganisme

 

Klages2.jpg“Dans le tourbillon des innombrables tonalités, perceptibles sur notre planète, les consonances et les dissonances sont l’aridité sublime des déserts, la majesté des hautes montagnes, la mélancolie que nous apportent les vastes landes, les entrelacs mystérieux des forêts profondes, le bouillonement des côtes baignées par la lumière des océans. C’est en eux que le travail originel de l’homme s’est incrusté ou s’est immiscé sous l’impulsion du rêve”.

 

C’est par des mots flamboyants et pathétiques, comme ceux que nous citons ici en exergue, et qui sont tirés de son essai le plus connu, “Mensch und Erde” (1913; “L’Homme et la Terre”), que Ludwig Klages n’a jamais cessé de louer le lien à la Terre et la piété naturelle de l’humanité primoridale, dont les oeuvres et les constructions “respirent” ou “révèlent” encore “l’âme du paysage dont ils ont jailli”. Cette unité a été détruite par l’irruption de “l’esprit” aux temps protohistoriques des “Pélasges”, événement qui équivaut à une chute dans le péché cosmique.

 

Le principe que représente “l’esprit” est, pour Klages, le mal fondamental et l’origine d’un processus de déliquescence qui a dominé toute l’histoire. Dans ce sens, “l’esprit” (“Geist”) n’est pas à l’origine une propriété de l’homme ni même une propriété consubstantielle à la réalité mais serait, tout simplement, pour l’homme comme pour le réel, le “Tout autre”, le “totalement étranger”. Pour Klages, seul est “réel” le monde du temps et de l’espace, qu’il comprend comme un continuum d’images-phénomènes, qui n’ont pas encore été dénaturées ou chosifiées par la projection, sur elles, de “l’esprit” ou de la “conscience égotique”, qui en est le vecteur sur le plan anthropologique. La mesure et le nombre, le point et la limite sont, dans la doctrine klagesienne de la connaissance et de l’Etre, les catégories de “l’esprit”, par la force desquelles il divise et subdivise en séquences disparates les phénomènes qui, au départ, sont vécus ontologiquement ou se manifestent par eux-mêmes via la puissance du destin; cette division en séquences disparates rend tout calculable et gérable.

 

Cette distinction, opérée par le truchement de “l’esprit”, permet toutefois à l’homme de connaître: parce qu’il pose ce constat, Klages, en dépit de son radicalisme verbal occasionnel et de ses innombrables critiques, ne peut être perçu comme un “irrationaliste”. Mais si “l’esprit” permet la connaissance, il est, simultanément et matriciellement, la cause première du gigantesque processus d’aveuglement et de destruction qui transformera très bientôt, selon la conviction de Klages, le monde en un vaste paysage lunaire.

 

Ce penseur, né en 1872 à Hanovre et mort en 1956 à Kilchberg,a dénoncé très tôt, avec une clairvoyance étonnante, les conséquences concrètes de la civilisation moderne comme l’éradication définitive d’innombrables espèces d’animaux et de plantes ou le nivellement mondial de toutes les cultures (que l’on nomme aujourd’hui la “globalisation”); cette clairvoyance se lit dès ses premiers écrits, rédigés à la charnière des 19ème et 20ème siècles, repris en 1944 sous le titre de “Rhythmen und Runen” (= “Rythmes et runes”); ils ont été publiés comme “écrits posthumes” alors que l’auteur était encore vivant! Klages est un philosophe fascinant —et cette fascination qu’il exerce est simultanément sa faiblesse selon bon nombre d’interprètes de son oeuvre— parce qu’il a cherché puis réussi à forger des concepts philosophiques fondamentaux aptes à nous faire saisir ce déplorable état de choses, surtout dans son oeuvre principale, “Der Geist als Widersacher des Lebens” (1929-1932).

 

Contrairement à beaucoup de ses contemporains qui, comme lui, avaient adhéré au vaste mouvement dit de “Lebensreform” (= “Réforme de la Vie”), qui traversait alors toute l’Allemagne wilhelminienne, Klages ne s’est pas contenté de recommander des cures dites “modernes” à l’époque, comme le végétarisme, le nudisme ou l’eurythmie; il n’a pas davantage prêché une révolution mondiale qui aurait séduit les pubères et ne s’est pas borné à déplorer les symptômes négatifs du “progrès”; il a tenté, en revanche, comme tout métaphysicien traditionnel ou tout philosophe allemand bâtisseur de systèmes, de saisir par la théorie, une fois pour toutes, la racine du mal. Le problème fondamental, qu’il a mis en exergue, c’est-à-dire celui de l’opposition entre esprit et âme, il l’a étudié et traqué, d’une part, en menant des polémiques passionnelles, qui lui sont propres, et, d’autre part, en l’analysant par des arabesques philosophiques des plus subtiles dans chacun de ses nombreux et volumineux ouvrages. Ceux-ci sont parfois consacrés à des figures historiques comme, par exemple, “Die psychologischen Errungenschaften Nietzsches” (1926; “Les acquis philosophiques de Nietzsche”) mais, dans la plupart des cas, ses ouvrages explorent des domaines que je qualifierais de “systématiques”. Ces domaines relèvent de disciplines comme les sciences de l’expression et du caractère (“Ausdrucks- und Charakterkunde”), qu’il a grandement contribué à faire éclore. Il s’agit surtout de la graphologie, pratique que Klages a hissée au rang de science.

 

En 1895, il fonde, avec Hans H. Busse, “l’Institut de Graphologie Scientifique” à Munich, après des études de chimie entreprises à contre-coeur. Klages consacrera plusieurs ouvrages théoriques à la graphologie, dont il faut mentionner “Handschrift und Charakter” (“Ecriture et caractère”), publié une première fois en 1917. Ce travail a connu de très nombreuses rééditions et permis à son auteur de conquérir un très vaste public. Parmi les autres succès de librairie de Klages, citons un ouvrage très particulier, “Vom kosmogonichen Eros” (1922; “De l’Eros cosmogonique”). Ce livre évoque un “pan-érotisme” et, avec une indéniable passion, les cultes païens des morts. Tout cela rappelle évidemment les idées de son ami Alfred Schuler qui, comme Klages, avait fréquenté, vers 1900, la Bohème littéraire et artistique du quartier munichois de Schwabing.

 

Cet ouvrage sur l’Eros cosmogonique a suscité les plus hautes louanges de Hermann Hesse et de Walter Benjamin. Ce livre parvient parfaitement à maintenir le juste milieu entre philosophie et science, d’une part, entre discours prophétique et poésie, d’autre part: c’est effectivement entre ces pôles qu’oscille l’oeuvre complète de Klages. Cette oscillation permanente permet à Klages, et à son style si typique, de passer avec bonheur de Charybde en Scylla, passages hasardeux faits d’une philosophie élaborée, fort difficle à appréhender pour le lecteur d’aujourd’hui: malgré une très grande maîtrise de la langue allemande, Klages nous livre une syntaxe parfaite mais composée de phrases beaucoup trop longues, explicitant une masse énorme de matière philosophique, surtout dans son “Widersacher”, brique de 1500 pages. Enfin, le pathos archaïsant du visionnaire et de l’annonciateur, que Klages partageait avec bon nombre de représentants de sa génération, rend la lecture malaisée pour nos contemporains. 

 

Mais si le lecteur d’aujourd’hui surmonte les difficultés initiales, il découvrira une oeuvre d’une grande densité philosophique, exprimée en une langue qui se situe à des années-lumière du jargon médiatique contemporain. Cette langue nous explique ses observations sur la perception “atmosphérique” et “donatrice de forme”, sur la conscience éveillée et sur la conscience onirique ou encore sur les structures de la langue et de la pensée: elle nous interdit d’en rester au simplisme du dualisme âme/esprit qui sous-tend son idée première (qui n’est pas défendable en tous ses détails et que ressortent en permanence ses critiques superficiels). Face à son programme d’animer un paganisme nouveau, que l’on peut déduire de son projet philosophique général, il convient de ne pas s’en effrayer de prime abord ni de l’applaudir trop vite.

 

Le néo-paganisme de Klages, qui n’a rien à voir avec l’astrologie, la runologie ou autres dérivés similaires, doit surtout se comprendre comme une “métaphysique du paganisme”, c’est-à-dire comme une explication philosophique a posteriori d’une saisie du monde païenne et pré-rationnelle. Il ne s’agit donc pas de “croire” à des dieux personnalisés ou à des dieux ayant une fonction déterminée mais d’adopter une façon de voir qui, selon la reconstruction qu’opère Klages, fait apparaître le cosmos comme “animé”, “doté d’âme”, et vivant. Tandis que l’homme moderne, par ses efforts pour connaître le monde, finit par chosifier celui-ci, le païen, lui, estime que c’est impiété et sacrilège d’oser lever le voile d’Isis.

 

Baal MÜLLER.

(article paru dans “Junge Freiheit”, Berlin, n°27/1999; http://www.jungefreiheit.de/ ).

Carl Schmitt: Volk und Menschheit

Carl Schmitt: Volk und Menschheit

lundi, 12 septembre 2011

Jonathan Bowden: Marxism and The Frankfurt School

Jonathan Bowden: Marxism and The Frankfurt School

Entretien avec Paul Gottfried

Entretien avec Paul Gottfried : les étranges métamorphoses du conservatisme

Propos recueillis par Arnaud Imatz

Ex: http://www.polemia.com/

gootfried.jpgProfesseur de Lettres classiques et modernes à l’Elizabethtown College, président du Henry Louis Mencken Club, co-fondateur de l’Académie de Philosophie et de Lettres, collaborateur du Ludwig von Mises Institute et de l’Intercollegiate Studies Institute, Paul Edward Gottfried est une figure éminente du conservatisme américain. Il est l’auteur de nombreux livres et articles sur notamment le paléo et néoconservatisme. Proche de Pat Buchanan, qui fut le candidat républicain malheureux aux primaires des présidentielles face à George Bush père (1992), Paul Gottfried a été l’ami de personnalités politiques comme Richard Nixon et intellectuelles prestigieuses telles Sam Francis, Mel Bradford, Christopher Lasch…

1. Au début des années 1970 vous sympathisiez avec le courant dominant du conservatisme américain. Quarante ans plus tard, le spécialiste notoire du conservatisme américain que vous êtes, déclare ne plus se reconnaître dans ce mouvement. Que s’est-il passé ?

L’explication tient dans le fait qu’il n’y a pas de véritable continuité entre le mouvement conservateur américain des années 1950 et celui qui a pris sa place par la suite. Sur toutes les questions de société, le mouvement conservateur actuel, « néo-conservateur », est plus à gauche que la gauche du Parti démocrate dans les années 1960. Depuis cette époque, et surtout depuis les années 1980, les néo-conservateurs [1] dominent la fausse droite américaine. Leur préoccupation essentielle, qui éclipse toutes les autres, est de mener une politique étrangère fondée sur l’extension de l’influence américaine afin de propager les principes démocratiques et l’idéologie des droits de l’homme.

2. Selon vous, les conservateurs authentiques croient en l’histoire et aux valeurs de la religion ; ils défendent la souveraineté des nations ; ils considèrent l’autorité politique nécessaire au développement de la personne et de la société. Aristote, Platon, Saint Thomas, Machiavel, Burke ou Hegel sont, dites vous, leurs références à des titres divers. Mais alors comment les néo-conservateurs, partisans de la croissance du PNB, du centralisme étatique, de la démocratie de marché, du multiculturalisme et de l’exportation agressive du système américain, ont-ils pu s’imposer?

J’ai essayé d’expliquer cette ascension au pouvoir des néo-conservateurs dans mon livre Conservatism in America. J’ai souligné un point essentiel : à l’inverse de l’Europe, les États-Unis n’ont jamais eu de véritable tradition conservatrice. La droite américaine de l’après-guerre n’a été, en grande partie, qu’une invention de journalistes. Elle se caractérisait par un mélange d’anticommunisme, de défense du libre marché et de choix politiques prosaïques du Parti républicain. Il lui manquait une base sociale inébranlable. Son soutien était inconstant et fluctuant. Dans les années 1950, le mouvement conservateur a essayé de s’enraciner parmi les ouvriers et les salariés catholiques ouvertement anti-communistes et socialement conservateurs. Mais à la fin du XXème siècle cette base sociale n’existait plus.

Les néo-conservateurs proviennent essentiellement de milieux juifs démocrates et libéraux. Antisoviétiques pendant la guerre froide, pour des raisons qui étaient les leurs, ils se sont emparés de la droite à une époque ou celle-ci était épuisée et s’en allait littéralement à vau-l’eau. J’ajoute que les conservateurs de l’époque, qui faisaient partie de l’establishment politico-littéraire et qui étaient liés à des fondations privées, ont presque tous choisi de travailler pour les néo-conservateurs. Les autres se sont vus marginalisés et vilipendés.

3. (…)

4. (…)

5. Vous avez payé le prix fort pour votre indépendance d’esprit. Vos adversaires néo-conservateurs vous ont couvert d’insultes. Votre carrière académique a été torpillée et en partie bloquée. La direction de la Catholic University of America a fait l’objet d’incroyables pressions pour que la chaire de sciences politiques ne vous soit pas accordée. Comment expliquez-vous que cela ait pu se produire dans un pays réputé pour son attachement à la liberté d’expression ?

Il n’y a pas de liberté académique aux États-Unis. La presque totalité de nos universités sont mises au pas ( gleichgeschaltet ) comme elles le sont dans les pays d’Europe de l’Ouest, pour ne pas parler du cas de l’Allemagne « antifasciste » ou la férule a des odeurs nauséabondes. Tout ce que vous trouvez en France dans ce domaine s’applique également à la situation de notre monde académique et journalistique. Compte tenu de l’orientation politique de l’enseignement supérieur aux États-Unis, je ne pouvais pas faire une véritable carrière académique.

6. (…)

7. (…)

8. Vos travaux montrent qu’en Amérique du Nord comme en Europe l’idéologie dominante n’est plus le marxisme mais une combinaison d’État providence, d’ingénierie sociale et de mondialisme. Vous dites qu’il s’agit d’un étrange mélange d’anticommunisme et de sympathie résiduelle pour les idéaux sociaux-démocrates : « un capitalisme devenu serviteur du multiculturalisme ». Comment avez-vous acquis cette conviction ?

Mon analyse de l’effacement du marxisme et du socialisme traditionnel au bénéfice d’une gauche multiculturelle repose sur l’observation de la gauche et de sa pratique aux États-Unis et en Europe. Le remplacement de l’holocaustomanie et du tiers-mondisme par des analyses économiques traditionnelles s’est produit avant la chute de l’Union soviétique. Au cours des années 1960-1970, les marqueurs politiques ont commencé à changer. Les désaccords sur les questions économiques ont cédé la place à des différends sur les questions culturelles et de société. Les deux « establishments », celui de gauche comme celui de droite, ont coopéré au recentrage du débat politique : la gauche s’est débarrassée de ses projets vraiment socialistes et la droite a accepté l’Etat protecteur et l’essentiel des programmes féministes, homosexuels et multiculturalistes. Un exemple : celui du journaliste vedette, Jonah Goldberg. Ce soi-disant conservateur a pour habitude de célébrer la « révolution féministe et homosexuelle » qu’il considère comme « un accomplissement explicitement conservateur ». Sa thèse bizarre ne repose évidemment sur rien de sérieux… Mais il suffit qu’une cause devienne à la mode parmi les membres du « quatrième pouvoir » pour qu’une pléiade de journalistes néo-conservateurs la présentent immédiatement comme un nouveau triomphe du conservatisme modéré.

9. Vos analyses prennent absolument le contrepied des interprétations néo-conservatrices. Vous rejetez comme une absurdité la filiation despotique entre le réformisme d’Alexandre II et le Goulag de Staline. Vous récusez comme une aberration la thèse qui assimile les gouvernements allemands du XIXème siècle à de simples tyrannies militaires. Vous réprouvez la haine du « relativisme historique » et la phobie de la prétendue « German connection ». Vous contestez l’opinion qui prétend voir dans le christianisme le responsable de l’holocauste juif et de l’esprit nazi. Vous dénoncez l’instrumentalisation de l’antifascisme « outil de contrôle au main des élites politiques ». Vous reprochez aux protestants américains d’avoir pris la tête de la défense de l’idéologie multiculturelle et de la politique culpabilisatrice. Vous affirmez que les chrétiens sont les seuls alliés que les Juifs puissent trouver aujourd’hui. Enfin, comble du « politiquement incorrect », vous estimez que la démocratie présuppose un haut degré d’homogénéité culturelle et sociale. Cela dit, en dernière analyse, vous considérez que le plus grave danger pour la civilisation occidentale est la sécularisation de l’universalisme chrétien et l’avènement de l’Europe et de l’Amérique patchworks. Pourquoi ?

En raison de l’étendue et de la puissance de l’empire américain, les idées qu’il propage, bonnes ou mauvaises, ne peuvent manquer d’avoir une influence significative sur les européens. Oui ! effectivement, je partage le point de vue de Rousseau et de Schmitt selon lequel la souveraineté du peuple n’est possible que lorsque les citoyens sont d’accords sur les questions morales et culturelles importantes. Dans la mesure où l’État managérial et les médias ont réussi à imposer leurs valeurs, on peut dire, qu’en un certain sens, il existe une forme d’homonoia aux États-Unis.

En fait, la nature du nationalisme américain est très étrange. Il est fort proche du jacobinisme qui fit florès lors de la Révolution française. La religion civique américaine, comme sa devancière française, repose sur la religion postchrétienne des droits de l’homme. La droite religieuse américaine est trop stupide pour se rendre compte que cette idéologie des droits de l’homme, ou multiculturaliste, est un parasite de la civilisation chrétienne. L’une remplace l’autre. Le succédané extraie la moelle de la culture la plus ancienne et pourrit sa substance.

Pour en revenir au rapide exposé que vous avez fait de mes analyses, je dirai que je suis globalement d’accord. Mais il n’est pas inutile de préciser pourquoi je considère aussi essentiel, aux États-Unis, le rôle du protestantisme libéral dans la formation de l’idéologie multiculturelle. Le pays est majoritairement protestant et la psychologie du multiculturalisme se retrouve dans le courant dominant du protestantisme américain tout au long de la deuxième moitie du XXème siècle. Bien sûr, d’autres groupes, et en particulier des intellectuels et des journalistes juifs ont contribué à cette transformation culturelle, mais ils n’ont pu le faire que parce que le groupe majoritaire acceptait le changement et trouvait des raisons morales de le soutenir. Nietzsche avait raison de décrire les juifs à demi assimilés comme la classe sacerdotale qui met à profit le sentiment de culpabilité de la nation hôte. Mais cette stratégie ne peut jouer en faveur des Juifs ou de tout autre outsider que lorsque la majorité se vautre dans la culpabilité ou identifie la vertu avec la culpabilité sociale. Je crois, qu’à l’inverse de la manipulation bureaucratique des minorités disparates et du lavage de cerveau des majorités, la vraie démocratie a besoin d’un haut degré d’homogénéité culturelle. Je suis ici les enseignements de Platon, Rousseau, Jefferson ou Schmitt, pour ne citer qu’eux.

10. Parmi les adversaires du néo-conservatisme, à coté des « vieux » conservateurs, souvent stigmatisés comme « paléo-conservateurs », on peut distinguer trois courants : le populisme, le fondamentalisme évangélique et le Tea Party. Pouvez-vous nous dire en quoi ces trois tendances diffèrent du vrai conservatisme ?

Je ne crois pas que l’on puisse trouver du « paléo-conservatisme » dans l’un ou l’autre de ces courants. Les membres du Tea Party et les libertariens sont des post-paléo-conservateurs. Les évangéliques, qui n’ont jamais partagé les convictions des vieux conservateurs, sont devenus les « idiots utiles » des néo-conservateurs, qui contrôlent les medias du GOP (Grand Old Party ou Parti Républicain). Actuellement, les « paléos » ont sombré dans le néant. Ils ne sont plus des acteurs importants du jeu politique. À la différence des libertariens, qui peuvent encore gêner les néo-conservateurs, les « paléos » ont été exclus de la scène politique. Faute de moyens financiers et médiatiques, ils ne peuvent plus critiquer ou remettre en cause sérieusement les doctrines et prétentions néo-conservatrices. Le pouvoir médiatique ne leur permet pas de s’exprimer sur les grandes chaînes de télévision. Ils ont été traités comme des lépreux, des « non-personnes », comme l’on fait les médias britanniques avec le British National Party. Pat Buchanan, qui fut un conseiller de Nixon, de Ford et de Reagan et qui est connu pour sa critique des va-t-en-guerre, a survécu, mais il est interdit d’antenne sur FOX, la plus grand chaîne de TV contrôlée par les néo-conservateurs. Il ne peut paraître que sur MSBNBC, une chaîne de la gauche libérale, où il est habituellement présenté en compagnie de journalistes de gauche.

11. Vous avez été traité d’antisémite pour avoir écrit que les néo-conservateurs sont des vecteurs de l’ultra-sionisme. En quoi vous différenciez-vous du sionisme des néo-conservateurs ?

Les néo-conservateurs sont convaincus que seule leur conception de la sécurité d’Israël doit être défendue inconditionnellement. Il est pourtant tout-à-fait possible d’être du côté des israéliens sans mentir sur leur compte. Que les choses soient claires : il n’y a aucun doute que les deux parties, les israéliens et les palestiniens, se sont mal comportés l’un vis-à-vis de l’autre. Cela dit, c’est une hypocrisie scandaleuse, une tartufferie révoltante, que de refuser à d’autres peuples (disons aux Allemands et aux Français) le droit à leur identité historique et ethnique pour ensuite traiter les Juifs comme un cas particulier, parce qu’ils ont connu des souffrances injustes qui les autoriseraient à conserver leurs caractères distinctifs.

12. Quels livres, revues ou sites web représentatifs du conservatisme américain recommanderiez-vous au public francophone ?

Je recommanderai mon étude la plus récente sur le mouvement conservateur  Conservatism in America  (Palgrave MacMillan, 2009) et le livre que je suis en train de terminer pour Cambridge University Press sur Leo Strauss et le mouvement conservateur en Amérique. Vous trouverez également les points de vue des conservateurs, qui s’opposent aux politiques des néo-conservateurs, sur les sites web : www.americanconservative.com 
www.taking.com [2]

13. Vos amis les néo ou postsocialistes Paul Piccone et Christopher Lasch, estimaient que les différences politiques entre droite et gauche se réduisent désormais à de simples désaccords sur les moyens pour parvenir à des objectifs moraux semblables ? Considérez-vous aussi que la droite et la gauche sont inextricablement mêlées et que les efforts pour les distinguer sont devenus inutiles ?

Je suis tout-à-fait d’accord avec mes deux amis aujourd’hui décédés. Les différences politiques entre droite et gauche se réduisent de nos jours à des désaccords insignifiants entre groupements qui rivalisent pour l’obtention de postes administratifs. En fait, ils ergotent sur des vétilles. Le débat est très encadré ; il a de moins en moins d’intérêt et ne mérite aucune attention. J’avoue que j’ai de plus en plus de mal à comprendre l’acharnement que mettent certains droitistes - censés avoir plus d’intelligence que des coquilles Saint-Jacques - à collaborer aux activités du Parti Républicain et à lui accorder leurs suffrages. Plutôt que d’écouter les mesquineries mensongères d’une classe politique qui ne cesse de faire des courbettes au pouvoir médiatique, je préfère encore assister à un match de boxe.

14. Dans les années 1990, deux universitaires néo-conservateurs ont soulevé de farouches polémiques en Europe : Francis Fukuyama, qui a prophétisé le triomphe universel du modèle démocratique, et Samuel Huntington, qui a soutenu que le choc des civilisations est toujours possible parce que les rapports internationaux ne sont pas régis par des logiques strictement économiques, politiques ou idéologiques mais aussi civilisationnelles. Ce choc des civilisations est-il pour vous une éventualité probable ou un fantasme de paranoïaque?

Je ne vois pas une différence fondamentale entre Fukuyama et Huntington. Les deux sont d’accords sur la nature du Bien : l’idéologie des droits de l’homme, le féminisme, le consumérisme, etc. La principale différence entre ces deux auteurs néo-conservateurs est que Fukuyama (du moins à une certaine époque car ce n’est plus le cas aujourd’hui) était plus optimiste qu’Huntington sur la possibilité de voir leurs valeurs communes triompher dans le monde. Mais les deux n’ont d’autre vision historique de l’Occident que le soutien du consumérisme, les revendications féministes, l’égalitarisme, l’inévitable emballage des préférences américaines urbaines c’est-à-dire le véhicule valorisant du hic et nunc.

Je ne doute pas un instant que si la tendance actuelle se poursuit les non-blancs ou les antichrétiens non-occidentaux finiront par occuper les pays d’Occident. Ils remettront en cause les droits de l’homme, l’idéologie multiculturaliste et la mentalité qui les domine aujourd’hui. Les nations hôtes (qui ne sont d’ailleurs plus des nations) sont de moins en moins capables d’assimiler ce que le romancier Jean Raspail appelle « un déluge d’envahisseurs ». En fait, l’idéologie des droits de l’homme n’impressionne vraiment que les chrétiens égarés, les Juifs et les autres minorités qui ont peur de vivre dans une société chrétienne traditionnelle. Pour ma part, je doute que l’idéologie ou le patriotisme civique de type allemand puisse plaire au sous-prolétariat musulman qui arrive en Europe. Cette idéologie ne risque pas non plus d’avoir la moindre résonance sur les latino-américains illettrés qui se déversent sur les États-Unis. Dans le cas ou les minorités revendicatrices deviendraient un jour le groupe majoritaire, une fois les immigrés parvenus au pouvoir, il y a bien peu de chances pour qu’ils s’obstinent à imposer les mêmes doctrines multiculturelles. En quoi leurs serviraient-elles ?

15. Vous avez anticipé ma dernière question sur les risques que devront affronter l’Europe et l’Amérique au XXIème siècle…

Je voudrais quand même ajouter quelques mots. La dévalorisation systématique du mariage traditionnel, qui reposait hier sur une claire définition du rôle des sexes et sur l’espoir d’une descendance, est la politique la plus folle menée par n’importe quel gouvernement de l’histoire de l’humanité. Je ne sais pas où cette sottise égalitariste nous conduira mais le résultat final ne peut être que catastrophique. Peut être que les musulmans détruiront ce qui reste de civilisation occidentale une fois parvenus pouvoir, mais je doute qu’ils soient aussi stupides que ceux qui ont livré cette guerre à la famille. Si ça ne tenait qu’à moi, je serai ravi de revenir au salaire unique du chef de famille. Et si on me considère pour cela anti-libertarien et anticapitaliste, je suppose que j’accepterai cette étiquette. Je ne suis pas un libertarien de cœur mais un rallié à contrecœur.

Propos recueillis par Arnaud Imatz
31/08/2011

Notes :

[1] Les figures les plus connues du conservatisme américain de l’après-guerre furent M. E. Bradford, James Burnham, Irving Babbitt, le premier William Buckley (jusqu’à la fin des années 1960), Will Herberg, Russell Kirk, Gerhart Niemeyer, Robert Nisbet, Forrest McDonald et Frank Meyer. Celles du néo-conservatisme sont Daniel Bell, Allan Bloom, Irving Kristol, S. M. Lipset, Perle, Podhoretz, Wattenberg ou Wolfowitz (N.d.A.I.).
[2] Dans son livre Conservatism in America, Paul Gottfried recommande trois autres sources qui peuvent aussi être consultées avec profit : l’enquête de George H. Nash, The Conservative Intellectual Movement in America Since 1945 (2ème éd., Wilmington, DE : ISI, 1996), l’anthologie de textes de Gregory L. Schneider, Conservatism in America Since 1930 (New York, New York University Press, 2003) et l’encyclopédie publiée par l’Intercollegiate Studies Institute, American Conservatism : An Encyclopedia (ISI, 2006), (N.d.A.I.).

Correspondance Polémia - 5/08/2011

dimanche, 11 septembre 2011

Mircea Eliade: Liberty

Liberty

By Mircea Eliade

"Iconar", March 5, 1937

mircea-eliade-1.jpgThere is an aspect of the Legionary Movement that has not been sufficiently explored: the individual’s liberty. Being primarily a spiritual movement concerned with the creation of a New Man and the salvation of our people – the Legion can’t grow and couldn’t have matured without treasuring the individual’s liberty; the liberty that so many books were written about with which so many libraries were stacked full, in defense of which many
democratic speeches have been held, without it being truly lived and treasured.
The people that speak of liberty and declare themselves willing to die for it are those who believe in materialist dogmas, in fatalities: social classes, class war, the primacy of the economy, etc. It is strange, to say the least, to hear a person who doesn’t believe in God stand up for “liberty,” who doesn’t believe in the primacy of the spirit or the afterlife.
Such a person, when they speak in good faith, mix “liberty” up with libertarianism and anarchy. Liberty can only be spoken of in spiritual life. Those who deny the spirit its primacy automatically fall to mechanical determinism (Marxism) and irresponsibility.

People bind themselves together according to either hedonism or a familiar economic destiny. I’m a comrade of X because he happens to be my relative, or a colleague at work, and thus comrades of pay. Connections between people are almost always involuntary, they are a natural given. I cannot modify my familiar destiny. And with respect to economic destiny, regardless of how much effort I employ, I could at most change my comrades of pay – but I will always unwillingly find myself in a solidarity with certain people I don’t know to which I’m tied by the chance of me being poor or rich.

There are, however, spiritual movements wherein people are tied by liberty. People are free to join this spiritual family. No exterior determination forces them to become brothers. Back in the day when it was expanding and converting, Christianity was a spiritual movement that people joined out of the common desire to spiritualize their lives and overcome death. No one forced a pagan to become a Christian. On the contrary, the state on the one hand, and its instincts of conservation on the other, restlessly raised obstacles to Christian conversion.

But even faced with such obstacles, the thirst of being free, of forging your own destiny, of defeating biological and economic determinations was much too strong. People joined Christianity, knowing that they would become poor overnight, that they would leave their still pagan families behind, that they could be imprisoned for life, or even face the cruelest death—the death of a martyr.

Being a profoundly Christian movement, justifying its doctrine on the spiritual level above all – legionarism encourages and is built upon liberty. You adhere to legionarism because you are free, because you decided to overcome the iron circles of biological determinism (fear of death, suffering, etc.) and economic determinism (fear of becoming homeless). The first gesture a legionnaire will display is one born out of total liberty: he dares to free himself of spiritual, biological and economic enslavement. No exterior determinism can influence him. The moment he decides to be free is the moment all fears and inferiority complexes instantaneously disappear. He who enters the Legion forever dons the shirt of death. That means that the legionnaire feels so free that death itself no longer frightens him. If the Legionnaire nurtures the spirit of sacrifice with such passion, and if he has proven to be capable of making sacrifices – culminating in the deaths of Mota and Marin – these bear witness to the unlimited liberty a legionnaire has gained.
 
“He who knows how to die will never be a slave.” And this doesn’t concern only ethnic or political enslavement – but firstly, spiritual enslavement. If you are ready to die, no fear, weakness, shyness can enslave you. Making peace with death is the most total liberty man can receive on this Earth.

http://www.archive.org/details/Liberty_7

samedi, 10 septembre 2011

Protestantism, Capitalism, & Americanism

Pilgrims-Landing,-Novem.jpg

Protestantism, Capitalism, & Americanism

By Edouard RIX

Translated by M. P.

Ex: http://www.counter-currents.com/

Many authors distinguish between, on the one hand Catholicism, which is supposed to be a negative Christianity incarnated by Rome and an anti-Germanic instrument, and, on the other hand, Protestantism, which is supposed to be a positive Christianity emancipated from the Roman papacy and accepting traditional Germanic values. In this perspective, Martin Luther is a liberator of the German soul from the despotic and Mediterranean yoke of papal Rome, his grand success being the Germanization of Christianity. The Protestants thus include themselves in the line of the Cathars and the Vaudois as representatives of the Germanic spirit in rupture with Rome.

But in reality, Luther is the one who first fomented the individualist and anti-hierarchical revolt in Europe, which would find expression on the religious plane by the rejection of the “traditional” content of Catholicism, on the political plane by the emancipation of the German princes from the emperor, and on the plane of the sacred by the negation of the principle of authority and hierarchy, giving a religious justification to the development of the merchant mentality.

On the religious plane, the theologians of the Reformation worked for a return to sources, to the Christianity of the Scriptures, without addition and without corruption, that is to say, to the texts of the Oriental tradition. If Luther rebelled against “the papacy instituted by the Devil in Rome,” it is only because he rejected the positive aspect of Rome, the traditional, hierarchical, and ritual component subsisting in Catholicism, the Church marked by Roman law and order, by Greek thought and philosophy, in particular that of Aristotle. Moreover, his words denouncing Rome as “Regnum Babylonis,” as an obstinately pagan city, recall those employed by the Hebraic Book of Revelation and the first Christians against the imperial city.

The balance sheet is as completely negative on the political plane. Luther, who presented himself as “a prophet of the German people,” favored the revolt of the Germanic princes against the universal principle of the Empire, and consequently their emancipation from any supranational hierarchical link. In effect, by his doctrine that admitted the right of resistance to a tyrannical emperor, he would legitimize rebellion against imperial authority in the name of the Gospel. Instead of taking up again the heritage of Frederick II, who had affirmed the superior idea of the Sacrum Imperium, the German princes, in supporting the Reformation, passed into the anti-imperial camp, desiring nothing more than to be “free” sovereigns.

Calvin.png

Similarly, the Reformation is characterized on the plane of the sacred by the negation of the principle of authority and hierarchy, the Protestant theologians accepting no spiritual power superior to that of the Scriptures. Effectively, no Church or any Pontifex having received from the Christ the privilege of infallibility in matters of sacred doctrine, every Christian is able to judge for himself, by individual free examination, apart from any spiritual authority and any dogmatic tradition, the Word of God.

Besides individualism, this Protestant theory of free examination is connected with another aspect of modernity, rationalism, the individual who has rejected any control and any tradition basing himself on what, for him, is the basis of all judgment, reason, which then becomes the measure of all truth. This rationalism, much more virulent than that which existed in ancient Greece and in the Middle Ages, would give birth to the philosophy of the Enlightenment.

Beginning from the sixteenth century, Protestant doctrine would furnish an ethical and religious justification to the rise of the bourgeoisie in Europe, as the sociologist Max Weber demonstrates in The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, a study on the origins of capitalism. According to him, during the initial stages of capitalist development, the tendency to maximize profit is the result of a tendency, historically unique, to accumulation far beyond personal consumption.

Weber finds the origin of this behavior in the “asceticism” of the Protestants marked by two imperatives, methodical work as the principal task in life and the limited enjoyment of its fruits. The unintentional consequence of this ethic, which had been imposed upon believers by social and psychological pressures to prove one’s salvation, was the accumulation of wealth for investment. He also shows that capitalism is nothing but an expression of modern Western rationalism, a phenomenon closely linked to the Reformation. Similarly, the economist Werner Sombart would denounce the Anglo-Saxon Handlermentalitat (merchant mentality), conferring a significant role to Catholicism as a barrier against the advance of the merchant spirit in Western Europe.

Liberated from any metaphysical principle, dogmas, symbols, rites, and sacraments, Protestantism would end by detaching itself from all transcendence and leading to a secularization of any superior aspiration, to moralism, and to Puritanism. It is thus that in Anglo-Saxon Puritan countries, particularly in America, the religious idea came to sanctify any temporal realization, material success, and wealth, prosperity itself being considered as a sign of divine election.

In his work, Les États-Unis aujourd’hui, published in 1928, André Siegfried, after having emphasized that “the only true American religion is Calvinism,” had already written: “It becomes difficult to distinguish between religious aspiration and pursuit of wealth . . . One thus admits as moral and desirable that the religious spirit becomes a factor of social progress and of economic development.” North America features, according to the formula of Robert Steuckers, “the alliance of the Engineer and the Preacher,” that is to say, the alliance of Prometheus and of Jean Calvin, or of the technics taken from Europe and of Puritan messianism issued from Judeo-Christian monotheism.

Transposing the universalistic project of Christianity into profane and materialistic terms, America aims to suppress frontiers, cultures, and differences in order to transform the living peoples of the Earth into identical societies, governed by the new Holy Trinity of free enterprise, global free trade, and liberal democracy. Undeniably, Martin Luther and, even more so, Jean Calvin, are the spiritual fathers of Uncle Sam . . .

As for us, we young Europeans viscerally reject this individualist, rationalist, and materialist West, the heir of the Reformation, the pseudo-Renaissance, and the French Revolution, as so many manifestations of European decadence. We will always prefer Faust to Prometheus, the Warrior to the Preacher, Nietzsche and Evola to Luther and Calvin.

Source: http://www.voxnr.com/cc/di_antiamerique/EpVAkuZFllAtfQNhcl.shtml [3]


Article printed from Counter-Currents Publishing: http://www.counter-currents.com

URL to article: http://www.counter-currents.com/2011/09/protestantism-capitalism-and-americanism/

vendredi, 02 septembre 2011

La critica a "la cosa en si"

La crítica a “la cosa en sí”

(Schopenhauer-Brentano-Scheler)

 

Alberto Buela (*)

 

La aparición de Kant (1724-1804) en la historia de la filosofía ha sido caracterizada, no sin razón, como la revolución copernicana de la disciplina. Y así como con Copérnico el sol se transformó en centro del universo desplazando a la tierra, así con Kant la filosofía en el problema del conocimiento dejó de considerar al sujeto un ente pasivo para otorgarle actividad. El mundo dejo de ser el mundo para ser “mi mundo”. El mundo es la representación que el sujeto tiene de él.

Pero Kant fue más allá y concibió a los entes siendo fenómenos para la gnoseología y noúmenos para la metafísica. Es decir, los entes nos ofrecen lo que podemos conocer pero además poseen un “en sí” ignoto. Y acá Kant comete el más grande y profundo error que produce la metafísica moderna: afirmar que existe “la cosa en sí”.

Ya Fichte(1762-1814), en vida de Kant y entrevistándose con él le dijo: ¿cómo puedo sostener, sin contradicción, la existencia de “la cosa en sí”, si al mismo tiempo no puedo conocerla?. Kant lo despachó con cajas destempladas.

Luego vino Schopenhauer (1788-1860) y demostró que la cosa en sí es la voluntad y el mundo no es otra cosa que voluntad y representación. La representación que nos hacemos de los fenómenos y la voluntad que es su fundamento. En forma inteligente y profunda, el solitario de Danzig,  no fue contra todo Kant sino contra la parte espuria y errónea de su filosofía.

Se produce en el ínterin una especie de suspensión del pensamiento filosófico clásico con la aparición, cada uno en su estilo, de Feuerbach(1804-1872), A.Ruge(1802-1880), Marx(1818-1883), Stirner(1806-1856), Bauer(1809-1882), Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Nietzsche (1844-1900) donde el tema principal de la metafísica, “la cosa en sí o el ente en tanto ente” , es dejado de lado.

Pero resulta que hay un filósofo en el medio. Ignorado, silenciado, postergado, no comprendido.  El hombre más inteligente, profundo y cautivador de su tiempo, Franz Brentano (1838-1917), que se da cuenta y entonces va a afirmar que el ser último de la conciencia es “ser intencional” y que dicha intencionalidad nos revela que el objeto no tiene una existencia en una zona allende, en una realidad independiente, sino que existe en tanto que hay acto psíquico como correlato de éste. De modo que el objeto es concebido como fenómeno, pero el ente es una realidad sustancial que está allí y que tiene existencia independiente del sujeto cognoscente. Es lo evidente, y lo evidente no necesita prueba, pues todo lo que es, es y lo que no es, no es.

Muchos años después, Heidegger (1889-1976) en carta el P. Richardson  le cuenta que se inició en filosofía leyendo a Brentano y que su Aristóteles sigue siendo el de Brentano. Y que, “lo que yo esperaba de Husserl era las respuestas a las preguntas suscitadas por Brentano”.

Finalmente Max Scheler (1874-1928), discípulo de E. Husserl que lo fue, a su vez, de Brentano, es el que ofrece una respuesta total y definitiva al falso problema planteado por Kant cuando en uno de sus últimos trabajos afirma: “Ser real es mas bien, ser resistencia frente a la espontaneidad originaria, que es una y la misma en todas las especies del querer y del atender”. La cosa en sí no existe como tal sino que es el impulso de resistencia que el ente nos ofrece cuando actuamos sobre él.

Curiosamente en Heidegger, donde uno esperaría encontrar una crítica furibunda a la cosa en sí, no sólo no se encuentra sino que en el texto emblemático sobre el asunto, Kant y el problema de la metafísica, que para mayor curiosidad dedica a Max Scheler, aparece una aceptación explícita cuando hablando del objeto trascendental igual X afirma: “X es un “algo”, sobre el cual, en general, nada podemos saber…”ni siquiera” puede convertirse en objeto posible de un saber” [1]. ¿No se aplica acá, la objeción de Fichte a Kant?. ¿Será por esto que en las conversaciones de Davos, en torno a Kant, Ernst Cassirer afirmó: “Heidegger es un neokantiano como jamás lo hubiera imaginado de él”.

 

                         I- Schopenhauer: el primer golpe a la Ilustración

 

 

En Arturo Schopenhauer (1788-1860) toda su filosofía se apoya en Kant y forma parte del idealismo alemán pero lo novedoso es que sostiene dos rasgos existenciales antitéticos con ellos: es un pesimista  y no es un profesor a sueldo del Estado. Esto último deslumbró a Nietzsche.

Hijo de un gran comerciante de Danzig, su posición acomodada lo liberó de las dos servidumbres de su época para los filósofos: la teología protestante o la docencia privada. Se educó a través de sus largas estadías en Inglaterra, Francia e Italia (Venecia). Su apetito sensual, grado sumo, luchó siempre la serena  reflexión filosófica. Su soltería y misoginia nos recuerda el tango: en mi vida tuve muchas minas pero nunca una mujer. En una palabra, conoció la hembra pero no a la mujer.

Ingresa en la Universidad de Gotinga donde estudia medicina, luego frecuenta a Goethe, sigue cursos en Berlín con Fichte y se doctora en Jena con una tesis sobre La cuádruple raíz del principio de razón suficiente en 1813.

En 1819 publica su principal obra El mundo como voluntad y representación y toda su producción posterior no va a ser sino un comentario aumentado y corregido de ella. Nunca se retractó de nada ni nunca cambió. Obras como La voluntad en la naturaleza (1836),  Libertad de la voluntad (1838), Los dos problemas fundamentales de la ética (1841) son simples escolios a su única obra principal.

Sobre él ha afirmado el genial Castellani: “Schopen es malo, pero simpático. No fue católico por mera casualidad. Y fue lástima porque tenía ala calderoniana y graciana, a quienes tradujo. Pero fue  “antiprotestante” al máximo, como Nietzsche, lo cual en nuestra opinión no es poco…Tuvo dos fallas: fue el primer filósofo existencial sin ser teólogo y quiso reducir a la filosofía aquello que pertenece a la teología” [2]

En 1844 reedita su trabajo cumbre, aunque no se habían vendido aun los ejemplares de su primera edición, llevando los agregados al doble la edición original.

Nueve años antes de su muerte publica dos tomos pequeños Parerga y Parilepómena, ensayos de acceso popular donde trata de los más diversos temas, que tienen muy poco que ver con su obra principal, pero que le dan una cierta popularidad al ser los más leídos de sus libros. Al final de sus días Schopenhauer gozó del reconocimiento que tanto buscó y que le fue esquivo.

Schopenhauer siguió los cursos de Fichte en Berlín varios años y como “el fanfarrón”, así lo llama, parte y depende también de Kant.

Así, ambos reconocen que el mérito inmortal de la crítica kantiana de la razón es haber establecido, de una vez y para siempre, que los entes, el mundo de las cosas que percibimos por los sentidos y reproducimos en el espíritu, no es el mundo en sí sino nuestro mundo, un producto de nuestra organización psicofísica.

La clara distinción en Kant entre sensibilidad y entendimiento pero donde el entendimiento no puede separarse realmente de los sentidos y refiere a una causa exterior la sensación que aparece bajo las formas de espacio y tiempo, viene a explicar a los entes, las cosas como fenómenos pero no como “cosas en sí”.

Muy acertadamente observa Silvio Maresca que: “Ante sus ojos- los de Schopenhauer- el romanticismo filosófico y el idealismo (Fichte-Hegel) que sucedieron casi enseguida a la filosofía kantiana, constituían una tergiversación de ésta. ¿Por qué? Porque abolían lo que según él era el principio fundamental: la distinción entre los fenómenos y la cosa en sí”.[3]

Fichte a través de su Teoría de la ciencia va a sostener que el no-yo (los entes exteriores) surgen en el yo legalmente pero sin fundamento. No existe una tal cosa en sí. El mundo sensible es una realidad empírica que está de pie ahí. La ciencia de la naturaleza es necesariamente materialista. Schopenhauer es materialista, pero va a afirmar: Toda la imagen materialista del mundo, es solo representación, no “cosa en sí”. Rechaza la tesis que todo el mundo fenoménico sea calificado como un producto de la actividad inconciente del yo. ¿Que es este mundo además de mi representación?, se pregunta. Y responde que se debe partir del hombre que es lo dado y de lo más íntimo de él, y eso debe ser a su vez lo más íntimo del mundo y esto es la voluntad. Se produce así en Schopenhauer un primado de lo práctico sobre lo teórico.

La voluntad es, hablando en kantiano “la cosa en sí” ese afán infinito que nunca termina de satisfacerse, es “el vivir” que va siempre al encuentro de nuevos problemas. Es infatigable e inextinguible.

La voluntad no es para el pesimista de Danzig la facultad de decidir regida por la razón como se la entiende regularmente sino sólo el afán, el impulso irracional que comparten hombre y mundo. “Toda fuerza natural es concebida per analogiam con aquello que en nosotros mismos conocemos como voluntad”.

Esa voluntad irracional para la que el mundo y las cosas son solo un fenómeno no tiene ningún objetivo perdurable sino sólo aparente (por trabajar sobre fenómenos) y entonces todo objetivo logrado despierta nuevas necesidades (toda satisfacción tiene como presupuesto el disgusto de una insatisfacción) donde el no tener ya nada que desear preanuncia la muerte o la liberación.

Porque el más sabio es el que se percata que la existencia es una sucesión de sin sabores que no conduce a nada y se desprende del mundo. No espera la redención del progreso y solo practica la no-voluntad.

El pesimista de Danzig al identificar la voluntad irracional con la “cosa en sí” puede afirmar sin temor que “lo real es irracional y lo irracional es lo real” con lo que termina invirtiendo la máxima hegeliana “todo lo racional es real y todo lo real es racional”. Es el primero del los golpes mortales que se le aplicará  al racionalismo iluminista, luego vendrá Nietzsche y más tarde Scheler y Heidegger. Pero eso ya es historia conocida. Salute.

 

Post Scriptum: 

Schopenhauer en sus últimos años- que además de hablar correctamente en italiano, francés e inglés, hablaba, aunque con alguna dificultad, en castellano. La hispanofilia de Schopenhauer se reconoce en toda su obra pues cada vez que cita, sobre todo a Baltasar Gracián (1601-1658), lo hace en castellano. Aprendió el español para traducir el opúsculo Oráculo manual (1647). También cita a menudo El Criticón a la que considera “incomparable”. Existe actualmente en Alemania y desde hace unos quince años una revista de pensamiento no conformista denominada “Criticón”. También cita y traduce a Calderón de la Barca.

Miguel de Unamuno fue el primero que realizó algunas traducciones parciales del filósofo de Danzig, como corto pago para una deuda hispánica con él. En Argentina ejerció influencia sobre Macedonio Fernández y sobre su discípulo Jorge Luis Borges. Tengo conocimiento de dos buenos artículos sobre Schopenhauer en nuestro país: el del cura Castellani (Revista de la Universidad de Buenos Aires, cuarta época, Nº 16, 1950) y el mencionado de Maresca.

El último aporte hispano a Schopenhauer es la traducción de los Sinilia, los pensamientos de vejez (1852-1860) con introducción, traducción y notas de Juan Mateu Alonso, en Contrastes, Universidad de Málaga, enero-febrero, 2009.

 

              II- Brentano, el eslabón perdido de la filosofía contemporánea

                                                                                                                   

                                                                                                                    

Su vida y sus influencias [4]

 

Franz Clemens Brentano (1838-1917) es el filósofo alemán de ancestros italianos de la zona de Cuomo, que introduce la noción de intencionalidad en la filosofía contemporánea. Noción que deriva del concepto escolástico de “cogitativa” trabajado tanto por Tomás de Aquino como por Duns Escoto en la baja edad media. Lectores que, junto con Aristóteles, conocía Brentano casi a la perfección y que leía fluidamente en sus lenguas originales.

Se lo considera tanto el precursor de la fenomenología (sus trabajos sobre la intencionalidad de la conciencia)  como de las corrientes analíticas (sus trabajos sobre el lenguaje y los juicios), de la psicología profunda (sus trabajos sobre psicología experimental)  como de la axiología (sus trabajos sobre el juicio de preferencia).

Nació y se crió en el seno de una familia ilustre marcada por el romanticismo social. Su tío el poeta Clemens Maria Brentano(1778-1842) y su tía Bettina von Arnim(1785-1859) se encontraban entre los más importantes escritores del romanticismo alemán y su hermano,  Lujo Brentano, se convirtió en un experto en economía social. De su madre recibió una profunda fe y formación católicas. Estudió matemática, filosofía y teología en las universidades de Múnich, Würzburg, Berlín, y Münster. Siguió los cursos sobre Aristóteles de F. Trendelemburg Tras doctorarse con un estudio sobre Aristóteles en 1862,Sobre los múltiples sentidos del ente en Aristóteles, se ordenó sacerdote católico de la orden dominica en 1864. Dos años más tarde presentó en la Universidad de Würzburg, al norte de Baviera, su escrito de habilitación como catedrático, La psicología de Aristóteles, en especial su doctrina acerca del “nous poietikos”. En los años siguientes dedicó su atención a otras corrientes de filosofía, e iba creciendo su preocupación por la situación de la filosofía de aquella época en Alemania: un escenario en el que se contraponían el empirismo positivista y el neokantismo. En ese periodo estudió con profundidad a John Stuart Mill y publicó un libro sobre Auguste Comte y la filosofía positiva. La Universidad de Würzburg le nombró profesor extraordinario en 1872.

Sin embargo, en su interior se iban planteando problemas de otro género. Se cuestionaba algunos dogmas de la Iglesia católica, sobre todo el dogma de la Santísima Trinidad. Y después de que el Concilio Vaticano I de 1870 proclamara el dogma de la infalibilidad papal, Brentano decidió en 1873 abandonar su sacerdocio. Sin embargo, para no perjudicar más a los católicos alemanes —ya de suyo hostigados hasta  llegar a huir en masa al Volga ruso por la “Kulturkampf” de Bismarck [5]— renunció voluntariamente a su puesto de Würzburg, pero al mismo tiempo, se negó a unirse a los cismáticos “viejos católicos”. Pero sin embargo este alejamiento existencial de la Iglesia no supuso un alejamiento del pensamiento profundo de la Iglesia pues en varios de sus trabajos y en forma reiterada afirmó siempre que: «Hay una ciencia que nos instruye acerca del fundamento primero y último de todas las cosas, en tanto que nos lo permite reconocer en la divinidad. De muchas maneras, el mundo entero resulta iluminado y ensanchado a la mirada por esta verdad, y recibimos a través de ella las revelaciones más esenciales sobre nuestra propia esencia y destino. Por eso, este saber es en sí mismo, sobre todos los demás, valioso. (…) Llamamos a esta ciencia Sabiduría, Filosofía primera, Teología» (Cfr.: Religion und Philosophie, pp.72-73. citado por Sánchez-Migallón).

Se desempeñó luego como profesor en Viena durante veinte años (entre 1874 y 1894), con algunas interrupciones. Franz Brentano fue amigo de los espíritus más finos de la Viena de esos años, entre ellos Theodor Meynert, Josef Breuer, Theodor Gomperz (1832-1912). En 1880 se casó con Ida von Lieben, la hermana de Anna von Lieben, la futura paciente de Sigmund Freud. Indiferente a la comida y la vestimenta, jugaba al ajedrez con una pasión devoradora, y ponía de manifiesto un talento inaudito para los juegos de palabras más refinados, En 1879, con el seudónimo de Aenigmatis, publicó una compilación de adivinanzas que suscitó entusiasmo en los salones vieneses y dio lugar a numerosas imitaciones. Esto lo cuenta Freud en un libro suyo El chiste.

En la Universidad de Viena tuvo como alumnos a Sigmund Freud, Carl Stumpf y Edmund Husserl, Christian von Ehrenfels, introductor del término Gestalt (totalidad), y, discrepa y rechaza la idea del inconsciente descrita y utilizada por Freud. Fue un profesor carismático, Brentano ejerció una fuerte influencia en la obra de Edmund Husserl, Alois Meinong (1853-1921), fundador de la teoría del objeto,  Thomas Masaryk (1859-1937) KasimirTwardowski, de la escuela polaca de lógica y Marty Antón, entre otros, y por lo tanto juega un papel central en el desarrollo filosófico de la Europa central en principios del siglo XX. En 1873, el joven Sigmund Freud, estudiante en la Universidad de Viena, obtuvo su doctorado en filosofía bajo la dirección de Brentano.

El impulso de Brentano a la psicología cognitiva es consecuencia de su realismo. Su concepción de describir la conciencia en lugar de analizarla, dividiéndola en partes, como se hacía en su época, dio lugar a la fenomenología, que continuarían desarrollando Edmund Husserl (1859-1938), Max Scheler (1874-1928), Martín Heidegger (1889-1976), Maurice Merleau-Ponty (1908-1961), además de influenciar sobre el existencialismo de Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980) con su negación del inconsciente.

En 1895, después de la muerte de su esposa, dejó Austria decepcionado, en esta ocasión, publicó una serie de tres artículos en el periódico vienés Die Neue Freie Presse : Mis últimos votos por Austria, en la que destaca su posición filosófica, así como su enfoque de la psicología, pero también criticó duramente  la situación jurídica de los antiguos sacerdotes en Austria. In 1896 he settled down in Florence where he got married to Emilie Ruprecht in 1897. En 1896 se instaló en Florencia, donde se casó con Emilie Ruprecht en 1897. Vivió en Florencia casi ciego y, a causa de la primera guerra mundial, cuando Italia entra en guerra contra Alemania, se traslada a Zurich, donde muere en 1917.

Los trabajos que publicaron sus discípulos han sido los siguientes según el orden de su aparición: La doctrina de Jesús y su significación permanente; Psicología como ciencia empírica, Vol. III; Ensayos sobre el conocimiento, Sobre la existencia de Dios; Verdad y evidencia; Doctrina de las categorías, Fundamentación y construcción de la ética; Religión y filosofía, Doctrina del juicio correcto; Elementos de estética; Historia de la filosofía griega; La recusación de lo irreal; Investigaciones filosóficas acerca del espacio, del tiempo y el continuo; La doctrina de Aristóteles acerca del origen del espíritu humano; Historia de la filosofía medieval en el Occidente cristiano; Psicología descriptiva; Historia de la filosofía moderna, Sobre Aristóteles; Sobre “Conocimiento y error” de Ernst March.

 

Lineamientos de su pensamiento

 

Todo el mundo sabe, al menos el de la filosofía, que no se puede realizar tal actividad sino es en diálogo con algún clásico. Es que los clásicos son tales porque tienen respuestas para el presente.  Hay que tomar un maestro y a partir de él comenzar a filosofar. Brentano lo tuvo a Aristóteles, el que le había enseñado Federico Trendelenburg (1802-1872), el gran estudioso del Estagirita en la primera mitad de siglo XIX.

En su tesis doctoral, Sobre los múltiples significados del ente según Aristóteles, que tanto influenciara en Heidegger, distingue cuatro sentidos de “ente” en el Estagirita: el ente como ens per accidens o lo fortuito; el ente en el sentido de lo verdadero, con su correlato, lo no-ente en el sentido de lo falso; el ente en potencia y el ente en acto; y el ente que se distribuye según la sustancia y las figuras de las categorías. De esos cuatro significados, el veritativo abrirá en Brentano el estudio de la intencionalidad. Pero al que dedica con diferencia mayor extensión es al cuarto, el estudio de la sustancia y su modificación, esto es, a las diversas categorías. Esto se debe, en parte, a las discusiones de su tiempo en torno a la metafísica aristotélica. En ellas toma postura defendiendo principalmente dos tesis: primera, que entre los diferentes sentidos categoriales del ente se da una unidad de analogía, y que ésta significa unidad de referencia a un término común, la sustancia segunda, que precisamente esa unidad de referencia posibilita en el griego deducir las categorías según un principio.[6]

Investigó las cuestiones metafísicas mediante un análisis lógico-lingüístico, con lo que se distinguió tanto de los empiristas ingleses como del kantismo académico. Ejerciendo una gran influencia sobre algunos miembros del Círculo de Viena.

En 1874 publica su principal obra Psicología como ciencia empírica, de la que editará tres volúmenes, donde realiza su principal aporte a la historia de la filosofía, su concepto de intencionalidad de la conciencia que tendrá capital importancia para el desarrollo posterior de la fenomenología a través de Husserl y de Scheler.

Sólo lo psíquico es intencional, esto es, pone en relación la conciencia con un objeto. Esta llamada «tesis de Brentano», que hace de la intencionalidad la característica de lo psíquico, permite entender de un modo positivo, a diferencia de lo que no lograba la psicología de aquella época, los fenómenos de conciencia que Brentano distingue entre representaciones, juicios teóricos y  juicios prácticos o emotivos (sentimientos y voliciones).
Todo fenómeno de conciencia es o una representación de algo, que no forzosamente ha de ser un objeto exterior, o un juicio acerca de algo. Los juicios o son teóricos, y se refieren a la verdad y falsedad de las representaciones (juicios propiamente dichos), y su criterio es la evidencia y de ellos trata la epistemología y la lógica; o son prácticos, y se refieren a la bondad o a la maldad, la corrección o incorrección, al amor y al odio (fenómenos emotivos), y su criterio es la «preferencia», la valoración, o «lo mejor», y de ellos trata la ética. Al estudio de la intencionalidad de la conciencia lo llama psicología descriptiva o fenomenología.

En 1889 dicta su conferencia en Sociedad Jurídica de Viena “De la sanción natural de lo justo y lo moral” que aparece publicada luego con notas que duplican su extensión bajo el título de: El origen del conocimiento moral”, trabajo que publicado en castellano en 1927, del que dice Ortega y Gasset, director de la revista de Occidente que lo publica, “Este tratadito, de la más auténtica filosofía, constituye una de las joyas filosóficas que, como “El discurso del método” o la “Monadología”… Puede decirse que es la base donde se asienta la ética moderna de los valores”.

Comienza preguntándose por la sanción natural de lo justo y lo moral. Y hace corresponder lo bueno con lo verdadero y a la ética con la lógica. Así, lo verdadero se admite como verdadero en un juicio, mientras que lo bueno en un acto de amor. El criterio exclusivo de la verdad del juicio es cuando, éste, se presenta como evidente. Pero, paradójicamente, lo evidente, va a sostener siguiendo a Descartes, es el conocimiento sin juicio.

Lo bueno es el objeto y mi referencia puede ser errónea, de modo que mi actitud ante las cosas recibe la sanción de las cosas y no de mí. Lo bueno es algo intrínseco a los objetos amados.

Que yo tenga amor u odio a una cosa no prueba sin más que sea buena o mala. Es necesario que ese amor u odio sean justos. El amor puede ser justo o injusto, adecuado o inadecuado. La actitud adecuada ante una cosa buena es amarla y ante una cosa mala, el odiarla. “Decimos que algo es bueno cuando el modo de referencia que consiste en amarlo es el justo. Lo que sea amable con amor justo, lo digno de ser amado, es lo bueno en el más amplio sentido de la palabra»”.

La ética encuentra su fundamento, según Brentano, en los actos fundados de amor y odio. Y actos fundados quiere decir, que el objeto de ser amado u odiado es digno de ser amado u odiado. El “ajuste” entre el acto de amor u odio al objeto mismo en ética, es análogo, según Brentano, a la “adecuación” que se da en el juicio verdadero entre predicado y objeto.

La diferencia que existe entre uno y otro juicio (el predicamental y el práctico) es que en el práctico puede darse un antítesis (amar un objeto y , pasado el tiempo, odiarlo) mientras que en el lógico o de  representación, no.

Dos meses después el 27 de marzo de 1889 dicta su conferencia Sobre el concepto de verdad, ahora en la Sociedad filosófica de Viena. Esta conferencia es fundamental por varios motivos: a) muestra el carácter polémico de Brentano, tanto con el historiador de la filosofía Windelbang (1848-1915) por tergiversar a Kant,  como a Kant, “cuya filosofía es un error, que ha conducido a errores mayores y, finalmente, a un caos filosófico completo” (cómo no lo van a silenciar luego, en las universidades alemanas, al viejo Francisco). b) Nos da su opinión sin tapujos sobre Aristóteles diciendo: “Es el espíritu científico más poderoso que jamás haya tenido influencia sobre los destinos de la humanidad”. c) Muestra y demuestra que el concepto de verdad en Aristóteles “adecuación del intelecto y la cosa” ha sido adoptada tanto por Descartes como por Kant hasta llegar a él mismo. Pero que dicho concepto encierra un grave error y allí él va a proponer su teoría del juicio.

Diferencia entre juicios negativos y juicios afirmativos. Así en los juicios negativos como: “no hay dragones”, no hay concordancia entre mi juicio y la cosa porque la cosa no existe. Mientras que sólo en los juicios afirmativos, cuando hay concordancia son verdaderos.

el ámbito en que es adecuado el juicio afirmativo es el de la existencia y el del juicio negativo, el de lo no existente”. Por lo tanto “un juicio es verdadero cuando afirma de algo que es, que es; y de algo que no es, niega que sea”.

En los juicios negativos la representación no tiene contenido real, mientras que la verdad de los juicios está condicionada por el existir o ser del la cosa (Sein des Dinges). Así, el ser de la cosa, la existencia es la que funda la verdad del juicio. El “ser del árbol” es lo que hace verdadero al juicio: “el árbol es”.

Y así lo afirma una y otra vez: “un juicio es verdadero cuando juzga apropiadamente un objeto, por consiguiente, cuando si es, se dice que es; y sino es, se dice que no es”.(in fine).

Y desengañado termina afirmando que: “Han transcurrido dos mil años desde que Aristóteles investigó los múltiples sentidos del ente, y es triste, pero cierto, que la mayoría no hayan sabido extraer ningún fruto de sus investigaciones”.

Su propuesta es, entonces, discriminar claramente en el juicio “el ser de la cosa” que  equivalente a ”la existencia”,  de “la cosa” también denominada por Brentano ”lo real”. Existir o existencia,  y ser real o realidad es la dupla de pares que expresan el “ser verdadero” y el “ser sustancial” respectivamente, que él se ocupó de estudiar en su primer trabajo sobre el ente en Aristóteles.

Conviene repetirlo, existir, existencia y ser verdadero vienen a expresar lo mismo: la mostración del ente al pensar. Y la cosa, lo real, el ser sustancial expresan lo mismo: el ente en sí mismo. Vemos como Brentano, liquida definitivamente “la cosa en sí” kantiana.

Aun cuando claramente Brentano muestra como “el objeto no tiene un existencia en la realidad independiente, o más allá del sujeto, sino que existe en tanto que hay un acto psíquico”, y este es el gran aporte a la psicología de Brentano.

Metafísicamente, todo lo que es, es. Y se nos dice también en el sentido de lo verdadero. En una palabra el ser de la cosa se convierte con la verdadero, sin buscarlo Brentano retorna al viejo ens et verum convertuntur de la teoría de los transcendentales del ente.

Y así da sus dos últimos y más profundos consejos:  “Por último, no estaremos tentados nunca de confundir, como ha ocurrido cada vez más, el concepto de lo real y el de lo existente”. Y “podríamos extraer de nuestra investigación otra lección y grabarla en nuestras mentes para siempre…el medio definitivo y eficaz (para realizar un juicio verdadero) consiste siempre en una referencia a la intuición de lo individual de la que se derivan todos nuestros criterios generales”.

No podemos no recordar acá, por la coincidencia de los conceptos y consejos, aquella que nos dejara el primer metafísico argentino, Nimio de Anquín (1896-1979),: “Ir siembre a la búsqueda del ser singular en su discontinuidad fantasmagórica. Ir al encuentro con las cosas en su individuación y  potencial universalidad”.[7]

Franz Brentano es el verdadero fundador de la metafísica realista contemporánea que luego continuarán, con sus respectivas variantes,  Husserl, Scheler, Hartmann y Heidegger.

En el mismo siglo XIX, a propósito de la encíclica Aeterni Patris de 1879 se dará el florecimiento del tomismo, sostenedor también, pero de otro modo, de una metafísica realista.

Siempre nos ha llamado la atención que los mejores filósofos españoles del siglo XX se hayan prestado a ser traductores de los libros de Brentano: José Gáos de su Psicología, Manuel García Morente de su Origen del conocimiento moral, Xavier Zubiri de El provenir de la filosofía, Antonio Millán Puelles de Sobre la existencia de Dios. Y siempre nos ha llamado la atención que no se enseñara Brentano en la universidad.

El problema de Brentano es que ha sido “filosóficamente incorrecto”, pues realizó una crítica feroz y terminante a Kant y los kantianos y eso la universidad alemana no se lo perdonó. Realizó una crítica furibunda a la escuela escolástica católica y eso no se le perdonó. Incluso se levantaron invectivas denunciándolo, que al criticar el concepto de analogía del ser, adoptó él, el de equivocidad. Un siglo después, el erudito sobre Aristóteles, Pierre Aubenque, vino a negar en un libro memorable y reconocido universalmente, Le problème de l´être chez Aristote (1962) la presencia en los textos del Estagirita del concepto de analogía.(si detrás de esto no está la sombra del viejo Francisco, que no valga).

Polemizó con Zeller, con Dilthey, con Herbart, con Sigwart. Criticó, como ya dijimos, a Kant, Descartes, Hume, Hegel, Aristóteles, y a Überweg. No dejó títere con cabeza. Sólo le faltó pelearse con Goethe. Fue criticado por Freud, que se portó con él, como el zorro en el monte, que con la cola borra las huellas por donde anda. Husserl no solo tomó y usufructuó el concepto de intencionalidad sino también el de “retención” que es copia exacta de concepto bentaniano de “asociación original”, pero eso quedó bien silenciado.

Filosóficamente, esta oposición por igual al idealismo kantiano y a la escolástica de su tiempo le valió el silencio de los manuales y la marginalización de su obra de las universidades. Quien quiera comprender en profundidad y conocer las líneas de tensión que corren debajo de las ideas de la filosofía del siglo XX, tiene que leer, forzosamente a Brentano, sino se quedará como la mayoría de los profesores de filosofía, en Babia.

El es el testigo irrenunciable de la ligazón profunda que existe en el desarrollo de la metafísica que va desde Aristóteles, pasa por Tomás de Aquino y Duns Escoto, sigue con él y termina en Heidegger. No al ñudo, el filósofo de Friburgo, realizó su tesis doctoral sobre La doctrina de las categorías y del significado pensando que era de Duns Escoto, cuando después se comprobó que el texto de la Gramática especulativa sobre el que trabajó, pertenecía a Thomas de Erfurt (fl.1325).

La invitación está hecha, seguro que algún buen profesor o algún inquieto investigador  recoge el guante.

 

 

Nota: Bibliografía de F. Brentano en castellano

Psicología (desde el punto de vista empírico), Revista de Occidente, Madrid, 1927

Sobre la existencia de Dios, Rialp, Madrid 1979.

Sobre el concepto de verdad, Ed. Complutense, Madrid, 1998

El origen del conocimiento moral, Revista de Occidente, Madrid 1927. (Tecnos, Madrid 2002).

Breve esbozo de una teoría general del conocimiento, Ed. Encuentro, Madrid 2001.

El porvenir de la filosofía, Revista de Occidente, Madrid 1936

Aristóteles y su cosmovisión, Labor, Barcelona 1951.

Sobre los múltiples significados del ente según Aristóteles, Ed. Encuentro, Madrid 2007

 

Razones del desaliento en filosofía, Ed. Encuentro, Madrid, 2010

 

Existen además, en castellano, trabajos de consulta valiosos sobre su filosofía como los debidos a los profesores Mario Ariel González Porta y  Sergio Sánchez-Migallón Granados.

 

                             III- Max Scheler y el sentido de la realidad

 

                                                                                                                                          

El tema de cómo saber que la realidad exterior existe no ha sido un asunto menor para la filosofía moderna. En general y desde sus primeros tiempos la filosofía  ha desconfiado siempre de los sentidos externos: ya Heráclito sostenía, tirado en la playa: el sol es grande como mi pie.

En la modernidad Descartes: “he experimentado varias veces que los sentidos son engañosos, y es prudente, no fiarse nunca por completo de quienes nos han engañado una vez.” [8] 

Max Scheler trata en tema, específicamente,  en una meditación titulada La metafísica de la percepción y la realidad  que estuvo incluida en uno de sus últimos trabajos Erkenntnis und Arbeit (Conocimiento y trabajo) de 1926.

 

 Es sabido que el fundador de la fenomenología, Edmundo Husserl (1859-1938), maestro de Scheler, se propuso construir una filosofía como ciencia estricta y para ello sostuvo: zu den Sachen selbst (ir a las cosas mismas) que son las que aparecen a la conciencia. Esta conciencia es una trama de relaciones intencionales, pues la conciencia tiende a objetos, in-tendere. Y para ello Husserl no ha querido plantearse la existencia de objetos reales como existencias en sí y ha recurrido a la epoché, a la puesta entre paréntesis de la existencia en sí de las cosas. Limitándose a la descripción de las estructuras y de los contenidos intencionales de la conciencia. De modo tal que exista o no exista la realidad, ese no es un problema de la fenomenología de Husserl. En una palabra, Husserl postergó el tema o problema de “la cosa en sí” y no se animó a tomar partido, cosa que sí va a hacer su discípulo.

Max Scheler va a seguir con el método de fenomenológico de su maestro y su ontología como teoría general de los objetos pertenecientes a distintas esferas: reales (naturales y culturales), ideales, valores y metafísicos. Destacándose sobre todo con brillantes estudios sobre los objetos culturales y axiológicos. Pero al mismo tiempo se va a modificar o completar el mismo método.

Las categorías que son las que acompañan a cada tipo de ser, no son como en Aristóteles producto de la predicación o formas de decir el objeto y que previamente son modos de existencia. No, para la fenomenología las categorías son modos de presentación “en mi conciencia” de tales objetos y no de existencia fuera de mi.

Cuando Scheler en la plenitud de su capacidad filosófica aborda el tema concreto del trabajo, el objeto propio del mismo lo lleva a dar un paso más allá que su maestro. Mientras que para Husserl, sobre todo para el primero, el existir fuera de mi conciencia de las cosas es solo presuntiva. Presumimos que las cosas pueden tener un ser en sí mismas, pero no estamos tan seguros. En sus últimas conclusiones, niega esta existencia presunta (Cfr. Ideas), mientras que  para Scheler podemos tener un saber cierto de esa realidad en sí.

Y lo afirma en forma tajante: “los centros de resistencia del mundo, tal cual han sido dados a la experiencia práctica de la voluntad de trabajo y del actuar en el mundo, han confirmado su eficacia en la relación práctica entre el hombre y el mundo”. [9]

De modo tal que solamente en el transcurso del trabajo ejercido sobre el mundo el hombre aprende a conocer el mundo objetivo y causal, aquel que se da en el espacio y en el tiempo. El trabajo y no la contemplación es “la raíz más esencial de toda ciencia positiva, de toda intuición, de todo experimento”.

El hombre posee además otra posibilidad de conocimiento a través de la percepción sensorial que se expresa en el conocimiento filosófico. Este conocimiento es de dos tipos: a) el de las esencias al que se llega a través “del asombro, la humildad y el amor espiritual hacia lo esencial” mediante la reducción fenomenológica de la existencia en sí de los objetos y b) de los instintos, impulsos y fuerzas que viene de las imágenes  a la que se llega “por la entrega dionisíaca en la identificación con el impulso cuya parte es también nuestro ser impulsivo”.

Y concluye Scheler: “Pero el verdadero conocimiento filosófico sólo nace en la máxima tensión entre ambas actitudes y a través de la superación de esta tensión, en la unidad de la persona.” [10]

 

La existencia de un mundo real es preexistente a todo lo demás, tanto a la concepción natural del mundo cuanto cualidades de la percepción. Está ahí y preexiste a los dominios de la mundanidad interior y exterior, a la existencia de las categorías.

De este mundo sabemos por “la resistencia” que nos ofrece a la actividad sobre él. “Ser real es mas bien, ser resistencia frente a la espontaneidad originaria, que es una y la misma en todas las especies del querer y del atender.” [11]

Este ser real existe antes de todo pensar y percibir. El ser real puede preexistir también a todos los actos intelectuales, cuyo único correlato es la “consistencia” y nunca la existencia.

La existencia esta dada porque el ser real es algo preexistente al conocer y que solo sabemos de él por el impulso de resistencia que nos ofrece cuando actuamos sobre él.

En el fondo el ser real es “ser querido” y  no “pensado” a través del fundamento del mundo y el principio de la experiencia de la resistencia es un acto volitivo. Scheler se da cuento y menta allí la sombra de Maine de Biran y de Schopenhauer.

Y termina enunciando las cuatro leyes que rigen la realidad y que preexisten a todo lo que aparece en las esferas de los objetos: 1) la realidad de algo “Real Absoluto”, esperado como posible. 2) la realidad del prójimo y de la comunidad, como el tú y el nosotros. 3) el mundo exterior como ser real de algo que existe y 4) la realidad del ser corporal, vivido como propio.

Estas cuatro leyes nos vienen a mostrar el principio fundamental de toda la filosofía de Scheler, aquel que aplica a todas las esferas del ser y los objetos según la cual lo real, lo resistente, lo que existe en sí, es mayor y surge allí donde nuestro dominio de las cosas es menor. Así, el domino del hombre es mínimo sobre el ser absoluto en cambio nuestro dominio es máximo sobre la máquina, que es nuestro producto. Frente a las personas nuestro dominio es muy limitado pero sobre los animales es mayor. “El dominio es infinitamente menor sobre lo viviente que sobre lo inanimado” [12]

Esto le permite establecer una jerarquía en las esferas que luego va a aplicar en su axiología y su ética. Y allí nos va a sorprender cuando enuncia que el espíritu carece de la fuerza y energía para obrar, pues toda la energía procede del impulso vital. Así, éste se espiritualiza sublimándose y el espíritu opera vivificándose. Pero solo la vida puede poner en actividad y hacer realidad en espíritu.

 

 

Breve biografía

 

Max Scheler (1874-1928) Hijo de un campesino bávaro luterano y madre judía, se bautiza católico en 1889. Es alumno de Simmel y Dilthey y le dirige su tesis Rudolf  Eucken, quien hizo su tesis sobre el lenguaje de Aristóteles (el método de la investigación aristotélica 1872)  y que  había estudiado a su vez con Trendelenburg, el gran estudioso del Estagirita en el siglo XIX. En 1902 conoce a Husserl y su método fenomenológico y en 1907 al gran teólogo von Hildebrand. Por escándalos de su mujer, de la que se separa, en 1911 la universidad de Munich le retira la venia dicenti.  

Prácticamente sin trabajo y viviendo de cursos privados y de la ayuda de sus amigos, Scheler produce sus mejores y más profundas obras. Este período, conocido como el del “Nietzsche católico”, dura hasta 1924, año en que se separa de su segunda mujer, se casa con una alumna y se aleja del catolicismo. Conrad Adenauer le devuelve la venia docente y se reintegra a la universidad. A partir de sus publicaciones de 1927 y 1928, año de su fallecimiento, Scheler cae en una especie panenteísmo. El puesto del hombre en el cosmos, su última obra, es ejemplo emblemático de ello.

 

Bibliografía en castellano

 

(1912) El resentimiento en la moral, de J. Gaos, Madrid, 1927; Buenos Aires, 1938; Edición de José Maria Vegas, Madrid, 1992; Caparros Editores, S. L. Madrid, 1993.

(1913) Etica, nuevo ensayo de fundamentacion de un personalismo etico. Traducción de de Hilario Rodríguez Sanz. Introducción de Juan Miguel Palacios. Tercera editción revisada. Caparrós Editores (Collección esprit, 45). Madrid, 2001, 758 págs.

(1916-23) Amor y conocimiento, di A. Klein, Buenos Aires, Sur, 1960. 

De lo eterno en el hombre. La esencia y los atributos de Dios, de J. Marias, Madrid, 1940. 

(1917) La esencia de la filosofía y la condición moral del conocer filosófico, de E.Tabernig de Pucciarelli e I. M. de Brugger, Buenos Aires, 1958, 1962. 

(1913-22) Esencia y formas de la simpatía, de J. Gaos, Buenos Aires, 1923, 1943.  Íngrid Vendrell Ferran revisó la traducción, 2005. Ediciones Sígueme Salamanca, España.

(1912) Los ídolos del autoconocimiento. Traducción e introdución de Íngrid  Vendrell Ferran. Ed. Sígueme. Salamanca, 2003

(1914) Sobre el pudor y el sentimiento de vergüenza. Traducción e introducción de Íngrid Vendrell Ferran. Ed. Sígueme. Salamanca, 2004.

Sociologia del saber, de J. Gaos, Madrid, 1935. 

(1928) El saber y la cultura,  de J. Gomez, Madrid 1926, 1934; Buenos Aires, 1939; Santiago, 1960. 

La idea del hombre y la historia, Madrid, 1926, e Buenos Aires, 1959. 

(1928) El puesto del hombre en el cosmos, de V. Gaos, Madrid, 1929, 1936. Nueva traducción por V. Gómez. Introducción  de W. Henckmann. Barcelona: Alba 2000.

El porvenir del hombre, Madrid 1927. 

(1921) La idea de paz y el pacifismo, de Camilo. Santé, Buenos Aires, 1955. 

(1911) Muerte y supervivencia. Traducción de Xavier Zubiri. Presentatión de Miguel Palacios. Ediciones Encuentro (opuscula philosophica, 3), Madrid, 2001, 93 págs.

(1914-16)Ordo Amoris, Traducción de  Xavier Zubiri. Edición de Juan Miguel Palacios. Segunda edición. Caparrós Editores (Collección Esprit, 23), Madrid, 2001, 93 págs.

(1911-21) El Santo, el genio, el heroe, de E. Tabernig, Buenos Aires, 1961.

(1926) Conocimiento y trabajo, de Nelly Fortuna, Ed. Nova, Buenos Aires, 1969

(1918-1927) Metafísica de la libertad, E. Nova, Buenos Aires, 1960

 

 

 

(*) alberto.buela@gmail.com  

 www.disenso.org

arkegueta, mejor que filósofo

Universidad Tecnológica Nacional –Argentina-

 



[1] Heidegger, M: Kant y el problema de la metafísica, FCE, México, 1973, p.109

[2] Castellani, Leonardo: Schopenhauer, en Revista de la Universidad de Buenos Aires, cuarta época, Nº 16, 1950, pp.389-426

[3] Maresca, Silvio: En la senda de Nietzsche, Catálogos, Buenos Aires, 1991, p. 20

[4] Estos datos que pasamos nosotros y muchos más, se pueden encontrar en los buscadores de Internet, no así en los manuales al uso de la historia de la filosofía contemporánea, que, en general, escamotean la figura y los aportes de Brentano. O peor aún, lo limitan al lugar común de inventor de la intencionalidad de la conciencia. 

[5] La persecución que sufrieron los católicos alemanes bajo el gobierno de Bismarck (1871-1890) ha sido terrible. Más de un millón de ellos huyeron a Rusia donde los recibió el Zar con un convenio de estadía por cien años. Pasado el siglo muchos de esos “alemanes del Volga” vinieron a radicarse en la Argentina en la zona de Coronel Suárez, al sur oeste de la provincia de Buenos Aires. Duró tanto el hostigamiento a los católicos de parte de la Kulturkampf, que cuenta Heidegger (1889-1976), que su padre era el sacristán de la iglesia de San Martín de su pueblo natal,  y que los protestantes se la devolvieron, recién, un año antes de que él naciera.

[6] 80 años después, en 1942 publicó Nimio de Anquín en Argentina un trabajo definitivo sobre el tema Las dos concepciones del ente en Aristóteles, Ortodoxia Nº 1, pp.38-69, Buenos Aires, 1942, del que se han privado de leer hasta ahora los europeos. 40 años después, en 1982 con motivo de mi tesis doctoral en la Sorbona bajo la dirección de Pierre Aubenque, ví como éste gran erudito se arrastraba sobre las tintas del libro Z de la Metafísica de  Aristóteles, sin poder llegar a la suela de los zapatos de de Anquín.

[7] Anquín, Nimo de:  Ente y ser, Gredos, Madrid, 1962

[8] Descartes: Meditaciones metafísicas, meditación primera, ab initio.

[9] Scheler, Max: Conocimiento y trabajo, Ed. Nova, Buenos Aires, 1969, p. 274

[10] Scheler, Max: op.cit. p.279

[11] Scheler, Max: op.cit. p.280

[12] Scheler, Max: op.cit. p.301

mercredi, 31 août 2011

Brentano, el eslabon perdido de la filosofia contemporanea

Brentano, el eslabón perdido de la filosofía contemporánea

                                                                                                                    Alberto Buela (*)

 

Su vida y sus influencias [1]

 

ClemensBrentanok_1803.jpgFranz Clemens Brentano (1838-1917) es el filósofo alemán de ancestros italianos de la zona de Cuomo, que introduce la noción de intencionalidad en la filosofía contemporánea. Noción que deriva del concepto escolástico de “cogitativa” trabajado tanto por Tomás de Aquino como por Duns Escoto en la baja edad media. Lectores que, junto con Aristóteles, conocía Brentano casi a la perfección y que leía fluidamente en sus lenguas originales.

Se lo considera tanto el precursor de la fenomenología (sus trabajos sobre la intencionalidad de la conciencia)  como de las corrientes analíticas (sus trabajos sobre el lenguaje y los juicios), de la psicología profunda (sus trabajos sobre psicología experimental)  como de la axiología (sus trabajos sobre el juicio de preferencia).

Nació y se crió en el seno de una familia ilustre marcada por el romanticismo social. Su tío el poeta Clemens Maria Brentano(1778-1842) y su tía Bettina von Arnim(1785-1859) se encontraban entre los más importantes escritores del romanticismo alemán y su hermano,  Lujo Brentano, se convirtió en un experto en economía social. De su madre recibió una profunda fe y formación católicas. Estudió matemática, filosofía y teología en las universidades de Múnich, Würzburg, Berlín, y Münster. Siguió los cursos sobre Aristóteles de F. Trendelemburg Tras doctorarse con un estudio sobre Aristóteles en 1862,Sobre los múltiples sentidos del ente en Aristóteles, se ordenó sacerdote católico de la orden dominica en 1864. Dos años más tarde presentó en la Universidad de Würzburg, al norte de Baviera, su escrito de habilitación como catedrático, La psicología de Aristóteles, en especial su doctrina acerca del “nous poietikos”. En los años siguientes dedicó su atención a otras corrientes de filosofía, e iba creciendo su preocupación por la situación de la filosofía de aquella época en Alemania: un escenario en el que se contraponían el empirismo positivista y el neokantismo. En ese periodo estudió con profundidad a John Stuart Mill y publicó un libro sobre Auguste Comte y la filosofía positiva. La Universidad de Würzburg le nombró profesor extraordinario en 1872.

Sin embargo, en su interior se iban planteando problemas de otro género. Se cuestionaba algunos dogmas de la Iglesia católica, sobre todo el dogma de la Santísima Trinidad. Y después de que el Concilio Vaticano I de 1870 proclamara el dogma de la infalibilidad papal, Brentano decidió en 1873 abandonar su sacerdocio. Sin embargo, para no perjudicar más a los católicos alemanes —ya de suyo hostigados hasta  llegar a huir en masa al Volga ruso por la “Kulturkampf” de Bismarck [2]— renunció voluntariamente a su puesto de Würzburg, pero al mismo tiempo, se negó a unirse a los cismáticos “viejos católicos”. Pero sin embargo este alejamiento existencial de la Iglesia no supuso un alejamiento del pensamiento profundo de la Iglesia pues en varios de sus trabajos y en forma reiterada afirmó siempre que: «Hay una ciencia que nos instruye acerca del fundamento primero y último de todas las cosas, en tanto que nos lo permite reconocer en la divinidad. De muchas maneras, el mundo entero resulta iluminado y ensanchado a la mirada por esta verdad, y recibimos a través de ella las revelaciones más esenciales sobre nuestra propia esencia y destino. Por eso, este saber es en sí mismo, sobre todos los demás, valioso. (…) Llamamos a esta ciencia Sabiduría, Filosofía primera, Teología» (Cfr.: Religion und Philosophie, pp.72-73. citado por Sánchez-Migallón).

Se desempeñó luego como profesor en Viena durante veinte años (entre 1874 y 1894), con algunas interrupciones. Franz Brentano fue amigo de los espíritus más finos de la Viena de esos años, entre ellos Theodor Meynert, Josef Breuer, Theodor Gomperz (1832-1912). En 1880 se casó con Ida von Lieben, la hermana de Anna von Lieben, la futura paciente de Sigmund Freud. Indiferente a la comida y la vestimenta, jugaba al ajedrez con una pasión devoradora, y ponía de manifiesto un talento inaudito para los juegos de palabras más refinados, En 1879, con el seudónimo de Aenigmatis, publicó una compilación de adivinanzas que suscitó entusiasmo en los salones vieneses y dio lugar a numerosas imitaciones. Esto lo cuenta Freud en un libro suyo El chiste.

En la Universidad de Viena tuvo como alumnos a Sigmund Freud, Carl Stumpf y Edmund Husserl, Christian von Ehrenfels, introductor del término Gestalt (totalidad), y, discrepa y rechaza la idea del inconsciente descrita y utilizada por Freud. Fue un profesor carismático, Brentano ejerció una fuerte influencia en la obra de Edmund Husserl, Alois Meinong (1853-1921), fundador de la teoría del objeto,  Thomas Masaryk (1859-1937) KasimirTwardowski, de la escuela polaca de lógica y Marty Antón, entre otros, y por lo tanto juega un papel central en el desarrollo filosófico de la Europa central en principios del siglo XX. En 1873, el joven Sigmund Freud, estudiante en la Universidad de Viena, obtuvo su doctorado en filosofía bajo la dirección de Brentano.

El impulso de Brentano a la psicología cognitiva es consecuencia de su realismo. Su concepción de describir la conciencia en lugar de analizarla, dividiéndola en partes, como se hacía en su época, dio lugar a la fenomenología, que continuarían desarrollando Edmund Husserl (1859-1938), Max Scheler (1874-1928), Martín Heidegger (1889-1976), Maurice Merleau-Ponty (1908-1961), además de influenciar sobre el existencialismo de Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980) con su negación del inconsciente.

En 1895, después de la muerte de su esposa, dejó Austria decepcionado, en esta ocasión, publicó una serie de tres artículos en el periódico vienés Die Neue Freie Presse : Mis últimos votos por Austria, en la que destaca su posición filosófica, así como su enfoque de la psicología, pero también criticó duramente  la situación jurídica de los antiguos sacerdotes en Austria. In 1896 he settled down in Florence where he got married to Emilie Ruprecht in 1897. En 1896 se instaló en Florencia, donde se casó con Emilie Ruprecht en 1897. Vivió en Florencia casi ciego y, a causa de la primera guerra mundial, cuando Italia entra en guerra contra Alemania, se traslada a Zurich, donde muere en 1917.

Los trabajos que publicaron sus discípulos han sido los siguientes según el orden de su aparición: La doctrina de Jesús y su significación permanente; Psicología como ciencia empírica, Vol. III; Ensayos sobre el conocimiento, Sobre la existencia de Dios; Verdad y evidencia; Doctrina de las categorías, Fundamentación y construcción de la ética; Religión y filosofía, Doctrina del juicio correcto; Elementos de estética; Historia de la filosofía griega; La recusación de lo irreal; Investigaciones filosóficas acerca del espacio, del tiempo y el continuo; La doctrina de Aristóteles acerca del origen del espíritu humano; Historia de la filosofía medieval en el Occidente cristiano; Psicología descriptiva; Historia de la filosofía moderna, Sobre Aristóteles; Sobre “Conocimiento y error” de Ernst March.

 

Lineamientos de su pensamiento

 

Todo el mundo sabe, al menos el de la filosofía, que no se puede realizar tal actividad sino es en diálogo con algún clásico. Es que los clásicos son tales porque tienen respuestas para el presente.  Hay que tomar un maestro y a partir de él comenzar a filosofar. Brentano lo tuvo a Aristóteles, el que le había enseñado Federico Trendelenburg (1802-1872), el gran estudioso del Estagirita en la primera mitad de siglo XIX.

En su tesis doctoral, Sobre los múltiples significados del ente según Aristóteles, que tanto influenciara en Heidegger, distingue cuatro sentidos de “ente” en el Estagirita: el ente como ens per accidens o lo fortuito; el ente en el sentido de lo verdadero, con su correlato, lo no-ente en el sentido de lo falso; el ente en potencia y el ente en acto; y el ente que se distribuye según la sustancia y las figuras de las categorías. De esos cuatro significados, el veritativo abrirá en Brentano el estudio de la intencionalidad. Pero al que dedica con diferencia mayor extensión es al cuarto, el estudio de la sustancia y su modificación, esto es, a las diversas categorías. Esto se debe, en parte, a las discusiones de su tiempo en torno a la metafísica aristotélica. En ellas toma postura defendiendo principalmente dos tesis: primera, que entre los diferentes sentidos categoriales del ente se da una unidad de analogía, y que ésta significa unidad de referencia a un término común, la sustancia segunda, que precisamente esa unidad de referencia posibilita en el griego deducir las categorías según un principio.[3]

Investigó las cuestiones metafísicas mediante un análisis lógico-lingüístico, con lo que se distinguió tanto de los empiristas ingleses como del kantismo académico. Ejerciendo una gran influencia el algunos miembros del Círculo de Viena.

En 1874 publica su principal obra Psicología como ciencia empírica, de la que editará tres volúmenes, donde realiza su principal aporte a la historia de la filosofía, su concepto de intencionalidad de la conciencia que tendrá capital importancia para el desarrollo posterior de la fenomenología a través de Husserl y de Scheler.

Sólo lo psíquico es intencional, esto es, pone en relación la conciencia con un objeto. Esta llamada «tesis de Brentano», que hace de la intencionalidad la característica de lo psíquico, permite entender de un modo positivo, a diferencia de lo que no lograba la psicología de aquella época, los fenómenos de conciencia que Brentano distingue entre representaciones, juicios teóricos y  juicios prácticos o emotivos (sentimientos y voliciones).
Todo fenómeno de conciencia es o una representación de algo, que no forzosamente ha de ser un objeto exterior, o un juicio acerca de algo. Los juicios o son teóricos, y se refieren a la verdad y falsedad de las representaciones (juicios propiamente dichos), y su criterio es la evidencia y de ellos trata la epistemología y la lógica; o son prácticos, y se refieren a la bondad o a la maldad, la corrección o incorrección, al amor y al odio (fenómenos emotivos), y su criterio es la «preferencia», la valoración, o «lo mejor», y de ellos trata la ética. Al estudio de la intencionalidad de la conciencia lo llama psicología descriptiva o fenomenología.

En 1889 dicta su conferencia en Sociedad Jurídica de Viena “De la sanción natural de lo justo y lo moral” que aparece publicada luego con notas que duplican su extensión bajo el título de: El origen del conocimiento moral”, trabajo que publicado en castellano en 1927, del que dice Ortega y Gasset, director de la revista de Occidente que lo publica, “Este tratadito, de la más auténtica filosofía, constituye una de las joyas filosóficas que, como “El discurso del método” o la “Monadología”… Puede decirse que es la base donde se asienta la ética moderna de los valores”.

Comienza preguntándose por la sanción natural de lo justo y lo moral. Y hace corresponder lo bueno con lo verdadero y a la ética con la lógica. Así, lo verdadero se admite como verdadero en un juicio, mientras que lo bueno en un acto de amor. El criterio exclusivo de la verdad del juicio es cuando, éste, se presenta como evidente. Pero, paradójicamente, lo evidente, va a sostener siguiendo a Descartes, es el conocimiento sin juicio.

Lo bueno es el objeto y mi referencia puede ser errónea, de modo que mi actitud ante las cosas recibe la sanción de las cosas y no de mí. Lo bueno es algo intrínseco a los objetos amados.

Que yo tenga amor u odio a una cosa no prueba sin más que sea buena o mala. Es necesario que ese amor u odio sean justos. El amor puede ser justo o injusto, adecuado o inadecuado. La actitud adecuada ante una cosa buena es amarla y ante una cosa mala, el odiarla. “Decimos que algo es bueno cuando el modo de referencia que consiste en amarlo es el justo. Lo que sea amable con amor justo, lo digno de ser amado, es lo bueno en el más amplio sentido de la palabra»”.

Dos meses después el 27 de marzo de 1889 dicta su conferencia Sobre el concepto de verdad, ahora en la Sociedad filosófica de Viena. Esta conferencia es fundamental por varios motivos: a) muestra el carácter polémico de Brentano, tanto con el historiador de la filosofía Windelbang (1848-1915) por tergiversar a Kant,  como a Kant, “cuya filosofía es un error, que ha conducido a errores mayores y, finalmente, a un caos filosófico completo” (cómo no lo van a silenciar luego, en las universidades alemanas, al viejo Francisco). b) Nos da su opinión sin tapujos sobre Aristóteles diciendo: “Es el espíritu científico más poderoso que jamás haya tenido influencia sobre los destinos de la humanidad”. c) Muestra y demuestra que el concepto de verdad en Aristóteles “adecuación del intelecto y la cosa” ha sido adoptada tanto por Descartes como por Kant hasta llegar a él mismo. Pero que dicho concepto encierra un grave error y allí él va a proponer su teoría del juicio.

Diferencia entre juicios negativos y juicios afirmativos. Así en los juicios negativos “no hay dragones” no hay concordancia entre mi juicio y la cosa porque la cosa no existe. Mientras que en los juicios afirmativos cuando hay concordancia son verdaderos.

el ámbito en que es adecuado el juicio afirmativo es el de la existencia y el del juicio negativo, el de lo no existente”. Por lo tanto “un juicio es verdadero cuando afirma de algo que es, que es; y de algo que no es, niega que sea”.

En los juicios negativos la representación no tiene contenido real, mientras que la verdad de los juicios está condicionada por el existir o ser del la cosa (Sein des Dinges). Así, el ser de la cosa, la existencia es la que funda la verdad del juicio. El “ser del árbol” es lo que hace verdadero al juicio: “el árbol es”.

Y así lo afirma una y otra vez: “un juicio es verdadero cuando juzga apropiadamente un objeto, por consiguiente, cuando si es, se dice que es; y sino es, se dice que no es”.(in fine).

Y desengañado termina afirmando que: “Han transcurrido dos mil años desde que Aristóteles investigó los múltiples sentidos del ente, y es triste, pero cierto, que la mayoría no hayan sabido extraer ningún fruto de sus investigaciones”.

Su propuesta es, entonces, discriminar claramente en el juicio “el ser de la cosa” que es equivalente a ”la existencia”,  de “la cosa” también denominada por Brentano ”lo real”. Existir o existencia,  y ser real o realidad es la dupla de pares que expresan el “ser verdadero” y el “ser sustancial” respectivamente, que él se ocupó de estudiar en su primer trabajo sobre el ente en Aristóteles.

De modo tal que todo lo que es, es. Y se nos dice también en el sentido de lo verdadero. En una palabra el ser de la cosa se convierte con la verdadero, sin buscarlo Brentano retorna al viejo ens et verum convertuntur de la teoría de los transcendentales del ente.

Y así da sus dos últimos y más profundos consejos:  “Por último, no estaremos tentados nunca de confundir, como ha ocurrido cada vez más, el concepto de lo real y el de lo existente”. Y “podríamos extraer de nuestra investigación otra lección y grabarla en nuestras mentes para siempre…el medio definitivo y eficaz (para realizar un juicio verdadero) consiste siempre en una referencia a la intuición de lo individual de la que se derivan todos nuestros criterios generales”.

No podemos no recordar acá, por la coincidencia de los conceptos y consejos, aquella que nos dejara el primer metafísico argentino, Nimio de Anquín (1896-1979),: “Ir siembre a la búsqueda del ser singular en su discontinuidad fantasmagórica. Ir al encuentro con las cosas en su individuación y  potencial universalidad”.[4]

Franz Brentano es el verdadero fundador de la metafísica realista contemporánea que luego continuarán, con sus respectivas variantes,  Husserl, Scheler, Hartmann y Heidegger.

En el mismo siglo XIX, a propósito de la encíclica Aeterni Patris de 1879 se dará el florecimiento del tomismo, sostenedor también, pero de otro modo, de una metafísica realista.

Siempre nos ha llamado la atención que los mejores filósofos españoles del siglo XX se hayan prestado a ser traductores de los libros de Brentano: José Gáos de su Psicología, Manuel García Morente de su Origen del conocimiento moral, Xavier Zubiri de El provenir de la filosofía, Antonio Millán Puelles de Sobre la existencia de Dios. Y siempre nos ha llamado la atención que no se enseñara Brentano en la universidad.

El problema de Brentano es que ha sido “filosóficamente incorrecto”, pues realizó una crítica feroz y terminante a Kant y los kantianos y eso la universidad alemana no se lo perdonó. Realizó una crítica furibunda a la escuela escolástica católica y eso no se le perdonó. Incluso se levantaron invectivas denunciándolo, que al criticar el concepto de analogía del ser, adoptó él, el de equivocidad. Un siglo después, el erudito sobre Aristóteles, Pierre Aubenque, vino a negar en un libro memorable y reconocido universalmente, Le probleme de l´etre chez Aristote (1962) la presencia en los textos del Estagirita del concepto de analogía.(si detrás de esto no está la sombra de Brentano, que no valga).

Polemizó con Zeller, con Dilthey, con Herbart, con Sigwart. Criticó, como ya dijimos, a Kant, Descartes, Hume, Hegel, Aristóteles, y a Überweg. No dejó títere con cabeza. Sólo le faltó pelearse con Goethe. Fue criticado por Freud, que se portó con él como el zorro en el monte que con la cola borra las huellas por donde anda. Husserl no solo tomó y usufructuó el concepto de intencionalidad sino también el de “retención” que es copia exacta de concepto bentaniano de “asociación original”, pero eso quedó bien silenciado.

Filosóficamente, esta oposición por igual al idealismo kantiano y a la escolástica de su tiempo le valió el silencio de los manuales y la marginalización de su obra de las universidades. Quien quiera comprender en profundidad y conocer las líneas de tensión que corren debajo de las ideas de la filosofía del siglo XX, tiene que leer, forzosamente a Brentano, sino se quedará como la mayoría de los profesores de filosofía, en Babia.

El es el testigo irrenunciable de la ligazón profunda que existe en el desarrollo de la metafísica que va desde Aristóteles, pasa por Tomás de Aquino y Duns Escoto , sigue con él y termina en Heidegger. No al ñudo, el filósofo de Friburgo, realizó su tesis doctoral sobre La doctrina de las categorías y del significado pensando que era de Duns Escoto, cuando después se comprobó que el texto de la Gramática especulativa sobre el que trabajó, pertenecía a Thomas de Erfurt (fl.1325).

La invitación está hecha, seguro que algún buen profesor o algún inquieto investigador  recoge el guante.

 

 

Nota: Bibliografía de F. Brentano en castellano

Psicología (desde el punto de vista empírico), Revista de Occidente, Madrid, 1927

Sobre la existencia de Dios, Rialp, Madrid 1979.

Sobre el concepto de verdad, Ed. Complutense, Madrid, 1998

El origen del conocimiento moral, Revista de Occidente, Madrid 1927. (Tecnos, Madrid 2002).

Breve esbozo de una teoría general del conocimiento, Ed. Encuentro, Madrid 2001.

El porvenir de la filosofía, Revista de Occidente, Madrid 1936

Aristóteles y su cosmovisión, Labor, Barcelona 1951.

Sobre los múltiples significados del ente según Aristóteles, Ed. Encuentro, Madrid 2007

 

Razones del desaliento en filosofía, Ed. Encuentro, Madrid, 2010

 

Existen además, en castellano, trabajos de consulta valiosos sobre su filosofía como los debidos a los profesores Mario Ariel González Porta y  Sergio Sánchez-Migallón Granados.

 

 

 

(*) alberto.buela@gmail.com

arkegueta, aprendiz constante, mejor que filósofo

www.disenso.org



[1] Estos datos que pasamos nosotros y muchos más, se pueden encontrar en los buscadores de Internet, no así en los manuales al uso de la historia de la filosofía contemporánea, que, en general, escamotean la figura y los aportes de Brentano. O peor aún, lo limitan al lugar común de inventor de la intencionalidad de la conciencia. 

[2] La persecución que sufrieron los católicos alemanes bajo el gobierno de Bismarck (1871-1890) ha sido terrible. Más de un millón de ellos huyeron a Rusia donde los recibió el Zar con un convenio de estadía por cien años. Pasado el siglo muchos de esos “alemanes del Volga” vinieron a radicarse en la Argentina en la zona de Coronel Suárez, al sur oeste de la provincia de Buenos Aires. Duró tanto el hostigamiento a los católicos de parte de la Kulturkampf, que cuenta Heidegger (1889-1976), que su padre era el sacristán de la iglesia de San Martín de su pueblo natal,  y que los protestantes se la devolvieron, recién, un año antes de que él naciera.

[3] 80 años después, en 1942 publicó Nimio de Anquín en Argentina un trabajo definitivo sobre el tema Las dos concepciones del ente en Aristóteles, Ortodoxia Nº 1, pp.38-69, Buenos Aires, 1942, del que se han privado de leer hasta ahora los europeos. 40 años después, en 1982 con motivo de mi tesis doctoral en la Sorbona bajo la dirección de Pierre Aubenque, vi como éste gran erudito se arrastraba sobre las tintas del libro Z de la Metafísica de  Aristóteles, sin poder llegar a la suela de los zapatos de de Anquín.

[4] Anquín, Nimo de:  Ente y ser, Gredos, Madrid, 1962

Armin Mohler, l'homme qui nous désignait l'ennemi!

mohler.jpg

Thorsten HINZ:

Armin Mohler, l’homme qui nous désignait l’ennemi

 

Le Dr. Karlheinz Weissmann vient de sortir de presse une biographie d’Armin Mohler, publiciste de la droite allemande et historien de la “révolution conservatrice”

 

Armin Mohler ne fut jamais l’homme des demies-teintes!

 

Qui donc Armin Mohler détestait-il? Les libéraux et les tièdes, les petits jardiniers amateurs qui gratouillent le bois mort qui encombre l’humus, c’est-à-dire les nouilles de droite, inoffensives parce que dépouvues de pertinence! Il détestait aussi tous ceux qui s’agrippaient aux concepts et aux tabous que définissait leur propre ennemi. Il considérait que les libéraux étaient bien plus subtils et plus dangereux que les communistes: pour reprendre un bon mot de son ami Robert Hepp: ils nous vantaient l’existence de cent portes de verre qu’ils nous définissaient comme l’Accès, le seul Accès, à la liberté, tout en taisant soigneusement le fait que 99 de ces portes demeuraient toujours fermées. La victoire totale des libéraux a hissé l’hypocrisie en principe ubiquitaire. Les gens sont désormais jugés selon les déclarations de principe qu’ils énoncent sans nécessairement y croire et non pas sur leurs actes et sur les idées qu’ils sont prêts à défendre.

 

Mohler était était un type “agonal”, un gars qui aimait la lutte: sa bouille carrée de Bâlois l’attestait. Avec la subtilité d’un pluvier qui capte les moindres variations du climat, Mohler repérait les courants souterrains de la politique et de la société. C’était un homme de forte sensibilité mais certainement pas un sentimental. Mohler pensait et écrivait clair quand il abordait la politique: ses mots étaient durs, tranchants, de véritables armes. Il était déjà un “conservateur moderne” ou un “néo-droitiste” avant que la notion n’apparaisse dans les médiats. En 1995, il s’était défini comme un “fasciste au sens où l’entendait José Antonio Primo de Rivera”. Mohler se référait ainsi —mais peu nombreux étaient ceux qui le savaient— au jeune fondateur de la Phalange espagnole, un homme intelligent et cultivé, assassiné par les gauches ibériques et récupéré ensuite par Franco.

 

Il manquait donc une biographie de ce doyen du conservatisme allemand d’après guerre, mort en 2003. Karlheinz Weissmann était l’homme appelé à combler cette lacune: il connait la personnalité de Mohler et son oeuvre; il est celui qui a actualisé l’ouvrage de référence de Mohler sur la révolution conservatrice.

 

Pour Mohler seuls comptaient le concret et le réel

 

La sensibilité toute particulière d’Armin Mohler s’est déployée dans le décor de la ville-frontière suisse de Bâle. Mohler en était natif. Il y avait vu le jour en 1920. En 1938, la lecture d’un livre le marque à jamais: c’est celui de Christoph Steding, “Das Reich und die Krankheit der europäischen Kultur” (“Le Reich et la pathologie de la culture européenne”). Pour Steding, l’Allemagne, jusqu’en 1933, avait couru le risque de subir une “neutralisation politique et spirituelle”, c’est-à-dire une “helvétisation de la pensée allemande”, ce qui aurait conduit à la perte de la souveraineté intérieure et extérieure; l’Allemagne aurait dérogé pour adopter le statut d’un “intermédiaire éclectique”. Les peuples qui tombent dans une telle déchéance sont “privés de destin” et tendent à ne plus produire que des “pharisiens nés”. On voit tout de suite que Steding était intellectuellement proche de Carl Schmitt. Quant à ce dernier, il a pris la peine de recenser personnellement le livre, publié à titre posthume, de cet auteur mort prématurément. Dans ce livre apparaissent certains des traits de pensée qui animeront Mohler, le caractériseront, tout au long de son existence.

 

L’Allemagne est devenue pour le jeune Mohler “la grande tentation”, tant et si bien qu’il franchit illégalement le frontière suisse en février 1942 “pour aider les Allemands à gagner la guerre”. Cet intermède allemand ne durera toutefois qu’une petite année. Mohler passa quelques mois à Berlin, avec le statut d’étudiant, et s’y occupa des auteurs de la “révolution conservatrice”, à propos desquels il rédigera sa célèbre thèse de doctorat, sous la houlette de Karl Jaspers. Mohler était un rebelle qui s’insurgeait contre la croyance au progrès et à la raison, une croyance qui estime que le monde doit à terme être tout compénétré de raison et que les éléments, qui constituent ce monde, peuvent être combinés les uns aux autres ou isolés les uns des autres à loisir, selon une logique purement arbitraire. Contre cette croyance et cette vision, Mohler voulait opposer les forces élémentaires de l’art et de la culture, de la nationalité et de l’histoire. Ce contre-mouvement, disait-il, et cela le distinguait des tenants de la “vieille droite”, ne visait pas la restauration d’un monde ancré dans le 19ème siècle, mais tenait expressément compte des nouvelles réalités.

 

Dans un chapitre, intitulé “Du nominalisme”, le Dr. Karlheinz Weissmann explicite les tentatives de Mohler, qui ne furent pas toujours probantes, de systématiser ses idées et ses vues. Il est clair que Mohler rejette toute forme d’universalisme car tout universalisme déduit le particulier d’un ordre spirituel sous-jacent et identitque pour tous, et noie les réalités dans une “mer morte d’abstractions”. Pour le nominaliste Mohler, les concepts avancés par les universalismes ne sont que des dénominations abstraites et arbitraires, inventées a poteriori, et qui n’ont pour effets que de répandre la confusion. Pour Mohler, seuls le concret et le particulier avaient de l’importance, soit le “réel”, qu’il cherchait à saisir par le biais d’images fortes, puissantes et organiques. Par conséquent, ses sympathies personnelles n’étaient pas déterminées par les idées politiques dont se réclamaient ses interlocuteurs mais tenaient d’abord compte de la valeur de l’esprit et du caractère qu’il percevait chez l’autre.

 

En 1950, Mohler devint le secrétaire d’Ernst Jünger. Ce ne fut pas une époque dépourvue de conflits. Après l’intermède de ce secrétariat, vinrent les années françaises de notre théoricien: il devint en effet le correspondant à Paris du “Tat” suisse et de l’hebdomadaire allemand “Die Zeit”. A partir de 1961, il fut le secrétaire, puis le directeur, de la “Fondation Siemens”. Dans le cadre de cette éminente fonction, il a essayé de contrer la dérive gauchisante de la République fédérale, en organisant des colloques de très haut niveau et en éditant des livres ou des publications remarquables. Parmi les nombreux livres que nous a laissés Mohler, “Nasenring” (= “L’anneau nasal”) est certainement le plus célèbre: il constitue une attaque en règle, qui vise à fustiger l’attitude que les Allemands ont prise vis-à-vis de leur propre histoire (la fameuse “Vergangenheitsbewältigung”). En 1969, Mohler écrivait dans l’hebdomadaire suisse “Weltwoche”: “Le ‘Républiquefédéralien’ est tout occupé, à la meilleure manière des méthodes ‘do-it-yourself’, à se faire la guerre à lui-même. Il n’y a pas que lui: tout le monde occidental semble avoir honte de descendre d’hommes de bonne trempe; tout un chacun voudrait devenir un névrosé car seul cet état, désormais, est considéré comme ‘humain’”.

 

En France, Mohler était un adepte critique de Charles de Gaulle. Il estimait que l’Europe des patries, proposée par le Général, aurait été capable de faire du Vieux Continent une “Troisième Force” entre les Etats-Unis et l’Union Soviétique. Dans les années 60, certaines ouvertures semblaient possibles pour Mohler: peut-être pourrait-il gagner en influence politique via le Président de la CSU bavaroise, Franz-Josef Strauss? Il entra à son service comme “nègre”. Ce fut un échec: Strauss, systématiquement, modifiait les ébauches de discours que Mohler avait truffées de références gaulliennes et les traduisait en un langage “atlantiste”. De la part de Strauss, était-ce de la faiblesse ou était-ce le regard sans illusions du pragmatique qui ne jure que par le “réalisable”? Quoi qu’il en soit, on perçoit ici l’un des conflits fondamentaux qui ont divisé les conservateurs après la guerre: la plupart des hommes de droite se contentaient d’une République fédérale sous protectorat américain (sans s’apercevoir qu’à long terme, ils provoquaient leur propre disparition), tandis que Mohler voulait une Allemagne européenne et libre.

 

Le conflit entre européistes et atlantistes provoqua également l’échec de la revue “Die Republik”, que l’éditeur Axel Springer voulait publier pour en faire le forum des hommes de droite hors partis et autres ancrages politiciens: Mohler décrit très bien cette péripétie dans “Nasenring”.

 

Il semble donc bien que ce soit sa qualité de Suisse qui l’ait sauvé de cette terrible affliction que constitue la perte d’imagination chez la plupart des conservateurs allemands de l’après-guerre. Par ailleurs, le camp de la droite établie a fini par le houspiller dans l’isolement. Caspar von Schrenck-Notzing lui a certes ouvert les colonnes de “Criticon”, qui furent pour lui une bonne tribune, mais les autres éditeurs de revues lui claquèrent successivement la porte au nez; malgré son titre de doctorat, il n’a pas davantage pu mener une carrière universitaire. La réunification n’a pas changé grand chose à sa situation: les avantages pour lui furent superficiels et éphémères.

 

La cadre historique, dans lequel nous nous débattions du temps de Mohler, et dans lequel s’est déployée sa carrière étonnante, freinée uniquement par des forces extérieures, aurait pu gagner quelques contours tranchés et précis. On peut discerner aujourd’hui la grandeur de Mohler. On devrait aussi pouvoir mesurer la tragédie qu’il a incarnée. Weissmann constate qu’il existait encore jusqu’au milieu des années 80 une certaine marge de manoeuvre pour la droite intellectuelle en Allemagne mais que cet espace potentiel s’est rétréci parce que la gauche n’a jamais accepté le dialogue ou n’a jamais rien voulu apprendre du réel. Le lecteur se demande alors spontanément: pourquoi la gauche aurait-elle donc dialogué puisque le rapport de force objectif était en sa faveur?

 

Weissmann a donc résussi un tour de force: il a écrit une véritable “biographie politique” d’Armin Mohler. Son livre deviendra un classique.

 

Thorsten HINZ.

(article paru dans “Junge Freiheit”, Berlin, n°31/32-2011; http://www.jugefreiheit.de/ ).

jeudi, 18 août 2011

Péguy parmi nous

Péguy parmi nous

par Pierre LE VIGAN

peguy.jpgIl y a cent ans, Péguy publiait Le mystère de la Charité de Jeanne d’Arc, pièce de théâtre qui est toute entière le mystère de la prière de Péguy. Il publiait aussi, cette même année 1911, Le Porche du mystère de la deuxième Vertu (« Ce qui m’étonne, dit Dieu, c’est l’espérance. » Cette « petite fille espérance. Immortelle » que chantera cet autre poète qu’était Brasillach). L’occasion de revenir sur Péguy, l’homme de toutes les passions.

En 1914 mourrait Charles Péguy, au début d’une guerre qui marqua la fin d’une certaine Europe et d’une certaine France. Péguy représentait précisément le meilleur de l’homme de l’ancienne France, atteint au plus haut point par les ravages du monde moderne. On dit parfois qu’il y eut deux Péguy, le premier socialiste et dreyfusard, et le second, nationaliste, critique du progrès, catholique proclamé (par ailleurs nullement pratiquant) et atypique. Ces deux Péguy ont leur grandeur, et les deux ont été bien vivants c’est-à-dire qu’ils ont écrits comme tout le monde aussi quelques bêtises. Mais c’est le même homme qui a été tour à tour socialiste idéaliste et critique passionné – et bien injuste – de Jean Jaurès. Et c’est le même homme qui fut poète, et qui fut hanté par l’idée de hausser l’homme. C’est pourquoi dans Notre jeunesse (1910), Péguy écrivait : « On peut publier mes œuvres complètes, il n’y a pas un mot que j’y changerais. » Et de dire dans ce texte, en substance : je ne renierais jamais mon engagement (dreyfusard) dans l’affaire Dreyfus et je ne renierais jamais la République.

Péguy est né à Orléans en 1873. Il sera influencé par Louis Boitier et le radicalisme orléanais. Fils d’un menuisier et d’une rempailleuse de chaises, Péguy peut faire des études grâce à une bourse de la République. Condisciple du grand historien jacobin Albert Mathiez, Péguy échoue à l’agrégation de philosophie. Dans les années 1890, il se range du côté des socialistes par aspiration à la fraternité et un ordre vrai. De même, il défend Dreyfus injustement accusé de trahison. C’est un anticlérical et un homme de gauche. « Les guerres coloniales sont les plus lâches des guerres », écrit-il en 1902. Sa première Jeanne d’Arc qui, parue en 1897, n’aura aucun succès est dédiée à ceux qui rêvent de la République socialiste universelle. Il abandonne la voie du professorat en 1897.

À partir de 1900, il évolue de manière de plus en plus autonome et inclassable. Il se convertit à un certain réalisme politique. « La paix par le sabre, c’est la seule qui tienne, c’est la seule qui soit digne », écrit-il alors à propos de la colonisation française. Ce qui n’est pas incompatible avec le premier propos mais marque une nette inflexion. C’est l’époque de Notre Patrie (1905) et du raidissement patriotique après l’incident de Tanger. « L’ordre, et l’ordre seul, fait en définitive la liberté. Le désordre fait la servitude », écrit-il alors dans les Cahiers de la Quinzaine. Mais ce ne peut être qu’un ordre vrai, c’est-à-dire un ordre juste.

L’antisocialisme de Péguy vers 1910 est surtout une protestation contre l’embourgeoisement du socialisme. Mais il faut le dire : il y aussi un profond recul de l’intérêt pour la question sociale. S’il ne fut jamais maurrassien (Daniel Halévy expliquera que ce qui a manqué au débat français c’est un face-à-face Maurras – Péguy), Péguy était par contre proche de Barrès.

Anticlérical mais chrétien – il trouve la foi en 1908 -, extrêmement patriote (jusqu’à un antigermanisme détestable mais naïf), Péguy était aussi philosémite (à une époque où le sionisme n’existait pas), ainsi grand admirateur de Bernard Lazare. Les amis juifs ne manquèrent pas à Péguy, tels le fidèle Eddy Marix. Sans parler de « Blanche », son dernier amour. Loin d’être attiré par les extrêmes, Péguy est à partir de 1900, en politique, très modéré. Il voue ainsi un grand respect à Waldeck-Rousseau, homme de gauche modéré, voire « opportuniste » au sens du moment, qui mit un terme  aux affres de l’affaire Dreyfus.

Après avoir ouvert une librairie, vite en faillite, Péguy crée les Cahiers de la Quinzaine, qui n’auront jamais assez d’abonnés pour être rentables (on parle de 1400 abonnés, mais des historiens tels Henri Guillemin indiquent qu’il n’en a jamais eu 1200). Abandonnant le socialisme devenu parlementaire, il s’attache à prôner une République idéale, indépendante des partis et de l’argent, patriote, sociale, apportant à tous l’éducation, la dignité dans le travail et la fraternité. C’est dire que Péguy n’a jamais complètement renié ses idéaux de jeunesse. « Une révolution n’est rien, si elle n’engage pas une nouvelle vie, si elle n’est entière, totale, globale, absolue… » Péguy devient l’homme de toutes les traditions, « des fleurs de lis mais aussi du bonnet phrygien (avec cocarde) ». « Un Michelet dégagé des vapeurs idéologiques », remarque Maurice Reclus. Une fidélité à la République comme continuité de toute notre histoire. C’est ce qu’il résuma par la fameuse formule : « La République c’est notre royaume de France ».

Ami de Jacques Maritain, de Lucien Herr, de Pierre Marcel-Lévy, de Georges Sorel (qui ne crut jamais à sa conversion catholique), de Léon Blum, avec qui il se fâcha, de Marcel Baudouin dont il épousa la sœur et à qui il vouait une affection fraternelle jusqu’à utiliser le pseudonyme de Pierre Baudouin, sous le nom duquel il publia sa première Jeanne d’Arc, Péguy était en relation avec les plus brillants mais aussi souvent les plus profonds des intellectuels de l’époque. De même qu’il échouera à l’agrégation de philosophie, il ne termina jamais sa thèse sur « l’histoire dans la philosophie au XIXe siècle », ni sa thèse complémentaire qui portait sur le beau sujet « Ce que j’ai acquis d’expérience dans les arts et métiers de la typographie ». Ce qu’il cherchait n’était pas de paraître, c’était de tracer un sillon bien précis : l’éloge des vertus d’une ancienne France, celle des travailleurs, des artisans, des terriens. « C’est toujours le même système en France, on fait beaucoup pour les indigents, tout pour les riches, rien pour les pauvres », écrivait-il dans une lettre du 11 mars 1914.

Souvent au bord de la dépression, Péguy ne se ménageait guère. « Le suicide est pour moi une tentation dont je me défends avec un succès sans cesse décroissant », écrivait-il à un de ses amis. Il ne cherchait pas le confort pour lui-même : ni le confort moral ni le confort intellectuel. « Il y avait en ce révolutionnaire du révolté, écrivait son ami Maurice Reclus, et, ces jours-là, je ne pouvais m’empêcher de voir en Péguy une manière de Vallès – en beaucoup plus noble, évidemment, en beaucoup moins déclamateur et revendicateur, un Vallès sans bassesse, sans haine et sans envie, mais un Vallès tout de même. » Péguy prétendait être un auteur gai, et s’il n’était pas comique ni léger, il était quelque peu facétieux. Oui, cet homme avait la pudeur de la gaieté. Il ne cherchait jamais à être étincelant, mais il étincelait.

Ce que récuse Péguy, et là, il n’est pas modéré, c’est le modernisme. Le danger qu’il annonce, c’est « la peur de ne pas paraître assez avancé ». C’est pourquoi sa critique de l’obsession moderniste est souvent associée au regret des temps passés, alors qu’elle témoigne pour un autre avenir possible. « Mais comment ne pas regretter la sagesse d’avant, comment ne pas donner un dernier souvenir à cette innocence que nous ne reverrons plus. […] On ne parle aujourd’hui que de l’égalité. Et nous vivons dans la plus monstrueuse inégalité économique que l’on n’ait jamais vue dans l’histoire du monde. On vivait alors. On avait des enfants. Ils n’avaient aucunement cette impression que nous avons d’être au bagne. Ils n’avaient pas comme nous cette impression d’un étranglement économique, d’un collier de fer qui tient à la gorge et qui se serre tous les jours d’un cran. » (L’Argent). Deux semaines avant d’être tué, le 5 septembre 1914, Péguy était au front à la tête d’une compagnie. Il écrivait : « nous sommes sans nouvelles du monde depuis quatre jours. Nous vivons dans une sorte de grande paix. »

Pierre Le Vigan

Bibliographie:

Arnaud Teyssier, Charles Péguy, une humanité française, Perrin, 2008.

Romain Rolland, Péguy, Albin Michel, deux volumes, 1945.

Maurice Reclus, Le Péguy que j’ai connu, Hachette, 1951.

Bernard Guyon, Péguy, Hatier, 1960.

Charles Péguy, L’Argent (1913), réédité par les éditions des Équateurs.

Paru dans Flash, n° 67 du 2 juin 2011.


Article printed from Europe Maxima: http://www.europemaxima.com

URL to article: http://www.europemaxima.com/?p=2012

dimanche, 14 août 2011

Zinoviev's Homo Sovieticus: Communism as Social Entropy

Zinoviev’s “Homo Sovieticus”: Communism as Social Entropy

Tomislav Sunic

Ex: http://freespeechproject.com/

 

Alexandre_Zinoviev_2002.jpgStudents and observers of communism consistently encounter the same paradox: On the one hand they attempt to predict the future of communism, yet on the other they must regularly face up to a system that appears unusually static. At Academic gatherings and seminars, and in scholarly treatises, one often hears and reads that communist systems are marred by economic troubles, power sclerosis, ethnic upheavals, and that it is only a matter of time before communism disintegrates. Numerous authors and observers assert that communist systems are maintained in power by the highly secretive nomenklatura, which consists of party potentates who are intensely disliked by the entire civil society. In addition, a growing number of authors argue that with the so-called economic linkages to Western economies, communist systems will eventually sway into the orbit of liberal democracies, or change their legal structure to the point where ideological differences between liberalism and communism will become almost negligible.

The foregoing analyses and predictions about communism are flatly refuted by Alexander Zinoviev, a Russian sociologist, logician, and satirist, whose analyses of communist systems have gained remarkable popularity among European conservatives in the last several years.

According to Zinoviev, it is impossible to study communist systems without rigorous employment of appropriate methodology, training in logic, and a construction of an entirely new conceptual approach. Zinoviev contends that Western observers of communism are seriously mistaken in using social analyses and a conceptual framework appropriate for studying social phenomena in the West, but inappropriate for the analysis of communist systems. He writes:

A camel cannot exist if one places upon it the criteria of a hippopotamus. The opinion of those in the West who consider the Soviet society unstable, and who hope for its soon disintegration from within (aside that they take their desires for realities), is in part due to the fact that they place upon the phenomenon of Soviet society criteria of Western societies, which are alien to the Soviet society.

Zinoviev’s main thesis is that an average citizen living in a communist system -- whom he labels homo sovieticus -- behaves and responds to social stimuli in a similar manner to the way his Western counterpart responds to stimuli of his own social landscape. In practice this means that in communist systems the immense majority of citizens behave, live, and act in accordance with the logic of social entropy laid out by the dominating Marxist ideology. Contrary to widespread liberal beliefs, social entropy in communism is by no means a sign of the system’s terminal illness; in fact it is a positive sign that the system has developed to a social level that permits its citizenry to better cope with the elementary threats, such as wars, economic chaos, famines, or large-scale cataclysms. In short, communism is a system whose social devolution has enabled the masses of communist citizens to develop defensive mechanisms of political self-protection and indefinite biological survival. Using an example that recalls Charles Darwin and Konrad Lorenz, Zinoviev notes that less-developed species often adapt to their habitat better than species with more intricate biological and behavioral capacities. On the evolutionary tree, writes Zinoviev, rats and bugs appear more fragile than, for example, monkeys or dinosaurs, yet in terms of biological survivability, bugs and rats have demonstrated and astounding degree of adaptability to an endlessly changing and threatening environment. The fundamental mistake of liberal observers of communism is to equate political efficiency with political stability. There are political stability. There are political systems that are efficient, but are at the same time politically unstable; and conversely, there are systems which resilient to external threats. To illustrate the stability of communist systems, Zinoviev writes:

A social system whose organization is dominated by entropic principles possesses a high level od stability. Communist society is indeed such a type of association of millions of people in a common whole in which more secure survival, for a more comfortable course of life, and for a favorable position of success.

Zinoviev notes that to “believe in communism” by no means implies only the adherence to the ruling communist elite of the unquestionable acceptance of the communist credo. The belief in communism presupposes first and foremost a peculiar mental attitude whose historical realization has been made possible as a result of primordial egalitarian impulses congenial to all human beings. Throughout man’s biocultural evolution, egalitarian impulses have been held in check by cultural endeavors and civilizational constraints, yet with the advent of mass democracies, resistance to these impulses has become much more difficult. Here is how Zinoviev sees communism:

Civilization is effort; communality is taking the line if least resistance. Communism is the unruly conduct of nature’s elemental forces; civilization sets them rational bounds.

It is for this reason that it is the greatest mistake to think that communism deceives the masses or uses force on them. As the flower and crowning glory of communality, communism represents a type of society which is nearest and dearest to the masses no matter how dreadful the potential consequences for them might be.

zinoviev1978.jpgZinoviev refutes the widespread belief that communist power is vested only among party officials, or the so-called nomenklatura. As dismal as the reality of communism is, the system must be understood as a way of life shared by millions of government official, workers, and countless ordinary people scattered in their basic working units, whose chief function is to operate as protective pillars of the society. Crucial to the stability of the communist system is the blending of the party and the people into one whole, and as Zinoviev observes, “the Soviet saying the party and the people are one and the same, is not just a propagandistic password.” The Communist Party is only the repository of an ideology whose purpose is not only to further the objectives of the party members, but primarily to serve as the operating philosophical principle governing social conduct. Zinoviev remarks that Catholicism in the earlier centuries not only served the Pope and clergy; it also provided a pattern of social behavior countless individuals irrespective of their personal feelings toward Christian dogma. Contrary to the assumption of liberal theorists, in communist societies the cleavage between the people and the party is almost nonexistent since rank-and-file party members are recruited from all walks of life and not just from one specific social stratum. To speculate therefore about a hypothetical line that divides the rulers from the ruled, writes Zinoviev in his usual paradoxical tone, is like comparing how “a disemboweled and carved out animal, destined for gastronomic purposes, differs from its original biological whole.”

Admittedly, continues Zinoviev, per capita income is three to four times lower than in capitalist democracies, and as the daily drudgery and bleakness of communist life indicates, life under communism falls well short of the promised paradise. Yet, does this necessarily indicate that the overall quality in a communist society is inferior to that in Western countries? If one considers that an average worker in a communist system puts in three to four hours to his work (for which he usually never gets reprimanded, let alone fears losing his job), then his earnings make the equivalent of the earnings of a worker in a capitalist democracy. Stated in Marxist terminology, a worker in a communist system is not economically exploited but instead “takes the liberty” of allocating to himself the full surplus value of his labor which the state is unable to allocate to him. Hence this popular joke, so firmly entrenched in communist countries, which vividly explains the longevity of the communist way of life: “Nobody can pay me less than as little as I can work.”

Zinoviev dismisses the liberal reductionist perception of economics, which is based on the premise that the validity or efficiency of a country is best revieled by it high economic output or workers’ standard of living. In describing the economics of the Soviet Union, he observes that “the economy in the Soviet Union continues to thrive, regardless of the smart analyses and prognoses of the Western experts, and is in fact in the process of becoming stronger.” The endless liberal speculations about the future of communism, as well as the frequent evaluations about whether capitalist y resulted in patent failures. The more communism changes the more in fact it remains the same. Yet, despite its visible shortcomings, the communist ideal will likely continue to flourish precisely because it successfully projects the popular demand for security and predictability. By contrast, the fundamental weakness of liberal systems is that they have introduced the principles of security and predictability only theoretically and legally, but for reasons of economic efficiency, have so far been unable to put them into practice. For Claude Polin, a French author whose analyses of communist totalitarianism closely parallel Zinoviev’s views, the very economic inefficiency of communism paradoxically, “provides much more chances to [sic] success for a much larger number of individuals than a system founded on competition and reward of talents.” Communism, in short, liberates each individual from all social effort and responsibility, and its internal stasis only reinforces its awesome political stability.

TERROR AS THE METAPHOR
For Zinoviev, communist terror essentially operates according to the laws of dispersed communalism; that is, though the decentralization of power into the myriad of workers’ collectives. As the fundamental linchpins of communism, these collectives carry out not only coercive but also remunerative measures on behalf of and against their members. Upon joining a collective, each person becomes a transparent being who is closely scrutinized by his coworkers, yet at the same time enjoys absolute protection in cases of professional mistakes, absenteeism, shoddy work, and so forth. In such a system it is not only impossible but also counterproductive to contemplate a coup or a riot because the power of collectives is so pervasive that any attempted dissent is likely to hurt the dissenter more than his collective. Seen on the systemic level, Communist terror, therefore, does not emanate from one central source, but from a multitude of centers from the bottom to the top of society, whose foundations, in additions to myriad of collectives, are made up of “basic units,” brigades, or pioneer organizations. If perchance an individual or a group of people succeeds in destroying one center of power, new centers of power will automatically emerge. In this sense, the notion of “democratic centralism,” derided by many liberal observers as just another verbal gimmick of the communist meta-language, signifies a genuine example of egalitarian democracy -- a democracy in which power derives not from the party but from the people. Zinoviev notes:

Even if you wipe out half the population, the first thing that will be restored in the remaining half will be the system of power and administration. There, power is not organized to serve the population: the population is organized as a material required for the functioning of power.

Consequently, it does not appear likely that communism can ever be “improved,” at least not as Westerners understand improvement, because moral, political, and economic corruption of communism is literally spread throughout all pores of the society, and is in fact encouraged by the party elite on a day-to-day basis. The corruption among workers that takes the form of absenteeism, moonlighting, and low output goes hand in hand with corruption and licentiousness of party elite, so that the corruption of the one justifies and legitimatizes the corruption of the others. That communism is a system of collective irresponsibility is indeed not just an empty saying.

IN THE LAND OF THE “WOODEN LANGUAGE”
The corruption of language in communist societies is a phenomenon that until recently has not been sufficiently explored. According to an elaborate communist meta-language that Marxist dialecticians have skillfully developed over the last hundred years, dissidents and political opponents do not fall into the category of “martyrs,” or “freedom fighters” -- terms usually applied to them by Western well-wishers, yet terms are meaningless in the communist vernacular. Not only for the party elite, but for the overwhelming majority of people, dissidents are primarily traitors of democracy, occasionally branded as “fascist agents” or proverbial “CIA spies.” In any case, as Zinoviev indicates, the number of dissidents is constantly dwindling, while the number of their detractors is growing to astounding proportions. Moreover, the process of expatriation of dissidents is basically just one additional effort to dispose of undesirable elements, and thereby secure a total social consensus.

for the masses of citizens, long accustomed to a system circumventing al political “taboo themes,” the very utterance of the word dissident creates the feeling of insecurity and unpredictability. Consequently, before dissidents turn into targets of official ostracism and legal prosecution, most people, including their family members, will often go to great lengths to disavow them. Moreover, given the omnipotent and transparent character of collectives and distorted semantics, potential dissidents cannot have a lasting impact of society. After all, who wants to be associated with somebody who in the popular jargon is a nuisance to social peace and who threatens the already precarious socioeconomic situation of a system that has only recently emerged from the long darkness of terror? Of course, in order to appear democratic the communist media will often encourage spurious criticism of the domestic bureaucracy, economic shortages, or rampant mismanagement, but any serious attempt to question the tenets of economic determinism and the Marxist vulgate will quickly be met with repression. In a society premised on social and psychological transparency, only when things get out of hand, that is, when collectives are no longer capable of bringing a dissident to “his senses,” -- which at any rate is nowadays a relatively rare occurrence -- the police step in. Hence, the phenomenon of citizens’ self-surveillance, so typical of all communist societies, largely explains the stability of the system.

In conclusion, the complexity of the communist enigma remains awesome, despite some valid insights by sovietologists and other related scholars. In fact, one reason why the study of communist society is still embryonic may be ascribed to the constant proliferation of sovietologists, experts, and observers, who seldom shared a unanimous view of the communist phenomenon. Their true expertise, it appears, is not the analysis of the Soviet Union, but rather how to refute each other’s expertise on the Soviet Union. The merit of Zinoviev’s implacable logic is that the abundance of false diagnoses and prognoses of communism results in part from liberal’s own unwillingness to combat social entropy and egalitarian obsession on their own soil and within their own ranks. If liberal systems are truly interested in containing communism, they must first reexamine their own egalitarian premises and protocommunist appetites.

What causes communism? Why does communism still appear so attractive (albeit in constantly new derivatives) despite its obvious empirical bankruptcy? Why cannot purportedly democratic liberalism come to terms with its ideological opponents despite visible economic advantages? Probably on should first examine the dynamics of all egalitarian and economic beliefs and doctrines, including those of liberalism, before one starts criticizing the gulags and psychiatric hospitals.

Zinoviev rejects the notion that the Soviet of total political consolidation that can now freely permit all kinds of liberal experiments. After all, what threatens communism?

Regardless of what the future holds for communist societies, one must agree with Zinoviev that the much-vaunted affluence of the West is not necessarily a sign of Western stability. The constant reference to affluence as the sole criterion for judging political systems does not often seem persuasive. The received wisdom among (American) conservatives is that the United States must outgun or out spend the Soviet Union to convince the Soviets that capitalism is a superior system. Conservatives and others believe that with this show of affluence, Soviet leaders will gradually come to the conclusion that their systems is obsolete. Yet in the process of competition, liberal democracies may ignore other problems. If one settles for the platitude that the Soviet society is economically bankrupt, then one must also acknowledge that the United States is the world’s largest debtor and that another crash on Wall Street may well lead to the further appeal of various socialistic and pseudosocialist beliefs. Liberal society, despite its material advantages, constantly depends on its “self-evident” economic miracles. Such a society, particularly when it seeks peace at any price, may some day realize that there is also an impossibly high price to pay in order to preserve it.

[The World and I   (Washington Times Co.), June, 1989]

Mr. Sunic, a former US professor and a former Croat diplomat, holds a Ph.D. in political science. He is the author of several books. He currently resides in Europe.

http://doctorsunic.netfirms.com

samedi, 13 août 2011

Towards a New World Order: Carl Schmitt's "The LandAppropriation of a New World"

 

CS.jpg

Towards a New World Order: Carl Schmitt's "The Land Appropriation of a New World"

Gary Ulmen

Ex: http://freespeechproject.com/

 

The end of the Cold War and of the bipolar division of the world has posed again the question of a viable international law grounded in a new world order. This question was already urgent before WWI, given the decline of the ius publicum Europaeum at the end of the 19th century. It resurfaced again after WWII with the defeat of the Third Reich. If the 20th century is defined politically as the period beginning with the "Great War" in 1914 and ending with the collapse of the Soviet empire in 1989, it may be seen as a long interval during which the question of a new world order was suspended primarily because of the confrontation and resulting stalemate between Wilsonianism and Leninism. Far from defining that period, as claimed by the last defenders of Left ideology now reconstituted as "anti-fascism," and despite their devastating impact at the time, within such a context fascism and Nazism end up automatically redimensioned primarily as epiphenomenal reactions of no lasting historical significance. In retrospect, they appear more and more as violent geopolitical answers to Wilsonianism's (and, to a lesser extent, Leninism's) failure to establish a new world order.

Both the League of Nations and the United Nations have sought to reconstitute international law and the nomos of the earth, but neither succeeded. What has passed for international law throughout the 20th century has been largely a transitory semblance rather than a true system of universally accepted rules governing international behavior. The geopolitical paralysis resulting from the unresolved conflict between the two superpowers created a balance of terror that provided the functional equivalent of a stable world order. But this state of affairs merely postponed coming to terms with the consequences of the collapse of the ius publicum Europaeum and the need to constitute a new world order. What is most significant about the end of the Cold War is not so much that it brought about a premature closure of the 20th century or a return to the geopolitical predicament obtaining before WWI, but that it has signaled the end of the modern age--evident in the eclipse of the nation state, the search for new political forms, the explosion of new types of conflicts, and radical changes in the nature of war. Given this state of affairs, today it may be easier to develop a new world order than at any time since the end of the last century.

At the beginning of the 20th century, Ernest Nys wrote that the discovery of the New World was historically unprecedented since it not only added an immense area to what Europeans thought the world was but unified the whole globe.(n1) It also resulted in the European equilibrium of land and sea that made possible the ius publicum Europaeum and a viable world order. In his "Introduction" to The Nomos of the Earth, Carl Schmitt observes that another event of this kind, such as the discovery of some new inhabitable planet able to trigger the creation of a new world order, is highly unlikely, which is why thinking "must once again be directed to the elemental orders of concrete terrestrial existence."(n2) Despite all the spatial exploration and the popular obsession with extra-terrestrial life, today there is no event in sight comparable to the discovery of a New World. Moreover, the end of the Cold War has paved the way for the further expansion of capitalism, economic globalization, and massive advances in communication technologies. Yet the imagination of those most concerned with these developments has failed so far to find any new alternatives to the prevailing thinking of the past decades.



Beyond the Cold War


The two most prominent recent attempts to prefigure a new world order adequate to contemporary political realities have been made by Francis Fukuyama and Samuel P. Huntington.(n3) Fukuyama thinks the West has not only won the Cold War but also brought about the end of history, while Huntington retreats to a kind of "bunker mentality" in view of an alleged decline of the West.(n4) While the one suffers from excessive optimism and the other from excessive pessimism, both fail primarily because they do not deal with the "elemental orders of concrete terrestrial existence" and troth remain trapped in an updated version of Wilsonianism assuming liberal democracy to be the highest achievement of Western culture. While Fukuyama wants to universalize liberal democracy in the global marketplace, If Huntington identifies liberalism with Western civilization. But Huntington is somewhat more realistic than Fukuyama. He not only acknowledges the impossibility of universalizing liberalism but exposes its particularistic nature. Thus he opts for a defense of Western civilization within an international helium omnium contra omnes. In the process, however, he invents an "American national identity" and extrapolates from the decline of liberal democracy to the decline of the West.

Fukuyama's thesis is derived from Alexandre Kojeve's Heideggerian reading of Hegel and supports the dubious notion that the last stage in human history will be a universal and homogeneous state of affairs satisfying all human needs. This prospect is predicated on the arbitrary assumption of the primacy of thymos--the desire for recognition--which both Kojeve and Fukuyama regard as the most fundamental human longing. Ultimately, according to Fukuyama, "Kojeve's claim that we are at the end of history . . . stands or falls on the strength of the assertion that the recognition provided by the contemporary liberal democratic state adequately satisfies the human desire for recognition."(n5) Fukuyama's own claim thus stands or falls on his assumption that at the end of history "there are no serious ideological competitors to liberal democracy."(n6) This conclusion is based on a whole series of highly dubious ideological assumptions, such as that "the logic of modern natural science would seem to dictate a universal evolution in the direction of capitalism"(n7) and that the desire for recognition "is the missing link between liberal economics and liberal politics."(n8)

According to Fukuyama, the 20th century has turned everyone into "historical pessimists."(n9) To reverse this state of affairs, he challenges "the pessimistic view of international relations . . . that goes variously under the titles 'realism,' realpolitik, or 'power politics'."(n10) He is apparently unaware of the difference between a pessimistic view of human nature, on which political realism is based, and a pessimistic view of international relations, never held by political realists such as Niccolo Machiavelli or Hans Morgenthau--two thinkers Fukuyama "analyzes" in order to "understand the impact of spreading democracy on international politics." As a "prescriptive doctrine," he finds the realist perspective on international relations still relevant. As a "descriptive model," however, it leaves much to be desired because: "There was no 'objective' national interest that provided a common thread to the behavior of states in different times and places, but a plurality of national interests defined by the principle of legitimacy in play and the individuals who interpreted it." This betrays a misunderstanding of political realism or, more plausibly, a deliberate attempt to misrepresent it in order to appear original. Although he draws different and even antithetical conclusions, Fukuyama's claim is not inconsistent with political realism.(n11)

Following this ploy, Fukuyama reiterates his main argument that: "Peace will arise instead out of the specific nature of democratic legitimacy, and its ability to satisfy the human longings for recognition."(n12) He is apparently unaware of the distinction between legality and legitimacy, and of the tendency within liberal democracies for legality to become its own mode of legitimation.(n13) Even in countries in which legality remains determined independently by a democratic legislative body, there is no reason to believe it will be concerned primarily or at all with satisfying any "human longing for recognition"; rather, it will pursue whatever goals the predominant culture deems desirable. Consequently, it does not necessarily follow that, were democratic legitimacy to become universalized with the end of the Cold War, international conflict would also end and history along with it. Even Fukuyama admits that: "For the foreseeable future, the world will be divided between a post-historical part, and a part that is still stuck in history. Within the post-historical part, the chief axis of interaction between states would be economic, and the old rules of power politics would have decreasing relevance."(n14)

This is nothing more than the reconfiguration of a standard liberal argument in a new metaphysical guise: the old historical world determined by politics will be displaced by the new post-historical world determined by economics. Schmitt rejected this argument in the 1920s: according to liberals, the "concept of the state should be determined by political means, the concept of society (in essence nonpolitical) by economic means," but this distinction is prejudiced by the liberal aversion to politics understood as a domain of domination and corruption resulting in the privileging of economics understood as "reciprocity of production and consumption, therefore mutuality, equality, justice, and freedom, and finally, nothing less than the spiritual union of fellowship, brotherhood, and justice."(n15) In effect, Fukuyama is simply recycling traditional liberal efforts to eliminate the political(n16)--a maneuver essential for his thesis of the arrival of "the end of history" with the end of the Cold War. Accordingly: "The United States and other liberal democracies will have to come to grips with the fact that, with the collapse of the communist world, the world in which they live is less and less the old one of geopolitics, and that the rules and methods of the historical world are not appropriate to life in the post-historical one. For the latter, the major issues will be economic."(n17) Responding to Walter Rathenau's claim in the 1920s that the destiny then was not politics but economics, Schmitt said "what has occurred is that economics has become political and thereby the destiny."(n18)

For Fukuyama, the old historical world is none other than the European world: "Imperialism and war were historically the product of aristocratic societies. If liberal democracy abolished the class distinction between masters and slaves by making the slaves their own masters, then it too should eventually abolish imperialism."(n19) This inference is based on a faulty analogy between social and international relations. Not surprisingly, Fukuyama really believes that "international law is merely domestic law writ large."(n20) Compounded with an uncritical belief in the theory of progress and teleological history, this leads him to generalize his own and Kojeve's questionable interpretation of the master-slave dialectic (understood as the logic of all social relations) to include international relations: "If the advent of the universal and homogeneous state means the establishment of rational recognition on the level of individuals living within one society, and the abolition of the relationship of lordship and bondage between them, then the spread of that type of state throughout the international system of states should imply the end of relationships of lordship and bondage between nations as well--i.e., the end of imperialism, and with it, a decrease in the likelihood of wars based on imperialism."(n21) Even if a "universal and homogeneous state" were possible today, in an age when all nation-states are becoming ethnically, racially, linguistically and culturally heterogeneous, it is unclear why domestic and international relations should be isomorphic. Rather, the opposite may very well be the case: increasing domestic heterogeneity is matched by an increasingly heterogeneous international scene where "the other" is not regarded as an equal but as "a paper tiger," "the Great Satan," "religious fanatics," etc.

At any rate, imperialism for Fukuyama is not a particular historical phenomenon which came about because of the discovery of the New World at the beginning of the age of exploration by the European powers. Rather, it is seen as the result of some metaphysical ahistorical "struggle for recognition among states."(n22) It "arises directly out of the aristocratic master's desire to be recognized as superior--his megalothymia."(n23) Ergo: "The persistence of imperialism and war after the great bourgeois revolutions of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries is therefore due not only to the survival of an atavistic warrior ethos, but also to the fact that the master's megalothymia was incompletely sublimated into economic activity."(n24) Thus the formal market relation between buyer and seller, both reduced to the level of the hyper-rational and calculating homo oeconomicus, comes to displace the master-slave dialectic whereby, miraculously, the interaction between these economic abstractions generates as much recognition as anyone would want, rendering conflict obsolete and putting an end to history.

In terms of Fukuyama's own formulation, the real end of history, as he understands it, is not even close. In his scenario, since there are still a lot of unresolved conflicts between the historical and the post-historical worlds, there will be a whole series of "world order" problems and "many post-historical countries will formulate an abstract interest in preventing the spread of certain technologies to the historical world, on the grounds that world will be most prone to conflict and violence."(n25) Although the failure of the League of Nations and the UN has led to the general discrediting of "Kantian internationalism and international law," in the final analysis, despite his Heideggerian Hegelianism, Fukuyama does not find the answer to the end of history in Hegel, Nietzsche or even Kojeve,(n26) but rather in Kant, who argued that the gains realized when man moved from the state of nature to civilization were largely nullified by wars between nations. According to Fukuyama, what has not been understood is that "the actual incarnations of the Kantian idea have been seriously flawed from the start by not following Kant's own precepts," by which he means that states based on republican principles are less likely than despotisms to accept the costs of war and that an international federation is only viable if it is based on liberal principles.

Although Huntington has a much better grasp of international relations than Fukuyama, his decline of the West scenario is equally unconvincing. The central theme of his book is that "culture and cultural identities, which at the broadest level are civilization identities, are shaping the patterns of cohesion, disintegration, and conflict in the post-Cold War world."(n27) But whereas Fukuyama couches his thesis in terms of a universal desire for recognition, Huntington couches his thesis in terms of a global search for identity: "Peoples and nations are attempting to answer the most basic question humans can face: Who are we?"(n28) The result is a "multipolar and multi-civilizational" world within which the West should abandon its presumed universalism and defend its own particular identity: "In the clash of civilizations, Europe and America will hang together or hang separately. In the greater clash, the global 'real clash,' between Civilization and barbarism, the worlds great civilizations . . . will also hang together or hang separately. In the emerging era, clashes of civilizations are the greatest threat to world peace, and an international order based on civilizations is the surest safeguard against world war."(n29)

In Huntington's new world, "societies sharing civilizational affinities cooperate with each other."(n30) Leaving aside his cavalier blurring of the differences between cultures, civilizations and societies, what does Huntington regard as the essence of Western particularism? Here he is ambiguous: he first mentions Christianity, then some secular residues of Christianity, but when he adds up the civilizational core of the West it turns out to be none other than liberalism. As Stephen Holmes points out, it is "the same old ideology, plucked inexplicably from the waste-bin of history that once united the West against Soviet Communism."(n31) But Huntington also claims that the West had a distinct identity long before it was modern (since he insists that modernization is distinct from Westernization, so that non-Western societies can modernize without Westernizing, thus retaining their civilizational distinctiveness). In this case, however, the West cannot really be identified with liberalism, nor can its heritage be equated sic et nunc with "American national identity." While liberalism may very well be declining, this need not translate into a decline of the West as such. Similarly, if "American national identity" is threatened by "multiculturalism,"(n32) it need not signal the arrival of barbarians at the gates but may only mark another stage in the statist involution of liberalism. Huntington's fears of a decline of the West at a time when it is actually at the acme of its power and vigor is the result of the unwarranted identification of Western civilization with liberalism and what he understands by "American national identity." Today liberalism has degenerated into an opportunistic statist program of "a small but influential number of intellectuals and publicists," and "American national identity" into a fiction invented as part of a failed project after the War between the States to reconfigure the American federation into a nation-state.(n33)

According to Huntington? the assumption of the universality of Western culture is: false, because others civilizations have other ideals and norms; immoral, because "imperialism is the logical result of universalism"; and dangerous, because it could lead to major civilizational wars.(n34) His equation of universalism and imperialism, however, misses the point of both it misunderstands the philosophical foundations of Western culture and the historical roots of Western imperialism. Other civilizations do have their own ideals and norms, but only Western civilization has an outlook broad enough to embrace all other cultures, which explains why it can readily sponsor and accommodate even confused and counterproductive projects such as "multiculturalism." Of course, Europeans set forth on their journeys of discovery and conquest not only in order to bring Christianity and "civilization" to the world but also to plunder whatever riches they could find. But whatever the reasons, Europeans were the ones who opened the world to global consciousness and what Schmitt called "awakened occidental rationalism."

Until recently, largely because of American cultural hegemony and technological supremacy, the goal of the rest of the world has been "Westernization," which has come to be regarded as synonymous with modernization. In Huntington's "realist" view, however: "A universal civilization requires universal power. Roman power created a near universal civilization within the limited confines of the Classical world. Western power in the form of European colonialism in the nineteenth century and American hegemony in the twentieth century extended Western culture throughout much of the contemporary world. European colonialism is over; American hegemony is receding."(n35) The real question is whether continued American world hegemony is primarily a function of the persistence of colonialism. Despite his emphasis on culture and civilization, Huntington does not appreciate the importance of cultural hegemony.? Had he not restricted the Western tradition to late 20th century liberalism, he may have appreciated the extent to which the rest of the world is becoming increasingly more, rather than less dependent on the US--in communication technologies, financial matters and even aesthetic forms. Today the Internet is potentially a more formidable agency of cultural domination and control than was the British Navy at the peak of the Empire. Here McNeill is right: Huntington's gloomy perception of the decline of the West may merely mistake growing pains for death throes.

If Huntington's salon Spenglerianism were not bad enough, he also adopts a kind of simplistic Schmittianism (without ever mentioning Schmitt). Complementing his "birds of a feather flock together" concept of civilizations --with "core states" assuming a dominant position in relation to "fault line" states--he pictures an "us versus them" type of friend/enemy relations based on ethnic and religious identities. But Schmitt's friend/enemy antithesis is concerned with relations between political groups: first and foremost, states. Accordingly, any organized group that can distinguish between friends and enemies in an existential sense becomes thereby political. Unlike Huntington (or Kojeve, who also explicitly drew geopolitical lines primarily along religious lines(n36), Schmitt did not think in terms of ethnic or religious categories but rather territorial and geopolitical concepts. For Schmitt, the state was the greatest achievement of Western civilization because, as the main agency of secularization, it ended the religious civil wars of the Middle Ages by limiting war to a conflict between states.(n37) In view of the decline of the state, Schmitt analyzed political realities and provided a prognosis of possible future territorial aggregations and new types of political forms.

Huntington finds the "realist" school of international affairs "a highly useful starting point," but then proceeds to criticize a straw man version of it, according to which "all states perceive their interests in the same way and act in the same way." Against it, not only power but also "values, culture, and institutions pervasively influence how states define their interests.... In the post-Cold War world, states increasingly define their interests in civilizational terms."(n38) Had Huntington paid more careful attention to hans Morgenthau, George Kennan or other reputable political realists, he would have concluded that their concept of power is not as limited as his caricature of it. In particular, had he read Schmitt more closely he would not have claimed that nation-states "are and will remain the most important actors in world affairs"(n39)--at a time when economic globalization has severely eroded their former sovereignty and they are practically everywhere threatened with internal disintegration and new geopolitical organizations. At any rate, political realism has been concerned primarily with the behavior of states because they were the main subjects of political life for the past three centuries.(n40) If and when they are displaced by other political forms, political realism then shifts its focus accordingly.

Huntington attempts to think beyond the Cold War. But since he cannot think beyond the nation-state, he cannot conceive of new political forms. When he writes that cultural commonality "legitimates the leadership and order-imposing role of the core state for both member states and for the external powers and institutions,"(n41) he seems to have in mind something akin to the concept of GroBraum.(n42) But Schmitt's model was the American Monroe Doctrine excluding European meddling in the Western Hemisphere. At that time (and well into the 20th century), the US was not a nation-state in the European sense, although it assumed some of these trappings thereafter. Thus it generally followed George Washington's policy--because of the "detached and distant situation" of the US, it should avoid entangling alliances with foreign (primarily European) powers. The Monroe Doctrine simply expanded on the reality and advantages of this situation. Schmitt rightly saw the global line of the Western Hemisphere drawn by the Monroe Doctrine as the first major challenge to the international law of the ius publicum Europaeum.

Given the current understanding of national sovereignty, it is difficult to see what Huntington means by "core state." Despite the title of his book, he has no concept of international law or of world order. Not only does he abandon hope for global regulations governing the behavior of states and civilizations, but he reverts to a kind of anthropological primitivism: "Civilizations are the ultimate human tribes, and the clash of civilizations is tribal conflict on a global scale."(n43) All he can suggest for avoiding major inter-civilizational wars is the "abstention rule" (core states abstain from conflicts in other civilizations), and the "mediation rule" (core states negotiate with each other to halt fault line wars).(n44) Huntington's vision is thus surprisingly conformist--it merely cautions the US from becoming embroiled in the Realpolitik of countries belonging to other civilizational blocs while defending a contrived liberal notion of"Western" civilization.

Anti-Colonialism and Appropriation
The anti-colonialism of both Fukuyama and Huntington is consistent with the predominant 20th century ideology directed primarily against Europe. Anti-colonialism is more historically significant than either anti-fascism and anti-communism. As Schmitt pointed out in 1962: "Both in theory and practice, anti-colonialism has an ideological objective. Above all, it is propaganda--more specifically, anti-European propaganda. Most of the history of propaganda consists of propaganda campaigns which, unfortunately, began as internal European squabbles. First there was France's and England's anti-Spanish propaganda--the leyenda negra of the 15th and 16th centuries. Then this propaganda became generalized during the 18th century. Finally, in the historical view of Arnold Toynbee, a UN consultant, the whole of Europe is indicted as a world aggressor."(n45) Thus it is not surprising that the 500th anniversary of the "discovery" of America was greeted with more condemnation than celebration.(n46)

Anti-colonialism is primarily anti-European propaganda because it unduly castigates the European powers for having sponsored colonialism.(n47) Given that there was no international law forbidding the appropriation of the newly discovered lands--in fact, European international and ecclesiastical law made it legal and established rules for doing so--the moral and legal basis for this judgment is unclear. On closer analysis, however, it turns out to be none other than the West's own universalistic pretenses. Only by ontologizing their particular Western humanist morality--various versions of secularized Christianity--as universally valid for all times and all places can Western intellectuals indict colonialism after the fact as an international "crime." Worse yet, this indictment eventually turns into a wholesale condemnation of Western culture (branded as "Eurocentrism") from an abstract, deterritorialized and deracinated humanist perspective hypostatized to the level of a universally binding absolute morality. Thus the original impulse to vindicate the particularity and otherness of the victims of colonialism turns full circle by subsuming all within a foreign Western frame-work, thereby obliterating the otherness of the original victims. The ideology of anti-colonialism is thus not only anti-European propaganda but an invention of Europeans themselves, although it has been appropriated wholesale and politically customized by the rest of the world.

As for world order, this propaganda has even more fundamental roots: "The odium of colonialism, which today confronts all Europeans, is the odium of appropriation,"(n48) since now everything understood as nomos is allegedly concerned only with distribution and production, even though appropriation remains one of its fundamental, if not the most fundamental, attributes. As Schmitt notes: "World history is a history of progress in the means and methods of appropriation: from land appropriations of nomadic and agricultural-feudal times, to sea appropriations of the 16th and 17th centuries, to the industrial appropriations of the industrial-technical age and its distinction between developed and undeveloped areas, to the present day appropriations of air and space."(n49) More to the point, however, is that "until now, things have somehow been appropriated, distributed and produced. Prior to every legal, economic and social order, prior to every legal, economic or social theory, there is the simple question: Where and how was it appropriated? Where and how was it divided? Where and how was it produced ? But the sequence of these processes is the major problem. It has often changed in accordance with how appropriation, distribution and production are emphasized and evaluated practically and morally in human consciousness. The sequence and evaluation follow changes in historical situations and general world history, methods of production and manufacture--even the image human beings have of themselves, of their world and of their historical situation."(n50) Thus the odium of appropriation exemplified by the rise of anti-colonialism is symptomatic of a changed world situation and changed attitudes. But this state of affairs should not prevent our understanding of what occurred in the past or what is occurring in the present.

In order to dispel the "fog of this anti-European ideology," Schmitt recalls that "everything that can be called international law has for centuries been European international law. . . [and that] all the classical concepts of existing international law are those of European international law, the ius publicum Europaeum. In particular, these are the concepts of war and peace. as well as two fundamental conceptual distinctions: first, the distinction between war and peace, i.e., the exclusion of an in-between situation of neither war nor peace so characteristic of the Cold War; and second, the conceptual distinction between enemy and criminal, i.e. exclusion of the discrimination and criminalization of the opponent so characteristic of revolutionary war--a war closely tied to the Cold War."(n51) But Schmitt was more concerned with the "spatial" aspect of the phenomenon: "What remains of the classical ideas of international law has its roots in a purely Eurocentric spatial order. Anti-colonialism is a phenomenon related to its destruction.... Aside from ... the criminalization of European nations, it has not generated one single idea about a new order. Still rooted, if only negatively, in a spatial idea, it cannot positively propose even the beginning of a new spatial order."(n52)

Having discovered the world as a globe, Europeans also developed the Law of Nations. Hugo Grotius is usually credited with establishing this new discipline with his De lure belli ac pacts (Paris: 1625), since he was the first to deal with the subject as a whole (although various European scholars had dealt at length with themes such as the justice of war, the right of plunder, the treatment of captives, etc.). Nys writes: ". . . from the I 1th to the 1 2th century the genius of Europe developed an association of republics, principalities and kingdoms, which was the beginning of the society of nations. Undoubtedly, some elements of it had been borrowed from Greek and Roman antiquity, from Byzantine institutions, from the Arabo-Berber sultanates on the coast of Africa and from the Moorish kingdoms of Spain. But at the time new sentiments developed, longing for political liberty. The members of this association were united by religious bonds; they had the same faith; they were not widely separated by speech and, at any rate, they had access to Latin, the language of the Church; they admitted a certain equality or at least none of them claimed the right to dominate and rule over the others. A formula came into use to describe this state of affairs: respublica a Christiana, res Christina."(n53)

Steeped in Roman law, 1 3th and 1 4th century jurists opposed any "Law of Nations" recognizing political distinctions between different peoples. In the Roman system, different peoples were only "parts of the Roman Empire." Thus, in a wider sense, ius gentium extended to all civilized peoples and included both public and private law. In a narrower sense, however, it also dealt with the rules governing relations between Romans and foreigners. Understood in this narrower sense, ius gentium promoted the constitution of distinct peoples and consequently kingdoms, intercourse and conflicts between different political communities, and ultimately wars. For this reason, those who still believed in the viability of the Holy Roman Empire thought that this interpretation of ius gentium led to disintegration. This is why the Law of Nations--European public law and international law--did not become a distinct "science" until the Middle Ages.

Spanish theologians first articulated the theoretical and practical problems of ius gentium understood as the Law of Nations. Chief among them was Francisco de Vitoria, whose Relectiones theologicae on the Indians and the right of a "just war" have become classics.(n54) In his lectures, Vitoria invokes the Law of Nations--the ius gentium. At the beginning of the third section of his account of the Spaniards' relations with the aborigines in the New World, he treats them as one people among others, and therefore subject to ius gentium: "The Spaniards have a right to travel into the lands in question and to sojourn there, provided they do no harm to the natives, and the natives may not prevent them. Proof of this may in the first place be derived from the law of nations (ius gentium), which either is natural law or is derived from natural law."(n55) That he understands peoples in the sense of "nations" becomes even more clear when he speaks about gentes nationes. He distinguishes between the political community--the respublica--and the private individual. The latter may defend his person and his property, but he may not avenge wrongs or retake goods after the passage of time. This is the respublica's prerogative--it alone has authority to defend itself and its members. Here Vitoria identifies the prince's authority with that of the state: "The prince is the issue of the election made by the respublica.... The state, properly so called, is a perfect community, that is to say, a community which forms a whole in itself, which, in other words, is not a part of another community, but which possesses its own laws, its own council, its own magistrates."(n56)

Clearly, what developed in Europe from antiquity to the respublica Christiana, from the origin of the sovereign state and ius publicum Europaeum to the Enlightenment and beyond, was as unique and significant as the discovery of the "New World." Yet, given today's predominant ideology, European culture has almost become the truth that dare not speak its name. Not only is Columbus demonized, but the whole Age of Discovery and all of European (Western) culture is dismissed as "imperialistic," "racist?" "sexist," etc. The Nomos of the Earth is a much needed antidote to this anti-European propaganda, which is only a symptom of the crisis of European identity and consciousness.(n57) All the major themes of Schmitt's book are either implicit or explicit in "The Land Appropriation of a New World": the origin and significance of the European and Eurocentric epoch of world history; the discovery of the New World and the American challenge to the European order; the search for a new nomos of the earth; the critique of the discriminatory concept of war; the critique of universalism and the danger of total relativism.

The Conquest of America and the Concept of a "Just War"


In the 20th century, the ideology of anti-colonialism was articulated most prominently by Woodrow Wilson and Vladimir Lenin, signaling the end of European domination in world history. Now, after the collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of communism, some American intellectuals have turned this anti-European propaganda against the US, seemingly unaware that their critique is possible only within the orbit of the European culture they otherwise castigate and dismiss. To attack European culture is tantamount to attacking American culture as well, since the latter is but a special case of the former, which is precisely why it has been able to accept and absorb peoples and influences not only from the Western hemisphere but from all over the world. American universalism is but an extension of that same Christian universalism which for centuries has defined European identity. As Schmitt emphasized, the European equilibrium of the ius publicum Europaeum presupposed a seemingly homogeneous Christian Europe, which lasted well into the 19th century. The American project has always been a fundamentally heterogeneous undertaking and Americans have always come from the most diverse ethnic, racial, religious and linguistic backgrounds. But if there had not been some homogeneous culture to unity this diversity, there would have been no distinct American culture which, unfortunately, today many educated Europeans and Americans no longer understand and therefore have come to despise.

A paradigmatic example of this general anti-European syndrome is Tzvetan Todorov's The Conquest of America. In an effort to vindicate the particularity of "the other," the author ends up castigating West European culture as a whole by deploying a secularized version of Christian universalism. Openly acknowledging the moralistic objectives and "mythological" character of his account,(n58) Todorov develops a "politically correct" postmodern interpretation of the Spanish conquista not to understand its historical significance but to show how it has shaped today's Western imperialist identity--one allegedly still unable to come to terms with "the other" and therefore inherently racist, ethnocentric, etc. The book closes with a discussion of "Las Casas' Prophesy" concerning the wrath that "God will vent" not only upon Spain but all of Western Europe because of its "impious, criminal and ignominious deeds perpetrated so unjustly, tyrannically and barbarously."(n59)

Todorov overlooks not only the generally religious framework of Las Casas' prophesy, but also the idiosyncratically Western concept of justice the Dominican bishop deployed. Having ontologized a humanism derived from the Western axiological patrimony, he does not realize the extent to which his postmodernism has already reduced "the other" to "the same," precisely in his effort to vindicate its particularity.(n60) Worse yet, inhibited by his "politically correct" moralism, he not only provides a ridiculous, if academically fashionable, explanation for the Spaniards' success,(n61) but he manages to subvert his own arguments with the very evidence he adduces to support them. He claims that the "present" is more important to him than the past, but in defining genocide he makes no reference whatsoever to either the Armenians or the Holocaust as reference points. Consequently, his claim that "the sixteenth century perpetuated the greatest genocide in human history"(n62) remains not only unsubstantiated but falsified. By his own account, most of the victims died of diseases and other indirect causes: "The Spaniards did not undertake a direct extermination of these millions of Indians, nor could they have done so." The main causes were three, and "the Spaniards responsibility is inversely proportional to the number of victims deriving from each of them: 1. By direct murder, during wars or outside them: a high number, nonetheless relatively small; direct responsibility. 2. By consequence of bad treatment: a high number; a (barely) less direct responsibility. 3. By diseases, by `microbe shock': the majority of the population; an indirect and diffused responsibility."(n63)

Todorov does acknowledge that Columbus was motivated by the "universal victory of Christianity" and that it was Columbus' medieval mentality that led him "to discover America and inaugurate the modern era."(n64) His greatest infraction, however, was that he conquered land rather than people, i.e., he was more interested in nature than in the Indians, which he is treated as "the other", "Columbus summary perception of the Indians [is] a mixture of authoritarianism and condescension . . . In Columus' hermeneutics human beings have no particular place."(n65) Had Todorov set aside his abstract moralizing, he may have realized that the conquest of the New World was primarily a land appropriation. It is not surprising, therefore, that the conquerors thought they were bringing "civilization" to those they conquered--something probably also true of the Mongols who invaded and colonized China, Russia and a few other which, by contrast, had higher than thier own.

The ideological slant of The Conquest of America is by no means unusual. Long before, Schmitt noted that non-European peoples who have undertaken conquest, land appropriations, etc. were not being tarred with the same brush as Europeans.(n66) Unlike Todorov's moralistic tirade, The Nomos of the Earth is dressed to historians and jurists. In no ways does Schmitt excuse the atrocities committed by the Spanish, but rather explains how they were possible in the given circumstances. "The Land Appropriation of a New World" begins with a discussion of the lines drawn by the European powers to divide the world. In this connection, Schmitt discusses the meaning of "beyond the line," which meant beyondn the reach of European law: " At this`line' Europe ended and `New World' began. At any rate, European law -- `European public law' -- ended. Consequently, so did the bracketing of war achieved by the former European international law, meaning the struggle for land appropriations knew no bounds. Beyond the line was an `overseas' zone in which, for want of any legal limits to war, only, the law of the stronger applied."n(67) For Todorov, it is a much simpler explanation: "Far from central government, far from royal law, all prohibitions give way, the social link, already loosened, snaps, revealing not a primitive nature, the beast sleeping in each of us, but a modern being? one with a great future in fact, restrained by no morality and inflicting death because and when he pleases."(n68) The Spaniards are simply racist, ethno-centric, ruthless exploiters, etc., i.e., modern -- they already exhibited traits Todorov claims are characteristic of Western identity.

Of particular interest here are Todorov's comments on Vitoria and the concept of a "just war," since most of Schmitt's chapter is devoted to these subjects. By his own admission, Todorov mixes (in fact, confuses) medieval and modern categories. This is particularly true in the case of Vitoria. Todorov observes that: "Vitoria demolishes the contemporary justifications of the wars waged in America, but nonetheless conceives that `just wars' are possible."(n69) More to the point: "We are accustomed to seeing Vitoria as a defender of the Indians; but if we question, not the subject's intentions, hut the impact of his discourses, it is clear that . . . under the cover of an international law based on reciprocity, he in reality supplies a legal basis to the wars of colonization which had hitherto had none (none which, in any case, might withstand serious consideration)."(n70) But there was no "international law based on reciprocity." Here Todorov is simply transposing modern categories to medieval matters for his own ideological purposes.

Unlike Todorov, Schmitt places the problem in perspective: "For 400 years, from the 16th to the 20th century, the structure of European international law was determined by a fundamental course of events the conquest of the New World. Then, as later, there were numerous positions taken with respect to the justice or injustice of the conquista. Nevertheless, the fundamental problem the justification of European land appropriations as a whole -- was seldom addressed in any systematic way outside moral and legal questions. In fact, only one monograph deals with this problem systematically and confronts it squarely in terms of international law.... It is the famous relectiones of Francisco de Vitoria."(n71) Vitoria rejected the contrary opinions of other theologians and treated Christians and non-Christians alike. He did not even accept discovery, which was the recognized basis of legal title from the 1 6th to the 1 8th century, as legitimate. More to the point, he considered global lines beyond which the distinction between justice and injustice was suspended not only a sin but an appalling crime. However: "Vitoria's view of the conquista was ultimately altogether positive. Most significant for him was the fait accompli of Christianization. . . . The positive conclusion is reached only by means of general concepts and with the aid of objective arguments in support of a just war.... If barbarians opposed the right of free passage and free missions, of liberum commercium and free propaganda, then they would violate the existing rights of the Spanish according to ius gentium; if the peaceful treaties of the Spanish were of no avail, then they had grounds for a just war."(n72)

The papal missionary mandate was the legal foundation of the conquista. This was not only the pope's position but also that of the Catholic rulers of Spain. Vitoria's arguments were entirely consistent with the spatial order and the international law of the respublica Christiana. One cannot apply modern categories to a medieval context without distorting both: "In the Middle Ages, a just war could he a just war of aggression. Clearly, the formal structure of the two concepts of justice are completely different. As far as the substance of medieval justice is concerned, however, it should be remembered that Vitoria's doctrine of a just war is argued on the basis of a missionary mandate issued by a potestas spiritualis that was not only institutionally stable but intellectually self-evident. The right of liberum commercium as well as the ius peregrinandi are to facilitate the work of Christian missions and the execution of the papal missionary mandate.... Here we are interested only in the justification of land appropriation--a question Vitoria reduced to the general problem of a just war. All significant questions of an order based on international law ultimately meet in the concept of a just war."(n73)

 

 

The Question of a New Nomos of the Earth


Following chapters on "The Land Appropriation of a New World" and "The Ius Publicum Europaeum," Schmitt concludes his book with a chapter titled "The Question of a New Nomos of the Earth, which is concerned primarily with the transformation of the concept of war. Clearly, this problem was uppermost in Schmitt's mind following Germany's total defeat in WWII and the final destruction of the European system of states. But he had already devoted a treatise to the development of a discriminatory concept of war following WWI,(n74) and in 1945 he wrote a legal opinion on the criminality of aggressive war.(n75) Despite whatever self-serving motives he may have had in writing these works,(n76) they are consistent with the historical and juridical structure of international law during the respublica Christiana, the ius publicum Europaeum, and what remains of international law today.

This progression can be put into perspective by following Schmitt's discussion of Vitoria's legacy: "Vitoria was in no sense one of the `forerunners of modern lawyers dealing with constitutional questions.'. . . Abstracted entirely from spatial viewpoints, Vitoria's ahistorical method generalizes many European historical concepts specific to the ius gentium of the Middle Ages (such as yolk prince and war) and thereby strips them of their historical particularity."(n77) In this context, Schmitt mentions the works of Ernest Nys, which paved the way for the popularization of Vitoria's ideas after WWI but who, because of his belief in humanitarian progress, also contributed to the criminalization of aggressive war. This was also true of James Brown Scott, the leading American expert on international law, who blatantly instrumentalized Vitoria's doctrines concerning free trade (liberum commercium, the freedom of propaganda, and a just war) to justify American economic imperialism. Schmitt sums up Sctott's argument as follows: "War should cease to be simply a legally recognized matter or only one of legal indifference; rather, it should again become a just war in which the aggressor as such is declared a felon in the full criminal sense of the word. The former right to neutrality, grounded in the international law of the ius publicum Europaeum and based on the equivalence of just and unjust war, should also and accordingly be eliminated."(n78)

Here then is the crux of the matter. Vitoria's thinking is based on the international law obtaining during the Christian Middle Ages rather than on the international law between states established with the ius publicum Europaeum. Moreover, as Schmitt points out, Vitoria was not a jurist but a theologian: "Based on relations between states, post-medieval international law from the 1 6th to the 20th century sought to repress the iusta causa. The formal reference point for the determination of a just war was no longer the authority of the Church in international law but rather the equal sovereignty of states. Instead of iusta causa, the order of international law between states was based on iustus hostis; any war between states, between equal sovereigns, was legitimate. On the basis of this juridical formalization, a rationalization and humanization--a bracketing--of war was achieved for 200 years." The turn to "the modern age in the history of international law was accomplished by a dual division of two lines of thought that were inseparable in the Middle Ages -- the definitive separation of moral-theological from juridical-political arguments and the equally important separation of the question of iusta causa, grounded in moral arguments and natural law," from the juridical question of iustus hostis, distinguished from the criminal, i.e., from object of punitive action."(n79)

With the end of the ius publicum Europaeum, the concept of war changed once again: moralistic (rather than theologically-based) arguments became confused with political arguments, and the iusta causa displaced the just enemy (iustus hostis). Accordingly, war became a crime and the aggressor a criminal, which means that the current distinction between just and unjust war lacks any relation to Vitoria and does not even attempt to determine the iusta causa.(n80) According to Schmitt: "If today some formulas of the doctrine of a just war rooted in the concrete order of the medieval respublica Christiana are utilized in modern and global formulas, this does not signify a return to, but rather a fundamental transformation of concepts of enemy, war, concrete order and justice presupposed in medieval doctrine."(n81) This transformation is crucial to any consideration of a new nomos of the earth because these concepts must be rooted in a concrete order. Lacking such an order or nomos, these free-floating concepts do not constitute institutional standards but have only the value of ideological slogans.

Unimpressed with the duration of the Cold War and its mixture of neither war nor peace, Schmitt speculated on the possibility of the eventual development of what he called GroBetaraume(n82) -- larger spatial entities, similar to but not synonymous with federations or blocs --displacing states and constituting a new nomos.(n83) Since his death in 1985 and the subsequent collapse of communism, the likelihood of his diagnosis and prognosis has increased. While the international situation remains confused and leading intellectuals such as Fukuyama and Huntington, unable to think behind predominant liberal democratic categories, can only recycle new versions of the old Wilsonianism, Schmitt's vision of a world of GroBetaraume as a new geopolitical configuration may well be in the process of being realized.

vendredi, 12 août 2011

Schopenhauer: el primer golpe a la Ilustracion

 

 

arthur-schopenhauer.jpg

Schopenhauer: el primer golpe a la Ilustración

 

Alberto Buela (*)

 

En Arturo Schopenhauer (1788-1860) toda su filosofía se apoya en Kant y forma parte del idealismo alemán pero lo novedoso es que sostiene dos rasgos existenciales antitéticos con ellos: es un pesimista  y no es un profesor a sueldo del Estado. Esto último deslumbró a Nietzsche.

Hijo de un gran comerciante de Danzig, su posición acomodada lo liberó de las dos servidumbres de su época para los filósofos: la teología protestante o la docencia privada. Se educó a través de sus largas estadías en Inglaterra, Francia e Italia (Venecia). Su apetito sensual, grado sumo, luchó siempre la serena  reflexión filosófica. Su soltería y misoginia nos recuerda el tango: en mi vida tuve muchas minas pero nunca una mujer. En una palabra, conoció la hembra pero no a la mujer.

Ingresa en la Universidad de Gotinga donde estudia medicina, luego frecuenta a Goethe, sigue cursos en Berlín con Fichte y se doctora en Jena con una tesis sobre La cuádruple raíz del principio de razón suficiente en 1813.

En 1819 publica su principal obra El mundo como voluntad y representación y toda su producción posterior no va ha ser sino un comentario aumentado y corregido de ella. Nunca se retractó de nada ni nunca cambió. Obras como La voluntad en la naturaleza (1836),  Libertad de la voluntad (1838), Los dos problemas fundamentales de la ética (1841) son simples escolios a su única obra principal.

Sobre él ha afirmado el genial Castellani: “Schopen es malo, pero simpático. No fue católico por mera casualidad. Y fue lástima porque tenía ala calderoniana y graciana, a quienes tradujo. Pero fue  “antiprotestante” al máximo, como Nietzsche, lo cual en nuestra opinión no es poco…Tuvo dos fallas: fue el primer filósofo existencial sin ser teólogo y quiso reducir a la filosofía aquello que pertenece a la teología” [1]

En 1844 reedita su trabajo cumbre, aunque no se habían vendido aun los ejemplares de su primera edición, llevando los agregados al doble la edición original.

Nueve años antes de su muerte publica dos tomos pequeños Parerga y Parilepómena, ensayos de acceso popular donde trata de los más diversos temas, que tienen muy poco que ver con su obra principal, pero que le dan una cierta popularidad al ser los más leídos de sus libros. Al final de sus días Schopenhauer gozó del reconocimiento que tanto buscó y que le fue esquivo.

Schopenhauer siguió los cursos de Fichte en Berlín varios años y como “el fanfarrón”, así lo llama, parte y depende también de Kant.

Así, ambos reconocen que el mérito inmortal de la crítica kantiana de la razón es haber establecido, de una vez y para siempre, que los entes, el mundo de las cosas que percibimos por los sentidos y reproducimos en el espíritu, no es el mundo en sí sino nuestro mundo, un producto de nuestra organización psicofísica.

La clara distinción en Kant entre sensibilidad y entendimiento pero donde el entendimiento no puede separarse realmente de los sentidos y refiere a una causa exterior la sensación que aparece bajo las formas de espacio y tiempo, viene a explicar a los entes, las cosas como fenómenos pero no como “cosas en sí”.

Muy acertadamente observa Silvio Maresca que: “Ante sus ojos- los de Schopenhauer- el romanticismo filosófico y el idealismo (Fichte-Hegel) que sucedieron casi enseguida a la filosofía kantiana, constituían una tergiversación de ésta. ¿Por qué? Porque abolían lo que según él era el principio fundamental: la distinción entre los fenómenos y la cosa en sí”.[2]

Fichte a través de su Teoría de la ciencia va a sostener que el no-yo (los entes exteriores) surgen en el yo legalmente pero sin fundamento. No existe una tal cosa en sí. El mundo sensible es una realidad empírica que está de pie ahí. La ciencia de la naturaleza es necesariamente materialista. Schopenhauer es materialista, pero va a afirmar: Toda la imagen materialista del mundo, es solo representación, no “cosa en sí”. Rechaza la tesis que todo el mundo fenoménico sea calificado como un producto de la actividad inconciente del yo. ¿Que es este mundo además de mi representación?, se pregunta. Y responde que se debe partir del hombre que es lo dado y de lo más íntimo de él, y eso debe ser a su vez lo más íntimo del mundo y esto es la voluntad. Se produce así en Schopenhauer un primado de lo práctico sobre lo teórico.

La voluntad es, hablando en kantiano “la cosa en sí” ese afán infinito que nunca termina de satisfacerse, es “el vivir” que va siempre al encuentro de nuevos problemas. Es infatigable e inextinguible.

La voluntad no es para el pesimista de Danzig la facultad de decidir regida por la razón como se la entiende regularmente sino sólo el afán, el impulso irracional que comparten hombre y mundo. “Toda fuerza natural es concebida per analogiam con aquello que en nosotros mismos conocemos como voluntad”.

Esa voluntad irracional para la que el mundo y las cosas son solo un fenómeno no tiene ningún objetivo perdurable sino sólo aparente (por trabajar sobre fenómenos) y entonces todo objetivo logrado despierta nuevas necesidades (toda satisfacción tiene como presupuesto el disgusto de una insatisfacción) donde el no tener ya nada que desear preanuncia la muerte o la liberación.

Porque el más sabio es el que se percata que la existencia es una sucesión de sin sabores que no conduce a nada y se desprende del mundo. No espera la redención del progreso y solo practica la no-voluntad.

El pesimista de Danzig al identificar la voluntad irracional con la “cosa en sí” puede afirmar sin temor que “lo real es irracional y lo irracional es lo real” con lo que termina invirtiendo la máxima hegeliana “todo lo racional es real y todo lo real es racional”. Es el primero del los golpes mortales que se le aplicará  al racionalismo iluminista, luego vendrá Nietzsche y más tarde Scheler y Heidegger. Pero eso ya es historia conocida. Salute.

 

Post Scriptum: 

Schopenhauer en sus últimos años- que además de hablar correctamente en italiano, francés e inglés, hablaba, aunque con alguna dificultad, en castellano. La hispanofilia de Schopenhauer se reconoce en toda su obra pues cada vez que cita, sobre todo a Baltasar Gracián (1601-1658), lo hace en castellano. Aprendió el español para traducir el opúsculo Oráculo manual (1647). También cita a menudo El Criticón a la que considera “incomparable”. Existe actualmente en Alemania y desde hace unos quince años una revista de pensamiento no conformista denominada “Criticón”. También cita y traduce a Calderón de la Barca.

Miguel de Unamuno fue el primero que realizó algunas traducciones parciales del filósofo de Danzig, como corto pago para una deuda hispánica con él. En Argentina ejerció influencia sobre Macedonio Fernández y sobre su discípulo Jorge Luis Borges. Tengo conocimiento de dos buenos artículos sobre Schopenhauer en nuestro país: el del cura Castellani (Revista de la Universidad de Buenos Aires, cuarta época, Nº 16, 1950) y el mencionado de Maresca.

 

(*) alberto.buela@gmail.com   www.disenso.org



[1] Castellani, Leonardo: Schopenhaue, en Revista de la Universidad de Buenos Aires, cuarta época, Nº 16, 1950, pp.389-426

[2] Maresca, Silvio: En la senda de Nietzsche, Catálogos, Buenos Aires, 1991, p. 20

Carl Schmitt's Decisionism

Carl Schmitt's Decisionism

Paul Hirst

Ex: http://freespeechproject.com/

 

politik.gifSince 1945 Western nations have witnessed a dramatic reduction in the variety of positions in political theory and jurisprudence. Political argument has been virtually reduced to contests within liberal-democratic theory. Even radicals now take representative democracy as their unquestioned point of departure. There are, of course, some benefits following from this restriction of political debate. Fascist, Nazi and Stalinist political ideologies are now beyond the pale. But the hegemony of liberal-democratic political agreement tends to obscure the fact that we are thinking in terms which were already obsolete at the end of the nineteenth century.

Nazism and Stalinism frightened Western politicians into a strict adherence to liberal democracy. Political discussion remains excessively rigid, even though the liberal-democratic view of politics is grossly at odds with our political condition. Conservative theorists like Hayek try to re-create idealized political conditions of the mid nineteenth century. In so doing, they lend themselves to some of the most unsavoury interests of the late twentieth century - those determined to exploit the present undemocratic political condition. Social-democratic theorists also avoid the central question of how to ensure public accountability of big government. Many radicals see liberal democracy as a means to reform, rather than as what needs to be reformed. They attempt to extend governmental action, without devising new means of controlling governmental agencies. New Right thinkers have reinforced the situation by pitting classical liberalism against democracy, individual rights against an interventionist state. There are no challenges to representative democracy, only attempts to restrict its functions. The democratic state continues to be seen as a sovereign public power able to assure public peace.

The terms of debate have not always been so restricted. In the first three decades of this century, liberal-democratic theory and the notion of popular sovereignty through representative government were widely challenged by many groups. Much of this challenge, of course, was demagogic rhetoric presented on behalf of absurd doctrines of social reorganization. The anti-liberal criticism of Sorel, Maurras or Mussolini may be occassionally intriguing, but their alternatives are poisonous and fortunately, no longer have a place in contemporary political discussion. The same can be said of much of the ultra-leftist and communist political theory of this period.

Other arguments are dismissed only at a cost. The one I will consider here - Carl Schmitt's 'decisionism' - challenges the liberal-democratic theory of sovereignty in a way that throws considerable light on contemporary political conditions. His political theory before the Nazi seizure of power shared some assumptions with fascist political doctrine and he did attempt to become the 'crown jurist' of the new Nazi state. Nevertheless, Schmitt's work asks hard questions and points to aspects of political life too uncomfortable to ignore. Because his thinking about concrete political situations is not governed by any dogmatic political alternative, it exhibits a peculiar objectivity.

Schmitt's situational judgement stems from his view of politics or, more correctly, from his view of the political as 'friend-enemy' relations, which explains how he could change suddenly from contempt for Hitler to endorsing Nazism. If it is nihilistic to lack substantial ethical standards beyond politics, then Schmitt is a nihilist. In this, however, he is in the company of many modern political thinkers. What led him to collaborate with the Nazis from March 1933 to December 1936 was not, however, ethical nihilism, but above all concern with order. Along with many German conservatives, Schmitt saw the choice as either Hitler or chaos. As it turned out, he saved his life but lost his reputation. He lived in disrepute in the later years of the Third Reich, and died in ignominy in the Federal Republic. But political thought should not be evaluated on the basis of the authors' personal political judgements. Thus the value of Schmitt's work is not diminished by the choices he made.

Schmitt's main targets are the liberal-constitutional theory of the state and the parliamentarist conception of politics. In the former, the state is subordinated to law; it becomes the executor of purposes determined by a representative legislative assembly. In the latter, politics is dominated by 'discussion,' by the free deliberation of representatives in the assembly. Schmitt considers nineteenth-century liberal democracy anti-political and rendered impotent by a rule-bound legalism, a rationalistic concept of political debate, and the desire that individual citizens enjoy a legally guaranteed 'private' sphere protected from the state. The political is none of these things. Its essence is struggle.

In The Concept of the Political Schmitt argues that the differentia specifica of the political, which separates it from other spheres of life, such as religion or economics, is friend-enemy relations. The political comes into being when groups are placed in a relation of emnity, where each comes to perceive the other as an irreconcilable adversary to be fought and, if possible, defeated. Such relations exhibit an existential logic which overrides the motives which may have brought groups to this point. Each group now faces an opponent, and must take account of that fact: 'Every religious, moral, economic, ethical, or other antithesis transforms itself into a political one if it is sufficiently strong to group human beings effectively according to friends and enemy.' The political consists not in war or armed conflict as such, but precisely in the relation of emnity: not competition but confrontation. It is bound by no law: it is prior to no law.

For Schmitt: 'The concept of the state presupposes the concept of the political.' States arise as a means of continuing, organizing and channeling political struggle. It is political struggle which gives rise to political order. Any entity involved in friend-enemy relations is by definition political, whatever its origin or the origin of the differences leading to emnity: 'A religious community which wages wars against members of others religious communities or engages in other wars is already more than a religious community; it is a political entity.' The political condition arises from the struggle of groups; internal order is imposed to pursue external conflict. To view the state as the settled and orderly administration of a territory, concerned with the organization of its affairs according to law, is to see only the stabilized results of conflict. It is also to ignore the fact that the state stands in a relation of emnity to other states, that it holds its territory by means of armed force and that, on this basis of a monopoly of force, it can make claims to be the lawful government of that territory. The peaceful, legalistic, liberal bourgeoisie is sitting on a volcano and ignoring the fact. Their world depends on a relative stabilization of conflict within the state, and on the state's ability to keep at bay other potentially hostile states.

For Hobbes, the political state arises from a contract to submit to a sovereign who will put an end to the war of all against all which must otherwise prevail in a state of nature - an exchange of obediance for protection. Schmitt starts where Hobbes leaves off - with the natural condition between organized and competing groups or states. No amount of discussion, compromise or exhortation can settle issues between enemies. There can be no genuine agreement, because in the end there is nothing to agree about. Dominated as it is by the friend-enemy alternative, the political requires not discussion but decision. No amount of reflection can change an issue which is so existentially primitive that it precludes it. Speeches and motions in assemblies should not be contraposed to blood and iron but with the moral force of the decision, because vacillating parliamentarians can also cause considerable bloodshed.

In Schmitt's view, parliamentarism and liberalism existed in a particular historical epoch between the 'absolute' state of the seventeenth century and the 'total state' of the twentieth century. Parliamentary discussion and a liberal 'private sphere' presupposed the depoliticization of a large area of social, economic and cultural life. The state provided a legally codified order within which social customs, economic competition, religious beliefs, and so on, could be pursued without becoming 'political.' 'Politics' as such ceases to be exclusively the atter of the state when 'state and society penetrate each other.' The modern 'total state' breaks down the depoliticization on which such a narrow view of politics could rest:

 

Heretofore ostensibly neutral domains - religion, culture, education, the economy - then cease to be neutral. . . Against such neutralizations and depoliticizations of important domains appears the total state, which potentially embraces every domain. This results in the identity of the state and society. In such a state. . . everything is at least potentially political, and in referring to the state it is no longer possible to assert for it a specifically political characteristic.

 



Democracy and liberalism are fundamentally antagonistic. Democracy does away with the depoliticizations characteristic of rule by a narrow bourgeois stratum insulated from popular demands. Mass politics means a broadening of the agenda to include the affairs of all society - everything is potentially political. Mass politics also threatens existing forms of legal order. The politicization of all domains increases pressure on the state by multiplying the competing interests demanding action; at the same time, the function of the liberal legal framework - the regulating of the 'private sphere' - become inadequate. Once all social affairs become political, the existing constitutional framework threatens the social order: politics becomes a contest of organized parties seeking to prevail rather than to acheive reconciliation. The result is a state bound by law to allow every party an 'equal chance' for power: a weak state threatened with dissolution.

Schmitt may be an authoritarian conservative. But his diagnosis of the defects of parliamentarism and liberalism is an objective analysis rather than a mere restatement of value preferences. His concept of 'sovereignty' is challenging because it forces us to think very carefully about the conjuring trick which is 'law.' Liberalism tries to make the state subject to law. Laws are lawful if properly enacted according to set procedures; hence the 'rule of law.' In much liberal-democratic constitutional doctrine the legislature is held to be 'sovereign': it derives its law-making power from the will of the people expressed through their 'representatives.' Liberalism relies on a constituting political moment in order that the 'sovereignty' implied in democratic legislatures be unable to modify at will not only specific laws but also law-making processes. It is therefore threatened by a condition of politics which converts the 'rule of law' into a merely formal doctrine. If this 'rule of law' is simply the people's will expressed through their representatives, then it has no determinate content and the state is no longer substantially bound by law in its actions.

Classical liberalism implies a highly conservative version of the rule of law and a sovereignty limited by a constitutive political act beyond the reach of normal politics. Democracy threatens the parliamentary-constitutional regime with a boundless sovereign power claimed in the name of the 'people.' This reveals that all legal orders have an 'outside'; they rest on a political condition which is prior to and not bound by the law. A constitution can survive only if the constituting political act is upheld by some political power. The 'people' exist only in the claims of that tiny minority (their 'representatives') which functions as a 'majority' in the legislative assembly. 'Sovereignty' is thus not a matter of formal constitutional doctrine or essentially hypocritical references to the 'people'; it is a matter of determining which particular agency has the capacity - outside of law - to impose an order which, because it is political, can become legal.

Schmitt's analysis cuts through three hundred years of political theory and public law doctrine to define sovereignty in a way that renders irrelevant the endless debates about principles of political organization or the formal constitutional powers of different bodies.

 

From a practical or theoretical perspective, it really does not matter whether an abstract scheme advanced to define sovereignty (namely, that sovereignty is the highest power, not a derived power) is acceptable. About an abstract concept there will be no argument. . . What is argued about is the concrete application, and that means who decides in a situation of conflict what constitutes the public interest or interest of the state, public safety and order, le salut public, and so on. The exception, which is not codified in the existing legal order, can at best be characterized as a case of extreme peril, a danger to the existence of the state, or the like, but it cannot be circumscribed factually and made to conform to a preformed law.

 



Brutally put: ' Sovereign is he who decides on the exception.' The sovereign is a definite agency capable of making a decision, not a legitimating category (the 'people') or a purely formal definition (plentitude of power, etc.). Sovereignty is outside the law, since the actions of the sovereign in the state of exception cannot be bound by laws since laws presuppose a normal situation. To claim that this is anti-legal is to ignore the fact that all laws have an outside, that they exist because of a substantiated claim on the part of some agency to be the dominant source of binding rules within a territory. The sovereign determines the possibility of the 'rule of law' by deciding on the exception: 'For a legal order to make sense, a normal situation must exist, and he is sovereign who definitely decides whether this normal situation actually exists.'

Schmitt's concept of the exception is neither nihilistic nor anarchistic, it is concerned with the preservation of the state and the defence of legitimately constituted government and the stable institutions of society. He argues that ' the exception is different from anarchy and chaos.' It is an attempt to restore order in a political sense. While the state of exception can know no norms, the actions of the sovereign within the state must be governed by what is prudent to restore order. Barbaric excess and pure arbitrary power are not Schmitt's objecty. power is limited by a prudent concern for the social order; in the exception, 'order in the juristic sense still prevails, even if it is not of the ordinary kind.' Schmitt may be a relativist with regard to ultimate values in politics. But he is certainly a conservative concerned with defending a political framework in which the 'concrete orders' of society can be preserved, which distinguishes his thinking from both fascism and Nazism in their subordination of all social institutions to such idealized entities as the Leader and the People. For Schmitt, the exception is never the rule, as it is with fascism and Nazism. If he persists in demonstrating how law depends on politics, the norm on the exception, stability on struggle, he points up the contrary illusions of fascism and Nazism. In fact, Schmitt's work can be used as a critique of both. The ruthless logic in his analsysis of the political, the nature of soveriegnty, and the exception demonstrates the irrationality of fascism and Nazism. The exception cannot be made the rule in the 'total state' without reducing society to such a disorder through the political actions of the mass party that the very survival of the state is threatened. The Nazi state sought war as the highest goal in politics, but conducted its affairs in such a chaotic way that its war-making capacity was undermined and its war aims became fatally overextended. Schmitt's friend-enemy thesis is concerned with avoiding the danger that the logic of the political will reach its conclusion in unlimited war.

Schmitt modernizes the absolutist doctrines of Bodin and Hobbes. His jurisprudence restores - in the exception rather than the norm - the sovereign as uncommanded commander. For Hobbes, lawas are orders given by those with authority - authoritas non veritas facit legem. Confronted with complex systems of procedural limitation in public law and with the formalization of law into a system, laws become far more complex than orders. Modern legal positivism could point to a normal liberal-parliamentary legal order which did and still does appear to contradict Hobbes. Even in the somewhat modernized form of John Austin, the Hobbesian view of sovereignty is rejected on all sides. Schmitt shared neither the simplistic view of Hobbes that this implies, nor the indifference of modern legal positivism to the political foundation of law. He founded his jurisprudence neither on the normal workings of the legal order nor on the formal niceties of constitutional doctrine, but on a condition quite alien to them. 'Normalcy' rests not on legal or constitutional conditions but on a certain balance of political forces, a certain capacity of the state to impose order by force should the need arise. This is especially true of liberal-parliamentary regimes, whose public law requires stablization of political conflicts and considerable police and war powers even to begin to have the slightest chance of functioning at all. Law cannot itself form a completely rational and lawful system; the analysis of the state must make reference to those agencies which have the capacity to decide on the state of exception and not merely a formal plentitude of power.

In Political Theology Schmitt claims that the concepts of the modern theory of the state are secularized theological concepts. This is obvious in the case of the concept of sovereignty, wherein the omnipotent lawgiver is a mundane version of an all-powerful God. He argues that liberalism and parliamentarism correspond to deist views of God's action through constant and general natural laws. His own view is a form of fundamentalism in which the exception plays the same role in relation to the state as the miracles of Jesus do in confirming the Gospel. The exception reveals the legally unlimited capacity of whoever is sovereign within the state. In conventional, liberal-democratic doctrine the people are sovereign; their will is expressed through representatives. Schmitt argues that modern democracy is a form of populism in that the people are mobilized by propaganda and organized interests. Such a democracy bases legitimacy on the people's will. Thus parliament exists on the sufferance of political parties, propaganda agencies and organized interest which compete for popular 'consent.' When parliamentary forms and the rule of 'law' become inadequate to the political situation, they will be dispensed with in the name of the people: 'No other constitutional institution can withstand the sole criterion of the people's will, however it is expressed.'

Schmitt thus accepts the logic of Weber's view of plebiscitarian democracy and the rise of bureaucratic mass parties, which utterly destroy the old parliamentary notables. He uses the nineteenth-century conservatives Juan Donoso Cortes to set the essential dilemma in Political Theology: either a boundless democracy of plebiscitarian populism which will carry us wherever it will (i.e. to Marxist or fascist domination) or a dictatorship. Schmitt advocates a very specific form of dictatorship in a state of exception - a "commissarial' dictatorship, which acts to restore social stability, to preserve the concrete orders of society and restore the constitution. The dictator has a constitutional office. He acts in the name of the constitution, but takes such measures as are necessary to preserve order. these measures are not bound by law; they are extralegal.

Schmitt's doctrine thus involves a paradox. For all its stress on friend-enemy relations, on decisive political action, its core, its aim, is the maintenance of stability and order. It is founded on a political non-law, but not in the interest of lawlessness. Schmitt insists that the constitution must be capable of meeting the challenge of the exception, and of allowing those measures necessary to preserve order. He is anti-liberal because he claims that liberalism cannot cope with the reality of the political; it can only insist on a legal formalism which is useless in the exceptional case. He argues that only those parties which are bound to uphold the constitution should be allowed an 'equal chance' to struggle for power. Parties which threaten the existing order and use constitutional means to challenge the constitution should be subject to rigorous control.

Schmitt's relentless attack on 'discussion' makes most democrats and radicals extremely hostile to his views. He is a determined critic of the Enlightenment. Habermas's 'ideal speech situation', in which we communicate without distortion to discover a common 'emancipatory interest', would appear to Schmitt as a trivial philosophical restatement of Guizot's view that in representative government, ' through discussion the powers-that-be are obliged to seek truth in common." Schmitt is probably right. Enemies have nothing to discuss and we can never attain a situation in which the friend-enemy distinction is abolished. Liberalism does tend to ignore the exception and the more resolute forms of political struggle.

jeudi, 11 août 2011

Keith Preston: Understanding Carl Schmitt

 

Keith Preston: Understanding Carl Schmitt

Carl Schmitt: The Conservative Revolutionary Habitus and the Aesthetics of Horror

Carl Schmitt: The Conservative Revolutionary Habitus and the Aesthetics of Horror

Richard Wolin

Ex: http://freespeechproject.com/

 

"Carl Schmitt's polemical discussion of political Romanticism conceals the aestheticizing oscillations of his own political thought. In this respect, too, a kinship of spirit with the fascist intelligentsia reveals itself."
—Jürgen Habermas, "The Horrors of Autonomy: Carl Schmitt in English"

"The pinnacle of great politics is the moment in which the enemy comes into view in concrete clarity as the enemy."
—Carl Schmitt, The Concept of the Political (1927)

carl_schmitt.jpg

Only months after Hitler's accession to power, the eminently citable political philosopher and jurist Carl Schmitt, in the ominously titled work, Staat, Bewegung, Volk, delivered one of his better known dicta. On January 30, 1933, observes Schmitt, "one can say that 'Hegel died.'" In the vast literature on Schmitt's role in the National Socialist conquest of power, one can find many glosses on this one remark, which indeed speaks volumes. But let us at the outset be sure to catch Schmitt's meaning, for Schmitt quickly reminds us what he does not intend by this pronouncement: he does not mean to impugn the hallowed tradition of German étatistme, that is, of German "philosophies of state," among which Schmitt would like to number his own contributions to the annals of political thought. Instead, it is Hegel qua philosopher of the "bureaucratic class" or Beamtenstaat that has been definitely surpassed with Hitler's triumph. For "bureaucracy" (cf. Max Weber's characterization of "legal-bureaucratic domination") is, according to its essence, a bourgeois form of rule. As such, this class of civil servants—which Hegel in the Rechtsphilosophie deems the "universal class"—represents an impermissable drag on the sovereignty of executive authority. For Schmitt, its characteristic mode of functioning, which is based on rules and procedures that are fixed, preestablished, calculable, qualifies it as the very embodiment of bourgeois normalcy—a form of life that Schmitt strove to destroy and transcend in virtually everything he thought and wrote during the 1920s, for the very essence of the bureaucratic conduct of business is reverence for the norm, a standpoint that could not exist in great tension with the doctrines of Carl Schmitt himself, whom we know to be a philosopher of the state of emergency—of the Auhsnamhezustand (literally, the "state of exception"). Thus, in the eyes of Schmitt, Hegel had set an ignominious precedent by according this putative universal class a position of preeminence in his political thought, insofar as the primacy of the bureaucracy tends to diminish or supplant the perogative of sovereign authority.

But behind the critique of Hegel and the provocative claim that Hitler's rise coincides with Hegel's metaphorical death (a claim, that while true, should have offered, pace Schmitt, little cause for celebration) lies a further indictment, for in the remarks cited, Hegel is simultaneously perceived as an advocate of the Rechtsstaat, of "constitutionalism" and "rule of law." Therefore, in the history of German political thought, the doctrines of this very German philosopher prove to be something of a Trojan horse: they represent a primary avenue via which alien bourgeois forms of political life have infiltrated healthy and autochthonous German traditions, one of whose distinguishing features is an rejection of "constitutionalism" and all it implies. The political thought of Hegel thus represents a threat—and now we encounter another one of Schmitt's key terms from the 1920s—to German homogeneity.

Schmitt's poignant observations concerning the relationship between Hegel and Hitler expresses the idea that one tradition in German cultural life—the tradition of German idealism—has come to an end and a new set of principles—based in effect on the category of völkish homogeneity (and all it implies for Germany's political future)—has arisen to take its place. Or, to express the same thought in other terms: a tradition based on the concept of Vernuft or "reason" has given way to a political system whose new raison d'être was the principle of authoritarian decision—whose consummate embodiment was the Führerprinzep, one of the ideological cornerstones of the post-Hegelian state. To be sure, Schmitt's insight remains a source of fascination owing to its uncanny prescience: in a statement of a few words, he manages to express the quintessence of some 100 years of German historical development. At the same time, this remark also remains worthy insofar as it serves as a prism through which the vagaries of Schmitt's own intellectual biography come into unique focues: it represents an unambiguous declaration of his satiety of Germany's prior experiments with constitutional government and of his longing for a total- or Führerstaat in which the ambivalences of the parliamentary system would be abolished once and for all. Above all, however, it suggest how readily Schmitt personally made the transition from intellectual antagonist of Weimar democracy to whole-hearted supporter of National Socialist revolution. Herein lies what one may refer to as the paradox of Carl Schmitt: a man who, in the words of Hannah Arendt, was a "convinced Nazi," yet "whose very ingenious theories about the end of democracy and legal government still make arresting reading."

The focal point of our inquiry will be the distinctive intellectual "habitus" (Bourdieu) that facilitated Schmitt's alacritous transformation from respected Weimar jurist and academician to "crown jurist of the Third Reich." To understand the intellectual basis of Schmitt's political views, one must appreciate his elective affinities with that generation of so-called conservative revolutionary thinkers whose worldview was so decisive in turning the tide of public opinion against the fledgling Weimar republic. As the political theorist Kurt Sontheimer has noted: "It is hardly a matter of controversy today that certain ideological predispositions in German thought generally, but particularly in the intellectual climate of the Weimar Republic, induced a large number of German electors under the Weimar Republic to consider the National Socialist movement as less problematic than it turned out to be." And even though the nationalsocialists and the conservative revolutionaries failed to see eye to eye on many points, their respective plans for a new Germany were sufficiently close that a comparison between them is able to "throw light on the intellectual atmosphere in which, when National Socialism arose, it could seem to be a more or less presentable doctrine." Hence "National Socialism . . . derived considerable profit from thinkers like Oswald Spengler, Arthur Moeller van den Bruck, and Ernst Jünger," despite their later parting of the ways. One could without much exaggeration label this intellectual movement protofascistic, insofar as its general ideological effect consisted in providing a type of ideological-spiritual preparation for the National Socialist triumph.

 

Schmitt himself was never an active member of the conservative revolutionary movement, whose best known representatives—Spengler, Jünger, and van den Bruck—have been named by Sontheimer (though one might add Hans Zehrer and Othmar Spann). It would be fair to say that the major differences between Schmitt and his like-minded, influential group of right-wing intellectuals concerned a matter of form rather than substance: unlike Schmitt, most of whose writings appeared in scholarly and professional journals, the conservative revolutionaries were, to a man, nonacademics who made names for themselves as Publizisten—that is, as political writers in that same kaleidoscope and febrile world of Weimar Offentlichkeit that was the object of so much scorn in their work. But Schmitt's status as a fellow traveler in relation to the movement's main journals (such as Zehrer's influential Die Tat, activities, and circles notwithstanding, his profound intellectual affinities with this group of convinced antirepublicans are impossible to deny. In fact, in the secondary literature, it has become more common than not simply to include him as a bona fide member of the group.

The intellectual habitus shared by Schmitt and the conservative revolutionaries is in no small measure of Nietzschean derivation. Both subscribed to the immoderate verdict registered by Nietzsche on the totality of inherited Western values: those values were essentially nihilistic. Liberalism, democracy, utlitarianism, individualism, and Enlightenment rationalism were the characteristic belief structures of the decadent capitalist West; they were manifestations of a superficial Zivilisation, which failed to measure up to the sublimity of German Kultur. In opposition to a bourgeois society viewed as being in an advanced state of decomposition, Schmitt and the conservative revolutionaries counterposed the Nietzschean rites of "active nihilism." In Nietzsche's view, whatever is falling should be given a final push. Thus one of the patented conceptual oppositions proper to the conservative revolutionary habitus was that between the "hero" (or "soldier") and the "bourgeois." Whereas the hero thrives on risk, danger, and uncertainity, the life of bourgeois is devoted to petty calculations of utility and security. This conceptual opposition would occupy center stage in what was perhaps the most influential conservative revolutionary publication of the entire Weimar period, Ernst Jünger's 1932 work, Der Arbeiter (the worker), where it assumes the form of a contrast between "the worker-soldier" and "the bourgeois." If one turns, for example, to what is arguably Schmitt's major work of the 1920s, The Concept of the Political (1927), where the famous "friend-enemy" distinction is codified as the raison d'être of politics, it is difficult to ignore the profound conservative revolutionary resonances of Schmitt's argument. Indeed, it would seem that such resonances permeate, Schmitt's attempt to justify politics primarily in martial terms; that is, in light of the ultimate instance of (or to use Schmitt's own terminology) Ernstfall of battle (Kampf) or war.

Once the conservative revolutionary dimension of Schmitt's thought is brought to light, it will become clear that the continuities in his pre- and post-1933 political philosophy and stronger than the discontinuities. Yet Schmitt's own path of development from arch foe of Weimar democracy to "convinced Nazi" (Arendt) is mediated by a successive series of intellectual transformations that attest to his growing political radicalisation during the 1920s and early 1930s. He follows a route that is both predictable and sui generis: predictable insomuch as it was a route traveled by an entire generation of like-minded German conservative and nationalist intellectuals during the interwar period; sui generis, insofar as there remains an irreducible originality and perspicacity to the various Zeitdiagnosen proffered by Schmitt during the 1920s, in comparison with the at times hackneyed and familar formulations of his conservative revolutionary contemporaries.

The oxymoronic designation "conservative revolutionary" is meant to distinguish the radical turn taken during the interwar period by right-of-center German intellectuals from the stance of their "traditional conservative" counterparts, who longed for a restoration of the imagined glories of earlier German Reichs and generally stressed the desirability of a return to premodern forms of social order (e.g., Tönnies Gemeinschaft) based on aristocratic considerations of rank and privilege. As opposed to the traditional conservatives, the conservative revolutionaries (and this is true of Jünger, van den Bruck, and Schmitt), in their reflections of the German defeat in the Great War, concluded that if Germany were to be successful in the next major European conflagaration, premodern or traditional solutions would not suffice. Instead, what was necessary was "modernization," yet a form of modernization that was at the same time compatible with the (albeit mythologized) traditional German values of heroism, "will" (as opposed to "reason"), Kultur, and hierarchy. In sum, what was desired was a modern community. As Jeffrey Herf has stressed in his informative book on the subject, when one searches for the ideological origins of National Socialism, it is not so much Germany's rejection of modernity that is at issue as its selective embrace of modernity. Thus
National Socialist's triumph, far from being characterized by a disdain of modernity simpliciter, was marked simultaneously by an assimilation of technical modernity and a repudiation of Western political modernity: of the values of political liberalism as they emerge from the democratic revolutions of the eighteenth century. This describes the essence of the German "third way" or Sonderweg: Germany's special path to modernity that is neither Western in the sense of England and France nor Eastern in the sense of Russia or pan-slavism.

Schmitt began his in the 1910s as a traditonal conservative, namely, as a Catholic philosopher of state. As such, his early writings revolved around a version of political authoritarianism in which the idea of a strong state was defended at all costs against the threat of liberal encroachments. In his most significant work of the decade, The Value of the State and the Significance of the Individual (1914), the balance between the two central concepts, state and individual, is struck one-sidely in favour of the former term. For Schmitt, the state, in executing its law-promulgating perogatives, cannot countenance any opposition. The uncompromising, antiliberal conclusion he draws from this observation is that "no individual can have full autonomy within the state." Or, as Schmitt unambiguously expresses a similar thought elsewhere in the same work: "the individual" is merely "a means to the essence, the state is what is important." Thus, although Schmitt displayed little inclination for the brand of jingoistic nationalism so prevalent among his German academic mandarin brethern during the war years, as Joseph Bendersky has observed, "it was precisely on the point of authoritarianism vs. liberal individualism that the views of many Catholics [such as Schmitt] and those of non-Catholic conservatives coincided."

But like other German conservatives, it was Schmitt's antipathy to liberal democratic forms of government, coupled with the political turmoil of the Weimar republic, that facilitated his transformation from a traditional conservative to a conservative revolutionary. To be sure, a full account of the intricacies of Schmitt's conservative revolutionary "conversion" would necessitate a year by year account of his political thought during the Weimar period, during which Schmitt's intellectual output was nothing if prolific, (he published virtually a book a year). Instead, for the sake of concision and the sake of fidelity to the leitmotif of the "conservative revolutionary habitus," I have elected to concentrate on three key aspects of Schmitt's intellectual transformation during this period: first, his sympathies with the vitalist (lebensphilosophisch) critique of modern rationalism; second, his philosophy of history during these years; and third, his protofascistic of the conservative revolutionary doctrine of the "total state." All three aspects, moreover, are integrally interrelated.

II.


The vitalist critique of Enlightenment rationalism is of Nietzschean provenance. In opposition to the traditional philosophical image of "man" qua animal rationalis, Nietzsche counterposes his vision of "life [as] will to power." In the course of this "transvaluation of all values," the heretofore marginalized forces of life, will, affect, and passion should reclaim the position of primacy they once enjoyed before the triumph of "Socratism." It is in precisely this spirit that Nietzsche recommends that in the future, we philosophize with our affects instead of with concepts, for in the culture of European nihilism that has triumphed with the Enlightenment, "the essence of life, its will to power, is ignored," argues Nietzsche; "one overlooks the essential priority of the spontaneous, aggressive, expansive, form-giving forces that give new interpretations and directions."

It would be difficult to overestimate the power and influence this Nietzschean critique exerted over an entire generation of antidemocratic German intellectuals during the 1920s. The anticivilizational ethos that pervades Spengler's Decline of the West—the defence of "blood and tradition" against the much lamented forces of societal rationalisation—would be unthinkable without that dimension of vitalistic Kulturkritik to which Nietzsche's work gave consummate expression. Nor would it seem that the doctrines of Klages, Geist als Widersacher der Seele (Intellect as the Antagonist of the Soul; 1929-31), would have captured the mood of the times as well as they did had it not been for the irrevocable precedent set by Nietzsche's work, for the central opposition between "life" and "intellect," as articulated by Klages and so many other German "anti-intellectual intellectuals" during the interwar period, represents an unmistakably Nietzschean inheritance.

While the conservative revolutionary components of Schmitt's worldview have been frequently noted, the paramount role played by the "philosophy of life"—above all, by the concept of cultural criticism proper to Lebensphilosophie—on his political thought has escaped the attention of most critics. However, a full understanding of Schmitt's status as a radical conservative intellectual is inseparable from an appreciation of an hitherto neglected aspect of his work.

In point of fact, determinate influences of "philosophy of life"—a movement that would feed directly into the Existenzphilosophie craze of the 1920s (Heidegger, Jaspers, and others)—are really discernable in Schmitt's pre-Weimar writings. Thus, in one of his first published works, Law and Judgment (1912), Schmitt is concerned with demonstrating the impossibility of understanding the legal order in exclusively rationalist terms, that is, as a self-sufficient, complete system of legal norms after the fashion of legal positivism. It is on this basis that Schmitt argues in a particular case, a correct decision cannot be reached solely via a process of deducation or generalisation from existing legal precedents or norms. Instead, he contends, there is always a moment of irreducible particularity to each case that defies subsumption under general principles. It is precisely this aspect of legal judgment that Schmitt finds most interesting and significant. He goes on to coin a phrase for this "extralegal" dimension that proves an inescapable aspect of all legal decision making proper: the moment of "concrete indifference," the dimension of adjudication that transcends the previously established legal norm. In essence, the moment of "concrete indifference" represents for Schmitt a type of vital substrate, an element of "pure life," that forever stands opposed to the formalism of laws as such. Thus at the heart of bourgeois society—its legal system—one finds an element of existential particularity that defies the coherence of rationalist syllogizing or formal reason.

The foregoing account of concrete indifference is a matter of more than passing or academic interest insofar as it proves a crucial harbinger of Schmitt's later decisionistic theory of sovereignty, for its its devaluation of existing legal norms as a basis for judicial decision making, the category of concrete indifference points towards the imperative nature of judicial decision itself as a self-sufficient and irreducible basis of adjudication. The vitalist dimension of Schmitt's early philosophy of law betrays itself in his thoroughgoing denigration of legal normativism—for norms are a product of arid intellectualism (Intelligenz) and, as such, hostile to life (lebensfeindlick)—and the concomitant belief that the decision alone is capable of bridging the gap between the abstractness of law and the fullness of life.

The inchoate vitalist sympathies of Schmitt's early work become full blown in his writings of the 1920s. Here, the key text is Political Theology (1922), in which Schmitt formulates his decisionist theory of politics, or, as he remarks in the work's often cited first sentance: "Sovereign is he who decides the state of exception [Ausnahmezustand]."

It would be tempting to claim from this initial, terse yet lapidry definition of sovereignty, one may deduce the totality of Schmitt's mature political thought, for it contains what we know to the be the two keywords of his political philosophy during these years: decision and the exception. Both in Schmitt's lexicon are far from value-neutral or merely descriptive concepts. Instead, they are both accorded unambiguously positive value in the economy of his thought. Thus one of the hallmarks of Schmitt's political philosophy during the Weimar years will be a privileging of Ausnahmezustand, or state of exception, vis-à-vis political normalcy.

It is my claim that Schmitt's celebration of the state of exception over conditions of political normalcy—which he essentially equates with legal positivism and "parliamentarianism"—has its basis in the vitalist critique of Enlightenment rationalism. In his initial justification of the Ausnahmezustand in Political Theology, Schmitt leaves no doubt concerning the historical pedigree of such concepts. Thus following the well-known definition of sovereignty cited earlier, he immediantly underscores its status as a "borderline concept"—a Grenzbegriff, a concept "pertaining to the outermost sphere." It is precisely this fascination with extreme or "boundry situations" (Grenzsituationen—K. Jaspers—those unique moments of existential peril that become a proving ground of individual "authenticity"—that characterizes Lebensphilosophie's sweeping critique of bourgeois "everydayness." Hence in the Grenzsituationen, Dasein glimpses transcendence and is thereby transformed from possible to real Existenz." In parallel fashion, Schmitt, by according primacy to the "state of exception" as opposed to political normalcy, tries to invest the emergency situation with a higher, existential significance and meaning.

According to the inner logic of this conceptual scheme, the "state of exception" becomes the basis for a politics of authenticity. In contrast to conditions of political normalcy, which represent the unexalted reign of the "average, the "medicore," and the "everyday," the state of exception proves capable of reincorporating a dimension of heroism and greatness that is sorely lacking in routinized, bourgeois conduct of political life.

Consequently, the superiority of the state as the ultimate, decisionistic arbiter over the emergency situation is a matter that, in Schmitt's eyes, need not be argued for, for according to Schmitt, "every rationalist interpretation falsifies the immediacy of life." Instead, in his view, the state represents a fundamental, irrefragable, existential verity, as does the category of "life" in Nietzsche's philosophy, or, as Schmitt remarks with a characteristic pith in Political Theology, "The existence of the state is undoubted proof of its superiority over the validity of the legal norm." Thus "the decision [on the state of exception] becomes instantly independent of argumentative substantiation and receives autonomous value."

But as Franz Neumann observes in Behemoth, given the lack of coherence of National Socialist ideology, the rationales provided for totalitarian practice were often couched specifically in vitalist or existential terms. In Neumann's words,

 

[Given the incoherence of National Socialist ideology], what is left as justification for the [Grossdeutsche] Reich? Not racism, not the idea of the Holy Roman Empire, and certainly not some democratic nonsense like popular sovereignty or self-determination. Only the Reich itself remains. It is its own justification. The philosophical roots of the argument are to be found in the existential philosophy of Heidegger. Transferred to the realm of politics, exisentialism argues that power and might are true: power is a sufficient theoretical basis for more power.

 


[Excerpts from The Seduction of Unreason: The Intellectual Romance with Fascism from Nietzsche to Postmodernism (2004).]

mercredi, 10 août 2011

Jonathan Bowden on Thomas Carlyle

 

Jonathan Bowden on Thomas Carlyle